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City of Madison Urban Redevelopment Plan Downtown Urban Renewal Area

W. WASHINGTON STREET GATEWAY CANAAN HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD N. SECOND STREET AREA AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL AREA N. MAIN STREET GATEWAY N. MAIN STREET NEIGHBORHOOD Spring 2011 City of Madison, Georgia: Planning & Development Downtown Development Authority of Madison


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City of Madison

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Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011


Contents DEVELOPMENTAL HISTORY ................................................................................................... 2 BASIS OF FINDING FOR THE REDEVELOPMENT AREA ................................................................... 6 BOUNDARIES OF THE REDEVELOPMENT AREA ......................................................................... 10 DOCUMENTATION OF EXISTING CONDITIONS ......................................................................... 16 DEMOGRAPHICS ......................................................................................................... 16 LAND USE, ZONING & OVERLAYS ................................................................................... 18 PARCEL ANALYSIS – SIZE, OWNERSHIP & BLOCKS ................................................................ 28 PUBLICLY OWNED PROPERTY ........................................................................................ 34 PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE – STREETS, STREETSCAPES & PARKING.............................................. 34 PROPERTY INVENTORY – AGE, INTEGRITY & VACANCY ......................................................... 38 SUSCEPTIBILITY TO REDEVELOPMENT ............................................................................... 40 POVERTY RATES ........................................................................................................ 40

REDEVELOPMENT NEED ..................................................................................................... 44 ACTION PLAN................................................................................................................... 46 CONFORMANCE WITH THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ............................................................... 46 LAND USE OBJECTIVES ................................................................................................. 46 CHANGES TO GROWTH MANAGEMENT TOOLS ................................................................... 46 DEMOLITION OR REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURES .............................................................. 48 RELOCATION OF DISPLACED RESIDENTS ............................................................................ 49 ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY .......................................................................................... 49 PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE IN SUPPORT OF REDEVELOPMENT ................................................... 50 OPPORTUNITY ZONE .................................................................................................. 52 ENTERPRISE ZONE ...................................................................................................... 52 SPECIALTY TAX DISTRICTS ............................................................................................ 53 HISTORIC PRESERVATION INCENTIVES .............................................................................. 53 HOUSING TAX CREDITS ................................................................................................ 54 LAND ASSEMBLY - PREFERRED DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS & AUTHORITY TAX EXEMPTION ........... 54 PROJECT ASSISTANCE - DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS & WAIVER OF FEES ............................... 55 TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS (TDR) ..................................................................... 55 PARKING BANK OPTION ............................................................................................... 55 OPENSPACE BANK OPTION............................................................................................ 56 STORMWATER CONGREGATE OPTION .............................................................................. 56 BLIGHT TAX ORDINANCE ............................................................................................. 57 IMPACT FEE WAIVER RECOMMENDATION .......................................................................... 57 GRANTS & OTHER FUNDING SOURCES.............................................................................. 57 PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS - PRIVATE DONATIONS & LAND CONTRIBUTIONS ........................ 57

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

PLAN TO LEVERAGE PRIVATE RESOURCES FOR REDEVELOPMENT ................................................ 52

CHARACTER AREA GOALS & MAPS .................................................................................. 58 LONG-TERM PLANS – INFRASTRUCTURE, OPENSPACE & CONNECTIVITY .................................... 62 CONCEPTUAL PLANS ................................................................................................... 74

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT APPROACH ............................................................................. 86 IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE .............................................................................................. 88

City of Madison

OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT .................................................................... 58

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Figures

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

FIGURE 1. DOWNTOWN URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AREA WITH THE DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AREA ......... 8 FIGURE 2. DOWNTOWN URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AREA ...............................................................12 FIGURE 3. DOWNTOWN URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AREA WITH SIX DISTINCT SUBAREAS ...........................14 FIGURE 4. EXISTING LAND USE WITHIN THE DURA ......................................................................20 FIGURE 5. FUTURE LAND USE WITHIN THE DURA .......................................................................22 FIGURE 6. ZONING DISTRICTS WITHIN THE DURA .......................................................................24 FIGURE 7. OVERLAY DISTRICTS WITHIN THE DURA .....................................................................26 FIGURE 8A. TAX PARCEL ANALYSIS WITHIN THE DURA .................................................................30 FIGURE 8B. TAX PARCEL ANALYSIS WITHIN THE DURA .................................................................32 FIGURE 9. PUBLICLY OWNED PROPERTY & PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE WITHIN THE DURA ........................36 FIGURE 10. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO REDEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE DURA ................................................42 FIGURE 11. OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT: CHARACTER AREA MAP (1 OF 3) ...................64 FIGURE 12. OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT: CHARACTER AREA MAP (2 OF 3) ...................66 FIGURE 13. OVERALL AREA DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDOUT: CHARACTER AREA MAP (3 OF 3) ...................68 FIGURE 14. INFRASTRUCTURE & CONNECTIVITY ..........................................................................70 FIGURE 15. OPENSPACE & CONNECTIVITY .................................................................................72 FIGURE 16. CONCEPTUAL SITE PLAN: DURA – WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON INTERSECTION......................76 FIGURE 17. CONCEPTUAL SITE PLAN: WALKER ROSE NEIGHBORHOOD, PHASE 2 & 3. .............................78 FIGURE 18. CONCEPTUAL SITE PLAN: COLLEGE HEIGHTS, A MADISON RETIREMENT COMMUNITY. ...............80 FIGURE 19. CONCEPTUAL SITE PLAN: COTTAGE ROW STREETSCAPE. ................................................82 FIGURE 20. CONCEPTUAL SITE PLAN: RAILROAD BOARDWALK. .......................................................84

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SEE ALSO APPENDIX H. DURA WITH CENSUS DATA, OPPORTUNITY ZONES & AREAS OF DISINVESTMENT APPENDIX I. CENTRAL BUSINESS SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT

 

 


Executive Summary The City of Madison recognized the general decline which occurred within the downtown core, on the downtown fringes and its surrounding historic neighborhoods, and on the eastern and western ends of Main Street since the late 1960s. Twenty-five years ago, local leadership acted to aggressively combat such a decline and many areas have experienced extensive reinvestment and a reversal of fortunes as a direct result of the revitalization process.

This vision outlined within the URP has been directly based upon many well-used and longadopted public visioning documents and local growth management tools, in addition to recent public input during comprehensive planning. Such documents and tools are referenced throughout this document. They, along with data and analyses necessary to comply with the provisions of the Urban Redevelopment Act, provide the primary underpinnings for the URP. The primary provisions of this plan use the powers of the Downtown Development Authority of Madison (DDA), along with the knowledge, skills and talents of its Board and staff, to institute a community-focused redevelopment program in the DURA by adding a development management activity to the DDA’s skill set. The primary purpose of Downtown Development Authorities is to actively support Georgia’s downtowns. Since its inception in 1984, Madison’s DDA has focused on downtown revitalization and preservation

City of Madison

To articulate a vision for the DURA and assure that new development realizes the potential for the character and quality envisioned for the area and for similar investment and redevelopment as enjoyed by other areas of the community, the City of Madison, through the Madison Planning Department assisted by interested members of the Downtown Development Authority of Madison (DDA), has prepared an Urban Redevelopment Plan (URP) pursuant to O.C.G.A. 36-61 for the DURA. The URP conforms to the requirements of the Urban Redevelopment Act (URA), O.C.G.A. 36-61, and includes supporting documentation to facilitate its implementation, such as maps and graphic illustrations, building, infrastructure, circulation, openspace, and site development standards to be implemented through the URP in order to guide the pattern of redevelopment in a fashion compatible with the vision for the DURA.

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

The community formally identified areas which have not been as fortunate in the 2009 Partial Update to the Comprehensive Plan, developed and adopted accordance with Chapter 110-12-1.06 of the Local Planning Requirements, Standards & Procedures for Local Comprehensive Planning. Titled as “Areas Requiring Special Attention,” such areas in closest proximity to the downtown core include: W. Washington Street Gateway, Canaan Historic Neighborhood, N. Second Street Area, Airport Industrial Area, N. Main Street Gateway, and N. Main Street Neighborhood. Collectively, these areas form a larger area or district discussed and referenced herein as the Downtown Urban Redevelopment Area (DURA).

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services, business retention and expansion programs, civic improvement and beautification projects, as well as development and redevelopment activities. Even so, some areas within the current DDA jurisdiction do not have many viable buildings to preserve or stabilize, sufficient businesses to retain nor expand, adequate public facilities or enhancements, nor the quantity or quality of building stock which can support healthy businesses or happy residents. These same issues also exist in areas in immediate proximity as well. Therefore, this development management activity is to focus in the DURA using the tools provided under Georgia law to stimulate private investment in development and redevelopment partnerships, which will put in place the types and quality of commercial, residential, and institutional buildings and spaces that the community has expressed in all of the plans cited above for Downtown Madison and the immediate vicinity within the DURA. This redevelopment management activity is to: Team with the City, County and Regional agencies to identify and obtain additional State and Federal funds which can contribute to the redevelopment of the DURA as in accordance with the URP;

City of Madison

Urban Redevelopment Plan | Spring 2011

Focus on proactive engagement of the DURA’s property and business owners to initiate redevelopment and enhancement of their current holdings in the DURA to stimulate economic activity in conformance with the URP;

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Seek out developers, businesses, and investors who have a track record of creating the types of projects and businesses that the URP has determined are most likely to contribute to the DURA’s success; Work with other public agencies to assure that the development standards and the public process which control the development activity in the DURA apply standards which result in the character and quality of development the community expects for the DURA and which are fair, reasonable, and comprehensible to the private development community. The URP provides a implementation schedule and preliminary work program for carrying out several tasks which help to advance this plan. Implementation outlines applying for a number of programs, such as an Opportunity Zone, which will provide incentives for private reinvestment in construction projects and business expansions as well as actively undertaking development of several projects, either by the DDA or in partnership with private sector developers. The URP is a plan with long-range, 20-year objectives coupled with short-term work items and a big tool box. Acknowledgement that the community has areas in need may be eye-opening and even embarrassing but is the step forward for change and opportunity.


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