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Summer 2010

Volume XCVIV, No. 2

Top-notch

SUMMIT

Paid or Free? Steve Outing, left, Walter Hussman and Steve Yelvington.

Ron Redfern is publisher, president and CEO of The Press-Enterprise in Riverside.

10

minutes

Transformational change: Earl Wilkinson, International Newsmedia Marketing Association.

with our new president

PHOTOS BY SHARON BARKER / SPECIAL TO CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Resource Roundtables: Greg Harmon, left, ITZBelden, talks shop with Liz Nyberg, Los Altos Town Crier.

Critical mass finds solid ground in Monterey

Welcome to paradise: Joe Livernois, The Monterey County Herald.

April’s 2010 Press Summit in Monterey presented a vast array of opportunities for members. “Coming Together: Strength in Partnerships and Innovation” was this year’s theme, and for the publishers, editors, advertising executives, speakers and the many other attendees, they found the words inspiring and the sessions intriguing. Keynote speaker Drew Davis of the American Press Institute provided an informative glance at the industry and presented API’s Newsmedia Economic Action Plan.

The Wilmington (Del.) News Journal’s David Ledford stressed taking advantage of the technological advances available, while James Moroney of the A.H. Belo Corp. spoke about how crucial local coverage is to a news organization. Insightful presentations, from nationally and globally known experts, covered all aspects of concern to any limber and progressive media company in these challenging times. Plus, it was in Monterey. You should have been there. See more on Pages 5-6 and 10-11.

Use the power of emotion for ad headlines that sell First in a series By David Fowler Special to California Publisher Since they account for 60 to 75 percent of an ad’s success, what better place to start the conversation of effective ads than with headlines? Having tested thousands of ads for 20 years, I know the best headlines arouse an “emotional” charge in readers. In fact, the emotional charge created by the headline gives it the power to reach past the reader’s skeptical, doubting, ice-cold glare, to touch their deepest wants, desires and fears.

Without an engaging headline you can forget response. Any business can use emotional headlines Can a bookkeeping service run an emotional headline? I just saw one that said, “Free Bookkeeping Services for StressedOut Business Owners.” Of course the “FREE” service was a trial offer, but the ad got a huge response! I recently turned a losing restaurant ad into a winner by “emotionalizing” the headline.

California Newspaper Publishers Association

See ADS Page 8

I N S I DE

Publisher Profile George Cogswell The Ventura County Star Legal HelpLine ......................... 2 From the President ................... 2 Newspaper Design .................... 6 Technology ................................15

By Daniel Cásarez Special to California Publisher Ronald Redfern, publisher, president and chief executive officer of The PressEnterprise in Riverside, presented great plans for 2010-11 in a 10-minute conversation in Monterey. First of all, thank you, Mr. Redfern for taking the time. Let’s start with a brief history. How did you get your start in the industry? RR: I actually started in the shopper business back in 1977. After a few years, I moved to weekly newspapers and after being in the weekly newspaper business for about five or six years, I moved to the daily newspaper business and stayed in that ever since. As chairman of this year’s summit, what were your thoughts coming in? RR: Well we felt a little challenged because 2009 was one of the worst years we’ve ever had. And it’s understandable that the financial conditions might prevent a lot of attendance. The NAA [Newspaper Association of America] moved their conference and changed the order of some of their events and bumped up against us. We were concerned that they might be prioritized before us. So we knew we had to have a real strong program. We had a great venue, and the proximity of Monterey to papers in both Northern and Southern California. At most, it’s a 6- or 7-hour drive from the opposite ends. We felt that we could get a reasonably good attendance. And we pushed really hard. There’s a whole slew of folks on the executive committee and on the board that were really, really responsible for moving the needle on this event. Everybody pitched in, and then with the core of committed people like that,

People ..................................... 16

708 10th St., Sacramento CA 95814 (916) 288-6000

See REDFERN Page 11 Fax (916) 288-6002

www.cnpa.com


 California Publisher Summer 2010

T H E C N PA M I S S I O N To champion the ideals of a free press in our democratic society and to promote the quality and economic health of California newspapers

Upcoming elections aligned with our growing ad network ITZBelden we have captured marIt’s a great honor and privilege ket data that illustrates the value for me to serve as your president of the network’s audience for this coming year. And I’d be advertisers. This audience inforremiss if I didn’t start this first mation, which has been included column by extending my thanks in our initial sales presentations, to everyone who made this year’s has created a very high level of Press Summit such a terrific advertiser interest and enthusisuccess – from our staff to our asm for the network, particularly advertisers, vendors and sponfrom political campaigns engaged sors – to every one of the 200FROM THE in this year’s elections. plus attendees who engaged and PRESIDENT participated. l CNPA is aggressively pursuing Ron Redfern In particular I want to recogstatewide political campaigns to nize and personally thank Tony Allegretti, drive revenue for the network, and some George Cogswell, Fred Hamilton, Eddie have expressed serious interest. We are Hartenstein, Jim Moroney, Ed Moss, Gary optimistic that one or more of them will be Omernick, Amy Pack, Richard Ramhoff, scheduled for the network as we get closer Mac Tully, Frank Vega, Frank Whittaker to the June primary and pacing to the and John Wilcox for supporting this year’s November election. When that happens, the Summit with sponsorship investments that newspapers that have signed on as network allowed us to deliver a great program. members will participate in that revenue As you might imagine, CNPA has a very share. full agenda to tackle this year based on the The CNPA Banner Ad Network is an results of our recent membership survey, opportunity you can’t pass up. There is but no item is more important nor offers absolutely no cost and no downside risk. our association and membership more And remember, each and every newspaopportunity this year than does CNPA’s per participating in the network has the new Banner Ad Network. opportunity to sell into the network in its We are making great progress on the market to its clients and receive a generous Banner Ad Network, and you need to get 15 percent commission on the total network onboard and signed up right now so that revenue for every sale made. you can share in the revenue opportunity Get onboard and in line to participate in the network holds. a new revenue stream in 2010. If you have Here’s why your newspaper needs to be a questions about how to get plugged in, how member of CNPA’s Banner Ad Network: to sell it, or if you need assistance with the network, please contact Eric Johnston, publ The network continues to grow, with 143 lisher of The Modesto Bee and chairman of papers now participating (57 dailies and 86 the Banner Ad Network committee. You weeklies). It is on track to become the largcan reach Eric at (209) 578-2090 or via est single access point for tapping into the email at ejohnston@modbee.com. very desirable California audience. Thanks for your ongoing support for l There is no cost to come onboard, and CNPA. And please let me hear from you when you do, you not only participate in a about how we can make CNPA a better share of any/all revenue sold, you also are organization for our members. able to sell the network to your clients and Ron Redfern is publisher of The Presscapture a 15 percent commission on the Enterprise in Riverside. Contact him at network revenue for the sales you make. (951) 368-9515 or rredfern@pe.com. l Through CNPA’s sales partnership with

CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Our FOI win was team effort By Brad Breithaupt Special to California Publisher Winning first place for our “Freedom of Information” reporting was a great honor for the Marin Independent Journal. In our story about the honor, I was the only staffer mentioned in the report on the 2009 California Newspaper Publishers Association “Freedom of Information” award because I wrote the 2008 story about the county’s release of its detailed payroll. I was involved in the two-year fight to get the county to release that data, but it was far from a lone effort. It really was a team effort that also included another reporter, Keri Brenner, and IJ editors Matt Wilson, Doug Bunnell, Robert Sterling and Nels Johnson. The team also included thenpublisher Mario van Dongen – and our ownership, MediaNews, who even amid significant budget difficulties believed strongly about the public’s right to know and invested money to defend that right in court. Our story let taxpayers know that one in five county employees was making $100,000 or more in salary and overtime pay. The data showed thousands of taxpayer dollars being spent on overtime pay for county tech workers to fix its disastrous conversion to a new fiscal software system. Overtime records also showed that the county emergency dispatch center was having costly staffing problems. Without disclosure, those figures would still be out of reach to taxpayers, those who are paying for local government. The details also shined a light on how local firefighters brought home large sums of overtime pay for serving on state “strike teams,” rushing to help stop major wildfires across the state. The state reimbursed the county for extra pay. While no one should tell these firefighters to stay home, the cost should not be kept unavailable for open and public review. I first worked on the story as a coach and cheerleader for Brenner, who faced bureaucratic obstacles getting dollars-and-cents specifics on some promotions the supervisors had approved. She was told the num-

Event costs can’t be hidden behind CPRA

Q:

Published quarterly by the California Newspaper Publishers Association 708 10th Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Summer, June 2010 Jack Bates Executive Director Joe Wirt Editor Diane Donohue Advertising California Publisher USPN 084720 ISSN 0008-1434 Subscriptions are $15 per year. California Publisher is printed by Paradise Post Printing. Periodicals postage paid at Sacramento, CA. Postmaster send address changes to: California Publisher 708 10th Street Sacramento, CA 95814-1803

bers were confidential by county brass, who said they were following new county rules and recent court rulings. Brenner, with Johnson’s encouragement, would not take “no” for an answer and pursued the story. As editorial page editor, I wrote editorials, urging the supervisors to reverse county staff’s stand. County officials proudly pointed to their online posting of positions and pay levels, but said workers’ names, their pay and overtime were off limits to the public. The supervisors at first argued against changing its rule – a sign of support for county employees. In this case, elected officials put loyalty to the bureaucracy ahead of the taxpayers they represent. Bunnell and I had a summit meeting with a team of county leaders and told them the IJ was committed to the fight. The supervisors eventually voted to disclose the details. That disclosure was stopped by a lawsuit filed by the county’s middle-management members, who argued that it was a violation of their right to privacy. The legal battle was on – and not surprisingly, the supervisors decided to stay out of the fight. We were represented by Bay Area lawyer Roger Myers. We spent hours researching our records, combing through dust-covered boxes of old IJ stories and writing depositions. The union won in local courts, but we prevailed on appeal. I was back working as a reporter when the story fell into my lap. The payroll data we fought for is available in a searchable database on our website: www.marinij.com/data. The IJ’s victory – in reporting on the county payroll and winning the CNPA award – truly was a group effort of a team of local journalists who believed it was important to halt the erosion of the public’s right to know. I’m proud of the IJ. This piece appeared in the April 21 edition of the Marin Independent Journal, from which it is reprinted with permission.

because they each contain a proThe last few years our vision that requires the town to town has organized keep the terms of the agreements a series of summer confidential. She says this is concerts held in the “pretty standard for the industry.” town plaza that have showcased Can she withhold this informaa lot of the local musical talent. tion because of the language in The event has annually grown in the contract? size and popularity since the first No. The California series and now includes quite a Public Records Act few local restaurants and busiHELPLINE (CPRA) contains no nesses that sell food, beverages Jim Ewert exemption that would and souvenirs. The event has CNPA Legal permit the town to been a great source of community Counsel withhold the contracts from you pride. because it agreed to keep them This year, the event has a new confidential. Since 1984, California courts director who is well connected to the music have consistently held that when one of the industry. She has created a controversial parties to a contract or a settlement agreesituation for this year’s series by signing several professional artists who are (or were ment is a government agency the terms of at one time) fairly well known. The concerts the contract or settlement are a matter of public record pursuant to the CPRA. are sure to draw larger crowds, but a few Also, several years ago, the legislature of the most popular local bands will not be performing this summer, which has many of added California Government Code Section 6253.3 to the CPRA which reads: “A state or the residents upset. local agency may not allow another party to I wanted to determine whether the town control the disclosure of information that is might be putting itself in a position where otherwise subject to disclosure pursuant to it might become financially overextended, this chapter.” so I submitted a public records act request Section 6253.3 specifically prohibits the to the series director for the contracts that the town signed with each of the artists who town from entering into a contract that contains a confidentiality provision that will be performing. The director said the prevents it from disclosing the contract or contracts could not be publicly disclosed

A:

ADVERTISERS THIS ISSUE Cal-SCAN/Cal-SDAN .................................. 15

CNPA Allied Members ....................... 17-19 CNPA Foundation .................................. 14 Graphic Communication Institute ................. 15 JP Media Partners ................................... 5

its terms. Absent any other exemption that might apply, the town is required to provide you with the contracts that you requested.

Q:

The county grand jury recently issued its final report that found conditions in the county’s jail to be below standard. The report found that the jail was consistently overcrowded, that many of the cells were frequently in an unsanitary condition and concluded these conditions might be in violation of state and federal law. I called the sheriff and asked him if I could set up a tour of the jail to see the condition of the facility and verify the grand jury’s findings. The sheriff denied my request. Do I have a legal right to tour the jail? Due to security concerns, authorities have broad discretion to control public access to state prisons and county jails. In general, the media has no special rights to access these facilities. In 1996, the California Department of Corrections passed a new regulation that abruptly eliminated special access to prisons by members of the media who made a request for face-to-face interviews. Presently, journalists may obtain access to inmates only in a manner that is consistent

A:

See HELPLINE, Page 7

Kamen & Co. Group Services ..................... 12 Publishers Circulation Fulfilment Inc. .......... 9 TownNews.com .......................................... 9 The Ultimate Print Source ......................... 20


Summer 2010 California Publisher 

PUBLISHER PROFILE

George Cogswell The Ventura County Star We know about those “Sideways” places up the coast. But can you recommend any wineries we should visit in your county? Two must-visits are: Rancho Ventavo, located at Heritage Square, Oxnard. George and Faye are the proprietors. Also, Herzog Wineries is the best of the best, also of Oxnard. Recently, a wine trail has been established in Oxnard. I highly recommend a visit.

Tell us a bit about The Ventura County Star’s breadth of coverage and distribution. It’s an incredibly diverse county, made of 10 cities with a total population of approximately 800,000 and growing. The city of Ventura holds the highest name recognition while Oxnard is the largest city, with population exceeding 200,000. Tell us a little about your outreach on behalf of your business. We have multiple Chamber of Commerce memberships (see Personal Stats box). As the dominant news source for Ventura County, both print and digitally, we are incredibly visible in all of the communities that we serve, whether it be through the chambers or via our hundreds of partnerships with community events.

What’s one aspect of professional improvement that you’d like to make more time for in your career? Public speaking! I am extended so many opportunities to speak at industry meetings and nonprofit organizations, and I love it. I began a Toastmasters club here at The Star but have not had the time to participate at the level that I would like. Their program works.

Describe your regional role with Scripps newspapers. My primary role is to serve as president and publisher for the Ventura County Star. My responsibilities as What do you like best about regional publisher are really to help communicate and facilitate much George Cogswell’s fancy footwork at the 2008 Oxnard Salsa Festival’s “Dancing with the Local Stars” com- your position? That there is NEVER a dull of what is going on within Scripps’ petition helped to raise a record $50,000 for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ventura County. moment as publisher. I can newspaper division to the other move at 110 mph each and every newspapers within the West Region Well, first of all we have our very products help us serve and grow our target day. There is always so much to (Redding and Kitsap, Wash.) Within own Timm Herdt, our bureau chief, in or “niche” audiences while contributing to do, and I am one of those people who canour new organizational structure, most Sacramento. All of our Scripps newspapers not sit around and wait for something to newspaper functional areas, i.e. Operations, the all-important bottom line. are making very good use of the excellent happen. Advertising, Marketing, Circulation Sales, Do you have a “seeing-eye dog” on the staff work done in Washington, with the Scripps But also, the fact that I get to interact etc., each have regional directors that manNews Service in D.C. – someone who keeps you attuned to digiwith so many people, from both inside The age/direct their direct reports at each of Regionally, we have been exploring tal developments and trends without going Star and from within the communities that the other newspapers within their region. opportunities to share with many of our too “I.T.” on you? we serve. This is a people business and I Each of those regional leaders resides at California friends but just haven’t been able Actually, not only do we have “seeing eye live for it! The Star. to finalize a plan. I am sure that will come dogs,” our entire newsroom is in tune with about soon. the digital world. Our objective moving forWhat are you most proud of? What has been the result of moving newsward is to be totally platform agnostic. That at The Star we have weathered this paper page production to Corpus Christi, Imagine you’re the guest producer for The Star, and Scripps as a whole, will storm and have come away stronger than Texas? “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives” (on the Food continue to put our toe in the water with we were just three years ago. We encounRedding’s experience has been a good Network). Where should Guy Fieri stop for virtually all new and emerging technologies. tered some pretty scary economic times and one. The move to Corpus has freed up local a chowdown in your area? We don’t care how our readers consume turbulent industry changes. Redding staff and resources to focus on Well, my house would be the first choice news, just that we have it there for them to what’s most important: providing great for a rib cook-off. On any given Saturday consume! Any regrets? local news to their readers. The move you can find me in the backyard, slow cookYou mean other that I didn’t grow to be 6 has been looked at quite favorably by the ing a nice rack of baby backs. feet, 10 inches tall and play for the Boston Redding staff. Ventura has not yet made the We’re hearing more about aggregating For a second choice, I would point him information in a coverage area, such as Celtics? move to moving to a central desk. That will to a pretty well-kept secret and place that I The Sacramento Bee’s Sacramento Connect I used to say that I wish I had been born come later this summer. just love: the Wine Cave in Ventura. They (sacramentoconnect.sacbee.com), which 10 years earlier and enjoyed the same fruits indexes selected area blogs with a potential excel at combining great wines and terrific that some of my predecessors (publishers) Describe your staff’s institutional knowlsmall dishes of incredibly good food. Tell revenue-sharing opportunity. How is The had enjoyed, but I am more excited now edge. Star partnering with other content produc- the owners that George sent you. about our business than ever before. We have many long-term employees who bring extensive local knowledge to the orga- ers or looking toward such a venture? nization, and although we have lost some incredible talent as we’ve reduced staff over the past couple of years, our folks have embraced new technology and found some better, faster ways of getting things done. Let’s face it … we are in the middle of some of the greatest change and challenges our industry has ever experienced, and that, all by itself, challenges our entire staff to experiment with new ways of doing things. Our folks here have done a stellar job of both accepting and initiating change that will help move us forward. You’ve started or partnered with several other publications in your time in Ventura – the Hispanic newspaper and website Siglo21.com and the Lighthouse Navy paper, to name two. How do you determine what’s a good fit for your company? I really only have two measures: 1.) There is a sizeable audience that we can capture and grow, and 2.) Is it profitable or will it be profitable very soon? Both of the above

PERSONAL STATS Name: George H. Cogswell III Born: April 6, 1959 First job: District manager, Middlesex News, Framingham, Mass. Current job: Regional publisher (West Coast), E.W. Scripps Co. Family: The first Cogswells arrived in this country in 1627 from England on the “Angel Gabriel.” Our family has great history. Two sons: George IV, 32; and Todd, 30. Grandson George V is 10 and granddaughter Chloe is 7. I was recently engaged to be married to Claudia Valenciana. Education: High school graduate, Leicester High, Leicester, Mass.

Community involvement and diversions: Chairman of the board, Oxnard Chamber of Commerce. On boards of directors of: Camarillo Chamber of Commerce, Ventura County Economic Development Association, Ventura County United Way, El Concilio, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ventura County, Boy Scouts of America, Oxnard Branding Committee, Honorary Commander of Naval Base Ventura, Workforce Investment Board of Ventura County. I serve as a Big Brother to Ryan Mullins, a 10-year old from Oxnard. I have coached Little League Baseball for 25 seasons all across the United States. I am an avid New England Patriots, Boston Celtics and Boston Red Sox fan.

Not to jinx anything, but what’s the Cogswell confidence assessment? Although things have dramatically improved so far in 2010, California is not like most other states. Our state’s budget troubles are deep, and who knows what that will mean in the next few years. But at the end of the day, someone must keep our government honest and citizens aware, and that someone will be us. How has your membership in CNPA helped your business? Aside from making friends around the state, CNPA keeps me informed of what’s going on in Sacramento and how our industry might be impacted by what’s happening within the Legislature. Thank you, CNPA for that! Q: Who will win the NBA Championship in 2010? A: The Boston Celtics!


 California Publisher Summer 2010

API’s Davis: Value your content By Daniel Cásarez Special to California Publisher In the opening keynote of the 2010 CNPA Press Summit in Monterey, Andrew B. Davis outlined a working economic plan to help settle the tension in today’s publications amid a tough worldwide economy. “The industry needs a message of hope. Yes, the economy is turning, but in these difficult times, the challenges are also great opportunities,” said Davis, director of the American Press Institute, before he touched on issues including the evolution of the newsroom and how to use advertising dollars more efficiently. Davis drew grins when he pointed out that talk-show hosts Jon Stewart and Rush Limbaugh, respectively, do not get their content until they read the newspapers. In his presentation, Davis introduced competitive strategies for the industry to explore. API’s Five Doctrines, dubbed the Newsmedia Economic Action Plan, are: Doctrine of True Value: What the industry creates has monetary value to it, and it has intellectual value; the news is actually intellectual property and must be recognized as such. Fair Use: The industry needs to capture revenue for content it produces; upon deliv-

scribers. The model ery of that content, rights must remain “I don’t, in my was well received. API is considered with the author. heart of hearts, a leading education Fair Share: Davis believe straight and research facilsays Google pays ity in the training of licensing to AP for online adverexecutives. usage, “but nothing tising banners industry Davis joined API in to you.” He calls and buttons 2003. As a major for renegotiating general, he was the this part of the will ever be director of Marine industry for paysufficient to Corps Public Affairs ment. sustain our investment in the at the Pentagon from Digital Delivery: 2001 to 2003. Davis wants journalistic product.” Davis would like everyone to take –Andrew B. Davis, to see more savvy advantage of digital delivery in mobile American Press Institute strategies in the protection of newsroom electronics; take content. In the case the opportunity to of Google, the protecdeliver rich contion of content is a “must-do, but in a hardtent, but for profit. to-do column,” he said in an interview after Consumer Centric: A progression aimed his talk. at the refocusing on readers and users. “Google is a very large company run by In introducing working models for paying very smart people,” said Davis, who admits online content, the API director explained he’s a self-proclaimed pessimist. “They have Paid Access Profiles. As an example, Davis their tentacles in every part of our commusaid the Financial Times, a national and nications and media society.” international publication, attracts print “I think we’ll emerge with the strength readership to its website with online offers from our brand and the strength from our that have led to nearly 150,000 print sub-

audience into the new era just fine. We still need to pay attention to maximizing our core products; this is still a $50 billion-ayear industry,” said Davis, commenting that the current economy is stretched, but will rebound. “There are things the newspapers can do to upgrade their sales organization,” he added. “I don’t, in my heart of hearts, believe straight online advertising banners and buttons will ever be sufficient to sustain our investment in the journalistic product.” Davis believes the industry is hopeful and eager to implement many new techniques to increase sales next year by 5 to 15 percent. Methods include experimentation with digital processes in this new digital-gadget era, utilizing search-engine optimization, video advertising, and email advertising, which on the whole, remain untouched. Daniel Cásarez is a reporter and photographer at Vida en el Valle in Fresno.

More resources online Videos, photo slideshows, session coverage and presenter files all are available at cnpa.com

Moore: Do you energize your sales team members? expectations,” he said. “Hire self-motivated people.” Moore said advertising executives should never be satisfied with mediocrity in a sales group. “Salespeople should have online goals and print goals on a monthly basis,” he added. What sales groups have done in the past, Moore said, no longer works. The industry’s biggest challenge today is simply raising the bar. Changes in recent years cannot be faced with traditional strategies, he said. A few good qualities to watch for in a sales rep? l Passionate for what they represent. l Prepared for what the customer expects. l Flexibility in a challenging industry. l Relentless, but respectful of the customer, industry. l Think like visionaries. “We’re in a position where everybody, everybody in our industry has had to change. That’s a given,” Moore said. “We need to redefine the entire culture of the sales organization.” Moore cofounded InsightEdge in 1999. His team offers clinics and strategies to various national sales organizations. Moore’s 35 years of sales experience include 10 years at McClatchy Newspapers and as an advertising director at The San Diego UnionTribune. –Daniel Cásarez Gary Moore answers questions for Press Summit correspondent Daniel Cásarez.

Gary Moore presented strategies to provide sales executives, publishers and online experts a wealth of knowledge in a competitive market. One idea was that sales leaders should know the salespeople that work for them. And the leaders must remain “plugged in” to what’s on their marketing plate. “Do you (leaders) interject energy?” Moore asked. Without micromanaging the crew, the more knowledgeable a sales leader is, the stronger and much more empowered the crew will be, he explained. Moore later admitted the energy question may not make him popular, but it is crucial in the production of an effective sales group. “Managers need to be clearly set on their

PHOTOS BY SHARON BARKER / SPECIAL TO CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Dawn Paduganan explains how to get the local ad dollar before the competition.

Grow your business with thrifty websites Dawn Paduganan, executive director for Private Label Solutions and of Local. com, provided a long list of revenue-saving online strategies that allow businesses the opportunity to reach out to more audiences. Internet advertising models like the popular Pay For Click banner ads are becoming the norm due to their effectiveness and efficiency, she told a CNPA Press Summit audience. The idea behind Pay For Click is that a business only pays when an online user “clicks” on the banner. “Deal of the Day” banner ads also are easy marketing tools, Paduganan said, calling them an exceptional idea for small busi-

nesses to expand their audience. Other sites, said Paduganan, like TurnHere, create professionally produced Internet video without the expensive price tag. TurnHere visits the client and produces a custom-made video for use on the Internet. It’s affordable and it works, according to Paduganan. In exchange, TurnHere hopes to gain more business from the client. Another idea is online interaction through reviews from advertisers’ best customers. A restaurant benefits from the added stimulation produced from the online visits. –Daniel Cásarez

More than 1,800 California newspaper executives and department heads from 120 dailies and 415 weeklies receive California Publisher.

One captive audience. California Publisher advertising: Call (916) 288-6017


Summer 2010 California Publisher 

Keeping up with change is a full-time job recently I heard about a film called “Hot Tub Digital. Here it comes, ready or not. As a guy Time Machine.” I think it’s a documentary. I’m who came up in this business, let’s just say several going to check that out. years ago, I am sometimes dazed and confused The idea of being able to go back to simpler about the future direction of this industry I love. times, say the early 1970s, when newspapers I haven’t been directly in the newspaper busi– bereft of any serious competition – ruled the ness for over 10 years now. But as an executive media landscape. In fact, major chain stores recruiter with a focus on newspapers, I remain were spending upwards of 80 percent of their tethered to it and have never regretted that I am. advertising budgets in newspapers. I am doing all I can to keep up with the evoluFood sections were packed with something tion of newspaper companies to “news companies” called ROP advertising. No one would think and the shift of emphasis from print to digital. NEWSPAPER about looking for a house or a car without In fact, we’re doing more and more searches for MARKETING checking the classifieds. Everyone turned to online/interactive people. I could spend eight newspapers for just about everything you could hours a day reading about all the new technology, Scott Little buy. but my clients actually expect me to find people to As an advertising guy in those days, it was fill key jobs in their company. pretty easy to be a hero. Actually, it might be a In truth, it’s all very exciting. In fact, as somegood idea to go back to 1440, when a guy named Gutenberg one who has been around the business for a few decades, I invented the first printing press using movable type. That think it’s the most exciting time in all of its history – parwould put me in on the ground floor of a business that had ticularly when you consider the relatively compacted time no place to go but up. in which this change has taken place. But, what if there really isn’t a time machine, and the And, if you think things have been moving too fast to only alternative for me is to actually learn about all that is keep up with, you ain’t seen nothing yet. digital … and then keep up with it? Regardless of how much I read, how many conferences Here’s an idea. I was thinking about when Superman I attend and how many people I talk to, I can still feel very was just a boy and Krypton, the planet where he lived, was overwhelmed. I’ve thought about the solution to this quanabout to disintegrate. His father, Jor-El, put him in a space dary and have come up with two pretty ground-breaking capsule and sent him to Earth. Along the way, in that capideas. sule, he was subliminally bombarded with all the wisdom of First, somehow go back to the good old days before Al the ages. In other words, he knew everything there was to Gore invented the Internet. That’s not easily done, but

know. It worked for him. He became a newspaperman. If I could find a machine like that, my troubles would be over. I’m not above taking the easy way out. But, assuming there are no short cuts, I guess I’ll keep doing what I’m doing, reading what I can and getting to media industry conferences. The recent CNPA conference was pretty focused on new technology as was the NAA mediaXchange. That’s generally true of just about all industry association get-togethers. If there was ever a time to take part in these conventions and tune in to the cost- effective, nearly daily webinars – this is it. In June, Editor & Publisher is hosting a conference and trade show in Las Vegas dedicated to interactive media. Suburban Newspapers of America (SNA) is piggybacking with a power-packed program for sales people and managers focused on selling a mix of print, online, mobile and more. The program for the E&P part of the conference will offer a very strong lineup of speakers who will help walk people like me through the digital landscape that lies before us. I know something about the digital world. I live and die by the Internet. My business wouldn’t exist without high-speed, 24/7 communication via email. I rarely let my iPhone and all its apps out of my sight. Our business has a Facebook page. I’m not Twittering yet. I think I’ll draw the line at that. Scott Little is president of Media Recruiters, an Allied member of CNPA. Contact him at slittle@mediarecruiters. com or (530) 342-6036.

Moroney: Local means unique Local coverage needs to be “unique and unduplicated,” said James M. Moroney III, executive vice president of the A.H. Belo Corp. Moroney, a luncheon speaker at the 2010 CNPA Press Summit in Monterey, said he’s tired of hearing that we, the newspaper and media industry, are down. Moroney, who is also publisher and chief executive officer at the Dallas Morning News, a publication celebrating its 125th anniversary, said newspapers still have a good and long life to them. And he wants the belief of a struggling newspaper to go out the proverbial window.

Taking advantage of local coverage is one strategy all newspapers can take “to get the value up” while improving morale. In speaking of value, Moroney outlined a model for local coverage and how to keep the content relevant for readership in the community. He said facilitating columnists and beat reporters, those who know the community, will deliver the news to where it matters most: the people who live in the community. “It’s unique and unduplicated,” said Moroney. “Most people care about what’s going on right around them.”

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Content can be irrelevent, meaning that it has no value. But local news, if wellpresented, is clearly differentiated. It then inherently becomes a valuable commodity, he said. A publication can then expand the content through various technological media advancements. To improve and expand local content, said Moroney, today’s newspapers should follow the model and learn the acronym PICA: Perspective. Interpretation. Context. Analysis.

Local news, if well-presented, is clearly differentiated, James Moroney said.

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How L.A. Times reduces costs, impacts A conversation with Emerson Lego, manager of environmental affairs at the Los Angeles Times. By Shannon Binns Special to California Publisher What are your primary responsibilities as the manager of Environmental Affairs at the L.A. Times? Emerson Lego: As part of the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) and Workers’ Compensation Department, my primary responsibility at the Los Angeles Times is to ensure that the company meets its environmental regulatory obligations. As a news organization, the company takes its commitment to environmental stewardship very seriously, and our department aims to do what is right and feasible to protect the environment and our workers, even when the regulatory framework does not necessarily call for it. Examples of this include using low-VOC blanket washes long before they were mandated by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, transitioning to Computer-to-Plate technology and eliminating silver-containing waste streams,

“Almost daily, our production managers evaluate and try to eliminate the process waste involved with printing the paper.” —Emerson Lego, Los Angeles Times

avoiding materials that may cause harm to our employees’ health, and participating in industry EHS roundtables to share knowledge and insight with peers in the media industry. What are some past initiatives that you have undertaken as a company that have reduced your environmental impacts while also reducing costs? E.L.: A recent project involved our direct mail inserting and sorting facility, California Community News. With the initiative of the facility’s director, Mark Dial,

the facility underwent a lighting replacement program in 2008. Existing metal halide lighting was replaced with high-efficiency fluorescent T8 lighting. Daylight and occupancy sensors were also installed. The capital spent on the project after rebates from Southern California Edison was about $82,000. The project anticipated and has realized about $139,000 per year in energy savings, so this immediate return on investment was a great success story for our company, the environment, and our employees. By saving money, this project has definitely contributed to the company’s bottom line. By utilizing a more efficient lighting system, the project has reduced the overall amount of energy needing to be generated, thus helping the environment. Lastly, by providing better lighting in the facility, the project has provided a more comfortable working environment for our employees. What are some current or planned initiatives and what impacts — both environmental and economic — do you expect them to have? E.L.: Although in the immediate future, the Los Angeles Times does not have any

particular projects planned specifically labeled as “environmental initiatives,” the organization is constantly looking for ways to become more efficient and to eliminate waste. Our facilities managers are constantly looking at ways of becoming more efficient by optimizing our buildings’ energy performance. Our news buildings and manufacturing plants have a number of energy-saving technologies that have been added over the years. Almost daily, our production managers evaluate and try to eliminate the process waste involved with printing the paper. Newsprint, ink, cleaners, water and fuel are all things that cost money to the company, so wasting them is neither in the company’s best interest nor the environment’s. By reducing such waste, we are not only reducing our impact to the environment but we can redirect our company’s resources so that we can keep more employees employed and stay focused on gathering and delivering more news for the years ahead. This is the fourth in a series offering guidance on greening your newspaper. Shannon Binns is a program manager at Green Press Initiative (greenpressinitiative.org).

InDesign CS5: Upgrades all winning time-savers They’ve gone and done it again. Those folks at Adobe keep upgrading their Creative Suite software about every 18 to 24 months. And every time they do, the question is: “Is it worth it for me to go with the upgrade?” With CS5, the answer ... again ... is “Yes!” Because most readers of this column are print-oriented, I’ll focus my attention on InDesign CS5 and its upgraded capabilities. Here are some of the things I really like about the new InDesign: Spanning multiple columns: This may revolutionize the way we paginate. Since the introduction of pagination software, we’ve always had to create a separate box for a headline and the text type in mulNEWSPAPER tiple-column designs. DESIGN Many of my clients found this Ed Henninger particularly troublesome when creating multi-column captions. They need to place the photo credit and a caption headline in one leg, but the caption in multiple legs. No longer. Now it’s a snap to set the caption headline to span the columns. Better yet, you can place the setup in a library for whenever you need a multiple-leg caption. I’m willing to bet it can be set up as a style sheet, too, though I haven’t had the time to try that yet. For many of us, this is gonna be the “wow” feature of InDesign CS5. Multi-talented selection tool: When you’re working on a page, how often do you go back-and-forth-back-and-

forth-back-and-forth to the tools palette? I try to use shortcuts (and a multi-button mouse) to save myself trips, but there’s still a lot of mousing around to grab the proper tool for what I need to do. With CS5, I can use the one tool to select, rotate, resize, reposition, crop, scale frames and frame content, duplicate, and apply corner effects. With CS5, you can set caption headlines to span multiple columns. Multiple page sizes: This may not matter much for issue-to-issue work on a broadsheet. But if you’re a MORE CS5 FEATURES: them when you close the document. So, you can make that hey-buddy-you’re-missingtabloid — or working on a tabloid speKevin Slimp has his picks / 15 some-fonts pink a thing of the past. cial section — it means you can keep Mini-bridge: A quick way to access the the centerspread as part of your entire originals of photos and other elements for use document instead of having to work on it separately. in your document. Enhanced layers panel: The new layers panel emuTracking changes: With Track Changes turned on, lates the layers panel in Illustrator. With it, you can hide, highlights in Story Editor will indicate what text has been lock and arrange different elements on a layer. When you added, moved or deleted. click the arrow next to a layer, you can drag an object to a The way I count, that’s at least eight good reasons for different layer, move it in or out of a group, lock it or hide you to consider upgrading to InDesign CS5. There are more it. ... about a few dozen more ... but for me, eight is enough. Object grids: OK ... this is soooo cool! Using the object CS5 scores again, with innovations and approaches that grid shortcut, you can arrange objects in a column, a row just can’t be matched by any other pagination software. — even diagonally — and duplicate the object as many times as you want. This will make those designs with mulEd Henninger offers design evaluations — at no charge tiple mug shots effortless. and with no obligation — to readers of this column. For Document-installed fonts: Just package a document more information, check the FREEBIE page on Ed’s webwith its fonts and — joy, joy joy! — InDesign will install site: henningerconsulting.com. those fonts when you open the document ... and uninstall

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Summer 2010 California Publisher 

No resolution yet on court coverage defend California’s same-sex ban Summer offers time to reflect when state officials wouldn’t) who on things, so I offer my reflecwent to the Supreme Court because tions on two Internet-related they were terrified with the proslegal developments that have pect that their witnesses’ public unfolded, somewhat, so far this trial testimony against same-sex year. marriage would be immediately This year began with a fas(and permanently) accessible cinating federal court access online. battle in San Francisco. A large Whether trial witnesses like it or media coalition asked permisnot, it seems only a matter of time sion to televise the landmark ONLINE before court proceedings find a federal trial in which the plainLEGALITIES regular home on the Internet. tiffs are challenging, on due In the category of events that process grounds, the constituTom Burke haven’t happened, consider the tionality of Prop. 8, California’s collective silence that has folban on same sex marriage. lowed the Federal Trade Commission’s The media had hoped that the Perry/ widely criticized guidelines to bloggers. Last Prop. 8 case (in which the plaintiffs were December, the FTC issued guidelines for represented by the odd pairing of Bush v. advertisers who have turned to bloggers to Gore attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies) write positive things about their products. would be the first federal trial to be teleThe FTC guidelines encourage bloggers vised under the Ninth Circuit’s pilot proto disclose their “material connections” (if gram for recording certain civil proceedings any) with advertisers, including payments in federal courts within the Ninth Circuit. for an endorsement or the receipt of free While the media was focused on camera access, Chief Judge Vaughan Walker had an products. Bloggers receiving “swag” from an advertiser must disclose this to their even more audacious plan in mind. He proposed that the entire Perry trial be recorded readership if the blogger reasonably expects to continue to receive free products. by the court itself and then made available (For a detailed advisory on these issues, to the public on the Internet. search for my DWT colleagues’ summary at Technical problems quickly nixed Judge http://www.broadcastlawblog.com.) Walker’s Internet plan and, in less than a Since the guidelines came out, the FTC week, the United States Supreme Court, on has launched only one investigation, a 5 to 4 vote, shut down even the court’s perhaps only to remind people that the scaled-back plan to “broadcast” the trial government is watching. In April, the FTC proceedings to five overflow courtrooms announced that it was looking into women’s throughout the nation. retailer Ann Taylor’s invitation to bloggers The Supreme Court’s swift and unprecto preview its Summer 2010 collection. edented decision in Perry marked a temAnn Taylor offered a special gift and porary setback for the Ninth Circuit’s pilot promised bloggers who posted coverage of camera program. Yet, despite the camera the event that they would be entered into ban, bloggers and reporters used new techa “mystery gift-card drawing” where they nology to cover the trial like never before. could win between $50 and $500. The FTC And, partially in response to Perry, the Senate Judiciary Committee recently passed later closed its investigation, taking no action against the retailer or any bloggers. legislation that would require United States The federal government’s blogger guideSupreme Court arguments to be televised lines raise a host of issues meeting at the and give lower federal courts the discretion intersection of commercial speech and the to televise certain trials. First Amendment. I had fully expected that But does Walker’s original thought to by now, some blogger group would have bypass the traditional media and make challenged the forced speech aspect of these court proceedings available to the world guidelines. on the Internet have legs? The traditional The guidelines were principally aimed media have forever played the role of the at advertisers who rarely seek out disputes middleman by reporting on, photographing with regulators, so this likely explains the and occasionally televising court proceedsilence. There is no dispute that the FTC ings for the public. can regulate advertising, but the FTC’s Few people have the time (or the desire) guidelines impose on bloggers a speech to watch entire trials. They count on the requirement that touches on constitutionmedia to give them the highlights and to ally protected editorial speech. explain what is happening. The Internet On both the long-term effect of Perry and will not diminish the value of this invaluthe FTC’s blogger guidelines, we’ll all just able public service. But wouldn’t making have to stay tuned. court proceedings available online be the Thomas R. Burke is a partner with Davis ultimate form of public access for those Wright Tremaine LLP in San Francisco interested in watching them? and was lead counsel for the Perry Media The biggest obstacle is not likely to be Coalition. He may be reached at (415) technology. After all, it was the defendants 276-6552 or thomasburke@dwt.com. in Perry (who voluntarily intervened to

Allied Members of CNPA: Your Allied membership entitles you to a business card-size ad in the next four issues of California Publisher, CNPA’s official newspaper. Specifications for business card-size ad: Up to 4.75” wide x 3.5” deep; black and white only Email PDF to joe@cnpa.com Copy deadlines: Fall 2010: Aug. 20 Winter 2010: Nov. 18 Spring 2011: Feb. 20 Summer 2011: May 21

For display advertising details, please contact: Diane Donohue, (916) 288-6017; diane@cnpa.com

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National honors for California Sen. Yee State Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) stands with Orange County journalism adviser Konnie Krislock at the Journalism Education Association convention April 17 in Portland, Ore., where Yee received the Friend of Scholastic Journalism Award from JEA. Yee’s SB 438, which stems from a press-rights issue at Krislock’s charter school, would clarify that California charter schools are required to obey existing

law that protects student speech and press activities on public and private high school campuses. SB 438 is awaiting Assembly hearing after clearing the Senate unanimously. Elsewhere, the California College Media Association also honored Yee for his support of the student press. Yee staffer Adam Keigwin accepted the award on the senator’s behalf at the CCMA awards banquet April 17 at San Simeon.

Nominees sought for Cal Press awards The California Press Association is seeking nominations for the Philip N. McCombs Achievement Award. The award, presented at the association’s annual winter meeting in San Francisco, honors distinguished newspaper executives who are no longer fully active in the industry. Qualifications include: a living person who has been an exemplar of ethical conduct, leadership and service to the newspaper industry and their community; one who has been a newspaper leader on the local, state or national level; and one who has been a community leader and has contributed, through the newspaper, to the enhancement of community life. Last year’s honoree was William A. Niese, retired Times Mirror vice president and general counsel. Nominations may be submitted to Jim

Brock, 49590 Marne Ct., La Quinta CA 92253. Questions? Contact Jim Brock at (760) 391-2582 or jbrock@tarbell.com. Cal Press also seeks nominees for the Justus F. Craemer Newspaper Executive of the Year Award. The award recognizes the achievement of colleagues who have had influence and impact on our industry, on their community and how they have represented our profession. The 2009 recipient was Tim Crews, editor and publisher of the Sacramento Valley Mirror. To nominate, send Mort Levine a brief email with a suggested name, a sentence or two about the person you’re recommending, and a suggestion of someone to contact who knows the nominee and would be able to provide a more detailed nomination letter. Please send your recommendations to mortlevine123@gmail.com.

HELPLINE From page 2 with the access rights of the general public, i.e., obtaining an interview with an inmate randomly while on a public tour of the prison or after being placed on the inmate’s list of visitors. Many of California’s counties have created policies on access to jails modeled after the Department of Corrections’ regulation. You should check with your county to see if it has a jail access policy. If so, determine whether the policy provides for the public to visit an inmate or schedule a random tour of the county’s jail facilities and try to either schedule a tour or visit an inmate pursuant to the policy. If no jail access policy exists, more likely than not you will be unable to tour the facility. It may also be worth exploring whether the county or the sheriff has allowed others into the jail and, if so, the circumstances in which the individuals were able to gain access. If others, such as a local Boy Scout

CNPA produces a weekly electronic bulletin that is emailed to members every Tuesday afternoon. To submit your news piece or subscribe to the newsletter, contact Joe Wirt at joe@cnpa.com

troop or participants in a D.A.R.E. or atrisk-youth program were provided access it would be easier for you to argue the county has a practice of allowing access and may be unlawfully discriminating against you because you are a member of the media. If you are unable to physically access the jail, you may be able to access the supporting documents or evidence that the grand jury relied upon to reach its conclusion about the jail’s conditions pursuant to California Penal Code Section 929. Section 929 provides that, with the approval of the presiding or supervising judge, “a grand jury may make available to the public part or all of the evidentiary material, findings, and other information relied upon by or presented to a grand jury for its final report in any civil grand jury investigation.” The statute prohibits the release of information that would identify any person who provided information to the grand jury and allows a judge to require the redaction or masking of any part of the released information, including but not limited to the identity of witnesses or defamatory material. Call the HelpLine: (916) 288-6013


 California Publisher Summer 2010

Time management from the pros Worried about managing time? Here are some “timeless” timemanagement tips that still work! Tip No. 1 came from Jack Nicklaus, the dominant golfer on the PGA Tour when I started out in sales. He ended his career with 18 wins and 19 second-places in major championships – that’s 37 times being either First or Second James in majors – and he did it all playing a limited schedule while building a successful design firm and his own brand in golf club manufacturing! Even today, at 70, he has more than 50 golf courses under construction around the globe with over 80 percent of his business overseas! I read a Jack Nicklaus interview on time management back in 1979. He said that in his early career, he was always working and the results weren’t that great because he was always “burned out.” He decided to change his approach by blocking recreation and family into his calendar first, then golf, then business, making sure that nothing was neglected and everything was in bal-

ance. That way, he said, he was never burned out and he could approach every segment of his life “recharged” with enthusiasm! When he was with family, he wasn’t thinking about work or golf. When he was on the course, he could concentrate on that. Lorenzen Tip No. 2 came from another interview I read, this one with Roger Staubach, who had been a star quarterback for Navy, served his country, became a Hall of Fame NFL quarterback and, five years before retiring, began a career in commercial real estate development. By the time he retired from the Dallas Cowboys, his company had become one of the most successful real estate developers in Texas. In his interview, he said he liked to “block” his time. All activity was assigned a letter code: “A” – activities that produced income. “B” – activities that contributed to “A.” “C” – activities that he called “white collar main-

tenance” – stuff you have to do that doesn’t contribute to revenue. “D” was driving, and “X” was everything else. Staubach said the first thing he’d do is get his calendar out – no CRMs in those days – and use a marker to draw boxes around each hour of the day, every day of the week, for the entire month. Then, he’d put codes in the boxes. Certain hours would always be A, B, C, etc. Then activities within each code would be prioritized and inserted. I’ve been using a combination of those two approaches as my system ever since. Try it! It will work for you, too. James Lorenzen was a record-setting ad salesman and founded, built, and sold five successful papers of his own. Jim has been the headline speaker at more than 500 conventions throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. He’s also been heard on American Airlines’ “Sky Radio” and on Nightingale-Conant’s “Sound Selling” audio series. See gardnerhathaway.com or call (805) 265-5418.

Sales webinars set for summer Coming up July 9 at Online Media Campus is “Advertising 301,” the third in a series of webinars on sales basics. The first and second parts are archived (onlinemediacampus.com), in case you or your staff missed them. Online Media Campus offers more than 20 programs annually on writing and editorial topics, print and online advertising sales, technology, social networking, management issues and more. Webinars are interactive. Each program runs approximately 60 minutes and includes post-webinar follow-up by presenters to ensure that all questions are answered. The fee is $35 per webinar. Group discounts are available. The webinars are presented by the Southern Newspaper Publishers Association and the Iowa Newspaper Foundation.

Equipment grants go to 15 campus newspapers The CNPA Foundation in May distributed equipment grants to 15 CNPA-member newspapers for a total of $13,000. Funds were raised through donations from newspaper publishers throughout California. Winners were determined by a panel of Foundation directors, who selected them from a pool of 29 applicants. The 2010 recipients are: l Dragon’s Tale, Sonoma Valley Highl l The San Matean, College of San Mateo l The Current, Bear River High, Grass Valley l The Guardsman, City College of San Francisco l The Telescope, Palomar College, San

Marcos l The Lumberjack, Humboldt State University, Arcata l The Skyline Oracle, Skyline High, Oakland l Coast Report, Orange Coast College, Costa Mesa l The Spectator, Chabot College, Hayward l Colonial Gazette, Fairfax High, Los Angeles l Los Angeles Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles l The Gazette, Granite Bay High l Bulldog Times, Jordan High, Los Angeles l Daily Forty-Niner, CSU Long Beach l The Bluffer, Red Bluff High

ADS From page 1

Here’s the ad before the make-over (above). Pretty bad, huh? The headline needs to stop hungry readers and make them salivate ... and that’s why ... The headline needs taste! My first job was to list the words people associate with the taste of steak. The words on my list were: l Juicy l Tender l Fat l Thick l Sizzling l Mouth watering Can’t you just taste those words? Good, we’re on track. Besides promoting steak, the restaurant’s owner wanted customers today, promising low price. I needed words that caused readers to “pre-taste” steak, visit today, feel this is a

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bargain. I wrote 15 headlines until I got one that conveyed the right emotion ... one that reeled in 78 couples the first day ... and continues to bring people each time the ad runs (above right). To have David Fowler train your staff and run advertiser workshops that generate instant revenues, call (760) 822-2133 or email gofinddavid@gmail. Buy his new book, “Ultimate Moneymaking Newspaper Ads,” at davidfowlerads.com.

Make sure your email server is allowing the CNPA Bulletin to reach you. Questions? Contact Bryan Clark at bryan@cnpa.com.

The CNPA Foundation, charitable arm of the California Newspaper Publishers Association, has provided equipment grants to campus newspapers since 2000. These grant awards are intended specifically for the purchase of equipment to improve the production process at campus newspapers. Examples include computer hardware and software, peripherals such as scanners and printers, and tools such as digital cameras, audio and video recorders, and related software. Applications for 2011 grants will be accepted in Spring 2011, with distributions that May.

Dicounts also available at Inland CNPA members also receive member rates for webinars offered by the Inland Press Association (inlandpress.org). Coming up: l June 9: Three Steps to Effective Sales Interviewing l June 22: The Positive Story About Newspapers: Actionable Ideas to Strengthen Your Competitive Position l June 24: Developing and Selling a Multimedia Advertising Program: Packaging, Commission and Training The Inland webinars are $75. For even more webinar opportunities, see NewspaperWebinars.com.


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I remember hearing a radio interview with a teacher who had a unique approach to teaching high school students about communication. In her classroom, she paid special attention to what she called “glittering generalities,” those phrases that look and sound impressive – but have no meaning. Her students have fun finding glittering generalities so they can tear them apart. If her classes ever examine ad copy, they will have no problems locating glitter. In a matter of minutes, I ran across the following colorful phrases. Can you guess the products and services AD-LIBS being advertised? 1. Cloud nine never John Foust looked better than this. 2. Inspired by genius. Crafted with care. 3. Relaxation is calling. Are you ready? 4. Get the right perspective. 5. Nobody does it more. Nobody does it better. 6. Treat yourself. 7. Unparalleled amenities to enhance your lifestyle of luxury. 8. Comfort deluxe. 9. Now you can have your dreams and wake up, too. 10. From urban elegance to casual design, we can take you wherever your dreams and budget can reach. Answers: (1) Condo development, (2) Furniture, (3) Vacation resort, (4) Solar heating, (5) Health club, (6) Windows, (7) Real estate, (8) Athletic shoes, (9) Auto, (10) Outdoor furniture. What these phrases need – what advertising needs – is specificity. Claude C. Hopkins, one of the early gurus of advertising, wrote, “Platitudes and generalities roll off the human understanding like water from a duck. They leave no impression whatever.” Let’s take a closer look at the “comfort deluxe” description of athletic shoes. Right off the bat, the word “deluxe” can be tossed. Like its cousins, “fantastic” and “excellent,” it is too vague to mean anything. On the other hand, the word “comfort” has potential, because it suggests a specific benefit to the wearer. What is it about these shoes that makes them comfortable? Special cushioning? Extra ankle support? Larger toe box? Focus on the specifics of comfort, and you’ll have a winning idea. Glittering generalities can also appear in conversations. If you’re on the receiving end, it is a frustrating experience. For example: Friend: You’ve gotta see the new movie that just opened. You: How did you like it? Friend: It’s fantastic. You: What is it about? Friend: You won’t believe the plot. It’s one of the best ever. You: So, what happens in the movie? Friend: All kinds of incredible things. Unbelievable special effects. It kept me on the edge of my seat for two hours. You: Is it an action movie? A mystery? A comedy? Friend: I can’t say enough good things about it. You’ll be impressed. You: I don’t know. Friend: Let me tell you about special ingredients in the popcorn. It was the best I’ve ever tasted. One of the keys to effective communication – and effective advertising – is to replace glitter with specifics. (c) Copyright 2010 by John Foust. All rights reserved.

E-mail John Foust for information about his training videos for ad departments: jfoust@mindspring.com


10 California Publisher Summer 2010

We’re neighbors: Paul Hutcheson, left, Mainscope Newspapers, and John Burns, Petaluma Argus-Courier.

Paid or Free?: Presenters David Bessen, left, MediaNews Group; Walter Hussman, Arkansas Democrat Gazette; and host Ralph Alldredge, Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas.

CNPA is all in the family: Joining new CNPA President Ron Redfern at the Press Summit were Redfern’s daughter Heather and son-in-law John Kerr, with their son Gavin.

Thank you, sponsors! Host

PHOTOS BY SHARON BARKER / SPECIAL TO CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Resource roundtables: Joyce Terhaar, left, The Sacramento Bee; and Karl Olson, attorney, Ram & Olson.

Premiere

Platinum

Gold

Bids, please: Craig Harrington, The Intermountain News, Burney, emcees CNPA Foundation Auction.

Bill Campbell, The Intermountain News, Burney, works the CNPA Foundation Auction crowd.

Silver

We’ve all been publishers: Wolf Rosenberg, left, CNPA; Jack Findley, Parade Magazine; and Scott Little, Media Recruiters.

Court Coverage: Dan Day, left, The Modesto Bee; Cheryl Brown, Black Voice News, Riverside; Linda Deutsch, Associated Press; and Judge William Murray, San Joaquin County Superior Court.


Summer 2010 California Publisher 11

Networking: Eric Johnston, The Modesto Bee, chair of the CNPA Banner Ad Network Committee, explains the program.

PHOTOS BY SHARON BARKER / SPECIAL TO CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Supplier support: Summit sponsors Linda Rowlee, left, TownNews.com; with Catalyst Paper’s John Ploufee and Bruce Savseth.

Resource Roundtables: Gary Omernick, right, The Monterey County Herald, chats with Robert Bouchard-Hall, Publishers Circulation Fulfillment.

Paid or Free?: Steve Yelvington, Morris Communications, part of the final Press Summit panel.

REDFERN From page 1 it’s really hard to beat. What do you hope to accomplish during your term as president? RR: What I hope to do is rely on the folks that are on that Executive Committee. We have some good continuity and we have a past president who really got some things going. It’s a challenging year for newspapers, which means it’s a challenging year for CNPA. And so, there’s a number of things that we are going to look at. We just did a survey and had some interesting findings. We’re going to fine-tune that survey to try to get some more feedback. There’s a big initiative that we have in place which is the online banner network for the state to access California. It’s critically important we get it up and running this year. We’ve formed a relationship with

want to try and do some valiITZBelden, and they have had dation from the findings of the some great results in getting survey. this activity from the marThere were some great preketplace. There’s an opporsenters who delivered some tunity to get this off really great feedback to the memgood, because the elected and bers. In looking at 2011, how candidates are going to want do you improve on this? to reach out to the state on the RR: You just have to really web. think and find out who the So the timing is critical for folks are that are going to that; it’s got to be the No. 1 be current and topical with priority. And we think we can the needs of the organizawrap that up. And it will fund General Excellence: John Diaz collects CNPA Freedom of tion; where the trends of the some additional resources for San Francisco Chronicle award from Information Award: business are going; and what CNPA in the process. And also Tony Allegretti. It was the first General Recipient Harold W. people in our organization are drive revenue for the memberExcellence on record for The Chronicle. Fuson Jr. interested in learning about. ship. It’s a challenging process, as I One of the things that I’m and start making some phone calls between found out. going to do, and my president-elect behind now and the end of the year. You have a lot of the larger papers that me, Ralph Alldredge, and I have agreed that We want to find what resonates with have a lot of resources, and their needs are we’re going to cut up our list of members them. What the organization can do. We very different from the smaller papers. So what we tried to do with this event was give people information that they could use and take back. The sessions were designed with takeaways they could understand and inform, like Dawn Paduganan, for example. That informed a lot of folks about new competitors and how to combat those competitors with the resources that could help you combat those competitors. That’s the kind of thing, I think, that helps the smaller papers. On the industry side, I think everybody was really interested about this paid-andfree debate. We got some really high-caliber people who were willing to come in and share their insights and observations. We had some people who were actually in the process of doing it. I think some of the information some of the members got from it was really, really helpful because each of us is going to be making decisions on that in the next year or so.

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How will your role in CNPA assist you at The Press-Enterprise? RR: I think it helps our newspaper get some visibility in the organization. It will also help my staff have a little bit higherlevel view of the importance of what newspapers do, and the importance of keeping our industry on a positive course attitudinally and operationally. I think it will broaden the perspective of the management team and maybe give them a sense that the work they do goes beyond just our market. It really is on behalf of what newspapers are and what newspapers stand for. So I’m hopeful that it will engage my staff and more of the greater good work that we want to do. I think I’m very fortunate and privileged to be in the position. – Daniel Cásarez is a reporter for Vida en el Valle in Fresno.


12 California Publisher Summer 2010

2009 CNPA Better Newspapers Contest Winners: Dailies 1. Public Service Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The Orange County Register, Santa Ana Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Sun, San Bernardino Second – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs Daily (D & E) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Visalia Times-Delta Second – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2. Editorial Pages Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Daily News-LA, Woodland Hills Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Second – The Modesto Bee Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Glendale News-Press Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – Auburn Journal 3. Editorial Comment Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Monterey County Herald Second – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Second – Lodi News-Sentinel Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Lake County Record-Bee, Lakeport Second – Auburn Journal 4. Writing Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – Los Angeles Times Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Ventura County Star Second – Press-Telegram, Long Beach Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Lodi News-Sentinel Second – Times-Standard, Eureka Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – Santa Barbara Daily Sound 5. Local Breaking News Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The Sacramento Bee Second – Los Angeles Times Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Daily News-LA, Woodland Hills Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs Second – The Record, Stockton Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Santa Cruz Sentinel Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Auburn Journal Second – The Daily Triplicate, Crescent City 6. Local News Coverage Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Jose Mercury News Second – San Francisco Chronicle Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Second – Oakland Tribune Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Napa Valley Register Second – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Lompoc Record Second – The Davis Enterprise 7. Feature Story Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – Los Angeles Times Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Ventura County Star Second – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Merced Sun-Star Second – Visalia Times-Delta Daily (E) 10,000 & under

First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Signal, Santa Clarita 8. Columns Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Francisco Chronicle Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Bakersfield Californian Second – The Record, Stockton Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Times-Standard, Eureka Second – Santa Cruz Sentinel Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Santa Barbara Daily Sound Second – The Davis Enterprise 9. Arts & Entertainment Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Second – Monterey County Herald Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Visalia Times-Delta Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Signal, Santa Clarita 10. Sports Coverage Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs Second – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale Second – Santa Maria Times Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – Auburn Journal 11. Sports Story Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Jose Mercury News Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Monterey County Herald Second – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Signal, Santa Clarita Second – The Signal, Santa Clarita 12. Lifestyle Coverage Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Second – Monterey County Herald Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Daily Republic, Fairfield Second – Sierra Sun, Truckee Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Auburn Journal Second – The Davis Enterprise 13. Business/Financial Story Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Jose Mercury News Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo Second – The Modesto Bee Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Napa Valley Register Second – Visalia Times-Delta Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Davis Enterprise 14. Investigative/Enterprise Reporting Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Oakland Tribune

Second – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Merced Sun-Star Second – The Sentinel, Hanford Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Daily Triplicate, Crescent City Second – The Recorder, San Francisco 15. Environmental/Ag Resource Reporting Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The San Diego Union-Tribune Second – The Sacramento Bee Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo Second – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale Second – Napa Valley Register Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Davis Enterprise 16. Front Page Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Daily Breeze, Torrance Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Modesto Bee Second – Ventura County Star Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Daily Republic, Fairfield Second – Merced Sun-Star Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – Lompoc Record 17. Page Layout & Design Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – Daily News-LA, Woodland Hills Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Oakland Tribune Second – The Record, Stockton Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Merced Sun-Star Second – Santa Cruz Sentinel Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Daily Triplicate, Crescent City Second – The Porterville Recorder 18. Breaking News Photo Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The San Diego Union-Tribune Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Record, Stockton Second – Ventura County Star Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Lodi News-Sentinel Second – Santa Cruz Sentinel Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Ukiah Daily Journal Second – Ukiah Daily Journal 19. General News Photo Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The San Diego Union-Tribune Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Daily News-LA, Woodland Hills Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Ventura County Star Second – Press-Telegram, Long Beach Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Second – Napa Valley Register Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Lompoc Record Second – The Recorder, San Francisco 20. Feature Photo Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The San Diego Union-Tribune Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – Daily News-LA, Woodland Hills Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Second – Ventura County Star Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Maria Times Second – Daily Republic, Fairfield Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Davis Enterprise 21. Sports Photo Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Jose Mercury News

Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Second – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Santa Maria Times Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Auburn Journal Second – The Davis Enterprise 22. Photo Essay Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Jose Mercury News Second – San Francisco Chronicle Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Second – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Record, Stockton Second – Record Searchlight, Redding Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Santa Cruz Sentinel Second – Daily Republic, Fairfield Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – The Davis Enterprise 23. Special Issue Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The Sacramento Bee Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – The Record, Stockton Second – The Modesto Bee Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Lodi News-Sentinel Second – Merced Sun-Star Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Signal, Santa Clarita Second – The Daily Triplicate, Crescent City 24. Illustration/Info Graphic Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – The Sacramento Bee Second – San Francisco Chronicle Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Second – The Fresno Bee Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Record Searchlight, Redding Second – The Record, Stockton Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Second – Napa Valley Register Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – Auburn Journal Second – Ukiah Daily Journal 25. Editorial Cartoon Daily A & B - Combined Circulation Divisions First – The San Diego Union-Tribune Second – The San Diego Union-Tribune Daily C, D & E - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Second – Auburn Journal 26. Best Website Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – The Sacramento Bee Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Fresno Bee Second – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Ventura County Star Second – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville Second – Napa Valley Register Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Signal, Santa Clarita Second – The Daily Transcript, San Diego 27. Freedom of Information Daily A & B - Combined Circulation Divisions First – San Jose Mercury News Second – San Francisco Chronicle Daily C, D & E - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Second – Merced Sun-Star 28. General Excellence Daily (A) 200,001 & above First – San Francisco Chronicle Second – San Jose Mercury News Daily (B) 75,001 - 200,000 First – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside Second – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek Daily (C) 25,001 - 75,000 First – Marin Independent Journal, Novato Second – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa Daily (D) 10,001 - 25,000 First – Daily Republic, Fairfield Second – Merced Sun-Star Daily (E) 10,000 & under First – The Davis Enterprise Second – Auburn Journal


Summer 2010 California Publisher 13

2009 CNPA Better Newspapers Contest Winners: Weeklies 1. Public Service Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Sacramento News & Review Second – Los Angeles Downtown News Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Pleasanton Weekly Second – Mountain View Voice Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First– Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal Second – The Merced County Times Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park Second – St. Helena Star 2. Editorial Pages Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Chico News & Review Second – Grunion Gazette, Long Beach Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – San Francisco Business Times Second – Los Gatos Weekly-Times Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Petaluma Argus-Courier Second – The Gilroy Dispatch Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – St. Helena Star Second –Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande 3. Editorial Comment Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – Sacramento News & Review Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – San Francisco Business Times Second – Mountain Democrat, Placerville Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Morgan Hill Times Second – The Business Journal, Fresno Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Point Reyes Light, Point Reyes Station Second – The Weekly Calistogan, Calistoga 4. Writing Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – SF Weekly, San Francisco Second – Sacramento News & Review Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – North Coast Journal, Arcata Second – North Coast Journal, Arcata Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Sonoma Index-Tribune Second – The Gilroy Dispatch Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – St. Helena Star Second – Idyllwild Town Crier 5. Local Breaking News Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Pasadena Weekly Second – The Press Tribune, Roseville Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Tracy Press Second – Berkeley Daily Planet Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Turlock Journal Second – The Trinity Journal, Weaverville Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Intermountain News, Burney Second – The Ferndale Enterprise 6. Local News Coverage Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – Sacramento News & Review Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – North Coast Journal, Arcata Second – Brentwood News Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Petaluma Argus-Courier Second – Sonoma Index-Tribune 6. Local News Coverage Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Ferndale Enterprise Second – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang 7. Feature Story Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Los Angeles Downtown News Second – Sacramento News & Review Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Pacific Sun, San Rafael Second – Campbell Reporter Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Half Moon Bay Review Second – Claremont Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Calistoga Tribune Second – Point Reyes Light 8. Columns Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Sacramento News & Review Second – SF Weekly, San Francisco Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Mountain Democrat, Placerville Second – North Coast Journal, Arcata Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000

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More in the Winners Tab To see more on this year’s winners, download the 2009 BNC Winners Tab It’s free at cnpa.com.

First – Elk Grove Citizen Second – Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Winters Express Second – Sanger Herald 9. Arts & Entertainment First – Metro, San Jose Second – SF Weekly, San Francisco 10. Sports Coverage Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – The Star-News, Chula Vista Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Burbank Leader Second – Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Morgan Hill Times Second – Half Moon Bay Review Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Hollister Free Lance Second – St. Helena Star 11. Sports Story Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Sacramento News & Review Second – SF Weekly, San Francisco Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Los Gatos Weekly-Times Second – Huntington Beach Independent Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Grapevine Independent, Rancho Cordova Second – Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang Second – Hollister Free Lance 12. Lifestyle Coverage Weekly (A) & (B) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Pacific Sun, San Rafael Second – Burbank Leader Weekly (C) & (D) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Half Moon Bay Review Second – Petaluma Argus-Courier 13. Business/Financial Story Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Good Times, Santa Cruz Second – SF Weekly, San Francisco Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – North Coast Journal, Arcata Second – San Francisco Business Times Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Sonoma Index-Tribune Second – The Business Journal, Fresno Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Mendocino Beacon Second – Calistoga Tribune 14. Investigative/Enterprise Reporting Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – SF Weekly, San Francisco Second – Los Angeles Downtown News Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – San Francisco Business Times Second – Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – The Gilroy Dispatch Second – Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Point Reyes Light, Point Reyes Station Second – The Cambrian, Cambria 15. Environmental/Ag Resource Reporting Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – SF Weekly, San Francisco Second – Vida en el Valle, Fresno

Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – North Coast Journal, Arcata Second – Santa Maria Sun Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Morgan Hill Times Second – Half Moon Bay Review Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Mount Shasta Herald Second –Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande 16. Front Page - Broadsheet Weekly (A) & (B) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Burbank Leader Second – Vida en el Valle, Fresno 16. Front Page - Tab & Broadsheet Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Half Moon Bay Review Second – Petaluma Argus-Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande Second – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang 16. Front Page - Tabloid Weekly (A) & (B) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Sacramento News & Review Second – San Francisco Business Times 17. Page Layout & Design - Broadsheet Weekly (A) & (B) - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Vida en el Valle, Fresno Second – Burbank Leader Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Petaluma Argus-Courier Second – Half Moon Bay Review Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande Second – Los Banos Enterprise 17. Page Layout & Design - Tabloid Weekly A & B - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – San Francisco Business Times Weekly C & D - Combined Circulation Divisions First – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal Second – Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas 18. Breaking News Photo Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Camarillo Acorn Second – Chino Champion Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Mountain Democrat, Placerville Second – Moorpark Acorn Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Sonoma Index-Tribune Second – The Trinity Journal, Weaverville Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Town Crier, Idyllwild Second – Town Crier, Idyllwild 19. General News Photo Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Vida en el Valle, Fresno Second – Camarillo Acorn Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Tracy Press Second – Tracy Press Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Sonoma Index-Tribune Second – Sonoma Index-Tribune Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Hollister Free Lance Second – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang 20. Feature Photo Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – Los Angeles Downtown News

CNPA produces a weekly electronic bulletin that is emailed to members every Tuesday afternoon. To submit your news piece or subscribe to the newsletter, contact Joe Wirt at joe@cnpa.com

Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – The Almanac, Menlo Park Second – San Francisco Business Times Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Morgan Hill Times Second – Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Feather River Bulletin, Quincy Second–Sonoma West Times & News, Sebastopol 21. Sports Photo Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Camarillo Acorn Second – Vida en el Valle, Fresno Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Poway News Chieftain Second – Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – The Merced County Times Second – Claremont Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Mammoth Times, Mammoth Lakes Second – Hollister Free Lance 22. Photo Essay Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Good Times, Santa Cruz Second – Sacramento News & Review Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister Second – Cupertino Courier Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Claremont Courier Second – Claremont Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Calistoga Tribune Second – Calistoga Tribune 23. Special Issue Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Chico News & Review Second – San Francisco Bay Guardian Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Los Gatos Weekly-Times Second – The Signal Tribune, Signal Hill 23. Special Issue Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Sonoma Index-Tribune Second – Silicon Valley/San Jose Bus. Journal Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Healdsburg Tribune Second – The Healdsburg Tribune 24. Illustration/Info Graphic First – San Francisco Business Times Second – Half Moon Bay Review 25. Editorial Cartoon Weekly (A) & (B) –Combined Circulation Divisions First – Los Angeles Downtown News Second – Berkeley Daily Planet Weekly (C) & (D) –Combined Circulation Divisions First – The Weekly Calistogan, Calistoga Second – Petaluma Argus-Courier 26. Best Website Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – The Santa Barbara Independent Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – Pleasanton Weekly Second – Los Altos Town Crier Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – The Trinity Journal, Weaverville Second – Petaluma Argus-Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park Second – Town Crier, Idylwild 27 Freedom of Information Weekly (A) & (B) –Combined Circulation Divisions First – Sacramento News & Review Second c The Star-News, Chula Vista Weekly (C) & (D) –Combined Circulation Divisions First – Town Crier, Idyllwild Second – The Ferndale Enterprise 28. General Excellence Weekly (A) 25,001 & above First – Palo Alto Weekly Second – The Acorn, Agoura Hills Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000 First – San Francisco Business Times Second – The Almanac, Menlo Park Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000 First – Petaluma Argus-Courier Second – Half Moon Bay Review Weekly (D) 4,300 & under First – Los Banos Enterprise Second – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang Campus Winners University First: The Orion, CSU Chico Second: The Panther, Chapman Univ., Orange Community College First: Los Angeles Collegian, Los Angeles City College Second: The Guardsman, City College of San Francisco High School First: The Chronicle,Harvard-Westlake High School, North Hollywood Second: The Gazette, Granite Bay High School


14 California Publisher Summer 2010

CNPA 2010-2011 Board of Directors Officers:

Ron Redfern

Ralph Alldredge

President-elect President The Press-Enterprise Calaveras Enterprise San Andreas Riverside

Amy Pack

John Burns

Vice President Visalia Times-Delta

Secretary-Treasurer Petaluma Argus-Courier

Tony Allegretti Immediate Past President MainStreet Media Group, Gilroy

Directors: Jeff Ackerman The Union, Grass Valley Gerald A. “Jerry” Bean Yucaipa News Mirror Bill Brehm Jr. Brehm Communications Inc., San Diego Cheryl Brown The Black Voice News, Riverside Cherie Bryant Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale George Cogswell Ventura County Star Dean Eckenroth Coronado Eagle & Journal Debra Godshall Half Moon Bay Review Karlene Goller Los Angeles Times Fred Hamilton Los Angeles Newspaper Group David Herburger Galt Herald Terry Horne The Orange County Register, Santa Ana Bill Johnson Palo Alto Weekly Eric Johnston The Modesto Bee Gene Lieb Los Banos Enterprise Ed Moss The San Diego Union-Tribune Paul Nyberg Los Altos Town Crier Gary Omernick The Monterey County Herald Melanie Polk L.A. Watts Times Newspaper Scott Pompe Tribune Community Newspapers Cynthia Schur Santa Maria Times Brenda Speth The Napa Valley Register Mike Taborski Feather River Bulletin, Quincy Mac Tully Bay Area News Group Frank Vega San Francisco Chronicle Edward A. Verdugo The Event News-Press, Cypress Marty Weybret Lodi News-Sentinel John Wilcox The Examiner, San Francisco Arnold York The Malibu Times

Myth: Newspapers are washed up By Margaret Sullivan Special to California Publisher The death watch began in March 2009. That was when – in the midst of some extraordinarily difficult times for newspapers — Time Magazine published its scarysounding list: The 10 Most Endangered Newspapers in America. Of the top 50 papers in the United States, the magazine speculated, at least eight would go out of business in the next 18 months. Big names were on the list: The Boston Globe, the Minneapolis StarTribune, The Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Miami Herald and others. As the 18-month mark approaches, Time is not exactly batting 1.000. More like zero. The apparently well-accepted belief that newspapers are closing their doors en masse is simply not true. Of the roughly 1,400 American dailies, 11 have gone out of business in the past two years. That’s well under 1 percent. And among those that did fold, a number were in cities with more than one major paper. The Rocky Mountain News and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, for example, stopped print publication – but, significantly, both of them were in markets with daily newspaper competition. What’s more, newspaper profit margins, after falling for many years, may actually improve this year, according to a new J.P. Morgan analysis, as revenue declines moderate and newspaper companies reap the results of their cost-cutting. Perhaps the magazine had the timetable right – something would happen to newspapers in the next year or so – but the story

wrong: Rather than going out of business, many newspapers are beginning to right themselves. That’s not to say that all is rosy in newspaper land. Advertising revenue continues to be down. Print circulation is, too – with the problem especially acute among the young. In an email exchange last year, New Yorker magazine editor David Remnick offered me his take: “My sons, who are in their teens, look at the Sunday paper outside the door as if a mattress had inexplicably landed there from heaven. To them, it’s a strange and gigantic thing, but they also have a hunger for news online. In that hunger is the hope that we’re not in the midst of a death of newspapers so much as a transformation.” Meanwhile, though, that change in reading habits by young and old alike drives down circulation revenue. And newspapers remain expensive to operate. Newsprint is costly; printing presses require production crews; delivery trucks need drivers; news gathering requires professional reporters and editors. However — and this is a big “however” — newspapers still have a lot going for them. As sources of news and information, especially in the role of government watchdogs, they continue to outshine Web and broadcast outlets. They also still have considerable strengths as businesses. Newspapers remain a strong way to deliver an advertising message, especially now that they have an online presence to augment print. Last year alone, according to the Newspaper

Association of America, newspapers took in $27 billion in advertising revenue – down significantly, of course, from previous years but still enough to make most of them solidly profitable despite their high costs. In an age of media fragmentation, newspapers continue to reach a mass market, and a print ad can pack a powerful punch. In many regional markets, newspapers remain the go-to place for advertisers such as department stores, car dealerships and supermarkets. What does this all mean for the newspaper you are holding in your hands — or reading on a screen? No one is certain. What we are certain about is our mission, which must be defended at all costs. Newspapers continue to be the best source for news and enterprise journalism in our region. We remain committed to investigative journalism and rigorous reporting. To do so means staying viable as businesses. We’re doing that by continuing to reinvent ourselves as a broad-based media companies and Internet destinations. Despite the headwinds, we’ll get there. We simply must. For, in Remnick’s words, “the death of newspapers — especially the best of them, the most aggressive and ambitious — would diminish the republic beyond measure.” Margaret Sullivan is editor of The Buffalo (N.Y.) News. This is one of four columns produced through the American Society of News Editors to reinforce the vitally important role of newspapers and professional journalism in the digital age. More at asne.org.

Rosenberg joins CNPA ad staff Wolf Rosenberg, a veteran California newspaper executive and former member of the CNPA Board of Directors, joined the CNPA staff in March to assist with management functions relating to CNPA Ad Services. Rosenberg has worked in newspaper organizations for many years. Most recently he was publisher of the Chico EnterpriseRecord. “Wolf brings a wealth of newspaper experience to CNPA,” Wolf Rosenberg said Jack Bates, CNPA executive director. “He will be an important addition to the management team of Ad Services. His advertising knowledge will be invaluable as we grow the volume of ad placements through the Newspaper Preprint Network and the other advertising channels offered to newspapers in California and across the country.” Rosenberg can be reached at (916) 2886036 or wolf@cnpa.com.

Get your discount for interactive conference CNPA members receive a $100 registration discount to Editor & Publisher’s 21st Annual Interactive Media Conference coming up June 16-17 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. To obtain this discount, click the Registration button at interactivemediaconference.com and enter the promotion code CNPA on the bottom of the registration form. Your discount will be applied during the checkout process. CNPA is an Affiliated Association Partner of the event, which will cover how to capitalize on the continuing and emerging opportunities in the industry. Keynote speakers include Google News’ Josh Cohen and the Journal Register Co.’s John Paton. Also scheduled are the 15th Annual EPpy Awards and the pre-conference Blinder/SNA Revenue Boot Camp.

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Summer 2010 California Publisher 15

PUBLISHER’S BOOKSHELF

Guidebook’s experts cover all digital bases “JournalismNext: A Practical Guide to Digital Reporting and Publishing,” by Mark Briggs. (CQ Press, 2010; 360 pages.) Mark Briggs’ previous guidebook,

12

“Journalism 2.0,” explained the tools for veteran journalists to adapt to a new-media world. His new book, “JournalismNext: A Practical Guide to Digital Reporting and Publishing,” explains how to become a

times since 1997, the top names in design and technology training have gathered for an event unparalleled in the newspaper industry. On

October 7-9, 2010 these trainers will gather once again for the 13th session of the:

Institute of Newspaper Technology The Institute of Newspaper Technology offers the industry’s leading trainers, utilizing state-of-the-art lab facilities (both Mac and PC), to newspaper professionals throughout the United States and Canada. Join us for classes in:

Bridge • Dreamweaver • InDesign • Flash Photoshop • PDF Issues • Illustrator Photography • Audio Slideshows • OS X Issues

Lisa Griffin

Russell Viers

Karl Kuntz

Rob Heller

Kevin Slimp

Mary Zimnik

digital publisher from scratch. Definitions, tools and free software suggestions are all in here. Briggs does most of the talking, but he earns extra points by including plenty of first-person explainers from veterans of this newish craft. You might find Chapter 10, “Managing News As a Conversation,” the most informative, if also the most nerve-wracking. Also included are many of the skills and tools that college students are learning. In fact, some journalism teachers are using it as a textbook. Cover to cover or by tabbed chapter, “JournalismNext” is a quick way to get on top of publishing in the post-print era. “Changes, even good ones, often make people nervous,” Briggs writes. “Pulitzer’s Gold,” by Roy J. Harris Jr. (University of Missouri Press, 2007; 476 pages.) In a year that California was virtually blanked in the Pulitzer Prizes, here’s the paperback version of “Pulitzer’s Gold,” an update of Roy Harris’ 2007 journey through the diverse group of newspapers that have won the Gold Medal for Public Service. The back stories are all told: of major metros utilizing massive resources to produce monster enterprise packages, of no-name dailies later made known by a win, and tiny shops such as the Lufkin (Texas) News and California’s Point Reyes Light, which won for gumshoe diligence and out-and-out bravery. Harris details the beginnings and growing pains of the Pulitzer program by including insights from jury members and from editors with contenders in the race. The politics of selection and the plugging of finalist leaks are particularly enlightening. His recounting of the Public Service win-

ners’ stories also mentions the other medal finalists, adding welcome context. The paperback version includes the 2009 Public Service prize, which went to the Las Vegas Sun. Throughout the book is plenty of reminiscence and back-shop storytelling. And the appendix itself is worth a referenceshelf spot: It lists every Pulitzer winner in every category, and Harris includes details on many medal winners that were not covered in the main narrative. OK, you California big guns and mighty mites, this is your textbook: Go out and get us another win. “The Imperfectionists,” by Tom Rachman. (The Dial Press, 2010; 275 pages.) Glimpses of individuals who make up the small staff of an unnamed Englishlanguage newspaper published in Italy for a European audience could stand as short stories. Taken together in “The Imperfectionists,” they relate the life cycle of a mid-size daily, from founding to folding. The characters and situations constructed by first-time novelist Tom Rachman, who has worked for the Associated Press as a Rome-based foreign correspondent, will ring familiar to many: The hands-off owner. The ladder-climbing top editor and her onetime fellow intern – the latter still slogging away, big chip on shoulder, on the copy desk. The clueless wanna-be reporter and the fast-talking, opportunistic global correspondent. The technological changes and the busted personal connections. The empty cubicles and the old equipment – still there because no one knows who’s supposed to tidy up. The outsourced printing. Doing more with less, again. You’ve seen too much of it all. Truth is stranger than fiction at many newspapers, but “The Imperfectionists” is a fair snapshot of how it all went down at this one. –Joe Wirt

CS5 makes it easier and easier photographers can include this Now that the iPad hysteria has information in the photo so the settled down, it’s been replaced paginator can simply insert it into by a new onslaught of questions the appropriate text frame. concerning Adobe’s latest rendition of Creative Suite, CS5. l Creating Animated Flash “Should I upgrade?” has been Documents: Yes, you heard me the query of choice in my email right. You can design a file to over the past few weeks, and be exported in various Flash now we lay aside our anxiety formats. These files can include and take a look at the applicamovement, such as a car zoomtion of most interest to newspaNEWSPAPER ing across the screen, videos and pers, InDesign CS5. TECHNOLOGY more. In a word, make that three Let’s not waste time. For words, I love it. Creating animatKevin Slimp those of you in too much of a ed files just became much easier. hurry to finish this column, the And you don’t have to have Flash answer is a resounding, “Yes!” No hesitato make it happen. The work can be done tion. No second guessing. solely in InDesign or exported and opened Or maybe a little second guessing. A tad in Flash for further enhancements. bit of hesitation. But only because the comEnough already. If I haven’t convinced puters you’re now using might not support you to upgrade to InDesign CS5 by now, this powerful application. And though you it’s probably not possible. Heck, I don’t might have the latest Macs and PCs scatget a penny if you upgrade, so use any vertered around your newsroom, chances are sion you wish. However, for those of you you still have a few G5s and Pentium IIIs who want my humble opinion, this is the pounding out pages. most impressive upgrade I’ve seen in any However, if you have the computers to application in a long time. And it’s well support Creative Suite 5 -- or you’re willing worth the $199 upgrade, if you’ve got the to go out and replace your older workstacomputer to run it. It might even be worth tions -- run, don’t walk, to the nearest softconsidering new computer purchases. ware dealer and upgrade to In-Design CS5. Adobe InDesign CS5 can be purchased Here’s what you’ll get for your trouble: as part of the Design Standard or Design Premium versions of CS5. It can be purl Photo Captions from Metadata: Metadata chased separately for $699 or upgraded is that information built into photos that from a previous version for $199. details how a file is created. Metadata Kevin Slimp is a newspaper trainer and can also include text intended for cutindustry speaker. To reach him, visit kevlines. InDesign CS5 will automatically fill inslimp.com. There’s more CS5 guidance your cutline text frame with information in Ed Henninger’s column on Page 6. from this metadata, meaning editors and


16 California Publisher Summer 2010

Wanted: Next best thing to being there In the spring, I lucked into being part of a panel discussion at a training conference for state agency public-information officers. Our topic was using social media as a tool for informing consumers and citizens. To my left on the stage was an oldschool flack who advised the audience to leave that social-media business to the next generation. To my right was Jon Ortiz, Sacramento Bee reporter, seasoned beat-blogger and giver of much-needed advice to the group. Pitching a story idea to a reporter is a lot like writing it for a news reader, he advised. Get to the point quickly, cut out the bureaucratese, and make sure you and the reporter are acquainted first. Yup; it’s true: Face to face meeting is still very important, especially to a reporter, columnist CNPA and blogger who gets OUTREACH hundreds of pitches Joe Wirt a day. Otherwise, you’re just another spammer. So what did I tell the group? I told them that they’re each the individual experts in their field, despite the limitations on what they can say and to whom they can broadcast. And after politely acknowledging Mr. Luddite to my left, I encouraged the P.I.O.s in the room to soak up everything they can on social media. They’ll never know when the boss is going to want to dip a toe in the new social world order. I heard from a community college reporter who was doing a piece on a former staffer who’d started her own community biweekly. She asked for some insight on the viability of a one-person shop like that. The rambling quote from me that ran in the story: “If she can find someone to help her pay the bills, it’s very old school, but good for her. She’s probably exhausted but having a killer time doing it.” Startups happen all the time, I also said, more cogently. Viability and continuity take awhile. The adviser of a much-honored onlineonly high school newspaper contacted me, wondering how to get news of his students’ latest journalism honors noticed by the local paper. My suggestions: l Make sure to reach the reporter who covers education or student media. l Find the newspaper blog that might sooner run it than the print. Hit up that writer. And if that blog can link to the students’ own online coverage, it might make getting the word out easier for all. Highlighting campus newspaper achievement is vital these days. It can make all the difference when a school board is weighing curricular and humanresources distribution. We found a willing Twitter user to document a recent CNPA newsroom legal seminar hosted by The Tribune in San Luis Obispo. Our thanks to Anthony Prado for pushing out the tweets. It’s a big state. We’re always looking for new ways to get there from here efficiently. Editor Joe Wirt is also secretary-treasurer of the CNPA Foundation. Contact him at joe@cnpa.com or (916) 288-6021.

Plaques aplenty The California Journalism Education Coalition delivered plaques to eight educators and one editor during its spring awards ambush. Honorees are, (top row from left): Diane Honda, right, Lifetime Achievement, Bullard High, Fresno; Marcy Burstiner, Educator of the Year, Humboldt State; Michelle Balmeo, left, Educator of the Year, Monta Vista High, Cupertino. Middle row from left: Deric Rothe, center, Champion of Journalism Education, Gold Country Media, Auburn; Rhonda Guess, left, Los Angeles City College, and Max Branscomb, Southwestern College, Chula Vista, both Educators of the Year; and Debra Schaefer, Educator of the Year, El Toro High, Lake Forest. Bottom row, from left: Glen Bleske, left, Lifetime Achievement, Chico State; and Rob O’Neil, right, Lifetime Achievement, Pierce College, Woodland Hills.

PEOPLE Fred Board has been named publisher of The Valley Chronicle in Hemet/San Jacinto. Board formerly was publisher of the Redlands Daily Facts, the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin in Ontario and of Gazette Newspapers in Long Beach. Board’s appointment was part of Century Group moves that saw Valley Chronicle Publisher Jane Smith named publisher of the company’s Highland Community News and Community News Publisher David Berkowitz moving to publisher of The Record Gazette in Banning/Beaumont. Smith has been in advertising positions for The Press-Enterprise, Riverside, and the Redlands Daily Facts. Berkowitz has served as an advertising executive for The Sun, San Bernardino; The Press-Enterprise and the Redlands Daily Facts. Steve Bennett became advertising director at the Watsonville RegisterPajaronian. He previously had overseen classified and online advertising at The Monterey County Herald. Bennett also has worked for newspapers in Ashland, Ore.; Medford, Ore.; and Nampa, Idaho. With the formation of the Hearst Texas Media Group, Chris Blaser, San Francisco Chronicle vice president of circulation, was promoted to senior vice president and added oversight of consumer marketing for the Texas group. Mike Craft is now opinion editor at the Ventura County Star. He had been deputy opinion editor since 1991 and succeeds Marianne Ratcliff, who had held the post since 2001. Mike Comeaux became deputy opinion page editor. Peggy del Toro returned to the Redlands Daily Facts as general manager. She had been president and general manager of the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Also in Redlands, Chris Brock was named managing editor. Chris Doyle is now vice president of content for the newspaper division at Knoxville, Tenn.-based E.W. Scripps Co., which publishes the Ventura County Star

and the Record Searchlight in Redding. Doyle had been president and publisher of the Naples (Fla.) Daily News. He succeeds Rusty Coats, who resigned in March. Lauralyn Loynes is now associate publisher of Picket Fence Media, which includes the San Clemente Times, Dana Point Times and The Capistrano Dispatch. Loynes had been advertising sales representative. Jonathan Volzke became group editor. He had been senior editor since joining Picket Fence following its acquisition of The Capistrano Dispatch in 2007. Volzke started The Dispatch in 2002. Alyssa Garrett was promoted to business operations manager. She had been billing/ collections manager. Jean Lund was named publisher of the Lincoln News-Messenger in Placer County. She had been general manager. Lund also oversees the Loomis News and Placer Herald in Rocklin and has an advertisingmanagement role in parent company Gold Country Media. All are properties of San Diego-based Brehm Communications Inc. Phyllis Pfeiffer, publisher of the La Jolla Light, Del Mar Times and Solano Beach Sun, added the Rancho Santa Fe Review and Carmel Valley News to her oversight. Dex Allen, who had been publisher of the two titles since their 2009 inclusion into the MainStreet Communications company, retired in February. Frank Pine became general manager at the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Ontario; and The Sun, San Bernardino. He succeeded Peggy del Toro, who became general manager at the Redlands Daily Facts. Pine, who has been with the company since 1996, continues as editor of The Daily Bulletin and The Sun. Ownership has changed at the Sonoma Valley Sun. The owners are now Barney La Haye, Kelly Magner, Jody Purdom and Val Robichaud. They acquired the 5-year-old weekly from founder and former Publisher Bill Hammett.

CONTACT

US

Subscribe to California Publisher: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Submit a story idea, letter or comment to California Publisher: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021 joe@cnpa.com Advertise in California Publisher: Diane Donohue (916) 288-6017 diane@cnpa.com Order a CNPA book or directory: Debbie Gerber (916) 288-6012 dgerber@cnpa.com Get help with a legal issue: Jim Ewert (916) 288-6013 jim@cnpa.com Legislative issues: Tom Newton (916) 288-6015 tom@cnpa.com Place a recruitment ad in the Classified Job Bulletin: Debbie Foster (916) 288-6018 debbie@cnpa.com Better Newspapers Contest: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Membership Services: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Donations to the CNPA Foundation: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021


Summer 2010 California Publisher 17

Those future tools are here Do you have a mobile strategy? Few hands went up when I asked that at a recent press association meeting. Yet I’d bet almost everyone had a mobile phone, that many had “smartphones” and that they consider them nearly indispensable. It was the opening gambit to a discussion about the future, which I get paid to think about now that I teach and am executive editor of “The Convergence Newsletter.” Here are some things for which I think you should prepare.

to be thinking now how to build it, budget for it and monetize it. I still think press associations should form tech cooperatives to help their smaller members with this.

Geolocative and augmented reality With mobile comes the abilCOMMON ity to tell where you are, and SENSE that opens the door to ads and JOURNALISM services that take advantage of pinpointing you. Doug Fisher For instance, check out Layar. With the software, you can hold your phone’s camera up toward a store, and Mobile it will tell you if there are any sales. Point The Web hasn’t had the same disruptive toward a building and find out if aparteffect in smaller communities as in many ments are for rent, etc. The same can be cities, and while the recession has been felt, done with news, and Layar is looking for its impact often has not been as severe in partners. community journalism. Mobile applications like Foursquare But even in the smallest hamlet, if you and Gowalla let people show where they use a mobile phone regularly, chances are are and see if anyone they know is nearby. your readers and viewers do, too. Foursquare allows you to get points and One of the nation’s fastest growing “badges” based on where you’ve been. mobile companies offers a flat-rate, no With Wikitude, a reality-augmented contract plan being used by many people as browser, point the phone’s camera at a their way to get online. And mobile devices’ landmark and get information about it. It power is roughly following Moore’s law, also incorporates local news. doubling about every 18 months. The possibilities are wide; how much of it Mobile equals always on, which means will you try to be a part of? your customers are less likely to wait for your publishing cycle, and with smartLifestreaming phones they’re probably going to expect the Blogging is so 2005, but a newer version, same kind of quality experience they can “lifestreaming,” that is best illustrated by get from the bigger players. Posterous and Tumblr, is more mobile and But mobile can be expensive. You have to multimedia oriented. With Posterous, for design for multiple operating systems, for example, upload several photos from your instance, and you can find companies that mobile phone, and it will automatically crewill do it for you – for a six-figure price. ate a gallery. Perhaps we’ll see the development of Upload a video and it will be automatidrag-and-drop tools to make it easier to create such apps in the future. But you have cally formatted and embedded.

It looks like a better tool for reporters than a traditional blog. HTML5 This major change in the underlying Web display code will be fully functional in a few years. So far, most of the discussion has been in the arcane documents of the Web’s standards-setting organization, the W3C. But HTML5 is being engineered to be much more multimedia friendly. That means possibly suggesting which multimedia players browsers will use – and that means possibly dictating which technology you will have to use. So it is worth paying attention. There are several good explanations as close as putting “HTML5” into your search engine. A Web without websites? When someone uses that shiny mobile app, chances are they’re not really going to a traditional website. Twitter isn’t really a website either, nor is Facebook, if you think about it. As we create more information streams, people have less need to go to your fancy website. So how do you apportion your development efforts? How do you make money? A Web without (or with many fewer) websites is not reality, but some of the people who engineered the technological changes that have brought traditional media so much heartburn already are talking about it. It’s worth thinking about. Doug Fisher, a former AP news editor, teaches journalism at the University of South Carolina and can be reached at (803) 777-3315 or dfisher@sc.edu. Read past issues of Common Sense Journalism at www.jour.sc.edu/news/csj/ index.html.

Collaborative to help journalism at 10 high schools The Los Angeles Unified Journalism Collaborative, an effort by California scholastic, university and professional journalism organizations to revive and improve journalism and student publications in Los Angeles Unified School District high schools, launched its program at a reception May 13 at the Los Angeles Press Club. Invitees included LAUSD district personnel and principals and teacher-advisers from 10 selected high schools who will meet with members of the collaborative to inaugurate this effort, funded by a generous grant from the McCormick Foundation and administered by the CNPA Foundation. The collaborative will train teachers in a summer program, enroll them in a university-level course (for college credit), provide curriculum and instructional support, work with students in the schools and at monthly network meetings, bring in professional journalists as speakers and mentors, place students in internships with local newspapers and assist in producing on-campus student publications. The project will culminate with the participating teachers and students attending a national high school journalism convention in April 2011 in Anaheim. The 10 schools that will participate are Amino South Charter, Banning High School, Daniel Pearl Journalism & Mass Communications High School, Fairfax High School, Huntington Park High School, Northridge Academy, Reseda High School, Roosevelt High School, South East High School and South Gate High School. For more, contact Steve O’Donoghue, director of the California Scholastic Journalism Initiative, at (415) 509-1518 or steveod@caljournalism.net

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CELEBRATING

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18 California Publisher Summer 2010

OBITUARIES Malcolm Glover, San Francisco Malcolm “Scoop” Glover, who was a teenage gardener at William Randolph Hearst’s Wyntoon estate in McCloud before becoming a photographer at The Examiner in San Francisco, then pursued a lifelong career on the cops beat, died March 1, 2010, of congestive heart failure. He was 83. “Malcolm Glover was minted in the days when newsmen eagerly and ceaselessly hoofed the pavement for bloody scoops and loved the lore of all things newspaper,” began the San Francisco Chronicle’s tribute to Glover, who worked 56 years for The Examiner and The Chronicle Harry Green, Contra Costa Harry Green, a former publisher of Contra Costa County, died April 30, 2010. He was 52. Green at one time published the Clayton Pioneer, Brentwood Bee, Bethel Islander, Discovery Bay Breaker, Oakley Herald and Rio Vista Beacon.

Stan Hall, Carmel Stan Hall, who published the Carmel Sun from 1988 until closing it in 1994, died April 19, 2010, in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 75. Hall was a United Press International reporter and worked in public relations before he and his wife bought the newspaper in 1988. Adam Harju, Cambodia Services were held in May for Adam Harju, a former California editor who died April 26, 2010, from head trauma due to a fall in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. He was 40 and had most recently worked for The Cambodia Daily after serving as editor at The Garden Island newspaper in Hawaii. Harju, a San Diego State graduate, also had worked for community newspapers in San Diego County, Santa Cruz and in Placerville. Richard Kimball, San Bernardino Richard S. Kimball, a retired editorial-

Good advice more often

page editor at The Sun in San Bernardino, died March 24, 2010, at his home in Highland. He was 67. Kimball worked for 34 years at The Sun. Rosemarie Pryke, Hesperia Rosemarie Jane Pryke, co-owner of the Hesperia Resorter in San Bernardino County, died April 25, 2010. She was 92. She and husband Raymond owned Valleywide Newspapers Publishing, with additional properties in Victor Valley, Palmdale, Lancaster and Dana Point. Gordon Wilson, Riverside Gordon Wilson, a former managing editor at The Press-Enterprise, died April 10, 2010, in Riverside after a fall. He was 88. Wilson, a USC graduate, began his newspaper career at the Daily Press in Victorville and retired in 1985 after helping with the merger of the morning Enterprise and afternoon Press into The Press-Enterprise. Send notices to joe@cnpa.com.

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