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Joel Raymond Burke Selected Studio Work

The Ohio State University - Yale School of Architecture

Fall 2003 - Spring 2010


New Orleans Project Spring 2005 Andrew Kudless

New Orleans Housing looks to provide one solution for the displaced population in and around the coast of Louisiana. Locating a project within the area of New Orleans demands knowledge of local vernacular as well as a building technique that is both aordable and easily adopted within the area. The ideas of mass customization and variability allow this project to fit tightly within the context of an existing urban site. It provides a level of variation that allows the project to be implemented on a variety of sites. Our team designed a residential complex based on a structural system that allowed our individual projects to integrate into a larger whole. Adopting common vernacular systems such as louvering allows the two individual projects to be read as a coherent system. e design of the units relies on a secondary structural grid system that accepts a library of panels based on environmental, aesthetic, budgetary and achitectural limitations. ese superstructures could be quickly shipped to the site via trailer and the various panels quickly assembled.


Night View


Unit Constructuion


Interiors


High Density Urbanism Spring 2007 Gabriel Esquivel

A critique of the strong indexicality present into today’s urban context lead to the negotiation of these ideas into a physical structure. Reproducing the atmosphere of ice architecturally, suspended yet fluid space, necessitated the incorporation of color, density, transaparency and layering as techniques. The spaces within the building begin to allow new types of circulation and experience resembling those interpreted from early frozen analogue studies. Common spaces begin to loose definite boundaries and create hyper-densities within the building that begin to register their color on the exterior. e buildings structure is brought into questions and its apparent mass is manipulated with the design of the ground plane as well as the overall aesthetic layering of the façade. e project is tested against more literal building techniques and wall sections that begin to give ideas at how such spaces could eventually be realized. ese sections act as guides for a final iteration of the overall structure and architecture of the building.


Conceptual Affect/ Effect


Structural Section


Interior Experience


Plan Organization


Building Section


Studio Fall 2007

Sunil Bald

SmartCar Dealership Williamsburg Brooklyn New York The Distribution Center allows visitors to interact with the product of the SMART Car on varying degrees of adjacency while at the same time enticing them to further explore the products and information provided by the dealership. The project fronts on a large street facade that allows glimpses of the products behind and allows entry into the showroom. This large showroom-circulation wall negotiates circulation between the three levels of the project. The main entry level is a public gallery with open circulation and dealership offices. The central level functions as more privatized showrooms and houses specialized programs. The upper most level is outdoor storage that is visible from the rear of the site (the Williamsburg Bridge and off-ramp) The three levels are punctured by more individualized showrooms where visitors can learn about specific features of the SMART Car as well as interact more directly with the products. Since these showroom pods occupy all three levels, as well as penetrate the facade, the visitor is able to experience the product from a variety of orientations as they consider their purchase.


Occupiable Roof Plan

Second Floor Plan

Entry Level Plan


Product Display

Model Studies

Program Organization


Final Model Street Facade

Interior Views

Front Facade : Section


Final Model Rear Facade

Cross Section


Studio Spring 2008

Turner Brooks

Replication : Multi-Family Housing New Haven Connecticut This project attempts to heighten the duality inherent in a two family residence. The two units are constantly in teracting with one another though their materiality and spatial organizations. The horizontal striations allow for an interweaving of structure and a continuity of interior space. Each unit is reliant on the other for circulation and the creation of exterior public space. The multiplicity is easily experienced from the street and the massing of the buildings give an ambiguity to the actual limits of each unit.


Exterior Views

Exterior Views

Foor Plans

Massing Studies


Site Plan

Section Perspective


Building Project Studio Spring 2008

Alan Organschi Joel Burke, AnnMarie Armstrong, Andrew Ashey, Jason Bond, Cory Collman, Stephanie Carlisle, Elijah Porter

Two Family Residence New Haven Connecticut Our proposal is rooted in an exploration in the relationship between a building, its inhabitants, and time. Designed for change, one of the second floor bedrooms can be swapped from the owner’s unit to the tenant’s through the relocation of a door opening. This capacity for reconfiguration allows the house to function as a three bedroom and one bedroom, or as a pair of two bedroom units. Both units have important visual and programmatic links to the outside. The central common space of the owner’s unit is designed to expand. Both the semi-enclosed porch space and the rear patio behave as “outdoor rooms,” providing additional living and dining space in warmer months. The openings to these spaces encourage natural cross ventilation of the interior. During cooler months these connections still provide the interior with a feeling of spaciousness, and a variety of views to the yards and street. The owner’s unit is arranged around a central double-height space that allows for visual and auditory links between the second floor bedrooms and the ground floor.


Site Plan

Final Model


Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Front Elevation


Long Section

Rear Elevation

Model Elevations


Cross Sections

Side Elevation


Section Prespective : Owners Unit

Model Details


Tennant Entrance

Model Details


Studio Fall 2008

Mario Gooden

Yale Center for Computing and the Arts New Haven, CT The integration of the Computer Science Department and the Arts School inherently leads to a dissonance between the needs of each program. The project negotiates these by designating specific program areas to the more unique tasks while at the same time creating a coherent whole where the public, students and faculty can interact. The project allows access across the site (front to back) and operates primarily along two grains, that of the continuous circulation that weaves the longitudinal programs together along programmed ramps, as well as along the cross grain that cuts across separate programs giving then a more direct interaction with one another, either visually or physically. The separate programs transition into one another, at moments holding autonomy while at other times combining with adjacent programs to create larger social areas of varying programs. These often address the exterior of the building allowing the school to have a presence within the greater context of the University. The physical spaces within the Center respond directly to the various functions necessitated by the individual programs.


Continuity of Surface

Adaptability of Program Volumes

Massing Studies


SPECIALTY STUDIOS

COMPUTING

STUDIO

SPECIALTY STUDIOS STUDIO

COMPUTING

CLASSROOMS

MEDIA LABS ADMINISTRATION

LIBRARY

D

MEDIA LOUNGE

EXHIBIT

BLACK BOX

THEATER

Cross Sections

Dynamic Edge

Formal Screening


Daylighting Studies

Conceptual Site Approach


Scale Model

Programmatic Layering MEDIA LOUNGE

FACULTY

RESTROOMS LOCKERS

EXHIBITION AREA

DEDICATED RESEARCH LAB

TRASH LOADING

LIBRARY

GRAPHICS/VIDEO LAB

STORAGE

SOUND PERFORMANCE LAB

PROGRAM

CCOLD OLD SINK INNK NK

BLACK BOX

THERMAL MASS

THEATER

EXHIBITION HALL

CAFE

RESTROOMS

PROGRAM

COMMONS

EQUIPMENT WORKSHOP FABRICATION LAB

OPERATIONS VISITING FACULTY

VOLUME

FACULTY

CAFE

DEDICATED RESEARCH LAB

SSOLAR HEAT SO HEATT

GRAPHICS/VIDEO LAB SOUND PERFORMANCE LAB

MEDIA LOUNGE

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH LAB

EXHIBITION HALL

COMMONS

EQUIPMENT WORKSHOP FABRICATION LAB

SSOLAROLARGAI SOLARGAI O ARGARR GAIGA N

COMPUTING CLASSROOM

EXHIBITION ON O A AREA

HEAT PRODUCTION

DEDICATED RESEARCH LAB RESTROOMS

TRASH LOADING

LOCKERS BUSINESS OFFICE

GRAPHICS/VIDEO LAB SOUND PERFORMANCE LAB

LIBRARY

RESTROOMS

VISITING FACULTY

FACULTY

THEATER

MEDIA LOUNGE EQUIPMENT WORKSHOP FABRICATION LAB

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH LAB

REGISTRARS OFFICE

STORAGE

COMPUTING CLASSROOM

BLACK BOX

COMMONS

EXHIBITION AREA

CAFE EXHIBITION HALL

ACTIVITY LEVEL

Programmatic Organization

Scale Model

DEDICATED RESEARCH LAB

RESTROOMS

VISITING FACULTY

THEATER

BLACK BOX

THEATER TTER ERR

STORAGE

OPERATIONS

SOUND PERFORMANCE LAB

BUSINESS OFFICE REGISTRARS OFFICE

LOCKERS

GRAPHICS/VIDEO LAB

LIBRARY EXHIBITION AREA

TRASH LOADING RESTROOMS

HEAT DISSIPATION

HHEAT EAATT SOURC EAT EA SSOU OOUURRCE RC

CAFE C F

LIBRARY LIB

LIBRARY

MEDIA LOUNGE

SHADE

EXHIBITION HALL

BLACK BOX CCOLD CO OLD SINK SINK NK

EQUIPMENT WORKSHOP FABRICATION LAB

HHEAT A SOURCE AT SOOOUUR URC RCE VENTILATION NTILAT ON

EXHIBITION HAL HALL

CLIMATE EXCHANGE

COMMONS O S

CCOLD SINK

SHADE

SOLAR GAIN

COMPUTING CLASSROOM

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH LAB COMPUTING CLASSROOM

BUSINESS OFFICE REGISTRARS OFFICE

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH LAB

PROGRAM

DEDICATED RESEARCHLH LAB

GRAPHICS/VIDEO LAB SOUNDND PERFORMANCE LAB

THERMAL MASS

THTHEATER HHE R

MEDIA OUNG LOUNGE

HEAT DISSIPATION

BLACK LA BOBOX

SHADE

EQUIPMENT WORKSHOP FFABRI ABRICATIONNLALAB

COMMONS C OM COMPUTING UNDERGRAD NDEND CLASSROOM RRESEARCH ESEARCHLABLAB CLASSR

EXHIBITION AREA

CLCLIMATEEXCHANGE ATE EXCHANGE

SOLAR OLAR A GAIN

CAFE VENTILATION


MEDIA LOUNGE

BLACK BOX

BACK OF HUOSE

CAFE OPEN EXHIBIT

LOADING

THEATER

Selected Floor Plans

DEDICATED LABS / STUDIOS DISPLAYS SPECIALTY STUDIOS DEDICATED LABS / STUDIOS CLASSROOMS FACULTY OFFICES

ADMINISTRATION

ENTRANCE

MEDIA LOUNGE BLACK BOX

THEATER

Longitudinal Section


CONTROL ROOM REHEARSAL ROOM

ADMINISTRATION

EXHIBIT THEATER

FACULTY LIBRARY

LIBRARY EXHIBIT

PRIVATE OFFICES

MEDIA LABS

FACULTY OFFICES

PUBLIC GATHERING

Interior Renderings

DISPLAYS

FACULTY OFFICES

LIBRARY

ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE

Longitudinal Section


Systems Integration Spring 2009 Advisors : Sarrah Khan, Steven Baumgartner, and Anne Gilbert

YCCA Construction Documentation New Haven , CT Joel Burke , Kate Thatcher and Yu Wang In articulating a previous semester’s studio project with adequate structure, environmental and mechanical systems certain criteria had to be established. Although particular portions of the design had to be jettisoned, the overall design concept had to be somehow latent in each of the decisions made. The use of a scissoring truss structure gave the project the continuity of circulation, visual connectivity and formal articulation that were important in the original design. The project structured itself around this central atrium which was naturally ventilated and acted as occupiable vertical circulation through the building. The louvers echoed the formal maneuvers of the original project in a more environmentally sensitive way.


Facade Adaptation

Facade Articulation


Interior Adaptaion

Structural Truss Section

Conceptual Construction Sequence


Conceptual Structural Diagram


Selected Floor Plans : Structural/ Architectural

Wall Section


Urbanism Studio Spring 2009

Peggy Deamer Joel Burke and Kate Thatcher

Infrastructural Lamination: Multi-Use Edge Boston Massachusetts Responding to such strong formal and functional limitations as a highway interchange the project addresses the initial condition and creates an infrastructural lamination that organizes the various speeds of traffic on the site. Its organization facilitates vehicular, mass-transit and pedestrian circulations along a densified spine that allows safe interaction and unique experiences for each user. The two unique cites within the master plan are treated uniquely while simultaneously using the same architectural language to provide a cohesion within the scheme. A continuous elevated commercial plinth provides for pedestrian access to the architecture as well as addresses both the infrastructural lamination and the public open space which is maximized due to the dense organization and citing of the program. The architecture takes full advantage of the open space created by the lamination and begins to define more localized conditions within the open public park. The addition of a light rail system to and from Harvard and the design of a train station makes the site a new destination for commuters.


Program Massing Studies

Massing Studies

Roof Plan


Conceptual Lamination

Lower Level Plan


Section Infrastructure Organization

Model Studies


Section : Architectural Organization

Site Section : Infrastructural Layering


Section : Train Station

Final Model : Plinth


Section : Public Access

Final Model : Retail Layer


Final Model : Public Open Space

Site Section : River Plinth


Final Model : Site Plan


Advanced Studio Fall 2009

Greg Pasquerelli and Brian Price Joel Burke and Harvey Chung

Urban Periphery Stadium Complex Rio De Janiero Brasil This project challenges the consumptive nature of sports arenas, and hypothesizes a solution that could alleviate, or rather rethink, the waste produced in these venues. By utilizing technology of waste collection and reuse that facilitates the production of energy the Futbol Stadium could begin to generate power and become self sufficient in terms of its energy use. Remaining power could be utilized in the creation of public amenities, pools, beaches, etc that entices more sustained visitors that could further enhance the productive qualities of the complex. A secondary program, an Urban Wall, organizes a series of public and private programs that support the stadium complex as well as provide nautical access from a variety of shuttle services that alleviate traffic congestion with the city of RIo de Janeiro. The two constituent program elements create a 24 hour cycle of use that continuously generates energy from its occupants while simultaneously creating a new urban center on the highly utilized coastal region of the city.


Initial Site Organization

String Model : Connectivity


Collage : Staium/City/Coast


Longitudinal Section

Experiencial Sequence

Waste Reuse Concept


Experiencial Sequence

Conceptual Diagrams


Visitor Map

Waste Reuse


Advanced Studio Spring 2009

Patrick Bellew, Andy Bow and Timothy Newton

(Socially) Sustainable Eco-Resort Marrakech, Morocco Eco-tourism is the newest solution to the long acknowledged problems of consumptive tourism. It is not enough however to expect that newer more sustainable technologies can begin to offset tourisms grasp on developing countries like Morocco. Social sustainability is perhaps more important, citing that the effects of tourism do not simply deplete the environment but cultures and populations as well. This project takes on that debate as an architectural challenge. Tourism can bring vital resources to developing communities and this type of tourism can only be enhanced by a responsible architectural solution. Through local interaction with the community, careful phasing, and the creation of a financial alliance the project can act as a prototype to future developments of its kind. Architectural set pieces bring financial stability to the project while local technologies and typologies allow for an infill within the existing urban fabric. Finally unification is accomplished through sustainable technologies that enhance he lives of both the local community and the visitor.


Financial Development Diagram

Street Restoration Sequence

Intervention Diagram


Conceptual Approach

Site Phasing


Night Rendering

Water Infrastructure Street

Spa Section

S

N

S

N

S

N


Cultural Amenity Street

Craft Center Section

S

N

S

N


Community Center

Riad and Spa Plaza


Water Infrastructure Street


Villa Units Plan

Villa Interiors

Villa Cross Section


Villa Rendering

Villa Cross Section


Riad

Riad Cross Section

S

N

S

N N

S

N


Community Center

Community Center Cross Section


Joel Raymond Burke Drawings, Built Work, Fabrications

Fall 2003 - Spring 2010


Dimensional Variability: Casting Fall 2005 Beth Blostein

This fabrictrion began as an investigation of interstitial space, in this case between human figures, and began to develop techniques to model figural voids. A jig was created that allowed the manipulation of figural voids. Finally various materials were used to create physical artifacts of the interstitial space. A reinvestigation of the aggregated materials gave a better understanding of the connection of units within the framework of the jig.


Transparent Aggregation Fall 2005 Andrew Kudless

Preliminary investigations allowed for an understanding of a given material, in this case acrylic sheets, and its material limitations. The design of an accurate jig became a necessity for the later assembly of the independent elements. The transformed material was designed into a system, both for structural stability as well as aesthetic manipulaitons. Aggregation was used as a building technique in the creation of a screening device. A fixed dimension was set and a grid established to allow for changeability and variability. A library of three units was created and a jig designed that allowed for the creation of each piece individually. Once a complete series was fabricated a structure was built that began to challenge depth and transparency.


REVIT Rethought Spring 2007 Beth Blostein

This investigation began to use REVIT to investigate parametric design outside the boundaries of the given software. A preliminary study of the cameleon lizard gave parameters to explore the possibilites of scripting a manipulative surface that mimiced animalistic behavior. The program produced a mechanical surface that altered its thickness based its deviation from the normal. The challenge was to create an analogue model that represented the results of the program.


Geometry Drawing and Visual Inquiry Fall 2007

Kent Bloomer and John Blood

The class is an opportunity to push the limits of physical representation, hand drawing, while simultaneously exploring its limitations by working with physical models as well as the computer. These techniques are combined in order to expand the understanding of the objects being investigated. The drawings and models allow for a more complete understanding of physical space, both visual and interpreted. Drawings became investigations between adjacencies of objects, as organized into super structural grids that provided for particular organizations. The space unseen within objects became important and its representation became paramount as simple formal organizations and representations of surface qualities fell short of accurately describing the objects. These explorations expanded on the conceptionof physical space, both actual and virtual. This virtual space was explored through the materiality of physical models as well as unique drawing techniques.


3D Formal Investigations through Drawing


Adjacency of Objects in Space


Figure Studies


Extended Aggregation of Unit


Fabrication Jig


Physical Model

Transparency and Connectivity


Survey of Digital Media Summer 2008

John Eberhardt

Digital Design and Fabrication This project begins with a case study of an architectural work, Office dA’s Toledo Residence, exploring the interrelation of form, surface and technologies through various representational techniques. The computer is utilized to turn Office dA’s original hand renderings into digitally representations that can be manipulated on a series of variables. These variables are then transformed into the creation of an object that applies the understandings derived from the previous studies. The computer plays an important role allowing the application of variation before the physical model is created. A Final component to the project is a collaborative project challenging the rigidity of mass produces furniture. Digital technology is utilized to create an insert that increases the depth of the surface, allowing an otherwise flat table to function as a display piece. The lamination of materiality allows the undulations of the form to remain legible as well as provide a level of translucency to the entire piece.


Office dA Toledo Residence

Scripted Surface

Scripted Studies


Conceptual Approach : Manual to Digital

Final Renderings


Formal Surface Study


Formal Surface Study

Formal Surface Fabrication


Fabrication Process

Final Rendering


Surface Materiality

Final Object

Final Rendering

Joel Burke and Jerome Haferd


Material Techniques and Fabrication Spring 2009

Kevin Rotheroe

Grain: Structure : Aesthetic : Application This project is an intense exploration of the graining structure of wood, invest ting its aesthetic, structural, and functional uses both inherent and interpreted. My purposely misinterpreting the qualities of a selected grain and completely divorcing it from its source material, wood, it can be reconceptualized along a variety of fronts. Identity and legibility play key roles in the derivation a new fabrication technique to represent the qualities form the study. The final object then takes into account the earlier exploration and investigates in what ways the natural tendencies within wood can be manifest though digital fabrication; redeploying the aesthetic and structural tendencies of grain to a new material, one that is cast.


Identitiy as Screen


Grain Exploration

Fabrication Studies


Final Model


Final Model

Fabrication Process


Studies in Light and Materials Fall 2009

Michelle Addignton Joel Burke and Jang Hyung Lee

Mirroring : Duplication : Completion This collaborative project stemmed from an interest in the physical qualities of light (reflection, transmission, etc) and the studio art work of Sydney Cash, a sculptor whose particular focus is on the reflective qualities of light. After an initial study of Cash’s techniques and replication of many of his early projects the focus of the work became scaling up the physical processes witnessed in the smaller studies. Materials were kept simple, employing only ‘low tech’ techniques using mirrors, glass, screen and colored films. There was a reliance on the additive and subtractive qualities of colored light as well as its unique ability to retain particular qualities after numerous reflections. Through reflection and transmission a four room gallery setting could be lit from a single light source providing a varying experience depending on the particular room. Four translucent/transparent/reflective walls would organize the light around the spaces providing an increased depth onto the gallery surfaces as well as changeability depending on the organization of the colored films.


Catalogue of Techniques

Completing the Figure

Addition and Subtraction


Translucent Colored Film Studies

Inversion through Reflection


Color Studies : Gallery


Gallery Space : Lighting Techniques

Light Studies : Gallery


Groundless Architecture Summer 2009 Independent Design Build

Groundless Architecture was a chance to work one on one with a client in the design and construction of a multi-use tree structure. Its function was to accommodate the client’s three children as well as provide a home oďŹƒce for the client who did a majority of her work within the home. Various levels provided climbing areas and sleeping nooks for the children and likewise functioned as desks and storage for the small oďŹƒce. is project provided an opportunity to test all facets of the design-build process from preliminary design through construction and included bidding, scheduling, revisions and numerous client meetings. Formal decisions were based on the initial structure and size of the tree as well as client stipulations. Aesthetic decisions were a collaboration between the client, her children and myself. The end goal was a structure that would be entirely built without any outside assistance. A platform structure was designed and revised on site to fit within the distinctive natural structure of the tree. Joists were cantilevered from the structure and decked to provide a stable platform from which to build the enclosure. Walls were framed and the roof structure was designed and installed around the trunk and vertical branches of the tree. A system of gutters and flashing prevent any water from infiltrating the interior.


Yale Building Project Summer 2008 Yale Class of 2010


Yale Building Project Summer 2010 Yale Class of 2012


Exterior Structrure


Joel Burke Portfolio  

Selected Work 2003-2010

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