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Inspirations Challenges Solutions Design

Joel A. Benavides MArch | MBA


Contact Joel A. Benavides Email: joel.benavides@ttu.edu jbdarchitecture@gmail.com Cell Phone: 210.827.6169

B JD

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Contents 4 :: 35

Healthcare Design

Dallas Presbyterian Cancer Center AIA/AAH Design Charrette 36 :: 59

Educational Design Texas Tech Satellite Graduate College

60 :: 65

Urban Design Passage Du Caire Fashion School| Paris, France

66 :: 69

Various Skill Delineations

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Healthcare

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Design Dallas Presbyterian Cancer Center

AIA/AAH Design Charrette Medical Facility for Athletes

5


Research

Dallas Presbyterian Cancer Center 8200 Walnut Hill Lane Square Footage: 58,175 sq. ft. Max Allowed: 60,000 sq. ft.

Daylight, Atriums, & Courtyards

Dallas Presbyterian Hospital is owned and operated by Texas Health Resources (THR). This particular project was under the guidance and direction of HKS Inc. and Principal Norman Morgan and Principal Ron Gover, both of HKS. The project is a current project being

Early on in the research phase of the design natural daylighting was a major emphasis of the client. Through various personal interviews natural daylighting was a key element that every interviewee wanted. Along with site analysis the logical and proper solution was to implement an atrium as the key design element. Many people 6

interviewed wanted natural light as much as possible as well as a connection to the outside. Due to the design being a cancer center patients did not always have the opportunity to be outside because of health risks. Therefore small atriums and large expanses of glazing were utilized to provide the feeling and sense of being outside of the building. Evidence has shown that elements such as this tend to help

designed by HKS Inc. Key design concerns were the association of the new cancer center with the existing Presbyterian campus, the use of natural daylighting, and the use of the site.

benefit the facility employees as well as help patients heal.


Research

The design project was centered around Evidence Based Design (EBD). This made it imperative that proper research was conducted to find the best information available to inform the decisions made during the design process. Such research was found in Health Environments Research and Design Journal. The resulting information was used as proper evidence for

reasoning in the design solution. The initial evidence research dealt with the spatial organization of many healthcare facilities. It was important to try and find evidence of facilities that not only had successful spatial planning but also utilized the concept of atriums and natural daylighting. The image above was a proper example of this as it contains a large natural daylit central atrium that organizes the

remaining program of the buildng around that central axis.

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Site Analysis

The site analysis involved traveling to Dallas to visit the site and the clients to understand the needs of the project. While visiting the site there were key items that were to be addressed such as: -Location of Entries/Drives -Views -Noise -Proximity to nature

4: Intersection toward nature area 3: Parking Lot toward existing building

Possible Views

Existing Existing

Existing

D.A.R.T

2: Intersection toward site Existing

Buildable Area

Existing

Possible Views 2

1: On site view toward entry bridge

3 Existing

4 Water Buildable Area

1

Trees/Nature Possible Views

Images

While in Dallas visiting the existing site photographs were taken in order to have a visual reference and understanding of how the site currently is to the entrances and the users of the facility. Views on this site were highly important because of the natural vegatation and nature just south of the site that also included a creek. The site also had a large grade and slope from the 8

North end of the site to the South end of the site and therefore working with that grade was an oppurtunity to provide views of the building from the exterior as well as views from the interior for the occupants.


Media: AutoDesk Ecotect Analysis

Best Orientation Analysis

Daylight Analysis

The second step in the site analysis was to analyze the climate of the site. The main climate data that was used to inform the design was the daylight analysis. The direction and angles of natural daylight throughout the year was vital because of the use of large expanses of glass and atrium space within the design.

Winter Solstice Analysis

The diagrams above were taken from AutoDesk Ecotect and show the “Best Orientation� for a structure on the site and the sun paths and angles for the summer and winter solstice. The solstice was taken for both seasons because these would be the highest and lowest angles the sun would be at for any given time throughout the year for this site.

Summer Solstice Analysis

Key Angle Measurements

The diagrams produced key angles that could be used to design the main natural lighting concepts. Key Angles: Best Orientation: 187.5 degrees West of South Summer Sun Angle: Max of 80.6 degrees Winter Sun Angle: Max of 33.7 9


Concept Most Public Circulation Semi Private Circulation Private or Department Specific Circulation Interior Atriums and Waiting Spaces

Schematic Diagrams

The human spine is one of the main heirarchical pieces of the body. It makes sense to use the spine as a model of organizing paths and direction through the building design. The subsequent radiating bones and organs become the lower levels in the organizational heirarchy. The initial image of spine was taken and analyzed in different levels and parts. The Spinal Cord became 10

the major heirarchical piece while other parts such as the bones of the rib cage became paths that lead to other points of interest. In the human body the rib cage acts as a protective shield to other vital organs that lie underneath the cage and within the body. The other vital organs in this case are the yellow points of interest in the diagram that are connected by secondary circulation. This secondary circulation is much like the veins and

arteries that carry blood between muscles and organs within the body. Ultimately, in a 2-Dimensional diagram, the spine is a perfect organizing principle for space and circulation in order to create circulation paths that lead to different points in the building. These points are either departments, atriums, or courtyards.


Process Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Best Orientation Overlay Central Spine Atrium

Central Spine Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Media: AutoCAD, Adobe Illustrator

Entry/Exit Points

Waiting Space

Original Organizational Layout

Best Orientation Angles Applied

Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Waiting Space

Central Spine

Final Spatial Organization

The Spine and Space

In this stage of the design process the spine concept was taken and merged with the site analysis and daylight analysis. The daylight analysis produced a “Best Orientation� for this specific site of 187.5 degrees West of South. This means that the southern facade and consequently the southern part of the building had to be turned 2.5 degrees to the West. This provided

the best possibility of sunlight as well as compromised heat gain and heat losses throughout the summer and winter months. Once the form of the large circulation atrium spine had been defined it was clear that the building would have both a major and minor entry point. This fit well to the program as well due to the need for a returning patient entrance. Seen in the upper right diagram,

the entry points were defined on the East and West sides of the spine. The East entrance would accomodate the first time visitors and any returning patients coming from Greenville Avenue. The West entrance would be a two story entrance with access to an adjacent parking garage for returning patients as well as an emergency entrance on the bottom 11


Drawings Storage

LINAC Vault

Fan Room

LINAC Vault

LINAC Vault

Garden Areas

Rad. Office

Diagnostic Radiography

Rad. Office

Rad. Office

SubWaiting Nuclear Medicine Linens

Meds Blood Draw Scale

Clean

Stretch Stretch LINAC Vault Physician Alcove

Nurses Workstation

Atrium

Gamma Knife

Gamma Control Room

Clean Supply

Nurse Practitioner Office

Soiled

Rad. Office

Dressing Room

Dressing Room

Changing Rooms

Exam Room

ExamGYN

Conference Room

Cubicles

Exam Room

Office

Intake

RR

Staff Break Room

Office

S-1

Ck. Out

Ck. In

Block Room

Storage

RR Image Processing

Consultation

RR Gamma Knife

Dosimetry Workstations

Source Room

Hot Lab

PET/CT

Rad. Office

RR Gamma Knife

Equipment Room

Atrium Cold Lab

Subwaiting Gamma Knife

Physicist Office

Physicist Office

Brachytherapy/HDR

Return Waiting

Exam Room

ExamGYN

Changing Rooms

Check Out

Exam Room

12 x 2" = 2'-0"

Workroom

Staff Locker Room

12 x 2" = 2'-0"

27 x 7" = 16'-0"

12 x 2" = 2'-0"

RR

Check In

Waiting

Service Area

Soiled Clean Intake

Shared Staff Area

Waiting Ck. Out

Storage Intake

Sub-Wait

ing

Ck. In

Blood Work Room Surgery Sch.

Physician Work Area

Ck. In

Blood Blood

Patient Library

Pharmacy , Retail

Boutique

S-1

Reception

RR

Storage

Blood Lab

io ltat

su

Con

n

Work Room

Office

Cancer

Massage Room Massage Room

RR

Life Waiting

Office Exam

Exam

Exam

Service Area

CCA

Exam Office RR Research

Office Research

Office Tumor Regist.

Office Tumor Regist.

Office

Work Room

Office Nurse Pract.

Ck. In Office

Office

Office Director

Office Med. Director

Office

Office

Office Clin. Special

Activity Room Conferen ce Room Conferen ce Room

Storage

Pantry

Scale: 1/64”=1’

Ground Floor Plan Square Footage: 40,033 of 58,175

Radiation Therapy Multi-Specialty Suites Stat Laboratory Administration Services & Maintenance

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Media: ArchiCAD 14 BIM Software

Open To Be

low

Receiving

Drug Storage

Returning Patient

Staff Area

Hematology/ Oncology & Infusion Wa iting Area

Chk. In Chemo/Com pound Prep.

Chk. Ch k. In Out

Work Room

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Intake

Consult

Office Storage

Clean Room

Nourish

Nourish Infusion

Shared

Infusion

Chk. In

Shared

Soiled Room

Chk. Out

Shared

Scale Service

Chk. Out

Exam

Shared

RR

Med Prep

Nurses Station

Break Room

RR

RR

Office

Locker Room

Med Alcove

Med Alcove

Office

Office

Office

Exam Exam

Office

Workroom

Exam

Exam

Office Exam

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Exam Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Nurses Station

Infusion

Exam Infusion

Exam Infusion Procedure Room

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion

Infusion Infusion Infusion

Scale: 1/32”=1’

Second Floor Plan Square Footage: 18,142 of 58,175

Hematology & Oncology Clinic Infusion Therapy Pharmacy Service & Maintenance

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Renders ’

Common Atrium

Waiting Space

Atrium Section

The atrium section was drawn in order to show the relationship between waiting spaces and the central circulation spine of the building. A key idea for this project was to give people a better waiting experience and therefore many of the waiting spaces were linked to the large expanse of natural lit atrium space as well as smaller atriums in other departments of the building. 14

Waiting Space


Media: ArchiCAD 14 BIM Software

g

Exterior Aerial Perspective Exterior image of final design for Dallas Presbyterian Hospital Cancer Center. Garden Area Central Spine Atrium Two interior radiation therapy atriums 15


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GreenVille Avenue Entrance Perspective Client: Dallas Presbyterian & Texas Health Resources Project: Cancer Center Addition Size: 58,175 sq. ft. Description: This is a final image of the proposed design for the cancer 16

center addition. This particular image is the entry view as a visitor comes from the GreenVille Avenue entrance.


Media: ArchiCAD 14 BIM Software, Adobe Photoshop

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2

1

Aerial Parking Lot Perspective

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3

4

Interior Renders 3. Radiation therapy waiting area 4. Return patient waiting area 5. Central spine atrium with waiting areas adjacent

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Media: ArchiCAD 14 BIM Software, Adobe Photoshop

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5 6. Main entrance atrium perspective

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AIA/AAH Des

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sign Charrette National Healthcare Design Conference| Design Charrette Nashville, Tennesse November 12-14, 2011 Teams: Texas Tech University, Kansas University, Illinois University, Texas A&M University

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Project Description The project was a 48 hour charrette sponsored by the AIA/AAH at the National Healthcare Design Conference. The conference and charrette were by invite only and Texas Tech and the Healthcare Certificate Program were selected for 2011. Myself and three other team members were selected and traveled to Nashville, Tennessee where we participated in the design challenge. The project was described as “an adaptive re-use of an existing medical facility... with a twist�. That twist became a medical facility for athletes and the exact determination of what a medical facility for athletes included and needed was completely up to us as the design team. The site was located in Centennial Park not far from Vanderbilt University. Team: Joel A Benavides Tyler Washburn Matt Davis Leo Spurgin

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The Future Facility for The Future Athlete

“See Yourself Improve & Exceed Past Performance Measures

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Schematic Progression

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Program/Form Initial Program

Final Program

Rapid Repair - Orthopedic Surgery - Imaging - Pharmacy - Exam Rooms - In-Patient Rooms - PACU & Prep/Hold Rooms - Rehabilitation - Extended Stay Suites

Rapid Repair - Orthopedic Surgery - Imaging + Research & Simulation - Pharmacy - Exam Rooms - In-Patient Rooms - PACU & Prep/Hold Rooms - Rehabilitation - Extended Stay Suites

Enhance Performance - Consulting - Nutrition - Training - Kinesiology - Therapy - Extended Stay Suites

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Enhance Performance - Consulting - Nutrition - Training +Strength Training +Cardio Training - Kinesiology - Therapy - Extended Stay Suites


04 Fourth Floor

Extended Stay Suites

03 Third Floor

Extended Stay Suites + Administration

02 Second Floor Rehab Spaces + Physical Therapy + Cardio Training

01 First Floor

Research and Imaging + Community Lobby + Locker Rooms + Strength Training

00 Ground Floor Maintenance + Service Space

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01 First Stage Form

02 Second Stage Form

Central Space with a track that runs through the interior spaces of the structure

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Reaching out to the site with new proposed forms. Additional outdoor spaces at the ends.


03 Third Stage Form 04 Final Form Strengthen the space between the Strengthen the space between.

“Cube�, a technology and training destination.

Overhead canopies and training spaces below step down with the landscape.

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Drawings Consultation 1,411 SF

Imaging 7,700 SF

S

TN

30

PN

First Floor

Research 11,773 SF

S

E

Comm 8


PT Offices 2,332 SF

S

munity Lobby 8,069 SF

S

E

Rehab Gym 6,604 SF Rehab Room 1,628 SF

S

Locker Room 4,393 SF

S

Rehab Room 1,335 SF

Rehab Room Open to Below 1,692 SF

Pharamacy 746 SF

S

Open to Below S

Cardio Area

Weight Room 13,175 SF

Open to Below

Second Floor

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n pe O

to

w lo e B

S

Extended Stay Suites 609 SF

S

Third Floor

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Extended Stay Suites 1,000 SF

Balconies 1,908 SF

E


Extended Stay Suites 1,000 SF

Extended Stay Suites 609 SF

S

S

E

S

Administration 2,843 SF S

Balconies 1,908 SF

Fourth Floor

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Envelope Mimicking the focus of orthopedics- The study of the muscoskeletal system. The facade system imitates muscular structure and connection. Plastication served as the inspiration for the the envelope’s design and composition.

The digital path landscape that runs through the adjacent sportsplex (visible in site plan) was inspired by the interwoven layering of an athletic quadricep muscle and the intricacies between the muscles, tendons, and bones.

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Satellite Grad

36


duate College

Designed in coordination with Matthew R. Davis

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Site Analysis Context and Site Images

TTU Campus

Broadway

TTU Campus

Background

The initial program involved the development of a highly extensive set of spaces for a graduate satellite school for the Texas Tech College of Architecture as well as a new Library Sciences graduate school. The location of the project was to be in Lubbock in the original and historic district of downtown. The site included two lots, one on the north side of Broadway Avenue and the second lot being on the 38

south side of Broadway Avenue. This site was highly important because the satellite campus would hopefully bring a strong connection of Texas Tech to downtown with the ultimate goal of revitalizing the downtown district. The direct axis between Texas Tech’s campus down Broadway to the East became the heirarchical organizational street of the design. A secondary challenge was to tie the “Art District” to the north of Broadway Avenue back to

the organizing axis and through to the downtown “Depot District”. The Depot District is a large area of bars and restaurants and therefore brings immense amounts of commerce to the area. The Art District brings commerce as well but also brings a cultural and artistic prescence back to dowtown. A key task in designing for this project was to meld the arts with the commerce around a central common axis to create a more vibrant downtown Lubbock.


www.lubbockarts.org

www.ttu.edu

www.downtownlubbockwarehouseapartment.com

Art and Depot District Images To Art District

Broadway Broadway

Site

To Depot District

As Texas Tech University strives to become a Tier I status school, the need for a much larger outreach to the community is absolutely necessary. The development of a downtown Graduate School will ultimately help to break the bounds of Texas Tech’s campus into the urban fabric and scene of the community. Texas Tech is quite simply the life line of the city of Lubbock and the city grows and thrives as the university and it’s

student body and faculty thrive. The fact that Texas Tech is planned and designed in such a way that blocks off the outside public world to it’s internal structure is not a conducive way of planning for the future and expansion of the university and Lubbock. There is a fundamental need to begin to tie the different types of neighborhoods and districts in Lubbock to the very entity that gives it life, Texas Tech University. 39


Foci

Foci Developed by Joel Benavides

Foci Developed by Matthew R. Davis

Rhythm & Harmony Harmony is the vertical aspect of music. Harmony becomes a series of waves and rhythms that change depending on the point of the harmonic series. Harmonies eventually develop a rhythmic pattern to create a song. A building must have a rhythm in many ways in order to function properly.

Growth The focus of growth became a key idea because of the need for this design to be able to help grow the downtown district back to what it once was. The design ultimately will incorporate growth in some form of the building.

The first stage of the design process began with the development of foci. Both partners were at liberty to choose any number of foci that they would like to focus on. These ideas could come from literally anything the person found as interesting to themselves. As the project progressed the foci were developed first in order to better understand what the idea could be used for in the design of the building. The 40

project itself has a program that ultimately is a contradiction of itself. The program calls for the combination of a building that includes both a Graduate College of Architecture as well as a Graduate College of Library Sciences. These two academic majors would normally never be put next to each other in the planning of an academic facility for campus simply because of the differences in curriculum for both.

This lends itself to the idea of the foci more because it forces the design team to take different ideas that may not normally pair together and make them meld to each other in order to satisfy the needs of the building, the program, the client, and the site. The final three foci ideas selected are seen above and briefly explained.


Foci Developed by Matthew R. Davis

Impact An impact can hold many different meanings. Some of these meanings could be the idea of two or more objects colliding or meeting at some given time and the resulting action of that moment. This could lend itself to an enormous event and action that could have either good or bad results. An impact could also be a feeling or lasting meaning to an area, building, place, etc that could ultimately affect how that place develops into the future. This

became a key element in the design foci because it can be seen how a building program such as this could have an enormous impact on Texas Tech, the downtown districts, and the Lubbock Community as a whole.

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Progression

The foci for the project were further developed into basic studies that could be used later on in the design process for different uses. The harmony/rhythm foci is used to determine circulation paths and within those paths there are patterns in the floor and cuts in the side walls of the paths. The paths act as catwalks that weave their way through the structure of the final building design. The initial idea of 42

rhythms and weaving can be seen above. The teal colored paths are the finalized circulation “tubes� or paths that were created. The larger gray tubes are the programmatic areas that are adjacent to the circulation paths. The rhythms are eventually the regulating principle of where windows, structure, and interior details are seen throughout the project.


Media: FormZ Renderzone

The development of this foci also included the notion of bridging Broadway Avenue. The long gray tubes at certain points became bridges from one programmatic part of the building to the next. This also lended itself to the development of the teal circulation catwalks because a thin circulation system was needed to move along side the program tubes as well. The program tubes in this

study bridge over Broadway to the southern side of the site where more program would potentially be located. An initial study into the “impact� foci was also incorporated so that the relationships that would otherwise not be there could begin to be seen, discussed, and iterated.

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Holocaust Memorial The initial precedent example that was informative and inspirational for the development of the urban park was the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. The urban design of the memorial has unjulating stone memorial pieces that when seen from above create a ripple and wave affect that is very strong and lasting to the viewer. This also helped to develop a connection to the foci of

impact because of the lasting impact that a structure or a series of structures such as this can have. The urban park for this design was built with this concept largely in mind.

Growth and Impact became the final two foci developed for use in the design of the building. Growth became a way of showing the relationship with what is presently in downtown to what could possibly be in downtown Lubbock. It shows the ability for Lubbock to grow as a community and as a district due to affect this school could have on it. Eventually the idea of growth led to the development of any urban green 44

space and park on the site in order to give the dowtown site a place of gathering. The places of gathering could be for every day people walking by or driving by in downtown or a place for gather by the students and faculty of the building.


The Growth focus developed the urban park as seen in the diagrams above. The development also created a supplementary idea to growth, that of a gradient. A gradient is essentially a growth of one color to another. The diagram above shows the growth and gradient from the left to the right end. The green spaces and walkable concrete areas are tighter and more compact and then begin to spread out and lengthen as they

move away from the left edge. This ultimately created the same ripple affect as the Holocaust Memorial. The different parts of this urban park however become planters for landscaping and benches as they become lower in the distance.

located on the southern end of the site. The unjulating urban park grew out of the ground and rippled outward from the impact of the building on that end of the site.

The focus of Impact ultimately tied directly with the idea of the urban park and growth. The impact became a piece of the building program, the auditorium, and was 45


Precedents

Structure

Cantilever Steel Box Truss

Truss System Zone

Column Grid

Column & Beam Structure Zone

Horizontal Bracing Heavy Foundations

Nanjing Museum of Art & Architecture Architect: Steven Holl

Functional Bars

This museum became the primary structural precedent for the graduate school structural design. The structure seen on this building is monumental and almost seems impossible. This building pushes two cantilevers in two different directions which makes the structural solution that much more impressive. This building helped to inform our design of the needs for a structural system this demanding.

www.stevenholl.com

Through initial foci development studies, programmatic groupings began to mature in the form of large functional bars. These bars established a consistency between the spaces that united certain parts of the program. The program bars run along the length of the project site at different levels based on their relation to the atrium of the building. One of the three bars emerged as a larger, more hierchical 46

www.archicentral.com

form. Within this bar existed the studios, classrooms, as well as the deans offices of the building. To give this program bar some visual significance, it was given a floating effect by raising the bar over the urban park. In an attempt to embrace this idea of a hierchical, floating bar, a complex structural system needed to be implemented. Behind the research

www.archdaily.com

of a helpful precedent study, a large box truss was developed with the intention of cantilevering the entire bar. This would not only create a stunning structural form but free up the space for the urban park that exists below this bar. The park would not be obstructed by any columns or other supports that come from the bar above. A secondary, supplemental box truss is crossbraced to the west one.


20’ 18’ OC

Structural Bay System

13’-6” 18’

26’ 60’

www.sustainabledesignupdate.com

This truss serves as the counter weight for the cantilevered weight. This supplemental box truss holds different program spaces and serves as the member that ties into the ground as the structural foundation. After calculating the span distance and total tributary area of beams, as well as maximum height of the columns, W12x65 wide flange

www.construction.com

steel beams were selected as the proper size for the trusses to be constructed. Different connections exist at different moments within the truss (e.g. instances where cross bracing beams tie the two trusses together).

William Clinton Library The Clinton Library was a clear choice for a structural precedent. The form is reminiscent of the shape and form of our design. The structure is monumental steel box trusses set within the building. The structure then holds a curtain wall out from to the exterior, creating a double skin layer.

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Envelope System Double Skin Envelope

Art Center College of Design-South Campus Located in Pasadena California, it uses a similar structural system to our building design in that it’s internal structure are trusses. The design has a transparent facade to reveal the structural systems. Our design will not include any patterning but the same basic panel types will be used. The external steel structure holds the glass or transparent material in place which is then structurally held by a secondary system behind the exterior layer.

ASU Polytechnic School Designed by Lake/Flato Architects, this building gives a strong precedent for the screen wall being used on this project. The screen is a series of horizontal rigid members that are held by a steel substructure which is subsequently connected to the main structure of the building.

7” “ECO-CLAD” SHADING PANELS BRACKET FOR CLADDING ATTACHMENT

4”x 4” VERTICAL STEEL TUBING SUBSTRUCTURE 12 x 65 WIDE FLANGE GIRDER WITHIN TRUSS SYSTEM 4”x 4” HORIZONTAL STEEL TUBING SUBSTRUCTURE ALUMINUM MULLION BETWEEN ETFE PANELS ALUMINUM HORIZONTAL BRACKET FOR ETFE PANELS

SECOND SKIN ETFE PANEL

10”x 10” BEAM SUBSTRUCTURE

RECESSED FLOOR LIGHTING SYSTEM

Design goals for the enclosure of the building were to use a double skin system on the majority of the exterior facing walls. The outter first skin will act as the shading device for the secondary more transparent skin. A major component of the building is the use of the immense truss structure throughout. The original design intent was for all of the structure and MEP to be exposed in the finished design. 48

Therefore the decision was made to use Low-E glazing for the secondary skin because of it’s translucency properties as well as its thermal properties. The primary skin will be made of long thin panels that are a sustainable 50% bamboo and 50% recycled paper. The panels are all 7” tall with varying lengths. The panels are to be arranged with a gradient from roof level down towards the ground level. The space

in between each panel ranges from 2” at the top to 30” at the bottom of the facade.


Sustainable Systems Systems & Materials

Above: American Clay Wall Finish Description: Wall finish material made from earth friendly materials. The material is a sustainable plaster. It is susceptible to changes with temperature and moisture control but the climate of the area and the exterior cladding of the building should help

in aiding this interior wall finish to be durable for the life of the builidng. These particular colors will give a warmth to the interior of the building in coordination with the wood and exposed steel.

Above: Bamboo flooring Description: Bamboo is a highly renewable source and therefore is very sustainable. A bamboo flooring system will be implemented throughout the design.

Left: Low E Curtain Wall Glass Description: This glass type will be used to help regulate against glare, heat gain, and heat loss. The central entrance atrium should be well protected from sun and winter weather by the two programmatic bars, but the use of this glass system will help to ensure the building functions more sustainably.

The Texas Tech University satellite graduate College of Architecture and graduate College of Library Sciences will implement a number of sustainable systems and materials. These implementations include a double skin system to help regulate with passive cooling and solar gain, exterior shading panels of Eco-Clad material, American Clay Materials,

sustainable flooring materials, rainwater collection systems, and low-e glass. These systems and materials are being implemented in the hopes of building a more sustainable and responsible building. This will lend itself to the longevity of the building as well as the rejuvenation of many of the materials back into the natural ecosystem. 49


Drawings 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

A

Gallery Storage

Closed Gallery

B Chimney

C

Plumbing Cavity

HVAC Cavity

Janitor Closet

Ele. Mech. Passenger Elevator

UP

Student Showcase Gallery

D

Rainwater Collection Tank

E

Passenger Elevator Ele. Mech.

F

G H

I

E3

R1

P1 - First Floor 1:40

R1

Northwest Perspective 50

12

13


Media: FormZ Renderzone, AutoCAD, Adobe Illustrator

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

A Passenger Elevator Ele. Mech.

B

Open Gallery

C D

E1

UP

E2 E F UP

G

UP

H I

S1

R2

R2

Broadway Perspective 51


2

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

A

10

LS Faculty 1

LS Faculty 2

LS Faculty 3

11

LS Faculty 4

12

LS Faculty 5

13

Head Librarian Office

CD/DVD Storage

Archives

Library Science Storage

Plumbing Chimney Cavity

HVAC Shaft

UP Womens Restroom LS Lab 1

LS Lab 2

D

Men's Restroom

E

Ele. Mech.

LS Classroom 1

Passenger Elevator

LS Classroom 2

Passenger Elevator

Ele. Mech.

C

UP

Janitor Closet

B

Student Critique Space

F

G H

I

P2 - Second Floor 1:40

E3

P2_Second Floor Plan A

Library Stacks

Closed Reading Room

Library Lobby & Reception

B Janitor Closet

Plumbing Chimney Cavity

C

Ele. Mech. Passenger Elevator

UP HVAC Shaft

Womens Restroom Architecture Model Shop

Architecture Model Shop

Print Lab

Photo Lab

Men's Restroom

D

Passenger Elevator

E

Student Critique Space

Ele. Mech.

F

G Staff Lounge

H

Secretary/Waiting Area

Staff Office 3

Staff Office 2

Conference Room

Architecture Studio 5

Architecture Studio 4

Architecture Studio 3

Architecture Studio 2

Staff Office 1

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P3 - Third Floor 1:40

P3_Third Floor Plan

E3

R3

Main Entry Perspective 52


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A Passenger Elevator Ele. Mech.

B

UP

UP

C D

E2 UP

E1

E F G

UP

H I

R3 S1 A Passenger Elevator Ele. Mech.

B

C D

E1

E2 E F G

UP

H I

Architecture Studio 1

R4 S1

R4

Auditorium Entrance 53


A

Roof Access

B Janitor Closet

Plumbing Chimney Cavity

C

Ele. Mech. Passenger Elevator

UP Womens Restroom

D

Arch. Faculty Office 10

Arch. Faculty Office 9

Arch. Faculty Office 7

Arch. Faculty Office 8

Arch. Faculty Office 6

Arch. Faculty Office 5

Arch. Faculty Office 4

Arch. Faculty Office 3

Arch. Faculty Office 2

HVAC Shaft

Men's Restroom

Passenger Elevator

Arch. Faculty Office 1

Ele. Mech.

E

Student Critique Space

F

R5

G H

Dean's Terrace

R6

Faculty Lounge

Arch. Dean

Architecture Studio 10

Architecture Studio 9

Architecture Studio 8

Architecture Studio 7

LS Dean

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P4 - Fourth Floor 1:40

E3

60’ _Roof

47’ _Faculty Offices & Studios

34’ _Workshops & Studios

17’ _Library Science Classrooms

1’ _Subtle Impact Slope

E3 - West Elevation

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R5

Interior Catwalk 54

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Air Handler Unit

C D

E2

E1

E F G

UP

H I

Architecture Studio 6

S1

Auditorium Peak_ 54’

Sky Bridge Roof_ 47’

Sky Bridge Gateway_ 34’

Supplemental Lab_ 17’

High Impact Slope_ 4’ Auditorium Entry_ 0’

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R6

Architecture Studio Space 55


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A

A Passenger Elevator Ele. Mech. Gallery Storage

Closed Gallery

B

Open Gallery

B Chimney

C

Plumbing Cavity

HVAC Cavity

C

Janitor Closet

Ele. Mech.

D

Passenger Elevator

UP

E1

UP Student Showcase Gallery

D

E2

Passenger Elevator

Rainwater Collection Tank

Ele. Mech.

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E

F

F UP

G

UP

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H

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E3

S1

D1 Eco-Clad Wood Panel Shade Device

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Cladding_67’-3”

Roof_61’

Steel Grate for Maintenance 1’x 1’ Steel Wide Flange with Site Weld

D2 1-1/2” Steel Tension Rod Lateral Bracing for Eco-Clad

48’_Roof

Studios_47’-6”

4”x 4” Hollow Steel Tube Substructure

1” Air Space

MANKO

Double Glazed Window System

34’-6”_Library

Typical Mullion System

Studios_34’-6”

Cladding_29’ Threaded Tension Rod Mounting Bracket

W1

1’-7”x 1’ Steel Wide Flange with Site Weld

D3

17’_Faculty Offices

1’x1’ Steel Wide Flange Column

1’x1’ Steel Wide Flange Diagonal Truss Support Beam

0’_Galleries

-17’_Basement

D4

S1_Transverse Section 0”

1/4”

1/2”

1”

0’

1’

3’

5’

1/4”=1’

JBMD_Arch 5901_D.Pruske_Fall 2010

S1 - Transverse Building Section

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W1- Wall Section


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4”x 4” Hollow Steel Tube

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5”x 5” Steel Wide Flange Support 1-1/2” Counter Sunk Screw 3-1/2” Counter Sunk Bolt

67’-3” _Cladding

61’ _Roof 7”x 3” Eco-Clad Panel

D1

47’-6” _Studios

Continuous Bead of Lap Sealant

Rubbergard

34’-6”’ _Studios

EPDM Membrane Bonding Adhesive Quickseam RPF Strip

29’ _Cladding

Quickprime Plus Metal Counterflashing

17’ _Faculty Offices

9” Rigid Roof Insulation

2” Ribbed Roof Decking 8”x 5” Steel Tube

1’x 1’ Steel Wide Flange 6”x 3” Steel Weld Plate

Aluminum Mullion System

D2 Aluminum Mullion System

E1 - North Entry Elevation

Recessed LED Floor Light

6”x 1” Bamboo Flooring 6” Concrete Subfloor

A

2” Cellular Decking

C

B

D

E

F

G

H

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1’x 1’ Steel Wide Flange 6”x 3” Steel Weld Plate

1’-7”x 1’ Steel Wide Flange

Auditorium Peak_ 54’

D3 MANKO

OKNAM

Aluminum Mullion System

Sky Bridge Gateway_ 34’ Recessed LED Floor Light

Supplemental Lab_ 34’ 6”x 1” Bamboo Flooring 6” Concrete Subfloor

Raised concrete planter_ 34’

2” Cellular Decking

Raised hardscape_ 34’

1’x 1’ Steel Wide Flange 6”x 3” Steel Weld Plate

1’-7”x 1’ Steel Wide Flange

AlucaBond Aluminum Panels

D4

Steel Backer Support for Panels

Details

E2 - South Entry Auditorium Elevation

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Model

Structural Model :: 1/8” =1’ Design Materials: Urban Park: MDF Chipboard Glue Structure: Basswood Glue Building Cores: MDF

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Auditorium: Basswood Piano Wire MDF


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Urban

Phase 1 | Massing

Phase 2 | Site Data Site Images | Site Trace

Plaza

Rue Pelican Massing Study Concept: Understand the urban landscape of Paris and the massing that forms the circulation streets and alleys through the city.

Courtyard Cafe NODE

Initial Cafe Plan

60

This design studio was an urban design studio conducted in Paris, France. The concept was to revive a district of Paris that was known for it’s fashion stores and schools at one time. The prescence of students and the fashion industry however had begun to lessen due to the crime riddled nature of the area.

student of architecture and civil engineering.

The project was designed in coordination with Billy Henly, a

Often times these passages are covered from the elements and

Site data of Passage Caire. Paris has upwards of 55 “passages” that cut from the primary radiating streets to the secondary and tertiary streets and alleys throughout the city.

provide areas of commerce through retail, restaurants, and services.


Paris, France Phase 3 | Finalized Drawings

B

UP

Media: FormZ Renderzone, AutoCAD, Adobe Illustrator

B

A

A

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

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Section A

Section B

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Aluminum Window Sill W18x60 Wide Flange

Mullion System

B.1

Glazing System

Clerestory Glazing

Aluminum Window Sill

4”x4” Steel Tubing W18x60 Wide Flange

Face Stone

Mullion System

Window Glazing

1”=1’

B.1

Formed Aluminum Cap

Mullion System

1.5” Glazing

Mullion System

1/2”=1’

Roof Detail

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Phase 4 | Renders

Plaza To Entrance

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Media: FormZ Renderzone, AutoCAD, Adobe Illustrator

Entrance to Plaza

Interior Retail Space

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Mixed Media

Delineations &

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& Models Sketches 67


Diagramming of Form & Function First design challenge to develop a skill of creating form before applying basic program spaces.

Physical model of Form

4 armatures holding the form and program spaces within a physical model.

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Lighting Studies

Series of iterations to assess how light affects a small area or box in order to try and inspire lighting design for future projects.

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About the designer:

Joel A. Benavides was born in San Antonio, Texas in 1988. He and his family moved to a hill country suburb of San Antonio called Boerne, Texas in 1995. Joel continued his education in Boerne through elementary, middle school, and graduated from Boerne High School in 2006. While in high school Joel was a two sport four year varsity letterman and won two state championships with the varsity cross country team. As high school progressed Joel took an interest in drawing and in particular architectural drawing and drafting which led to the decision to attend Texas Tech University’s College of Architecture in the Fall of 2006. Joel graduated in May of 2010 with his B.S. Architecture with Cum Laude honors. He is also a member of Tau Sigma Delta, the National Honor Society for Architecture and Allied Arts. He will graduate in May of 2012 with a dual Masters Degree, the first a Master of Architecture and the second a Master of Business Administration. Joel obtains his design certification in December of 2011 for Healthcare Facilities Design from the Texas Tech College of Architecture.

B JD

J | B | D


Inspirations | Challenges | Solutions| Design