Zero Waste Menswear

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A design-research project aiming to develop a zero-waste menswear product range, focusing strongly on usability, durability and lifestyle integration.

Durable construction, technical fabrics and innovative CAD pattern-design. Familiar, usable garments with a fresh, efficient approach.

Includes a modular outerwear system and a mix of traditional and modern weather-proof fabrics for optimal accessibility, durability and functionality.

A clean, technical take on zero-waste design, aiming to demonstrate a proof of concept for contemporary, ethical menswear design.

↓ Patterns for overcoat, suit jacket and suit trouser (left to right). → Lookbook outfit photo-shoot.



SU IT T RO U S ERS

↓ A brief explanation of the zero waste design process. ↘ Exploded diagram of the trouser, showing belt loops and fastenings → Trouser construction diagram.

FOR REFERENCE

1 On average, around 15% of the fabric used in a traditionally produced garment is wasted when the pattern is cut out.

2 The zero waste design process starts with reducing the garment to it’s core components, and carefully redesigning it.

FOR REPRODUCTION

DO NOT ALTER

MASTER

SCALE

3 The final garment retains all functionality of it’s traditional equivalent, without producing any of the fabric wastage.


TROUS ER CONSTRUCTION 1 3

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With a pattern as simple as the one shown above, many different styles can be produced simply by altering factors such as fabric, finishes, and trims.

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This sort of designing and styling is an important aspect of the brand's range development, as well as a complimentary ethical design skill.


S U IT JACK ET

↓ Rubberised front buttons. ↓ Centre back label with contrast stitching on satin bias binding. ← Internal pocket with double button and loop closures. ↙ Pocket, side-seam and facing binding junction. Contrast stitching on satin bias binding.


↓ 'Playing card' style tessellation ideas for a suit jacket. ↓ Exploded diagram of suit jacket construction. Highlighted parts in orange correspond to flat pattern.


BREATHABLE

SHELL LAYER WINDPROOF

WATERPROOF SHELLSEAMS LAYER SEALED

BREATHABLE WATERPROOF LINER COMPATIBLE

3-PLY LAMINATE FABRIC

SEAMS 3-PLYSEALED LAMINATE FABRIC

WATERPROOF

3-PLY LAMINATE FABRIC WINDPROOF BREATHABLE

SEALED SEAMS LINER COMPATIBLE

↑ Technical feature information logos. ↗ Triple-layer PTFE laminate fabric. Highly waterproof and breathable. Wired hood peak and waterproof zippers. Skeleton style cord locks and cuff adjusters. Compatible with optional, reversible liner. → Fully seam taped internals with adjustable waist, cuffs and hem.

BREATHABLE

WINDPROOF

SEALED SEAMS WINDPROOF

LINER COMPATIBLE

LINER COMPATIBLE


WATER P R O O F JAC K ET

↑ Initial developmental sketch. ↖Hood prototyping process. The aim was initially to develop a self contained zero waste hood design, for addition to other patterns. ← Final jacket pattern.


RE VE R S IB LE L INE R

↙ Technical feature information logos. ← Developmental CAD work exploring a perfectly repeating quilting pattern. ↓ Fully reversible jacket liner. Highly breathable quilted Nylon (grey) and weather proof Cotton Ventile (orange).

Scale 1:4 (cm) LINER-dev2

REVERSIBLE

REVERSIBLE

AUTUMN WEIGHT REVERSIBLE

AUTUMN WEIGHT REVERSIBLE

AUTUMN WEIGHT BREATHABLE

BREATHABLE

MULTI-PURPOSE AUTUMN WEIGHT BREATHABLE

STANDARDISED MULTI-PURPOSE FITTING SYSTEM BREATHABLE

STANDARDISED FITTING SYSTEM

AUTUMN WEIGHT

MULTI-PURPOSE AUTUMN WEIGHT BREATHABLE

MULTI-PURPOSE

WATERPROOF

WATERPROOF MULTI-PURPOSE STANDARDISED FITTING SYSTEM

WATERPROOF THERMAL QUILTING

WATERPROOF MULTI-PURPOSE STANDARDISED FITTING SYSTEM BREATHABLE

WATERPROOF THERMAL QUILTING STANDARDISED FITTING SYSTEM

THERMAL QUILTING

WATERPROOF THERMAL QUILTING STANDARDISED FITTING SYSTEM

THERMAL QUILTING

THERMAL QUILTING


→ Initial design ideas for a fully reversible jacket liner. ↓ Final liner pattern. The simplicity is mainly down to its reversible design ↘ Working pattern, demonstrating the identical patterns, but differing component uses of the two sides.

Scale 1:5 (cm) LINER-dev3

A: pocket bag B: popper reinforcement appliques C: Shoulder applique D:Jet/OTHER (RESOLVE) B FOLD

FOLD

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split one into two jets Leave other intact for cuff adj.

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EA RLY DEVELOPMENT

→ Sketches of initial ideas for the field jacket before the fully tessellated set in sleeve was resolved. ↓ Digitally coloured sketch of the initial plans for the field jacket as a cotton liner for the waterproof.


→ First attempt at exploded diagrams as specification drawings. ↓ Rejected shirt idea. Used a folded pattern with a 'grouped' back pleat and button stand. As with early field jacket designs, better sleeve head solutions meant this design was not pursued, similar.


FIE L D JACK ET

↙ Digitally coloured development sketch for a Ventile Cotton field jacket. ↓ Chest pocket with pleat and bellows allowing it to expand to almost double its initial capacity. ↓ Digital mock-ups of a field jacket prototype, exploring ergonomic and aesthetic benefits of an angled, expandable chest pocket.


↓ Center back popper re-enforcement flap with contrast stitching bound edge. The Cotton adhesive seam finishing tape is also visible. ↘ Finished field jacket. ↘ Internal drawstring with springloaded barrel style cord-lock. ↓ Matt finish, low-profile, front fastening buttons.


D IG ITAL DEVELOPMENT

A large portion of the research done during this project has involved computers at some stage. All the patterns have been created and developed digitally using Adobe Illustrator and the final patterns were printed off full scale using a large format printer. I have used blogs to research the work of other zero waste designers, had my work published digitally, and in print, by a creative social networking site, and my exhibition included an interactive system showing all the digital and digitised work from the project.

↓ Reference image and 3D modelling development. Modelling by Robin Smith.

I have also collaborated with a game art designer to create an interactive 3D model of my waterproof jacket, to demonstrate the possible crossover and role of digital art in garment design. In the future I would like to see this range become prototyped and drafted digitally in virtualisation software already available in industry. Essentially removing all prototyping waste and making the garment design process truly wasteless from start to end. I would also like to see garments interacted with digitally online as 3D models, or exploded and manipulated

interactively by customers via an online webstore or game-demo type store/ space or through further exhibition spaces.


↙ Drafting digital patterns to paper from a large scale monitor. Saves paper from printing every pattern development out in A0. Changes made during drafting can also be made directly to the digital file, to save drafting twice and wasting paper. ← Final overcoat drafting pattern in 1:4 on A4 ready for printing 1:1 at A0. The accuracy for the final patterns was brought down to around ± 0.4%. ↓ 3D modelling development screenshots and real garment comparisons.

correct pocket placements mark button holes

Title: OVERCOAT Date: 14/03/2012 Drawn by: Joe O'Neill Scale: 1:5

A: cuff facing B: front PB C: CB label D: hem facing E: back PB F: inside PB G: font to hem facing transition H: shoulder applique detail I: inside pen pocket J: top button-hole jetting

147.82 cm

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B 108.93 cm

Fold

Fold


RE CE N T P RE SS

An article about my work was published in the independent arts and culture magazine, FD2D. It was published in the Summer 2012 issue of both the Leicester and Derby versions of the magazine, as well as a digital, interactive magazine on the FD2D website. The layout, content and words are my own. The whole experience was a great excercise in graphic design and networking, and has led on to possible consultancy in creative networking and events management; assisting in FD2D's expansion to a regional publication.

↓ Interactive, online edition of the magazine. ↘ FD2D Summer 2012 Leicester edition front cover. → Two full spread layouts published in the Summer 2012 issue of FD2D.