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EDD 7914-OL1 Curriculum Teaching and Technology: Integrating Emerging Technology into the Curriculum – ASSURE Lesson Plan Marc Snyder

Assignment #4 – Integrating Emerging Technology into the Curriculum – ASSURE Lesson Plan Dr. Al P. Mizell

Due: August 6, 2011


2 Submitted: July 27, 2011 Assignment #4 – Integrating Emerging Technology into the Curriculum -- ASSURE Lesson Plan Abstract This lesson plan follows the steps of the ASSURE model presented on page 39 of the Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2011) text. The steps of the ASSURE model ensure the effective integration of technology into the classroom. These steps include the following: 1) analyze learners; 2) state standards and objectives; 3) select strategies, technology, media, and materials; 4) utilize technology, media, and materials; 5) require learner participation; and 6) evaluate and revise. For this lesson, students will use biotechnological techniques to extract human DNA from cheek cells. The lesson was based on the writer’s assessment of his own technological use in the classroom via the Technology Integration Matrix (2010). The writer determined that his current technology use was at the Active and Entry Level. After performing this lesson with his students, the writer hopes to advance to the Active and Transformational Level. This writer has included all items listed in the rubric for this assignment and believes that overall it is at a level of Excellent. I certify that the work in this paper is my own and material included from other sources is correctly cited.

Marc Snyder; Date: August 6, 2011


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ASSURE Lesson Plan Introduction The ASSURE model is an acronym for effective lesson planning that stands for the following: 1) analyze learners; 2) state standards and objectives; 3) select strategies, technology media, and materials; 4) utilize technology, media, and materials; 5) require learner participation; and 6) evaluate and revise (Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell, 2011, p. 39). According to Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2011), “effective instruction requires careful planning” (p, 38). Certainly, the use of technology in teaching is no different. The purpose of this paper is to present a lesson plan, using the ASSURE model, that describes the planned learning experience presented in assignment 4. In assignment 4, the writer used the Technology Integration Matrix (2010) to select a goal cell for the use of technology in the classroom. The goal cell selected by the writer was Active Learning at the Transformational Level. The planned learning experience involved the extraction of human DNA from cheek cells. Analyze Learners When preparing a lesson to be taught in the classroom, it is critical to understand the learners. As noted by Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2011), analyzing learners includes an examination of their “general characteristics, specific entry competencies, and learning styles” (p. 38). The learners for this lesson will be ninth-grade students of mixed gender with the majority White and Catholic. Since the writer taught the majority of the students last year, the writer is cognizant of their abilities, which is average; however, there are students who fall on


4 both sides of the bell curve – some on the higher end and others on the lower end. Prerequisite knowledge to the lesson will include an understanding of the DNA molecule; i.e., its structure, function, importance, and so on. The writer will prepare students for the lesson by presenting a PowerPoint presentation on DNA. Moreover, the writer will allow for students to engage in hands-on learning of DNA by building a DNA model using different colored beads and tubes. Regarding learning styles, the writer is aware that students prefer to work in groups and benefit from any learning activity that is hands-on. Extracting human DNA will provide for an excellent opportunity for both (i.e., for student to work in groups and be engaged hands-on). State Standards and Objectives The standards for the ASSURE lesson come from the Florida Sunshine State Standards (2008). The specific standard for this lesson is Standard 16: Heredity and Reproduction. Related benchmarks include the following: •

SC.912.L.16.3: Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to the transmission and conservation of the genetic information.

SC.912.L.16.4: Explain how mutation in DNA may result in phenotypic change.

SC.912.L.16.7: Describe how viruses and bacteria transfer genetic material between cells and the role of this process in biotechnology.

SC.912.L.16.9: Explain how and why the genetic code is universal and is common to almost all organisms.

SC.912.L.16.10: Evaluate the impact of biotechnology on the individual, society, and the environment, including medical and ethical issues.


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SC.912.L.16.11: Discuss the technologies associated with forensic medicine and DNA identification, including RFLP analysis.

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SC.912.L.16.12: Describe how basic DNA technology is used to construct recombinant DNA molecules. (Sunshine State Standards, 2008, Related Benchmarks, 3-4, 7, 10-12)

National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S) (2007) include the following: 1) Creativity and Innovation. Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct

knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. 2) Digital Citizenship. Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related

to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. 3) Technology Operations and Concepts. Students demonstrate a sound understanding

of technology concepts, systems and operations. (Standards 1, 5-6) The specific objectives chosen for this lesson include the following. After completing this lesson, students will: 1) understand that DNA is the blueprint for life; 2) explain the benefits and uses of genetic engineering; 3) use biotechnological techniques to extract DNA from human cheek cells; 4) understand that the extraction of DNA can be used for genetic engineering, detection of genetic diseases, and forensic analysis (Fajardo-Cavazos & Nicholson, 2009). Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials


6 The strategies used for this lesson will be both teacher and learner centered. As previously mentioned, the writer will first present a short PowerPoint presentation on DNA, including an explanation of genetic engineering and how to extract DNA from human cheek cells. Following the short introduction, the remainder of the lesson will be student centered. Students will construct a DNA model to obtain a visual representation of DNA. Students will then proceed to extract actual DNA from cells. The following materials for this lesson include everything students will need to extract DNA: 1) One disposable 3-oz plastic cup containing 7 milliliters (ml) of clear Gatorade; 2) One 15-ml conical screw-cap disposable centrifuge tube (with 5-ml line marked); 3) digital micropipette; 4) water bath with digital thermometer; 5) test tube rack; 6) permanent marker; 7) 10% SDS (detergent) solution; 8) 5 molar NaCl salt solution; 9) 70% Isopropanol; and 10) Protease K (optional). A short video that demonstrates the DNA extraction procedure will be used for this lesson and will be shown to students prior to the actual extraction steps. Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials According to Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2011), this step in the ASSURE model involves the utilization of technology in the lesson. When implementing this step, it is best to follow the “5 Ps” process: “Preview and prepare the technology, media, and materials; prepare the environment; prepare the learners; and provide the learning experience” (Smaldino, Lowther, & Russell, 2011, p. 47). In order to carry out this lesson, the writer will prepare the PowerPoint presentation on DNA, prepare the materials for the DNA model (to be built), preview the DNA extraction video (to be watched), and prepare the materials to be used for the actual DNA extraction. Prior to the DNA extraction, the writer will perform the DNA extraction procedural steps in order to make sure that lab works. Since the students will be working in groups, each


7 group will be given the first two materials mentioned above. The remainder of the materials will be set up on a lab counter in the back of the classroom for students to use. Students will be prepared for the learning experience via the PowerPoint presentation and video and will take part in the experience once prepared. Require Learner Participation In order for students to participate in the DNA extraction part of the lesson, they will complete the following steps: 1) each student will collect check cells by swishing the Gatorade in his or her mouth 2-3 times and spitting it back into the cup; 2) each student will pour a sample into the conical centrifuge up to the 5-ml line and mark his or her name on the tube; 3) each student will add 250 microliters of 10% detergent solution, 2 ml of 5 molar NaCl solution, and 10 microliters of Protease K; 4) each student will cap the tube and mix the contents by inverting the tube several times; 5) each student will place his or her tube in the water bath at 55 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes; 6) each student will add 4 ml of isopropanol to the tube and cap; 7) after waiting 5 minutes, each student will invert his or her tube several times and observe the appearance of a white material, i.e., DNA (Fajardo-Cavazos & Nicholson, 2009). The writer will assist the students as they perform the above-mentioned steps and will proffer feedback to let them know how they are doing. Evaluate and Revise When it comes to evaluating the students, the writer will require students to type up a lab report of the DNA extraction and include the lab report as part of their e-portfolio. Students are already familiar with hard-copy portfolio requirements, but will receive prior training on how to do an e-portfolio using the website Issuu.com. Students will be polled on the writer’s website in


8 regards to the effectiveness of the lesson, how it could be improved, and so on. Based on learner input, the writer will reflect on how the lesson can be revised to better meet the objectives and student needs. Summary In summary, the ASSURE model is a model that can be used for the effective integration of technology in the classroom. ASSURE is an acronym that stands for the following: 1) analyze learners; 2) state standards and objectives; 3) select strategies, technology, media, and materials; 4) utilize technology, media, and materials; 5) require learner participation; and 6) evaluate and revise. This paper used the steps of the ASSURE model to prepare a lesson for students that involves the use of biotechnological techniques to extract human DNA. References Fajardo-Cavazos, P., & Nicholson, W. L. (2009). Show me my DNA: Engaging Florida elementary students in biotechnology. Retrieved from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mb003.

Florida Sunshine State Standards. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.floridastandards.org/Standards/PublicPreviewIdea587.aspx.

National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). (2007). Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students/nets-student-standards-2007.aspx.

Smaldino, S. E., Lowther, D. L., & Russell, J. D. (2011). Instructional technology and media for learning. Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.

Technology Integration Matrix. (2010). Retrieved from http://fcit.usf.edu/matrix/index.html.


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