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Overall Area Development and Buildout The Overall Area Development and Buildout plan for the Downtown Urban Redevelopment Area (DURA) is formed by the text and maps of this section. In addition to referencing the aforementioned local growth management tools, the DDA shall use these DURA-specific tools to market, guide, and review redevelopment with the DURA: Character Area Goals & Maps [FIGURES 11, 12 & 13] Infrastructure & Connectivity Map [FIGURE 14] Openspace & Connectivity Map [FIGURE 15]

Character Area Goals & Maps

The six subareas used to evaluate existing conditions informed the creation of the Character Area Maps, so that the DDA can outline expectations for redevelopment per subarea.

CHARACTER AREA 2 [SEE FIGURE 11, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1] This is an area adjacent to the City Cemetery and including One Mile Branch, currently flanked by vegetation and located within a flood plain area. Since most of the area is below street level and challenging to all but a few uses, the primary goal shall be to create low-visibility, congregate, and future parking and maximize the recreational and tourism opportunities. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Development of a shared/cross-access parking lot behind the new cottages; 2) Development of parking garage; 3) Construction of a plaza and pedestrian bridge across the One Mile Branch.

City of Madison

CHARACTER AREA 1 [SEE FIGURE 11, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1] This is a historic and prominent corridor entrance into the community. Restablishment of an attractive residential appearance (not necessarily land use) is the primary goal. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Demolition of all non-historic structures; 2) Rehabilitation of the five (5) viable historic residential structures as identified on the map; 3) Construction of new infill cottages, reflective of the extant residential structures (scale, footprint, spacing, materials, etc.) and meeting Historic Preservation guidelines; 4) Creation of a gateway point park, reflective of other intersection point parks; 5) Realignment of intersection to address traffic at Fifth Street; 6) Development of a shared/cross-access parking lot behind new cottages; 7) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 8) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

W. WASHINGTON STREET GATEWAY

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CHARACTER AREA 3 [SEE FIGURE 11, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1] This is an area that has been rezoned for higher density residential. Having close proximity but no relationship nor connectivity to Downtown and hampered by lots too small to accommodate automobiles, the primary goal is to create new connectivity and allow for alternative housing options. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Completion of the street connecting to W. Jefferson Street and Fifth Street; 2) Development of residential units having a single-family appearance, but including some combination of single-family detached, single-family attached (garden flat or patio home), duplex, or apartment house. 3) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

CHARACTER AREAS 4 & 5 [SEE FIGURE 11, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1] This is an area that is heavily vegetated, has some challenging slopes and water resources, and is a known historic site. The primary goals are to establish a community building, preserve the historic and natural resources of the site, maximize recreational and tourism opportunities, and utilize portions thereof for a collective openspace or stormwater initiative to serve the adjacent areas. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Development of a non-commercial community building (not necessarily public); 2) Development of a shared/cross-access parking lot behind new cottages; 3) Conservation of existing vegetation and any historic site features; 4) Retention of the historic institution and consideration of a shared parking facility; 5) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

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CHARACTER AREA 6 [SEE FIGURE S 11 & 12, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1 & 2] This area is distinct because it not an automobile-based corridor, rather it flanks the railroad and has an very different industrial appearance. The primary goal is to align new development between a new version of Bull Street and the Railroad and reinforce and build upon the industrial character. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Demolition of all non-historic structures; 2) Rehabilitation of the one (1) viable historic industrial structure as identified on the map; 3) Relocation and rehabilitation of the historic depot as identified on the map; 4) Construction of new two (2) new sentinel warehouses, reflective of the extant brick warehouse structures (scale, bulk, materials, lack of ornamentation, etc.) and meeting Historic Preservation guidelines (note: a Downtown “storefront� appearance is not industrial); 5) Construction of a new warehouse structure, reflective of frame warehouses near the railroad; 6) Creation of a boardwalk, creating connectivity and linkage along the railroad; 7) Completion of the street connecting to W. Jefferson Street and Fifth Street; 8) Realignment and construction of a new segment of Bull Street to create a new cross-axis; 9) Development of a shared/cross-access parking lot in front of new buildings; 10) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 11) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way. Please note that Character Area 6 overlaps onto: [SEE FIGURE 12, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 2].


CANAAN HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD This is a historic residential neighborhood. The primary goals are to reinforce housing within the area, create an abutting neighborhood commercial/service center, and improve neighborhood connectivity and amenities. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6)

Rehabilitation of viable residential structures; Development of neighborhood service/commercial structures; Development of neighborhood amenities; Improvement of stormwater systems in the neighborhood; Connectivity to public sidewalk system; Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

CHARACTER AREA 8 [SEE FIGURE 12, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 2]. This area is located in the Madison Historic District along N. Main Street and there are not additional improvements proposed for this area. The primary goal is to include this area for it to capitalize on economic benefits of participation. Existing growth management tools shall govern this area. AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL AREA This area is located adjacent to the airport and there are not additional improvements proposed for this area. The primary goal is to include this area for it to capitalize on economic benefits of participation. Existing growth management tools shall govern this area.

City of Madison

CHARACTER AREA 7 [SEE FIGURE 12, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 2] This area is a historic residential area with both large and small houses; however, there is a weak pedestrian connection between W. Jefferson and N. Second streets that is impairing connectivity and business expansion. The primary goals are to reinforce residential character, resolve traffic (vehicular and pedestrian) conflicts, and rebuild connectivity for the area. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Retention of all historic structures; 2) Demolition of all non-historic structures; 2) Rehabilitation of historic structures (not necessarily used for residential purposes); 3) Construction of new infill cottages, reflective of the extant residential structures (scale, footprint, spacing, materials, etc.) and meeting Historic Preservation guidelines; 4) Construction of congregate and shared access rear parking areas; 5) Completion of a limited section of a new street entitled Autry Street; 6) Allow for expansion of non-conforming warehouses, provided that traffic and connectivity concerns can be addressed; 7) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 8) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

N. SECOND STREET AREA CHARACTER AREA 6 [SEE FIGURE 12, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 2] Please note that Character Area 6 overlaps onto [SEE FIGURE 11, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 1]. See notes above.

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City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

N. MAIN STREET GATEWAY CHARACTER AREA 9 [SEE FIGURE 13, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 3] This area is a historic residential area with small houses, but the street lacks continuity in the faรงade line, connectivity to the public sidewalk system, and residential occupancy. The primary goals are to reinforce this as a residential street and recreate an attractive streetscape buffer to reinforce this residential edge of the Madison Historic District. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Demolition of all non-historic structures; 2) Relocation of any non-residential occupancies 3) Rehabilitation of the three (3) viable historic residential structures; 3) Construction of new infill cottages, reflective of the extant residential structures (scale, footprint, spacing, materials, etc.) and meeting Historic Preservation guidelines; 4) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 5) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.

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CHARACTER AREA 10 [SEE FIGURE 13, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 3] This is a prominent corridor entrance into the community, but suffers from poor single-lot development and is too small of an area not to capitalize upon the benefits of shared party walls, design elements, parking, etc. Full redevelopment of this area as a neighborhood commercial center is the primary goal. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Retention of the gateway point park; 2) Demolition of all structures; 3) Construction of a new commercial center with shared party walls to maximum potential square footage (with storefronts, one-story brick, mid-century modern design); 4) Development of a shared/cross-access parking lot behind new commercial center; 5) Realignment of railroad intersection and development of a new stub street as per the Comprehensive Plan; 6) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 7) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way. N. MAIN STREET NEIGHBORHOOD [SEE FIGURE 13, OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT - MAP 3] CHARACTER AREA 11, 12 & 13 This is a historic residential neighborhood. The primary goals are to reinforce housing within the area, create an abutting neighborhood commercial/service center, and improve neighborhood connectivity and amenities. Development proposals shall execute one or more of the following: 1) Rehabilitation of viable residential structures; 2) Development of neighborhood service/commercial structures; 3) Development of neighborhood amenities; 4) Improvement of stormwater systems in the neighborhood; 5) Connectivity to public sidewalk system; 6) Installation of a five (5) foot public sidewalk and street trees every twenty-five (25) linear feet of frontage along public rights-of-way.


Long-Term Plans – Infrastructure, Openspace & Connectivity

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

Utilizing the aforementioned existing growth management tools, theses maps have been compiled to smooth the interface of new development with long-term public plans for infrastructure, openspace, and connectivity[SEE FIGURES 14 & 15].

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City of Madison

BLANK PAGE

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011


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Conceptual Plans

While the Overall Area Development and Buildout as described and mapped herein has sufficient specificity to guide DDA decisions and encourage developers to invest with confidence given the planning for each subarea and character area, the DDA may explore the feasibility of specific catalytic projects and develop potential conceptual plans. The DDA acknowledges that the URP alone will not catalyze redevelopment. Rather redevelopment is stimulated through the assurance of the adopted plan, offered incentives, public infrastructure, private investment, and creative public-private partnerships. A few conceptual plans have been generated by the DDA to stimulate private interest in the area. DURA – Washington & Jefferson Intersection [FIGURE 16] Realigns the inferior intersection of the HWY 83 and Fifth Street Creates a new point park to make this gateway an attractive community entrance Walker Rose Lane Neighborhood (Phase II & III) [FIGURE 17] Completes the development, returning three more acres to tax rolls; Introduces alternative housing options, designed for retirees and owner-occupied Creates another segment of the trail system (similar to Round Bowl Spring Park)

Cottage Row Streetscape [FIGURE 19] Starts the infill cottage row along W. Washington Street Utilizes a historic structure of the appropriate era next to Richter Cottage Shares a new parking area with the Richter Cottage Creates an axial view of a future public amenity, pedestrian bridge across the branch Creates the first segment of improved public streetscape and connectivity Railroad Boardwalk [FIGURE 20] Rehabilitates a historic warehouse and creates a corner cottage lot Creates a new connection for the adjacent subdivision and Canaan neighborhood Invites potential relocation and restoration of threatened historic depot Creates a new connectivity amenity improving a sparse area Invites the possibility of train-related activity and tourism

City of Madison

Explores a new housing type for assisted living in the community Incorporates senior housing in low visibility and high connectivity areas Targets new households - positive to the tax base - to increase number of rooftops

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

College Heights, A Retirement Neighborhood [FIGURE 18]

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City of Madison

BLANK PAGE

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011


Development Management Approach The Urban Redevelopment Law authorizes the City of Madison Mayor and City Council to designate a Urban Redevelopment Agency (URA) for the purpose of implementation of the Urban Redevelopment Plan (URP). Based on its documented experience and track record in revitalization, the Downtown Development Authority of Madison (DDA) has been designated by the City of Madison to serve as the City’s Redevelopment Agent for implementation of the URP within the Downtown Urban Redevelopment Area (DURA). As the City’s Redevelopment Agent, the DDA will provide development management to: Coordinate and implement the URP by working with entities within the DURA, City of Madison departments, and members of other City-appointed boards; Conduct standard predevelopment activities, including but not limited to: site analysis, environmental analysis, development planning, market analysis, financial feasibility studies, preliminary design, zoning compliance, facilities inspections, and overall analysis of compatibility of proposed development projects with the Comprehensive Plan and URP (either directly or by subcontracting for services); Solicit appropriate development projects, obtain financing, and obtain other forms of private investment to implement the URP;

Enter into negotiations with property owners and real estate developers within the redevelopment area for the purpose of acquiring land and property for redevelopment in accordance with the URP; Prepare (either with City staff or through contract) economic and financial analyses, project-specific feasibility studies and assessments of tax base in support of the issuance of bonds by the City; Enter into negotiations with qualified vendors for the provision of professional and other services required in qualifying and issuing the bonds, managing and disbursing the bond funds, as well as in design, feasibility, project management, legal, engineering, and other services required for implementation of the URP; Perform other duties as necessary to implement the Redevelopment Plan.

City of Madison

Coordinate public improvement planning and construction with the DDA, City Manager, and appropriate City of Madison departments;

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

Market the DURA among developers, capital sources, and the general public;

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This redevelopment management activity will increase DDA’s operating costs. There are several alternative approaches that DDA and the City of Madison may take to implement this activity and to fund it. DDA may staff this activity by adding more volunteer hours from its board members, by obtaining in-kind services or additional staff support from city staff to fill this role, or by contracting with an outside entity. There are also several routes to funding the function. DDA may request an increase in its budget allotment, it may impose a variety of user fees, such as design review and/or permit fees, or it may charge development management fees to projects for which it plays some role. In the first instance, it may be assumed that the DDA’s development management activities will substantially increase the tax digest for the district and the increased tax revenues will ultimately offset the additional cost. Past projects and initiatives by the DDA have contributed in a demonstrable manner to the local tax base. Any budget allotment request would likely take the form of an intergovernmental agreement and is fully at the discretion of the City of Madison.

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

In the second instance, user fees, rather than the increased tax revenues, would become the funding source. At this time, the DDA seeks to incentivize the DURA with fee reductions and/or waivers and does not anticipate any addition of user fees.

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In the third instance, the Development Management function may be funded as a part of DDA project implementation, through a development management fee charged to projects based on the project’s scope and calculated as a percentage of the project cost. Such a fee typically is in the 2%-6% range, similar to an architect’s fee. For example, a 2% development management fee for the prior Walker Rose Neighborhood project with a $875,000 project cost would be $17,500. The fee could be spread evenly across the entire duration of the project. The City/DDA may initiate this activity at any time, temporarily funding it with General Funds or other available sources, then reimbursing itself as project financing is put in place.


Implementation Schedule Upon adoption of the Urban Redevelopment Plan (URP), the Downtown Development Authority of Madison (DDA) shall immediately determine a process by which they will implement the above-described Development Management function within ninety (90) days of the URP’s adoption. All City of Madison departments and the members of other Cityappointed boards are directed to provide such staff support as may be necessary or desirable for the DDA in accomplishing this task within ninety (90) days of this plan’s adoption by the City Council. Once this function is in place the DDA shall develop a 1-Year and 3-Year Work Plan to address the redevelopment activities described above and: DDA, in conjunction with the Planning Department and/or other appropriate departments shall initiate an application for the Downtown Urban Redevelopment Area (DURA) to be designated an Opportunity Zone under the Georgia Department of Community Affairs’ Opportunity Zone Program.

DDA, in conjunction with the Planning Department with assistance from the University of Georgia or other such agency shall schedule a neighborhood workshop with design charette inviting residents and property owners in the Canaan Historic Neighborhood to discuss the potential formation of a neighborhood center and its integration as part of the DURA. DDA, in conjunction in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall initiate research to maximize and seek grant funding opportunities, specifically the Community Development Block Grant (CBDG) to address stormwater and infrastructure issues in the neighborhood subareas.

City of Madison

DDA, in conjunction with the Planning Department and/or other appropriate departments shall develop a program for the DURA, which will qualify as a Redevelopment Area Strategy as defined by the Georgia Department of Community Affairs’ Redevelopment Area Strategy program and submit the required application materials.

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

DDA, in conjunction with the Planning Department and/or other appropriate departments shall explore the feasibility and interest of other local governments for an application for the Downtown Urban Redevelopment Area (DURA) to be designated an Enterprise Zone under the Georgia Department of Community Affairs’ Enterprise Zone Program.

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DDA, in conjunction with the Madison Main Street, Planning Department, and the non-profit Downtown Design & Development, Inc. (3-D) shall extend the area in which the Downtown Façade Grant Program is offered to include all portions of the W. Washington Street Gateway and N. Second Street Area not previously covered. DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall undertake to define the structure of the Parking Space Fund and make recommendations to the City Council on its structure and operation, including the preparation of a Parking Space Plan to designate specific areas of investment by the Fund. DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall undertake to define the structure of the Open Space Fund and make recommendations to the City Council on its structure and operation, including the preparation of an Open Space Plan to designate specific areas of investment by the Fund.

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall undertake to define the structure of the Stormwater Management Fund and make recommendations to the City Council on its structure and operation, including the preparation of a Stormwater Management Plan to designate specific areas of investment by the Fund.

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DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall initiate research the implementation of a Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) program and make recommendations to the City Council on its structure and operation, to assist DDA’s private development partners in developing financially-feasible residential projects in the DURA and remain zero growth on residential density, while respecting the City residential zoning maximums - single-family (2005) and multi-family (2009). DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall initiate research on housing tax credits and other incentive programs which can assist DDA’s private development partners in developing financially-feasible projects in the DURA which conform to its development standards. DDA, in conjunction with the Community Development Department and/or other appropriate departments shall initiate research to identify or create a nonprofit entity which can act as a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) to serve the redevelopment area. 


/draft%20URP_Section_5  

http://www.madisonga.com/4/documents/draft%20URP_Section_5.pdf

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