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CLIO a toolkit to Help teenagers Learn design for social change.

Joelle Riffle Thesis 2 March 19


250 word persuasive text Clio is a toolkit to teach teenagers design for social change. Designed to be integrated into existing art, design, or social studies curricula or as a standalone project, the kit guides the learner through a series of hands-on activities, lessons, and projects. Learners delve into design topics such as typography and prototyping as well as social issues, like sustainability and poverty. The project was inspired by my interest in the intersection of design and education. Through this work, I hope to show that design is not just an industry for professionals to distribute content but rather a tool for learning and expression of what has been learned. I researched extensively into alternative schooling methods and pedagogies, existing models of art and design education, and recent innovations around teaching and learning. This research has formed an invisible structure to my project, that lends legitimacy and context. The intention for the project is that this project will

develop into something that can be first tested in a pilot program in local schools and organizations, then implemented locally, regionally, and even nationally. For this to happen, I need various kinds of resources. To elevate this project from a design student project to an implementable concept, I would need to consult with a professional curriculum designer, who would help me to evolve my content. I would need a platform on which to test the project, and therefore willing participants with time and energy. Finally, I would need funding to produce multiples of the kit itself.


Artist Statement My belief is that design, like reading or writing is a tool for teaching and learning. Design is a means of exposing a concept visually, researching and developing content, as well as a vehicle for content, a way of interfacing with information. It is much more than a two-way street, beyond being a creator or one who is influenced by the created. This relationship shifts, is fluid, can be uncomfortable, and is messy but it a whole and significant one. Design isn’t about broadcasting information, or rather it shouldn’t be. It should be responsive and respectful of the viewer and the user. It should be informed by the person who is intended to be influenced upon. The old model of fine arts and mastery is being overturned in a great swift movement of “open source”, activism, and inclusion. Design is no longer for those who study the theory of it at an institution. It is accessible, mobile, and in flux. It should not be the role of the designer to pass graphics and theory and visual culture down to the anonymous and ubiquitous “user” or “viewer.” It is also not about the consumer or customer, marketing words that were created to allow people to fit themselves comfortably within labels, not the other way around. Design should be about being a human; what are people saying to other people? There is nothing more human in the world of artifice than design, genuine design that considers the chain of humans who will encounter their work. A designer understands and accepts the responsibility that comes with the power of making. To make is to turn an idea into something that can be touched, explained,

translated into colors and shapes. To make is give yourself a voice. Design is not a zero sum situation. For one person to have the power of design does not mean that it keeps another person from having it too. We can all have a voice. To share that ability to design with another person is to empower them and to acknowledge their voice and vision. To tell a young person that their voice is valid and important is to help them find power. Young people are usually under the impression that they are somewhat lesser, that they must simply aspire to grow older and then what they think and say will somehow begin to matter. The truth of that is that even as an adult, unless you give yourself he power, no one is going to give it to you, no matter what your age. There’s nothing inherently more capable about being an adult. So let us begin to acknowledge that we have something to say and the ability to affect change as soon as possible in our lives.


Current Prototype


Process Documentation Day 1

Learn it

A successful designed piece considers how the viewer will emotionally react to the work. What is the intention of the piece? Is the viewer meant to feel disgusted or inspired? Maybe the viewer is meant to be engaged with the piece and is encouraged or persuaded to take some kind of action. The concept can be thought of as the underlying structure of the design and dictates what design choices you make and why. If you’re concept is a soda brand inspired by a science fiction fantasy based future, you will choose and create colors, graphics, and typography that helps push your concept. Take a look at these examples and see if you can figure out what the designer was trying to make you feel and that the concept is. Choose a work of fiction, like a play, movie, book, or television show. Take some notes and figure out what the piece is about. Don’t just consider what happens in the narrative but what it is really trying to say. Think about the major themes and tropes at play.

Design activity

Design a book cover or promotional poster for the work of fiction. What can you tell the viewer about it through design? Think about how you want the user to feel when they look at it? What elements will you use and design choices will you make to express the concept?

Ch apter One

Design is an iterative process, meaning that there are many steps that you build upon. Clio is designed to move you forward through a project but, you can always skip back, repeat, and jump ahead as much as you want. Again, just follow along with the prompts using your sketchbook!

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Jump rIGht In!

Observe your school or community and journal your observation in your sketchbook all day. Pay attention to any issues you might notice.

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For example, you might be waiting for public transportation in the city on your way to school and notice that there isn’t enough seating for people waiting. Don’t worry about how you’ll solve the problem or if a solution is feasible, just write down everything you think of. Take photographs of things you observe if necessary.

Le

arn a

Emotion & ConCEpt

A designer decides how a person is going to feel when they look at something. They can inspire emotions in the viewer. This emotion probably has something to do with the intention of the design. Maybe the viewer is meant to be engaged with the piece and is encouraged or persuaded to take some kind of action.

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The first thing you will be working on is your very own project! Call it whatever you want! This is a project you will be working on throughout the whole kit. You will start on Chapter 1 and finish it on the Chapter 12. Take as long as you want to finish the project, one week, one month, or one year!

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When using Clio, you will be doing two different things at once. It shouldn’t be too complicated if you follow along, take your time, and ask for help!

let’s start makInG thInGs!

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hellO!

A design concept is the idea behind the design. Having a good idea of what your concept is will help you choose the aesthetic, or the look of the design. Concept and emotion can be the same or closely connected. You can’t have one without the other!

here are a COuple questIOns tO start thInkInG abOut yOur desIGn.

Choose a work of fiction, like a play, movie, book, or television show. Take some notes and figure out what the piece is about. Don’t just consider what happens in the narrative but what it is really trying to say. Think about the major themes and tropes at play.

Who is your TargeT audience?

Design a book cover or promotional poster for the work of fiction. What can you tell the viewer about it through design? Think about how you want the user to feel when they look at it? What elements will you use and design choices will you make to express the concept?

WhaT is The inTenTion of your design? do your design choices supporT your concepT?

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Joelle Riffle - Thesis 2- March 19