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MARCH 19-25, 2009 VOL 7 NO 12 • LACITYBEAT.COM • FREE EVERY THURSDAY •WE DRANK VITAMIN WATER ON DEADLINE, SAW GOD, WE THINK

THEY VOTE TO SUCK YOUR BLOOD DAVID ICKE EXPLAINS HOW TO EARN YOUR FREEDOM FROM THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION’S REPTILIAN MIND CONTROL MACHINE

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LACITYBEAT 2 MARCH 19-25, 2009

CONTENTS March 19-25, 2009 volume 7 issue 12

21 05 News

For the past decade, L.A. has sold its public space to advertisers to help keep its streets clean. Matthew Fleischer explains why it hasn’t worked.

08 On the Cover

David Icke explains how to earn your freedom from the Obama administration’s reptilian mind control machine. By Nathaniel Page.

10 Eat

Miles Clements faces the ultimate stomachscorching cuisine.

11 Film

Tom Child says I Love You, Man walks beside you and is your friend. What happens when oldmoney psychopaths become a handful of horny freaks guarded by Lon Chaney Jr.? Ron Garmon previews Sid Haig Week at the New Beverly.

18 Music

Chris Ziegler talks chrome dreams with Avi

Buffalo, indie rock class of ’09 – and Millikan High class of ’09, too. And Sarah Tressler reports that Shwayze is as smooth as goose shit.

19 Art “These few dozen photos, clustered in a cozy maze within this stylish cavern of a museum, increase what we know of the Black Panthers, their supports and of photographer Howard Bingham himself.” Ron Garmon visits the California African American History Museum.

20 Stage Don Shirley goes to the theater to figure out whether such film hits The Graduate and Frost/ Nixon work better on stage. COVER ART BY LUKE MCGARRY Although David Icke specifies that Obama is merely a puppet of the reptilians, we present to you this terrifying what-if scenario-for entertainment purposes only.

Think Santa Monica First For Rocky and Hannah Keever, owners of Three Dog Bakery, Santa Monica is the natural choice for their store because dogs are at home here, as are trees, birds and blooms. When you support businesses like theirs, you help the environment, invigorate the local economy and encourage entrepreneurship. Buy in Downtown Santa Monica and be a community’s best friend.

MANAGING Editor Tom Child Executive Editor Chris Ziegler Senior Editor Matthew Fleischer Arts Editor Ron Garmon Copy Editor Joshua Sindell Editorial Contributors Miles Clements, Alan Rich, Richard Foss, Carl Kozlowski, Joe Piasecki, Don Shirley, Greg Stacy, Jeffrey Anderson, Cornel Bonca, David Cotner, Daiana Feuer, Oliver Hall RESEARCH Guelda Voien Editorial Interns Sarah Tressler Art Director Paul Takizawa Web & Print Production Manager Meghan Quinn Classified Production Artist Tac Phun Contributing Artists and Photographers Joe McGarry, Luke McGarry, Josh Reiss, Rosheila Robles Sales DIrector Michael DeFilippo Sales Supervisor Bill Child Co-op Advertising Director Spencer Cooper Music & Entertainment Sales Manager Jon Bookatz Account Executives Patrick Hodgins, Andy Enriquez, Alex Kaptsan, John Schoenkopf, Jason Stanley VP of Operations David Comden VP of Finance Michael Nagami Human Resources Manager Andrea Baker Accounting Ginger Wang, Archie Iskaq, Tracy Lowe, Christie Lee, Angela Wang (Business Manager) Circulation Supervisor Andrew Jackson Receptionist Candon Murry Publisher Will Swaim

“Santa Monica is a dog-loving community. We are ‘yappy’ to be here!” - Rocky & Hannah Keever, Three Dog Bakery

LA CITY BEAT newspaper is published every Thursday and is available free at locations throughout Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley. One copy per reader, additional copies are $10 each. Copyright: No articles, illustrations, photographs, or other editorial matter or advertisements herein may be reproduced without written permission of copyright owner. All rights reserved, 2009.

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For every $100 you spend in Santa Monica, $45 stays in the local economy. Buying locally supports a sustainable Santa Monica.

MARCH 19-25, 2009 3 LACITYBEAT

LETTERS AW, YOU NOTICED!

Thank you for picking up Tony Millionaire’s Maakies. Great seeing cartoon characters with real vices again. L.A. Weekly has really been dropping the ball on a lot of fronts. Your coverage of news, art, music and restaurants saves the day. Ken Roskos Via e-mail

ENOUGH, ENOUGH, WE’RE BLUSHING

Re: “Drinks Issue 2009,” March 12: What a fun issue! Ladonafeliz Via LAcitybeat.com

WHAT, IS IT OUR BIRTHDAY?

Re: “Arthur, We Love You,” March 12: You wrote this so well. An absolutely perfect telling of Verocai’s epic influence and style. Reading this was almost as good as watching it last night. Semidivina Via LAcitybeat.com

OH NO, APPARENTLY IT’S NOT

Re: “Critic Tested, Kid Approved,” March 12: Oh, for f ’s sake, Tom. I don’t want to be a total dick here, because you usually know your stuff

this community works. George Torres is not a crook, not a dealer, not a street thug or anything like that. He’s a community leader. In our community, you’ve got some clowns that will tell anybody anything. That’s who the government has to testify. But George has THAT’S CLASSIC Re: Alan Rich’s “Not-So-Great Expectations,” friends in this community, friends like me March 12: I hated classical music reviews until who will tell the truth and blow the lid off this I read Alan Rich years ago. Before Rich, the thing. Why don’t you just stay covering Beverly writing seemed, I don’t know, stodgy, religious, Hills? Name Withheld By Request respectful, like the reviewer was watching God Via e-mail conduct angels in a Jesus composition: No criticism allowed. Reading this week’s review reminded me how much I’ve missed him. JESUS IS JUST NOT RIGHT WITH HIM Rich writes about the L.A. music scene like it Re: William Lobdell’s “Abandon All Hope, matters. Zubin Mehta? He “walks onstage as Christians,” March 5: William is absolutely if he’d just peed in his pants.” Joseph Marx? correct. It seems that the Christians will do Tom Child responds: If I had intended a “Dinosaur.” Alan Rich? Ass-kicker. Good to just about anything to drag us into their mass. They’re like cancerous cells trying to recruit the wisecrack, I might have found a way to work have him back. rest of the healthy body. I think that if they’d Doug Loh in the fact that in 12-step parlance, “dropping Via e-mail just keep their crazy beliefs to themselves, we’d the rock” is a euphemism for abandoning your all be better off. character defects in an effort to improve your FrankieAvocado WE DON’T KNOW JACK. OR GEORGE. life. Now THAT’S a wisecrack. But I like Johnson Via LAcitybeat.com and have no beef with professional wrestling BUT WE KNOW B.H. in general. In fact, I received a bit of academic Re: Jeffrey Anderson’s “The Trials of Mexican training in the subject in college; the phrase “neo- George,” February 19: You guys don’t know Send letters to editor@lacitybeat.com or do it up old populist vaudeville” is seared onto my brain as anything. You got this all wrong. The federal school: Letters to the Editor, L.A. CITY BEAT, 5209 a result. You have a point about the LAFCAs investigators you talked to don’t know how Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036. about older movies … but seriously: “Dwayne Johnson (who recently abandoned his “The Rock” moniker in a bid for more critical consideration) … .” No need to let it get in the way of a good wisecrack or anything, but the tiniest bit of research might have helped here. “The Rock” is trademarked by WWE, and any time Dwayne used it, he had to pay them part of his salary; he ditched it as soon as he was contractually able. It wasn’t about critical consideration in the least ... do you really think Race to Witch Mountain is going to win a LAFCA award, no matter what the actor is named? LYT Via LAcitybeat.com

caring more about quality and less about names, though. Who can forget their groundbreaking decision to award the 2008 Best Director award to Danny “The British Bruiser” Boyle?

LACITYBEAT 4 MARCH 19-25, 2009

NEWS

PHOTO by MATThew fliescher

bus bench advertising? results may vary

Trashed For the past decade L.A. has sold its public space to advertisers to help keep its streets clean – it hasn’t worked By Matthew Fleischer The sidewalk underneath Highway 2 on Colorado Boulevard in Eagle Rock isn’t the most disgusting place in Los Angeles, but it’s certainly up there. Grease-stained takeout boxes, discarded newspapers, half-finished sodas and piles of chicken bones from the Popeye’s up the street line the curb. Though it will probably take a week or two for someone to come clean up most

of the trash, the chicken bones won’t be there for too long at least. By night, rats and mice storm from nearby brush to polish off the remains. The newspapers will most likely fly away in the breeze to destinations unknown. So, what is this place, you must be thinking – a homeless colony? Actually, no.

Straddling the border between Glendale and Eagle Rock, this spot under the highway is the origin of the popular 81 bus line, as well as the Dash line to the Highland Park Gold Line train stops. Shoppers on their way home from nearby Eagle Rock Plaza, who would rather sit in the shade of the overpass than deal with the heat of the exposed Colorado Boulevard stop, wait

MARCH 19-25, 2009 5 LACITYBEAT

here for the bus. As do commuters on their way to L.A. from Glendale. This dark, filthy spot is one of the most trafficked public transit hubs in the area. And there’s not a single trash can in sight. It’s illegal to bring food or drinks on an L.A. Metro bus. So, naturally, anyone who grabs a bite to eat while waiting for the bus is stuck with the dilemma of bringing their ➤

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3/16/09

1:54 PM

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NEWS

food with them, and risking a stiff fine, or chucking their trash on the curb. Judging from the look of things, many people choose to avoid the fine. This situation isn’t unique to Eagle Rock. The Los Angeles Public Works Bureau of Street Services keeps up roughly 3,000 trash bins throughout the city. Metro, however, has nearly 6,000 bus stops. “We don’t have the budget to put a trash bin at every stop,” says John Sapone, manager of the Street Maintenance division of the Bureau of Street Services. “We’d have to double our fleet of trucks, each of which costs a few hundred thousand dollars. And of course that doesn’t include the cost of hiring new drivers.” Nearly a decade ago, however, the city figured out a way to defray the costs of street cleanup through something it called the Norman Advertising Bus Bench Program. According to the program’s contract, a company called Norman Advertising would install bus benches across the city, maintain them, and keep them clean and graffiti-free. The city could demand up to one out of every four of these bus benches come equipped with a trash bin, installed and maintained by Norman Advertising. Discretion over the placement of these bins was supposed to fall under the control of the Bureau of Street Services. In exchange, Norman would sell ads on public benches, with the city taking a cut of the revenue. In theory, the contract could have boosted L.A.’s public trash bin presence by nearly 50 percent. The program’s oversight, however, has proved nothing short of disastrous. Neither Sapone nor anyone else at Street Maintenance seems able to answer how many trash bins Norman Advertising actually maintains and where those bins are located. One Street Services enforcement official says he was unaware the one-tofour provision even existed. Enforcement doesn’t even keep track of the number of trash bins. A casual survey of benches in the Eagle Rock area reveals a bench-totrash bin ratio far below the one in four the city is allowed to demand. The trash bins that Norman does operate are often ill-maintained and emptied infrequently, and have been the subject of numerous public complaints. Anecdotally speaking, it’s rare to see an L.A. bus bench that doesn’t at least have a tag or two. L.A.’s bus-stop filth is so bad it has become a source of international, internet mockery. A photo on the popular website Fail Blog shows a tagged-up L.A. bus bench with a public service advertisement telling L.A. residents to help keep their city “Clean and Safe.” In front of the bench is an overflowing trash bin. “I think it’s pretty obvious that contract isn’t working out so well,” says Sapone. But why is that, exactly? Sapone doesn’t have an answer. “Aside from responding to public

LACITYBEAT 6 MARCH 19-25, 2009

complaints,” says Sapone, “I have absolutely nothing to do with the Norman contract.” Three years ago, in response to the complaints about the filth surrounding the city’s bus benches, the L.A. City Council audited the Norman Advertising program. The audit determined “Norman Advertising’s prompt responsiveness to service requests has diminished slightly.” The city needed to “pursue Norman Advertising to correct such service deficiencies if the frequency of these infractions increases above their current levels.” The audit failed to mention the one-tofour ratio. “There’s no question we don’t have enough oversight on the program,” says City Councilman Tom LaBonge, whose office, in the wake of the audit, helped oversee the hiring of three new street furniture inspectors. “The only way to do it is to hire more inspectors,” says LaBonge. That’s not the only way to keep L.A. clean, however. The city has tried one more route. In 2001, city officials signed a separate street furniture contract with Viacom Decaux to provide bus shelters at various Metro bus stops throughout the city. That contract, too, allotted for trash bins. As per the contract, for every 18 trash cans installed and maintained by Viacom, L.A. residents have to endure 100 panels of advertising. In order to achieve this ratio, Viacom was given permission to set up tri-paneled advertising kiosks throughout the city. One kiosk plus a two-sided bus shelter advertisement is almost enough to get the city a single trash can. Of course, there aren’t too many communities thrilled with the prospect of enduring five advertising panels for every fully equipped bus shelter. Viacom needs the approval of the city council for each shelter they build. Unlike the Norman contract, however, the city has no authority to tell Viacom where to put their trash bins. So don’t expect a cleanup in the dark, advertising-unfriendly hole under the 2 anytime soon. Then there’s this: Six months before the Viacom contract was signed, City Hall enacted a ban on all new billboards. Advertising companies alleged preferential treatment for Viacom and sued the city. Though the ad companies recently lost in court, the contract dispute has cost the city bundles in legal fees. Not to mention the antics of artist, ad-man and shameless self-promoter Michael McNeilly, who has plastered annoying Statue of Liberty “supergraphics” – giant images he illegally attaches to the sides of buildings – throughout the city in protest. The city is stuck with the Viacom contract until 2021. The Norman Advertising Bus Bench contract, however, expires at the end of the year. Maybe this time around we can just pay for our own trash cans. ✶

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3/12/09

9:12 AM

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GEN-JE-09-010 ©2009 LACMTA

$

—Jonathan S.

’ David Icke explains how to earn your freedom from the Obama administration’s reptilian mind control machine By Nathaniel Page

hese people are serious blooddrinkers!” David Icke bellows, prodding the air with an index finger. An aging English gentleman with a gunmetal gray mullet and a gut, Icke paces back and forth across the stage of the International Ballroom at the LAX Hilton. His fists are clenched. Beads of sweat glisten at his temples. The packed crowd of 300 sits at attention. “The idea that Obama just arrived and attracted the greatest funding – ran the slickest campaign in the history of the country – that’s just a fairy tale,” Icke says. “Who do you think was behind this? There are no miracles, people.” I’m sitting in the audience, surrounded mostly by wave-field consciousness kooks who think the government is stealing their brainwaves. To my left is a mildly obese man named Thomas who tells me that he is “keeping an open mind.” To my right sits a gray-haired lady in a wool sweater who nods solemnly and murmurs with each of Icke’s pronouncements.

T

LACITYBEAT 8 MARCH 19-25, 2009

It’s late evening on Monday, February 16. Icke is a keynote speaker at the Los Angeles Conscious Life Expo. For the past three days, both Hilton ballrooms and a separate conference center have been filled with secret crystal shaman worshipers, people with copper-wire pyramids stuck on their heads and crown chakra snake oil salesman. Despite the economic malaise, the speakers – dilettantes in Oriental mysticism, Mayan apocalypse prophesies and Babylonian tablet claims – each charge a stiff fee. At 95 bucks, Icke’s “Mega Talk” fee may be the stiffest. But Expo organizers have definitely saved the best for last. Amongst the innocuous crystal worshipers has suddenly stepped a fiery, half-mad demagogue known for televised selfdeification and his prophesies of British doom by tsunami. Right-wing nationalist groups on both sides of the Atlantic have praised him for his rants on international institutions and Judaism. Icke’s Howard Beale-esque ravings have intrigued me for years. I’ve been waiting to check out the Mega Talk for months, but since I can’t afford a ticket, I had to sign up as a volunteer at the Expo to get in. For 15 hours throughout the weekend, I stuffed baggies with promotional literature and made sure that everyone going into the exhibitors’ area had the proper armband – all for the chance to earn my freedom from the Obama administration’s reptilian mind control machine. “Get ready for seven hours of pure madness,” a fellow volunteer warned me before Icke went on. “He’ll blow your mind.” That was no exaggeration. “Puppet! Puppet! Puppet!” Icke says, hunched in front of a projector and flipping through photos of Obama, George Tenet, Treasury Secretary Geithner, Obama mentor Zbigniew Brzezinski. “Rahm Emanuel’s father was part of a terrorist group that bombed Israel into existence,” Icke says. “Brzezinski wants a world bank controlling a microchipped population. These are real blood-drinking bloodlines, people!”

wo decades ago, David Icke had an awakening – an intergalactic fascist conspiracy is afoot. A retired pro footballer and sports anchor, Icke was working as a Green Party spokesperson at the time. “I got hit by a bloody Exocet missile, is what happened,” he says of his illumination. “Couldn’t remember me name for three months, mate. I was minding me business, and me head blew off.” Orchestrating the conspiracy is a cabal of inter-dimensional, shape-shifting, oft-invisible, cannibalistic, psychopath reptilian-humanoids – progeny of bloodlines from the Draco constellation. Icke has produced 13 thick books about the conspiracy and has traveled the world prodigiously since his awakening,

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spreading the word to all those with the will and means to listen. Every person in a position of power in every realm of society – politics, mass media, science, academia, banking, industry, military – they’re all either reptilians or helpless pawns in the reptilians’ plot. The reptilians have engineered every major event in the history of the world to manipulate the human body-politic. A few years ago, while tripping on Ayahuasca in the Brazilian rainforest, Icke heard a “female voice” tell him many things about our former president, for instance. The reptilians deployed George W. Bush to break the country down, Icke says. Then they offered up Obama as a savior. Icke’s “great friend” Credo Mutwa, a South African witch doctor, further warned him of this “hope hoax.” In a poem, Mutwa calls Obama “Judas” and tells him: “They will put around your head a bloodwet martyrs crown/Oh black Kennedy following the one before/May God forgive thee and thy fiery spouse.” The cover graphic on the speaker’s latest book – The David Icke Guide to the Global Conspiracy, on sale at the Expo for $25 – shows the flags of the European Union, NATO, Israel, England and Algeria all swirling into a reptile eye, alongside portraits of Queen Elizabeth, Rudy Giuliani, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and Hillary Clinton. If all this sounds crazy, there seems to be no shortage of people willing to eat it up. “What most impressed me,” said one man in line before the show, “is that [Icke] has a picture of Obama with the word ‘fraud’ right on the front of his website. I always knew Obama was a fraud.” “The election was rigged,” he continued. “Probably black ops,” his friend said. Amongst my coworkers at the Expo is Andy, an animated Redondo Beach dude whose friends think he’s lost his mind, and two tattooed rockers named Sean and Tom. Like me, Andy was putting in three shifts for Icke. Sean and Tom won positions as parking enforcers while the rest of us stuffed baggies. After our first shift, Sean and Tom invited Andy and I to smoke a bowl in the underground parking garage. As we hotboxed Sean’s subcompact, Tom filled me in on a dark, Illuminati coming-of-age ritual. A mother imprisons her child until the child becomes extremely thirsty. She brings a pitcher of water to the child at intervals, but does not offer him any. If the child asks for a drink, she beats him to a pulp. “The kid’s thinking, ‘Oh my God, this is my mother!’” Tom said. “And she’s just beating the living shit out of him.” Only when the child stops asking, Tom explained, does she give him a drink: “It’s about learning that ‘you do not ask. You are given.’” After we finished and went back upstairs, Andy downed two glasses of wine and claimed that his family are Illuminati. His grandmother, he assured me, was a broomflying witch. “I’ll just put it this way,” he said, “we had roosters, and they disappeared.” He insisted the reptilians will soon

lure us all into underground concentration camps by way of a pandemic hoax. “They want to drink your blood,” he said, “but they prefer to do it when you’re terrified. They like the chemicals your body releases when you’re terrified.” Andy says he once worked as a producer under Clint Eastwood. He would sort Eastwood’s mail and insists the actor is a reptilian. Eastwood would receive letters from the “Bohemian Club.” As a higher-up told Andy, “it’s just a bunch of rich guys who act like total fags for a couple weeks every year. But they rule the world, so don’t fuck around with it, and never open any of that mail.” “When the reptilians think, you can see them moving their reptilian tongues around in their mouths,” Andy said, “like this.” He closed his mouth and rolled his tongue around under his cheeks. “I used to see Clint doing that.”

eptilians have a long history in Los Angeles. They constructed one of their elaborate subterranean cities below downtown 5,000 years ago. According to Hopi legend, “their city is laid out like a lizard,” the Los Angeles Times reported on January 29, 1934. “Its tail to the southwest, far below Fifth and Hope streets, its head to the northeast, at Lookout and Marda streets. The city’s key room is situated directly under south Broadway.” Icke says it all began with the lost continents of Atlantis and Lemuria. Back then, people were able to levitate, cause spontaneous combustion and talk to whales. When those continents sunk, the reptilians established all the ancient civilizations of the world. They’ve since littered history with symbols of their dominance and reptilian origins: the Chinese dragon, the Alfa Romeo logo, the Statue of Liberty, and “an enormous willy” called the Golden Penis of Nimrod. An English Nazi militia called Combat 18 once reckoned that Icke was one of their own, perhaps because his theory resembles so closely that of the International Jewish Conspiracy. Russian rabble-rousers of old often drummed up pogroms against the Jews by calling them blood-drinkers. Icke responded by claiming that Combat 18 is a front for the Anti-Defamation League, which is in turn a front for the Mossad, which is controlled by the Rothschild banking conglomerate, who are shapeshifting reptilians. “Zionism is Rothschildism!” Icke further explains at the Expo. “It is Illuminati-ism! Jacob Rothschild doesn’t give a damn about Jews. Rothschild wants war with Iran! Rothschild wants war with China!” Icke is too paranoid and scatterbrained to be a Nazi, though. The reptilians probably consider him a 40th-tier threat. In the realm of mainstream politics, Icke would fall somewhere between a radical libertarian and a schizophrenic anarchist. In appealing to kooks across a spectrum ranging from

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MARCH 19-25, 2009 9 LACITYBEAT

neo-Nazi to wave-field stoner, he exposes his theories as devoid of tangible content. He hates the establishment, and that’s about it. Anyone else who hates the establishment can sympathize. There is no point in pegging him. He defies all conventions of reasonable discourse. As Andy put it: “I just love to hear him stick it to The Man.”

t’s at least four hours into the seminar and Icke isn’t slowing down. “Ted Heath!” Icke spits as he flips to a slide of the former British prime minister. Icke says he once encountered Heath alone in a dressing room. “Heath didn’t say a thing, just looked me up and down. It was like he was scanning me. And then his eyes went black. Looking into them was like looking into a black hole, but I knew I was really looking into another dimension. Ted Heath! There you have it: satanist, blooddrinker, child molester, mind controller, shape-shifting reptilian ... .” Icke goes on to explain that one of the reptilians’ latest hoaxes is global warming. “Temperatures are falling,” he insists. Temperature changes are the work of nothing more than sunspots. Al Gore and other members of the “Babylonian Brotherhood” have engineered an hysteria to force another level of control on the world population. “I learned long ago that anything Al Gore is involved in is a hoax,” Icke says. “The environmental movement is being played like a violin! “The world is so bloody crazy, it thinks it’s sane. They say I’m out of my mind, and I say good! We need to get out of our minds.” By hour seven, I am so exhausted from trying to keep up with Icke that I nearly miss his last proclamation. In the future, humans will not have to eat. Our need for food is simply a symptom of the reptilians sucking our energy from us. “When consciousness manifests itself,” Icke says, exuding measured profundity, “animals will not have to kill each other to survive. The lion will lay with the lamb. “Miracles can happen!” “Woo!” shouts a front-row spectator. Assorted clapping. The gray-haired lady sighs. Sitting amongst the cheering throng, the whole scene suddenly begins to make sense. These people probably all know Icke is basically batty, but that doesn’t mean they think he’s wrong. He’s a court-jester version of Morpheus from The Matrix. The notion that there is something vast and deeply malicious behind this cruel mess we call the world isn’t particularly novel. The reptilians are a representation of forces beyond our control – a Star Trek Satan. $95 can buy a person two weeks’ worth of food. But, strange as it sounds, Icke’s audience seems to be receiving something more nourishing. Icke straightens and looks into the distance. “We are consciousness!” he says, rising to a crescendo. “I am freedom!”✶

I

eat

smoked hunan ham with spicy bean curd

BITES

PHOTO by roshEIla robles

Something New

This Heat Xiang Wei Lou’s stomach-scorching cuisine By Miles Clements There’s some fiery foreshadowing in Xiang Wei Lou’s dining room – garlands of chiles dangling from the walls and one diner wearily padding the sweat from his forehead. The restaurant has what might seem to be all the makings of a sadistic meal – a place apparently fond of the most unearthly kind of heat. But Xiang Wei Lou doesn’t indiscriminately do spice for the sake of spice. Every dish here is measured and attuned to a careful proportion of capsaicin. The still-shiny San Gabriel restaurant – a clean but not uncomfortably sterile space in the shadow of the marbled Hilton San Gabriel – specializes in Hunanese cuisine, the chile-charged cooking of China’s

southeastern Hunan province. It’s food famous for its adrenaline-chasing burn, one that’s often compared to that of the nearby Sichuan province. But Hunanese dishes pursue a different, drier heat. Xiang Wei Lou isn’t quite as boastful about its chile-heavy menu as some of its neighbors – Hunan Chili King, for example – but the restaurant’s specialties are still plenty obvious. The requisite dish here (and the one that seems to land on most every table) is Xiang Wei Lou’s steamed whole fish. Elsewhere, you might only find fish heads – huge things plated in shallow, peppery pools. But here you get the entire fish, tail and all, completely broken down by a steady rush of steam. By the time it

hits the table, the fish’s flesh can practically be massaged off its tiny, splintery bones, yielding buttery bites of meat flavored with equal parts chile and garlic. And because the fish is served whole, you won’t miss the head’s most pleasurable piece – the cheeks. The rest of the menu includes all the necessary stomach-scalding highlights, but the best are corralled into a corner and given the chef ’s recommendation. Within this section are a number of essentials, like frog legs and crispy shards of pork skin, the latter of which arrives like some translated version of chicharrones. But for a break from Xiang Wei Lou’s pure heat, order the restaurant’s smoked ham. Although it’s a staple at spots like Xiang Wei Lou, the smoked ham might seem something of an anomaly, considering that it’s basically bacon. Still, given its preparation – tossed into quick-cooking stir-fries that balance its black rinds with vegetables and chiles – the ham fits right in with the rest of the menu, offered with accompanying helpings of string beans, kernel-like pieces of dried radish or wobbly blocks of tofu. Not every dish is designed to make you sweat, but if you need a quick cool-down, flip the menu over to find a much milder selection of vegetables. There are, of course, plenty of ways to keep the heat on, namely the potatoes tossed with (yes) chiles. But most of the vegetable dishes keep it clean with mushrooms and cabbage. Sautéed ong choy – a straw-like green that’s something like a hybrid of spinach and watercress – is great for its simplicity: it’s a garlicky bowl of vegetables that goes a long way toward wiping away any lingering heat. Xiang Wei Lou’s kitchen can dial down the spice if necessary – medium seems to be the limit for more soft-stomached mortals – but you don’t want to erase the taste of the chiles completely. Because the restaurant cooks with care, that heat is crucial – an amplifying element that can turn dishes like cumin-dusted lamb into stratospheric successes. ✶

After a glut of new spots downtown

Xiang Wei Lou, 227 W. Valley Blvd., San Gabriel, (626) 289-2276. Open daily 10:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Food for two: $20-$30. Cash only.

me.

LACITYBEAT 10 MARCH 19-25, 2009

and beyond, Silver Lake has snagged a couple of restaurant openings of its own. On the higher end is Reservoir, which apparently subscribes to the same proximity-based naming scheme as downtown’s Library Bar. Helmed by Gloria Felix (previously of Lucques, AOC and others), Reservoir’s menu is based around so-called “setups,” which typically include a pair of sides to accompany the “featured dishes,” things like skirt steak with chimichurri and pan-seared chicken breast. On the casual end is Café Bravo, a Hyperion-local alternative to the omnipresent Zankou Chicken. Like its Glendale outpost, the Silver Lake location focuses mostly on kabobs (lule, pork and Cornish hen kabobs are all offered), although falafel and roasted chicken will be added to the menu soon. Visit Reservoir at silverlakereservoir.com and Café Bravo at bravokabob.com.

Pour House Riva, the Santa Monica restaurant from Jason Travi (also of Culver City’s Fraiche), continues its monthly Italian wine classes on March 21. Led by Sommelier Thierry Perez, the two-hour class will explore wines from Italy’s Piedmont region. Travi will also be whipping up food pairings to accompany the class. Call (310) 451-7482 or visit rivarestaurantla. com for details.

Testing, Testing Pop into La Cachette for a preview of dishes from the forthcoming La Cachette Bistro, which is set to open this summer. Look for the requisite mussels and tuna carpaccio, as well as a braised lamb shank and a rum baba. Call (310) 470-4992 for more info.✶ –M.C. Tips accepted … e-mail miles@ eatfoodwith.me or visit eatfoodwith.

FILM

Paul Rudd and Jason Segel make noise for boys

Bros Before Who?

‘I Love You, Man’ walks beside you and is your friend By Tom Child It’s been four years since Judd Apatow released The 40-Year-Old Virgin to critical acclaim and box office success, and while the man didn’t invent the wellmeaning gross-out comedy genre, he certainly perfected it to the point where “Apatow-esque” necessitates little further description. While Apatow’s name doesn’t appear anywhere on this John Hamburgdirected film, his comedic influence is apparent, right down to the casting of Apatow mainstays Paul Rudd and Jason Segel in the lead roles. And though it might not quite match Apatow’s best, I Love You, Man’s consistent good humor – and surprising insight into human relationships – raises it above most romantic comedies. Paul Rudd plays Realtor Peter Klaven, newly engaged to Rashida Jones’ Zooey,

but conspicuously lacking in male friends to nominate as his best man. At the urging of Zooey and his family, Klaven embarks on a mission to find a best guy friend in advance of the wedding. At an open house, he meets and is quickly charmed by Jason Segel’s Sydney Fife. Klaven, buttoneddown and mature, is attracted to Fife’s more free-wheeling ways and they initiate a friendship in which Fife (who lives in Venice Beach) bemusedly encourages Klaven to loosen up and embrace his Id. Unfortunately, the intensity of the friendship begins to trouble Zooey, who is concerned that the man she fell in love with may be more honest and relaxed around his new man friend than he is around her. It would have been easy to make a godawful comedy based on this premise

– square befriends bro, square’s girlfriend says no – but I Love You, Man tries harder. Zooey might have been written and performed as a possessive fuddy-duddy; Fife a Blutarsky-like buffoon; Klaven a personality-deprived nebbish. It could have been a too-long series of soft punch lines for stunted man-babies instead of the reasonably mature piece of work it is. To be fair, the film does have a fart gag or two, and, yes, a few gentle jokes centered around Klaven’s accidental dinner date with a gay man – but as a whole the film avoids cliché. I Love You, Man instead enjoys happily precise writing (Hamburg and Larry Levin) and uniformly committed performances. Rashida Jones plays Zooey as a woman who handles legitimate relationship issues with honesty and all possible reason. In

MARCH 19-25, 2009 11 LACITYBEAT

the maddeningly charming hands of Paul Rudd, it’s easy to see why one would want Klaven around as a husband or best friend, straitlaced though he is. And Segel’s Fife is ultimately lovable, intelligent and capable, despite his occasional lapses of judgment. Like the Apatow oeuvre to which it is indebted, I Love You, Man benefits most not from its ability to get a laugh from projectile vomit, but from its sensitive, witty analysis of emotionally intimate social relationships and all of their attendant highs and lows. Love – even platonic love – is complicated. I Love You, Man understands. V I Love You, Man. Directed by John Hamburg. Featuring Paul Rudd, Jason Segel and Rashida Jones. Citywide.

FILM

Support your local badass

few of those who saw Spider Baby upon first release doubted this was the best Old Dark House movie of all time when it finally hit the drive-in circuit at the end of the 1960s. (Deposited as a small boy before this grave-digger’s sex farce by errant hippie babysitters, it made such a dent that for years I jabbered about negligees, horny inbreeds and the lopped-off ear of Mantan Moreland to any incautious enough to admire Eraserhead within earshot.) Then the movie was rediscovered (to general acclaim) early in the 1990s. Shot in Highland Park at the then-dilapidated Smith Estate – which Hill masterfully transports to some dusty void past Pahrump – Spider Baby explores the dubious genetic legacy of the Merrye family, once old-money psychopaths now shrunk to a handful of horny freaks guarded by faithful retainer Bruno (Lon Chaney, Jr.). Haig is Ralph Merrye, a sex-crazed pinhead reduced to grunting libido by the time lawyers and pretty girls descend upon this mutant arcadia. The movie “kinda predated stuff that would get a lot more acclaim,” Haig says now. “It was made eleven years before Texas Chainsaw Massacre, fourteen before Rocky Horror. A lot of those later films had that kind of feel to it.” Haig’s excellence at the delicate art of comic menace walked him through future cult cinema like Point Blank, THX 1138 and Emperor of the North, in between trips to the Philippines. (“I think I made ten films there, but not consecutive,” Haig says. “I did four in a row and I was there for six months at one stretch.”) One of the first residents at the Intercontinental Hotel, the actor lived grandly while sweating in gonzo action movies like The Big Bird Cage, also by Hill, where Sid and Pam mastermind a mass breakout at a women’s prison run by the usual savage pigs. “It was I think number three in the series of films I did there,” he says. “Companies would come into town and say ‘Oh, God! Sid Haig’s still here!’” The actor programs the following week at the New Bev, with Sam Peckinpah’s Ride the High Country and The Wild Bunch on Wednesday and Thursday, with The Thing from Another World and House of Wax on Friday and Saturday. Sunday and Monday is Lawrence of Arabia, with Haig hailing Peter O’Toole’s star turn as “a classic, with the insanity level very subtly escalating throughout. Anyone into film acting should look at that one about 500 times in order to get an idea of what their job is.” On Tuesday, March 31, the week concludes with a pair of rare starring vehicles: Hill’s Pit Stop, shows evolution of a public menace along with Little Big Top, a decidedly more realistic twisted-clown story than Haig’s turns as Captain Spaulding in Rob Zombie’s feverish House of 1000 Corpses Tide (1961) in the gothic-expressionist cult are on display this week at the New and The Devil’s Rejects. V manner Hollywood perfected between Beverly when Spider Baby – last of the the world wars. In 1964, first-time great Hollywood black-and-white horror A Tribute to Sid Haig, with Spider Baby writer-director Jack Hill ended what Tod films – screens along with The Big Bird and The Big Bird Cage, at the New Beverly Browning began with a corking parody Cage (1972), featuring Haig leering at the Cinema, 7165 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. of the art that crowned the Lon Chaney exquisite Pam Grier. newbevcinema.com. Starts Tue., 7:30 Quentin Tarantino has evangelized p.m. $4-$6. Complete schedule and more legend, and simultaneously launched the cult of Sid Haig. The primal texts of that on behalf of Jack Hill for years, but information at newbevcinema.com.

‘Oh God! Sid Haig’s Still Here!’ Sid Haig Week at the New Bev By Ron Garmon Film savants across all schisms agree the black-and-white horror film was dead by the 1950s. Displaced by cheap spaceopera and Technicolor throat-slash cranked out by the kilometer in the U.K., the form went underground, producing occasional minor-key masterpieces like I Bury the Living (1958) and Night

LACITYBEAT 12 MARCH 19-25, 2009

HUGELY ENJOYABLE.

PAUL RUDD AND JASON SEGEL ARE HOWLINGLY FUNNY.” Peter Travers

“ONE

OF THE FUNNIEST MOVIES OF THE DECADE.” Steve Oldfield, FOX-TV

“THE

SMARTEST COMEDY OF THE YEAR!” Liam Mayclem, CBS-TV

“IT’S THE

REAL DEAL – A HILARIOUS, FOUL-MOUTHED, BIG-HEARTED SURPRISE.” Stephen Rebello, PLAYBOY

STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 20 AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES

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SHOWTIMES MAR. 20-26, 2009 Note: Times are p.m., and daily, unless otherwise indicated. All times are subject to ch ange without notice.

BURBANK AMC Burbank 16, 140 E Palm Av, (818) 9539800. Coraline 3D Fri-Sat 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 8:05, 9:40, 10:35; Sun 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 8:05, 9:40; Mon-Wed 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 8:05, 9:40; Thur 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40. Duplicity Fri 10:55 a.m., 1:55, 4:50, 7:55, 11; Sat 10:55 a.m., 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 11; Sun 10:55 a.m., 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:45; Mon-Thur 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:25. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri-Sun 10:40 a.m., 1:35, 4:35, 7:30, 10:25; Mon-Thur 1:20, 4:15, 7:20, 10:15. I Love You, Man Fri 11:45 a.m., 12:45, 2:30, 3:30, 5:15, 6:15, 8, 9:05, 10:45, 11:45; Sat 11:45 a.m., 12:45, 2:30, 3:30, 5:10, 6:15, 8, 9:05, 10:45, 11:45; Sun 11:45 a.m., 12:45, 2:30, 3:30, 5:10, 6:15, 8, 9:05, 10:40; MonThur 1:05, 2:25, 3:35, 5:05, 6:15, 7:40, 9:05, 10:20. Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience in Disney Digital 3D Fri-Sun 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 3:45, 5:55; Mon 3:45, 5:55; Tue 5:55; Wed 1:40, 3:45, 5:55; Thur 12:55, 2:55, 5:10.

Knowing Fri-Sat 11:40 a.m., 2:40, 5:45, 8:40, 11:40; Sun 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:15; Mon-Thur 1:50, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sun 10:50 a.m., 1:30, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55; Mon-Thur 1:30, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55. Metropolitan Opera: La Sonnambula Sat only, 10 a.m. Miss March Fri-Sun 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:35; Mon-Thur 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:35. Race to Witch Mountain Fri 10:45 a.m., 12:10, 1:15, 2:45, 3:50, 5:25, 6:25, 8:15, 9, 10:55; Sat 10:40 a.m., 12:10, 1:15, 2:45, 3:50, 5:25, 6:25, 8:15, 9, 10:55; Sun 10:40 a.m., 12:10, 1:15, 2:45, 3:50, 5:25, 6:25, 8:10, 9; Mon-Thur 1:15, 2:45, 3:50, 5:25, 6:25, 8:10, 9. Slumdog Millionaire Fri 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:50, 10:50; Sat 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 5, 7:50, 10:50; Sun 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 5, 7:50, 10:35; Mon-Thur 2, 5, 7:45, 10:35. Taken Fri-Sat 10:35 a.m., 12:55, 3:25, 5:50, 8:10, 10:40; Sun 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15, 10:30; Mon-Thur 1:10, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15, 10:30. Watchmen Fri-Sat 11 a.m., 2:25, 6:10, 9:50; Sun 11:40 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10:20; Mon-Thur 3:15, 6:45, 10:10. Watchmen: The IMAX Experience IMAX Fri-Sat 12:30, 4:10, 7:45, 11:20; IMAX Sun 12:30, 4:10, 7:40; IMAX Mon-Thur 1, 4:25, 7:50. AMC Burbank Town Center 8, 210 E Magnolia Bl, (818) 953-9800. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri-Sat 11:55 a.m., 2:45, 5:30, 8, 10:30; Sun 11:55 a.m., 3, 5:30, 8, 10:30; Mon-

Thur 3, 5:25, 7:55, 10:20. Crossing Over Fri-Sun 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:30, 10:10; Mon-Thur 2:15, 4:55, 7:30, 10:10. The International Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15; Mon-Thur 3:30, 6:15, 9:15. Knowing Fri-Sat 11 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45; Sun 11 a.m., 2:45, 5:45, 8:30; Mon-Thur 2:45, 5:45, 8:30. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Fri-Sun 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:15, 6:30, 9; Mon-Thur 2:05, 4:15, 6:30, 9. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sun 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 7, 9:30; Mon-Thur 1:55, 4:20, 7, 9:30. The Reader Fri-Sun 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 4:30, 7:15, 10; Mon-Thur 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10. Watchmen Fri-Sat 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10:20; Sun 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 6, 9:45; Mon-Thur 2:30, 6, 9:45. AMC Burbank Town Center 6, 770 N First St, (818) 953-9800. Duplicity Fri-Sun 12:05, 3:05, 6:15, 9:15; Mon-Thur 3:05, 6:15, 9:15. I Love You, Man Fri-Sun 11 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Mon-Thur 1:45, 4:15, 7, 9:45. Knowing Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; MonThur 3:30, 6:30, 9:30. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sat 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:40; Sun 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 7:50, 10:20; Mon-Thur 2:30, 5:15, 7:50, 10:20. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25; Sun 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:40, 10:10; Mon-Thur 2:15, 4:55, 7:40, 10:10. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sun 11:20 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:15, 10; Mon-Thur 2, 4:30, 7:15, 10.

CULVER CITY, MARINA DEL REY

Own it on Blu-ray® and DVD 04/07/09

The Bridge: Cinema De Lux & IMAX Theater, The Promenade at Howard Hughes Center, 6081 Center Dr, Westchester, (310) 568-3375. Coraline 3D Fri-Sat noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:30, 11:50; Sun-Thur noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:30. Duplicity Fri-Sat 1, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45, 12:35 a.m.; Sun-Thur 1, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri-Sat 12:30 a.m. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50, 12:20 a.m.; Sun-Thur 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50. Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience in Disney Digital 3D 12:05, 2, 3:55, 5:50. Knowing Fri-Sat 11:40 a.m., 12:45, 3:40, 4:40, 6:35, 7:35, 9:30, 10:30, 12:25 a.m.; Sun-Thur 11:40 a.m., 12:45, 3:40, 4:40, 6:35, 7:35, 9:30, 10:30. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sat 12:45, 2:15, 3:15, 5:45, 7:45, 8:15, 10:15, 10:45, 12:30

a.m.; Sun-Thur 12:45, 2:15, 3:15, 5:45, 7:45, 8:15, 10:15, 10:45. Miss March Fri-Sat 10:40, 12:35 a.m.; Sun-Thur 10:40. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat noon, 12:30, 2:25, 2:55, 4:50, 5:20, 7:15, 7:45, 9:40, 10:10, 12:05 a.m.; Sun-Thur noon, 12:30, 2:25, 2:55, 4:50, 5:20, 7:15, 7:45, 9:40, 10:10. Slumdog Millionaire Fri-Sat 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55, 12:25 a.m.; Sun-Thur 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55. Taken Fri-Sat 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05, 12:30 a.m.; Sun-Thur 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail 12:40, 3:10, 5:40, 8:10, 10:40. Watchmen 12:20, 12:50, 3:40, 4:10, 7, 7:30, 10:30. Culver Plaza Theatre, 9919 Washington Blvd, (310) 836-5516. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri-Sun 12:15, 5:05; Mon-Thur 12:30, 5:30. Crossing Over Fri-Sun 12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10; Mon-Thur 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:50. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Fri-Sun 2:45, 8:45; Mon-Thur 2:45, 8:30. Defiance Fri-Sun noon, 6; Mon-Thur noon, 5:50. Frost/Nixon Fri-Sun 2:30, 7:15; Mon-Thur 2:30, 7:40. Gran Torino Fri-Sun 2:30, 7:15; Mon-Thur 2:50, 7:45. The International Fri-Sun 2:20, 7:15, 9:40; MonThur 2:50, 7:45. Moscow, Belgium Fri-Sun 12:15, 5:10, 9:40; Mon-Thur 12:15, 5:10. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Fri-Sun 12:05, 5:05, 9:40; Mon-Thur 12:30, 5:30. Slumdog Millionaire Fri-Sun noon, 2:30, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; Mon-Thur noon, 2:45, 5:20, 8. Loews Cineplex Marina Marketplace, 13455 Maxella Av, (310) 827-9588. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri 3:25, 6:30, 9:30; Sat-Sun 12:25, 3:25, 6:30, 9:30; Mon-Tue 2:30, 5:30, 8:30; Wed 2:30, 8. I Love You, Man Fri 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05; Sat 11 a.m., 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05; Sun 11:05 a.m., 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05; Mon-Wed 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Knowing Fri 2, 4:45, 7:35, 10:30; Sat 11:10 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:35, 10:30; Sun 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15; Mon-Wed 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45. The Last House on the Left Fri 2:10, 5, 7:45, 10:25; Sat 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 5, 7:45, 10:25; Sun 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 5, 7:35, 10:10; Mon-Wed 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30. Race to Witch Mountain Fri 1:45, 4:10, 7, 9:35; Sat-Sun 11:20 a.m., 1:45, 4:10, 7, 9:35; MonWed 1:35, 4, 6:30, 9. Taken Fri 2:20, 4:40, 6:55, 9:20; Sat-Sun

AN EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF REDEMPTION AND FAITH FROM THE STUDIO THAT BROUGHT YOU

THE MOTORC YCLE DIARIES AND TRAFFIC “

STAR-CROSSED ROMANCE!” TY BURR, THE BOSTON GLOBE

FROM EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS DIEGO LUNA AND

To enter to win a free DVD

GAEL GARCÍA BERNAL.

send your name, address, and daytime phone number to contests@lacitybeat.com

Carl Allen has stumbled across a way to shake free of post-divorce blues and a dead-end job: embrace life and say yes to everything. Working every funny bone in his nimble body and every muscle in his hilariously mobile face, Jim Carrey plays Carl in a YEScapade about opening up to life’s possibilities especially when those possibilities include romance with an intriguing, free-spirited musician (Zooey Deschanel). From the director of The Break-Up comes an invitation to discover the comedy power of yes.

THE GREATEST SIN OF ALL

IS RISKING NOTHING.

WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY

CARY JOJI FUKUNAGA

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, MARCH 20TH HOLLYWOOD

WEST LOS ANGELES

SANTA MONICA

ArcLight Cinemas The Landmark at W. Pico Laemmle’s Monica at Sunset & Vine & Westwood 310/394-9741 323/464-4226

310/281-8233

4 hours validated parking -$2

www.landmarktheatres.com FREE PARKING

Tickets available at laemmle.com CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES SORRY, NO PASSES ACCEPTED OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT

MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes – Text SIN with your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

© 2008 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

For more on breakthrough filmmaker Cary Fukunaga and the making of ‘Sin Nombre’ visit filminfocus.com/sinnombre or filminfocus.com/sinnombre/espanol

A

LACITYBEAT 14 MARCH 19-25, 2009

12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 6:55, 9:20; Mon-Tue 2:15, 4:35, 6:55, 9:10; Wed 5:30. Pacific Culver Stadium 12, 9500 Culver Bl, (310) 855-7519. Coraline 1:45, 4:35, 7:10, 9:30. Duplicity Fri-Sun 12:45, 4, 7:30, 10:25; Mon 1:15, 4, 7:30, 10:25; Tue-Thur 12:45, 4, 7:30, 10:25. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri-Sun 12:50, 4:10, 7:20, 10:10; Mon 1:20, 4:10, 7:20, 10:10; TueThur 12:50, 4:10, 7:20, 10:10. I Love You, Man Fri-Sun 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45, 10:45; Mon 1:30, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45; Tue-Thur 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:45, 10:45. Knowing 1, 4:30, 7:45, 10:35. The Last House on the Left 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:15. Miss March 1:35, 4:20. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sun 12:25, 1:25, 3, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:40, 10:40; Mon 1:25, 2:25, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:40, 10:20; TueThur 12:25, 1:25, 3, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:40, 10:40. Taken Fri-Sun 12:20, 2:35, 5:05, 7:50, 10:05; Mon 2, 5:05, 7:50, 10:05; Tue-Thur 12:20, 2:35, 5:05, 7:50, 10:05. Watchmen Fri-Sun 12:30, 4:05, 7, 8, 10:20; Mon 1, 4:35, 7, 8, 10:20; Tue-Thur 12:30, 4:05, 7, 8, 10:20. UA Marina, 4335 Glencoe Av, (310) 823-1721. Duplicity 12:30, 3:30, 7:20, 10:20. Miss March 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:30, 10:10. Open Captioned Performance - Selected Film Daily . The Reader 12:10, 3, 7, 9:50. Slumdog Millionaire 12:40, 3:40, 7:10, 10. Watchmen 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10:15. The Wrestler noon, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:30.

DOWNTOWN & SOUTH L.A. Downtown Independent, >251 South Main St, (213) 617-1033. Koyaanisqatsi 8. Laemmle’s Grande 4-Plex, 345 S Figueroa St, (213) 617-0268. Coraline Fri 5:50, 8:10; SatSun 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10; Mon-Thur 5:50, 8:10. Knowing Fri 5:10, 8; Sat-Sun 1:40, 5:10, 8; MonThur 5:10, 8. The Pink Panther 2 Fri 5:45, 8:15; Sat-Sun 1:20, 3:35, 5:45, 8:15; Mon-Thur 5:45, 8:15. Watchmen Fri 5, 8:30; Sat-Sun 1:30, 5, 8:30; Mon-Thur 5, 8:30. Magic Johnson Theaters, Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza, 4020 Marlton Av, (323) 2905900. Coraline Fri-Sat 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10; Sun 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 9:45; Mon-Thur 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 10. Duplicity Fri-Sat 10:30 a.m., 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:30; Sun 10:30 a.m., 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:25; Mon-Thur 1:35, 4:35, 7:30, 10:15. Friday the 13th Fri-Sat 10 a.m., 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45; Sun 10 a.m., 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35; Mon-Thur 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:10, 9:35. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 11:55 a.m., 2:45, 5:30, 8:15, 10:55; Sun 11:55 a.m., 2:45, 5:30, 8:15, 10:40; Mon-Thur 12:20, 2:45, 5:30, 8:05, 10:35. Knowing Fri-Sat 10:50 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45; Sun 10:50 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:30; Mon-Thur 1:45, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sat 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5:20, 8:05, 10:50; Sun 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35; Mon-Thur 2:25, 5:20, 8:05, 10:30. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Fri-Sun 9:55 a.m., 12:05, 2:10, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30; Mon-Thur 12:05, 2:10, 4:45, 7:10, 9:25. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat 9:50 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:15, 2:20, 2:50, 4:55, 5:25, 7:30, 8, 10:10, 10:40; Sun 9:50 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:15, 2:20, 2:50, 4:55, 5:25, 7:30, 8, 9:55; Mon-Thur 12:25, 2:20, 2:50, 4:55, 5:25, 7:25, 7:55, 9:55. Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li Fri-Sat 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:40, 10:15; Sun 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:40, 10; Mon-Thur 12:15, 2:40, 5, 7:35, 10. Taken Fri-Sat 10:15 a.m., 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 7:55, 10:20; Sun 10:15 a.m., 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 7:55, 10:05; Mon-Thur 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 7:50, 10:05. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sat 11:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:20, 7:50, 10:05, 10:35; Sun 11:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:20, 7:50, 9:50; Mon-Thur noon, 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 9:50. Watchmen Fri-Sat 10:05 a.m., 10:55 a.m., 1:30, 2:35, 5:05, 6:15, 8:30, 9:55; Sun 10:05 a.m., 10:55 a.m., 1:30, 2:35, 5:05, 6:15, 8:30, 9:40; Mon-Thur 1:30, 2:35, 5:05, 6:15, 8:30, 9:40. University Village 3, 3323 S Hoover St, (213) 748-6321. Call theater for titles and showtimes.

HOLLYWOOD

“AN

ACTION-FILLED

THRILLER! It will keep you at the edge of your seat.” – Maria Salas, CW Miami

STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 20 WESTWOOD

The Majestic Crest 310/474-7866 Get info and reserve seats online at www.westwoodcrest.com HOLLYWOOD

ArcLight Cinemas at the Dome 323/464-4226 4 hours validated parking -$2

HOLLYWOOD

ArcLight Cinemas at Sunset & Vine 323/464-4226 4 hours validated parking -$2 CENTURY CITY

AMC Century 15

“HEART-STOPPING!” ––Earl Earl Dittman, Dittman, WIRELESS WIRELESS MAGAZINES MAGAZINES

“INTENSE.”

–– Bonnie Bonnie Laufer-Krebs, Laufer-Krebs, TRIBUTE TRIBUTE TV TV CANADA CANADA

“BREATHLESS.” –– Lisa Lisa Collins, Collins, HOLLYWOOD.COM HOLLYWOOD.COM

310/289-4AMC 3 hrs free parking. Additional 2 hr parking $3.00 with AMC validation. BEVERLY HILLS

Pacific’s The Grove Stadium 14 323/692-0829 #209 4 hours on-site validated parking only $2.00. SANTA MONICA

Mann Criterion 6 310/248-MANN #019

“CHILLING.” –– Tony Tony Toscano, Toscano, TALKING TALKING PICTURES PICTURES

“MYSTERIOUS.” –– Stephanie Stephanie Simmons, Simmons, GREAT GREAT DAY DAY ST. ST. LOUIS LOUIS

UNIVERSAL CITY

CityWalk Stadium 19 with IMAX 800/FANDANGO #707 MOVIE PARKING REBATE $5 General Parking Rebate At Box Office With Movie Ticket Purchase (Excludes Preferred & Valet) WEST LOS ANGELES

The Bridge Cinema De Lux 310/568-3375 SHERMAN OAKS

ArcLight Cinemas at the Sherman Oaks Galleria 818/501-0753 SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT COUPONS ACCEPTED

SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS CASTING MUSIC AN ESCAPE ARTISTS PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH MYSTERY CLOCK CINEMA AN ALEX PROYAS FILM NICOLAS CAGE “KNOWING” ROSE BYRNE CHANDLER CANTERBURY BY GREG APPS BY MARCO BELTRAMI DIRECTOR OF COSTUME COPRODUCTION CO-EXECUTIVE DESIGNER TERRY RYAN EDITOR RICHARD LEAROYD DESIGNER STEVEN JONES-EVANS PHOTOGRAPHY SIMON DUGGAN,A.C.S. PRODUCER RYNE DOUGLAS PEARSON PRODUCERS AARON KAPLAN SEAN PERRONE EXECUTIVE PRODUCED STORY PRODUCERS STEPHEN JONES TOPHER DOW NORM GOLIGHTLY DAVID BLOOMFIELD BY TODD BLACK JASON BLUMENTHAL STEVETISCH ALEX PROYAS BY RYNE DOUGLAS PEARSON SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY RYNE DOUGLAS PEARSON AND JULIET SNOWDEN & STILES WHITE BY ALEX PROYAS DISASTER SEQUENCES, DISTURBING IMAGES AND BRIEF STRONG LANGUAGE

A

C d

© 2009 SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

(213), (310), (323), (562), (626), (661), (714), (760), (805), (818), (866), (877), (909), (949), (951), (Group Tickets 81), (xxx)

AND AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU. CONSULT YOUR LOCAL LISTINGS.

MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes, Text Message KNOWING and Your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

ArcLight Cinemas Hollywood, 6360 Sunset Bl, (323) 464-4226. Alien Mon only, Midnight. The Birds Wed only, Midnight. Coraline Fri 11:10 a.m., 1:40; Sat-Sun 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30; Tue-Thur 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30. Duplicity 11:15 a.m., 1, 2:05, 4, 5:05, 7, 8:05, 9:50, 11:05. The Haunting in Connecticut Thur only, Midnight. I Love You, Man Fri 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:15, 2:20, 4:15, 4:35, 4:45, 5:20, 7:05, 7:25, 8, 9:45, 10:15, 11, 11:50; Sat 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:15, 1:45, 2:20, 4:15, 4:35, 5:20, 7:05, 7:25, 8, 9:45, 10:15, 11, 11:50; Sun 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:15, 1:45, 2:20, 4:15, 4:35, 5:20, 7:05, 7:25, 8, 9:45, 10:15, 11; Mon 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:45, 2:20, 4:35, 5:20, 7:25, 8:10, 10:15, 10:50; Tue-Wed 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:15, 1:45, 2:20, 4:15, 4:35, 5:20, 7:05, 7:25, 8, 9:45, 10:15, 11; Thur 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:15, 1:45,

2:20, 4:15, 4:35, 5:20, 7:05, 7:25, 8, 9:35, 10:15, 11. Knowing Fri 11:35 a.m., 1:30, 2:35, 4:30, 5:35, 7:30, 8:35, 10:30, 11:40; Sat-Thur 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30, 10:30, 11:40. The Last House on the Left 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 5:10, 7:40, 10:40. Monsters vs. Aliens 3D Thur only, Midnight. Sin Nombre Fri 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35; Sat-Thur 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35. Slumdog Millionaire Fri 4:20, 7:20, 10:10; SatTue 1:05, 4:05, 7:35, 10:25; Wed 1:05, 10:25; Thur 1:05, 4:05, 7:35, 10:25. Sunshine Cleaning Fri 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:20, 2:25, 4:40, 5:25, 7:10, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45; Sat-Tue 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:20, 2:25, 4:40, 5:25, 7:20, 8:15, 9:40, 10:45; Wed 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:20, 2:25, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40; Thur 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:20, 2:25, 4:40,

5:25, 7:20, 8:15, 9:40, 10:45. Watchmen Fri-Sun 11:25 a.m., 12:30, 3:05, 4:10, 6:35, 7:50, 10:05, 11:10; Mon 11:25 a.m., 12:30, 3:05, 4:10, 7:50, 11:10; Tue-Thur 11:25 a.m., 12:30, 3:05, 4:10, 6:35, 7:50, 10:05, 11:10. Grauman’s Chinese, 6925 Hollywood Bl, (323) 464-8111. Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li 12:40, 3, 5:30, 8, 10:30. Los Feliz 3, 1822 N Vermont Av, (323) 6642169. Duplicity 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45. Gomorrah 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45. Watchmen 2, 5:20, 8:45. Mann Chinese 6, 6801 Hollywood Bl, (323) 4613331. Doubt Fri 3:50; Sat-Mon 3:50, 9:30; Wed 3:50; Thur 3:50, 9:30. Friday the 13th Fri 12:20; Sat-Sun 12:20, 5:20, 10:20; Tue-Wed 12:20, 5:20, 10:20; Thur 12:50, 6:40. Frost/Nixon Fri 12:50; Sat-Mon 12:50, 6:40;

please join us for

A One-Day Introduction to pacifica graduate institute ’s masters & doctoral degree programs with Special Guest James Hillman, Ph.D.

Follow Your Dream to Graduate School.

Saturday, April 4, 2009 •

Learn more about Pacifica’s graduate degree programs in psychology, the humanities, and mythological studies

Pacifica Graduate Institute is an accredited graduate school, located a few miles south of Santa Barbara, California. All of the Institute’s programs are informed by the teachings of C.G. Jung, Joseph Campbell, Marion Woodman, James Hillman, and others in the Depth Psychological Tradition. The programs have a unique educational format sensitive to the needs of adult learners.

Explore Pacifica’s two campuses and their resources… including the Joseph Campbell Archives and Library, the Graduate Research Library, and Bookstore

• •

Learn about admissions procedures and financial aid

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL

Experience the school’s interdisciplinary curriculum through characteristic classroom presentations

Meet and speak with Pacifica alumni, faculty, staff, and other prospective students

YOUR $75 REGISTRATION FEE INCLUDES:

• •

a $25 Gift Certificate good at the Pacifica Bookstore Continental Breakfast and Buffet Lunch

Two Continuing Education Credits are Available REGISTRATION REQUIRED. SPACE IS LIMITED.

For more information or to register online visit www.pacifica.edu or call 805.969.3626, ext. 103

249 Lambert Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013

LACITYBEAT 16 MARCH 19-25, 2009

Wed 12:50. He’s Just Not That Into You 1, 4, 7, 10. Miss March Fri 2:50; Sat-Sun 2:50, 7:50; TueWed 2:50, 7:50. Super Capers 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50. Taken 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Tue 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40; Wed 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40; Thur 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Pacific’s El Capitan, 6838 Hollywood Bl, (323) 467-7674. Race to Witch Mountain 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7, 9:45. Pacific’s The Grove Stadium 14, 189 The Grove Dr, Third St & Fairfax Av, (323) 692-0829. Confessions of a Shopaholic 11:20 a.m., 2, 4:45. Duplicity Fri-Sun 10:30 a.m., 1:35, 4:40, 7:40, 10:45; Mon 11 a.m., 2:05, 5:10, 8:15, 11:20; Tue-Thur 10:30 a.m., 1:35, 4:40, 7:40, 10:45. He’s Just Not That Into You 1:05, 4:15, 7:25, 10:35. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 10:55 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:45, 2:45, 4:30, 5:35, 7:20, 8:20, 10:05, 11:10, 12:30 a.m.; Sun-Wed 10:55 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:45, 2:45, 4:30, 5:35, 7:20, 8:20, 10:05, 11:10; Thur 11:55 a.m., 1, 2:45, 3:45, 5:35, 8:20, 10:05, 11:10. Knowing Fri-Sat 10:35 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 4, 4:50, 7:10, 8, 10:20, 11:15, 12:15 a.m.; SunThur 10:35 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 4, 4:50, 7:10, 8, 10:20, 11:15. The Last House on the Left 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8:05, 10:55. Race to Witch Mountain 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:50, 2:25, 4:25, 5:05, 7:05, 7:45, 9:45, 10:25. Sunshine Cleaning 11:15 a.m., 12:10, 1:55, 2:50, 4:35, 5:30, 7:15, 8:10, 9:55, 10:50. Taken Fri-Wed 12:25, 2:55, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; Thur 10:40 a.m., 1:10, 3:40, 10:15. Watchmen Fri-Sun 11:40 a.m., 3:20, 7, 7:30, 10:40, 11:05; Mon-Thur 11:40 a.m., 3:20, 7, 7:30, 10:40. Regent Showcase, 614 N La Brea Av, (323) 934-2944. 12 7:30. Vine, 6321 Hollywood Bl, (323) 463-6819. Vista, 4473 Sunset, (323) 660-6639. I Love You, Man Fri 4:20, 7, 9:40; Sat-Sun 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40; Mon-Thur 4:20, 7, 9:40.

NORTH HOLLYWOOD, UNIVERSAL CITY Century 8, 12827 Victory Bl, (818) 508-6004. Coraline 3D 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45. I Love You, Man 12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05. Knowing 11:15 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:35. The Last House on the Left 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5, 7:40, 10:20. Paul Blart: Mall Cop 11:20 a.m., 4:40, 10:10. Race to Witch Mountain 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35. Slumdog Millionaire 1:40, 7:10. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50. Watchmen noon, 3:30, 7, 10:30. Loews CityWalk Stadium 19 with IMAX, 100 Universal City Dr at Universal CityWalk, (818) 508-0588; IMAX Theater (818) 760-8100. Coraline 3D Fri-Sun 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:55; Mon-Thur 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:55. Duplicity Fri-Sun 11:05 a.m., 1:55, 4:40, 7:40, 10:35; Mon-Thur 1:55, 4:40, 7:40, 10:35. Friday the 13th Fri-Sat 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:15, 11:10; Sun 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:15, 10:35; Mon-Thur 2:50, 5:30, 8:15, 10:35. The Haunting in Connecticut Thur only, 12:01 a.m. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 11 a.m., 12:30, 1:35, 3, 4:10, 5:40, 6:50, 8:20, 9:30, 11, 12:10 a.m.; Sun 11 a.m., 12:30, 1:35, 3, 4:10, 5:40, 6:50, 8:10, 9:30, 10:40; Mon-Thur 1:35, 2:45, 4:10, 5:40, 6:50, 8:10, 9:30, 10:40. Knowing Fri-Sat 12:20, 1:20, 3:20, 4:20, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:20, 12:15 a.m.; Sun 12:20, 1:20, 3:20, 4:20, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:20; Mon-Thur 12:45, 1:20, 3:30, 4:20, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:20. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sat 11:30 a.m., 1:15, 2:10, 3:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 10:10, 11:50; Sun 11:30 a.m., 1:15, 2:10, 3:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 10:10; Mon-Thur 1:15, 2:10, 3:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 10:10. Miss March Fri-Sat 11 a.m., 1:15, 3:40, 6, 8:30, 10:50; Sun 11 a.m., 1:15, 3:40, 6, 8:30, 10:45; Mon-Thur 1:15, 3:40, 6, 8:30, 10:45. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Fri-Sat 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:20, 8:10, 10:30; Sun 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:20, 8:10, 10:25; Mon-Thur 2:30, 5:20, 8:10, 10:25. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat 11:05 a.m., noon, 1:30, 2:35, 4:05, 5:05, 6:35, 7:35, 9, 10, 11:30; Sun 11:05 a.m., noon, 1:30, 2:35, 4:05, 5:05, 6:35, 7:35, 9, 10; Mon-Thur 1:30, 2:35, 4:05, 5:05, 6:35, 7:35, 9, 10. Slumdog Millionaire 1:10, 4:15, 7, 9:45.

Taken Fri-Sun 12:15, 2:45, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15; Mon-Thur 2:45, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sun 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5, 8:05, 10:45; Mon-Thur 2:25, 5, 8:05, 10:45. Watchmen Fri-Sat 11:10 a.m., 1, 2:40, 4:30, 6:10, 8, 9:50, 11:40; Sun 11:10 a.m., 1, 2:40, 4:30, 6:10, 8, 9:50; Mon-Thur 1, 2:40, 4:30, 6:10, 8, 9:50. Watchmen: The IMAX Experience IMAX Fri 12:40, 4, 7:15, 10:40; IMAX Sat 4:25, 7:50, 11:10; IMAX Sun 12:40, 4, 7:15, 10:30; IMAX Mon-Wed 12:45, 4, 7:15, 10:30; IMAX Thur 12:45, 4, 7:15.

NORTHRIDGE, CHATSWORTH, GRANADA HILLS Mann Granada Hills, Devonshire St & Balboa Av, (818) 363-3679. Duplicity 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10. I Love You, Man noon, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10. Knowing 1, 4:10, 7, 9:50. The Last House on the Left 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30. Race to Witch Mountain 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Slumdog Millionaire 12:50, 3:40, 6:40, 9:30. Taken 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail 1:20, 3:50, 6:30, 9. Watchmen 1:10, 4:50, 8:10. Pacific’s Northridge Fashion Center All Stadium 10, 9400 N Shirley Av, (818) 501-5121. Duplicity Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:40; Sun 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35; Mon-Thur 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. He’s Just Not That Into You 1:50, 7:25. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 8, 10:35; Sun 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 8, 10:30; MonThur 2:45, 5:20, 8. Knowing Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; Sun 1:25, 4:30, 7:30, 10:25; Mon-Thur 1:25, 4:35, 7:30. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sat 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50; Sun 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45; MonThur 1:40, 4:25, 7:10. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Fri-Sat 12:35, 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, 10; Sun 12:35, 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55; Mon-Thur 2:50, 5:15, 7:35. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat 12:25, 2:05, 2:55, 4:40, 5:25, 7:15, 7:55, 9:45, 10:20; Sun 12:25, 2:05, 2:55, 4:40, 5:25, 7:15, 7:55, 9:40, 10:20; Mon-Thur 2:05, 2:55, 4:40, 5:25, 7:15, 7:55. Taken Fri-Sat 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05; Sun 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10; Mon-Thur 2:40, 5:10, 7:40. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sat 4:50, 10:25; Sun 4:50, 10:15; Mon-Thur 4:50. Watchmen Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:55, 7:20, 10:45; Mon-Thur 1, 4:30, 8:05. Pacific’s Winnetka All Stadium 21, 9201 Winnetka Av, Chatsworth, (818) 501-5121. Confessions of a Shopaholic 12:15, 2:55, 5:35. Duplicity Fri 1:25, 2:25, 4:20, 5:20, 7:20, 8:20, 10:20, 11:15; Sat 11:25 a.m., 1:25, 2:25, 4:20, 5:20, 7:20, 8:20, 10:20, 11:15; Sun 11:25 a.m., 1:25, 2:25, 4:20, 5:20, 7:20, 8:20, 10:20; Mon-Thur 1:25, 2:25, 4:20, 5:20, 7:20, 8:20, 10:20. I Love You, Man Fri 12:30, 1:45, 2:30, 3:10, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7:10, 7:55, 8:35, 9:50, 10:30, 11:10; Sat 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 1:45, 2:30, 3:10, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7:10, 7:55, 8:35, 9:50, 10:30, 11:10; Sun 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 1:45, 2:30, 3:10, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7:10, 7:55, 8:35, 9:50, 10:30; Mon-Thur 12:30, 1:45, 2:30, 3:10, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7:10, 7:55, 8:35, 9:50, 10:30. Knowing Fri 12:50, 1:35, 2:20, 4:05, 4:50, 5:30, 7:05, 7:50, 8:40, 10:15, 11; Sat 11:15 a.m., 12:50, 1:35, 2:20, 4:05, 4:50, 5:30, 7:05, 7:50, 8:40, 10:15, 11; Sun 11:15 a.m., 12:50, 1:35, 2:20, 4:05, 4:50, 5:30, 7:05, 7:50, 8:40, 10:15; Mon-Thur 12:50, 1:35, 2:20, 4:05, 4:50, 5:30, 7:05, 7:50, 8:40, 10:15. The Last House on the Left Fri 12:15, 1:55, 3, 4:40, 5:40, 7:25, 8:25, 10:05, 11:05; Sat 11:10 a.m., 12:15, 1:55, 3, 4:40, 5:40, 7:25, 8:25, 10:05, 11:05; Sun 11:10 a.m., 12:15, 1:55, 3, 4:40, 5:40, 7:25, 8:25, 10:05; MonWed 12:15, 1:55, 3, 4:40, 5:40, 7:25, 8:25, 10:05; Thur 1:55, 4:40, 7:25, 10:05. Miss March Fri-Sat 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:15, 8:15, 9:40, 10:40; Sun-Thur 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:15, 8:15, 9:40, 10:35. Race to Witch Mountain Fri 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:35, 3:20, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7, 7:45, 8:25, 9:25, 10:10, 10:50; Sat 11:20 a.m., 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:35, 3:20, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7, 7:45, 8:25, 9:25, 10:10, 10:50; Sun 11:20 a.m., 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:35, 3:20, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7, 7:45, 8:25, 9:25, 10:10; MonThur 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:35, 3:20, 4:25, 5:10, 5:50, 7, 7:45, 8:25, 9:25, 10:10. Slumdog Millionaire Fri 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:35; Sat-Sun 11:05 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:35; MonThur 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:35. Taken 1, 3:20, 5:45, 8:20, 10:40. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sat 12:25,

3, 5:40, 8:10, 10:45; Sun-Thur 12:25, 3, 5:40, 8:10, 10:40. Watchmen Fri-Sat noon, 12:45, 1:25, 3:30, 4:15, 4:55, 7:05, 7:45, 8:30, 10:35, 11:15; Sun-Wed noon, 12:45, 1:25, 3:30, 4:15, 4:55, 7:05, 7:45, 8:30, 10:30; Thur noon, 12:45, 3:30, 4:15, 7:05, 7:45, 10:30.

SANTA MONICA AMC Santa Monica 7, 1310 Third Street Promenade, (310) 395-3030. Coraline 3D Fri-Sun 11:20 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Mon-Thur 1:50, 4:15, 7:10, 9:35. Duplicity Fri-Sun 10:40 a.m., 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20; MonThur 1:15, 4:05, 7, 10. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sun 10:50 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10; Mon-Thur 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:45. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sun 11 a.m., 12:15, 1:20, 2:45, 4, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9, 10:15; Mon-Thur 1:30, 2:30, 4, 5, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 9:55. Sunshine Cleaning Fri-Sun 11:10 a.m., 12:30, 1:40, 3, 4:15, 5:30, 6:50, 8, 9:20, 10:30; Mon-Thur 2, 2:40, 4:25, 5:10, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:05. Laemmle’s Monica 4-Plex, 1332 Second St, (310) 3949741. Gomorrah 1:40, 4:50, 8. Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 Sat-Sun 11 a.m.. Moscow, Belgium 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55. Sin Nombre 1:45, 4:10, 7, 9:30. Slumdog Millionaire 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10. Loews Cineplex Broadway, 1441 Third Street Promenade, (310) 458-1506. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri-Sun 4:55, 10:20; Mon-Thur 4, 9:25. Fuel Fri 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:15; Sat-Sun 11 a.m., 1:40, 4:25, 7:15, 10:15; Mon-Thur 1:40, 4:25, 7:05, 9:50. Gran Torino Fri 2:10, 7:30; Sat-Sun 11:25 a.m., 2:10, 7:30; Mon-Thur 1:30, 6:45. Miss March Fri-Sun 4:35, 9:50; Mon-Thur 4:35, 9:45. The Reader Fri 1:45, 7; Sat-Sun 11 a.m., 1:45, 7; Mon-Thur 1:45, 7. Super Capers Fri-Sun 12:35, 3, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10; Mon-Thur 2, 4:15, 6:30, 9. Mann Criterion, 1313 Third Street Promenade, (310) 3951599. Call theater for titles and showtimes.

SHERMAN OAKS, ENCINO ArcLight Sherman Oaks, 15301 Ventura Bl, Sherman Oaks, (818) 501-0753. 12 Rounds Thur only, Midnight. Adventureland Thur only, Midnight. Back to the Future Sun; Mon 7:30. Coraline Fri-Sun 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:20, 7, 9:25; Mon 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:50, 10:15; Tue; Wed 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:50, 10:15; Thur. Duplicity Fri-Sun 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 2:20, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15, 11:15; Mon 11:40 a.m., 1:15, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15, 11:15; Tue; Wed 11:40 a.m., 1:15, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:15, 10:15, 11:15; Thur. I Love You, Man Fri-Sun 11:25 a.m., 12:15, 2:10, 2:50, 4:50, 5:45, 7:45, 8:45, 10:30, 11:35; Mon 11:35 a.m., 12:15, 2:10, 2:55, 4:50, 5:45, 7:45, 8:45, 10:30, 11:10; Tue; Wed 11:35 a.m., 12:15, 2:10, 2:55, 4:50, 5:45, 7:45, 8:45, 10:30, 11:10; Thur. Knowing Fri-Sun 11 a.m., 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11:20; Mon 11:30 a.m., 1, 2:20, 4, 5:10, 7, 8:10, 10, 11:15; Tue; Wed 11:30 a.m., 1, 2:20, 4, 5:10, 7, 8:10, 10, 11:15; Thur. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sun 11:10 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7:10, 10:05; Mon 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25; Tue; Wed 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25; Thur. Monsters vs. Aliens 3D Thur only, Midnight. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sun 11:45 a.m., 12:10, 12:45, 2:15, 2:45, 3:15, 4:40, 5:10, 5:40, 7:20, 8:20, 9:45, 10:45; Mon 11:45 a.m., 12:10, 12:45, 2:15, 2:45, 3:15, 4:40, 5:25, 5:40, 7:20, 8:20, 9:45, 10:45; Tue; Wed 11:45 a.m., 12:10, 12:45, 2:15, 2:45, 3:15, 4:40, 5:25, 5:40, 7:20, 8:20, 9:45, 10:45; Thur. Slumdog Millionaire Fri-Sun 11:15 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:25, 10:20; Mon 12:05, 2:50, 5:35, 8:25, 11:05; Tue-Thur. Sunshine Cleaning Fri-Sun 11:05 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 3:05, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:55, 11; Mon 12:30, 1:30, 3:05, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:55, 11; Tue-Thur. Taken Fri-Mon 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 10:10; Tue-Thur. Watchmen Fri-Sun noon, 3:30, 7:05, 8:05, 10:35, 11:25; Mon noon, 3:30, 8:05, 10:35, 11:25; Tue-Thur. Laemmle’s Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Bl, Encino, (818) 981-9811. Doubt Fri 5, 7:30, 9:55; Sat 10:30 a.m., 5, 7:30, 9:55; Sun 10:30 a.m., 5, 7:30; Mon-Tue 5, 7:30; Wed 10:30 a.m., 5, 7:30; Thur 5, 7:30. Everlasting Moments Fri 1, 4, 7, 10; Sat 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7, 10; Sun 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7; Mon-Tue 1, 4, 7; Wed 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7; Thur 1, 4, 7. The Great Buck Howard Fri 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10; Sat 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10; Sun 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45; Mon-Tue 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45; Wed 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45; Thur 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45. Reporter 1, 2:45. The Secrets Fri 1, 4, 7, 10; Sat 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7, 10; Sun 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7; Mon-Tue 1, 4, 7; Wed 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7; Thur 1, 4, 7. Two Lovers Fri 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 9:50; Sat 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 9:50; Sun 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:20; Mon-Tue 1:50, 4:30, 7:20; Wed 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:20; Thur 1:50, 4:30, 7:20. Mann Plant 16, 7876 Van Nuys Bl, Panorama City, (818) 7790323. Coraline 3D 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30. Duplicity 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10. Hotel for Dogs 12:30, 3, 5:30. I Love You, Man 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15. Knowing 11:10 a.m., 1, 2, 3:50, 4:50, 6:40, 7:40, 9:40, 10:30.

The Last House on the Left 11:50 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:10, 5:10, 6:50, 7:50, 9:30, 10:30. Miss March 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:10. Paul Blart: Mall Cop 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15. Race to Witch Mountain 11 a.m., noon, 1:30, 2:30, 4:05, 5, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 10. Taken 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45. The Uninvited 8, 10:20. Watchmen 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 3:15, 5, 6:45, 8:30, 10:15. Pacific’s Sherman Oaks 5, 14424 Millbank St, Sherman Oaks, (818) 501-5121. Confessions of a Shopaholic 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:40. He’s Just Not That Into You 1:20, 4:10, 7, 9:50. The International 1:10, 4:20, 7:25, 10. Miss March 1, 4, 7:30, 9:55. The Wrestler 1:15, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45.

WEST HOLLYWOOD, BEVERLY HILLS, CENTURY CITY AMC Century City 15, 10250 Santa Monica Bl, (310) 2772011. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri-Sun 11:40 a.m., 2:35, 5:10, 8:05, 10:40; Mon-Thur 1:15, 4:30, 7:20, 10. Coraline 3D Fri-Sun 9:30 a.m., noon, 5:20; Mon-Thur noon, 5:20. Duplicity Fri-Sun 10 a.m., 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:45; Mon-Thur 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:35. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri-Sun 9:50 a.m., 12:55, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; Mon-Thur 12:55, 4:05, 7:15, 10:15. I Love You, Man Fri-Sat 9:45 a.m., 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:35, midnight; Sun 9:45 a.m., 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:35; Mon-Tue 12:50, 1:40, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20; Wed 1, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 9:20, 10:45; Thur 12:50, 1:40, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20. The International 2:30, 7:50, 10:40. Knowing Fri-Sat 9:40 a.m., 11 a.m., 12:40, 2, 3:40, 5, 6:40, 8, 9:40, 10:55, 12:10 a.m.; Sun 9:40 a.m., 11 a.m., 12:40, 2, 3:40, 5, 6:40, 8, 9:40, 10:55; Mon-Tue 12:40, 2, 3:40, 5, 6:40, 7:55, 9:40, 10:45; Wed 12:40, 1:40, 3:40, 6:40, 7:55, 9:40; Thur 12:40, 2, 3:40, 5, 6:40, 7:55, 9:40, 10:45. The Last House on the Left Fri 10:35 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45, 12:25 a.m.; Sat 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45, 12:25 a.m.; Sun 10:35 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45; Mon-Thur 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45. Metropolitan Opera: La Sonnambula Sat only, 10 a.m. Miss March Fri-Sun 11:45 a.m., 10:20; Mon-Tue 10:20; Wed 9:55; Thur 10:20. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sun 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:25, 4, 5:05, 6:50, 7:45, 9:30; Mon-Tue 1:20, 2:25, 4, 5:05, 6:50, 7:45, 9:30; Wed 1:20, 4, 6:50, 9:30; Thur 1:20, 2:25, 4, 5:05, 6:50, 7:45, 9:30. Slumdog Millionaire Fri 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Sat 10:10 a.m., 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Sun 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Mon-Thur 1:05, 3:55, 7:10, 10:10. Taken Fri-Sun 9:35 a.m., 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:55, 10:25; Mon 12:10, 5:15, 8, 10:25; Tue-Thur 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 8, 10:25. Watchmen Fri-Sun 10:15 a.m., 2:20, 6:10, 9:50; Mon-Thur 2:20, 6:10, 9:50. Watchmen: The IMAX Experience IMAX Fri-Sun 11:50 a.m., 3:30, 7, 10:30; IMAX Mon-Tue noon, 3:30, 7, 10:30; IMAX Wed 3:30, 7, 10:30; IMAX Thur noon, 3:30, 7, 10:30. Laemmle’s Music Hall 3, 9036 Wilshire Bl, (310) 274-6869. Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 Fri 5, 7:30, 10; Sat noon, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10; Sun 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10; Mon 5, 7:30; Wed 5, 7:30; Thur 5. La Scala Ballet Mediterranea Sun 11 a.m.; Thur 7:30. The Secrets Fri 5:40, 8:30; Sat noon, 2:50, 5:40, 8:30; Sun noon, 2:50, 5:40, 8:25; Mon 5:40, 8:30; Wed-Thur 5:40, 8:30. Virtual JFK: Vietnam If Kennedy Had Lived Fri 5:30, 7:40, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50; Mon-Thur 5:30, 7:40. Laemmle’s Sunset 5 Theatre, 8000 Sunset Bl, (323) 8483500. Explicit Ills 1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 10. Gomorrah 1:15, 4:35, 8. The Great Buck Howard 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10. Perestroika 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45. The Perfect Sleep 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:45. Beverly Center 13 Cinemas, 8522 Beverly Blvd., Suite 835, (310) 652-7760. Coraline 12:10, 2:20, 4:20, 6:40, 8:50. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Fri-Wed 1, 4:30, 7:50. Fired Up Fri-Wed 1, 5:20, 9:50; Thur 1, 4:30, 7:50. Friday the 13th 7:20, 9:50. Frost/Nixon noon, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10. Gran Torino 12:30, 3, 5:30, 7:50, 10:10. Hotel for Dogs 12:20, 2:30, 4:40. Miss March 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:30. Paul Blart: Mall Cop 12:40, 2:40, 5, 7, 9:10. The Pink Panther 2 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:30, 9:20. Rachel Getting Married noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Slumdog Millionaire 11:50 a.m., 12:50, 2:30, 3:30, 5, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:10. Twilight Fri-Wed 3, 7:30. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 7, 9:30.

WESTWOOD, WEST L.A. AMC Avco Center, 10840 Wilshire Bl, (310) 475-0711. Duplicity Fri 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; Sat-Sun 10:35 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; Mon-Thur 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:25.

I Love You, Man Fri 2, 4:45, 7:45, 10:40; Sat-Sun 11:20 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:45, 10:40; Mon-Thur 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15. The Last House on the Left Fri 1:35, 4:20, 7:15, 10; Sat-Sun 10:50 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:15, 10; Mon-Thur 1:50, 4:25, 7:15, 10. Taken Fri 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:45; Sat-Sun 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:45; Mon-Thur 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:45. Laemmle’s Royal Theatre, 11523 Santa Monica Bl, (310) 477-5581. The Class Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:15; SunThur 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Landmark’s Nuart Theater, 11272 Santa Monica Bl, (310) 281-8223. The Rocky Horror Picture Show Midnight Sat only,. Tokyo! Sub-Titled Fri-Sun 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:50; Sub-Titled Mon-Thur 4:30, 7:15, 9:50. Who Framed Roger Rabbit Midnight Fri only,. Landmark’s Regent, 1045 Broxton Av, (310) 281-8223. Race to Witch Mountain Fri 6:10, 8:30; Sat-Sun 1:30, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30; Mon-Thur 6:10, 8:30. The Landmark West Los Angeles, 10850 W Pico Bl, (310) 281-8223. Duplicity 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15. Everlasting Moments 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 9:55. The Great Buck Howard Fri 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 10:10; Sat-Thur 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50. I Love You, Man 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:10. The Reader 11:05 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05. Sin Nombre 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:35, 9:50. Slumdog Millionaire 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:45, 10:25. Sunshine Cleaning Fri-Sat 11:15 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:40, 2:20, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:50, 6:30, 7:20, 8:15, 9, 9:45, 10:35; Sun 11:15 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:40, 2:20, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:50, 6:30, 7:20, 8:15, 9, 9:45; Mon 11:15 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:40, 2:20, 3:25, 4:50, 5:50, 7:20, 8:15, 9, 9:45; Tue-Wed 11:50 a.m., 1, 2:20, 3:25, 4:50, 5:50, 7:20, 8:15, 9:45; Thur 11:15 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:40, 2:20, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:50, 6:30, 7:20, 8:15, 9, 9:45. Two Lovers 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10. Watchmen Fri-Sun noon, 3:30, 7:15, 10:30; Mon-Thur 1:15, 4:45, 8:10. Majestic Crest Theater, 1262 Westwood Bl, (310) 474-7866. Knowing 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10. Mann Bruin, 948 Broxton Av, (310) 208-8998. He’s Just Not That Into You 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:20. Mann Festival 1, 10887 Lindbrook Av, (310) 208-4575. Call theater for titles and showtimes. Mann Village, 961 Broxton Av, (310) 208-5576. Watchmen noon, 3:30, 7, 10:30.

WOODLAND HILLS, WEST HILLS, TARZANA AMC Promenade 16, 21801 Oxnard St, Woodland Hills, (818) 883-2262. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:40, 10:10; Sat 4:55, 7:40, 10:10; Sun 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:40, 10:10; Mon-Thur 2:05, 4:55, 7:40, 10:15. Coraline 3D Fri-Sun 10:15 a.m., 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; Mon-Wed 5:25, 7:50, 10:10; Thur 5:25. Duplicity Fri-Sun 10 a.m., 1, 4:05, 7:15, 10:20; Mon-Thur 1:05, 4:05, 7:15, 10:05. He’s Just Not That Into You Fri-Sat 10:10 a.m., 1:15, 4:15, 7:30, 10:40; Sun 10:10 a.m., 1:15, 4:15, 7:30, 10:25; MonThur 1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 10:10. I Love You, Man Fri 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:10, 2:15, 3:50, 5:05, 6:30, 7:55, 9:20, 10:45, 11:30; Sat 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:10, 2:15, 3:50, 5:05, 6:30, 7:55, 9:20, 10:45; Sun 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:10, 2:15, 3:50, 5:05, 6:30, 7:55, 9:20; Mon-Thur 1:05, 2:15, 3:50, 5:05, 6:30, 7:55, 9, 10:20. Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience in Disney Digital 3D Fri-Sun 12:40, 2:45; Mon-Thur 1:10, 3:20. Knowing Fri-Sat 10 a.m., 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 3:45, 4:35, 6:45, 7:35, 9:40, 10:35; Sun 10 a.m., 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 1:40, 3:45, 4:35, 6:45, 7:35, 9:40; Mon-Thur 1, 1:40, 3:45, 4:35, 6:45, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15. The Last House on the Left Fri-Sun 10:55 a.m., 1:45, 4:40, 7:25, 10:05; Mon-Thur 1:45, 4:40, 7:25, 9:55. Metropolitan Opera: La Sonnambula Sat only, 10 a.m. Miss March Fri-Sat 12:35, 5:35, 10:40; Sun 12:35, 5:35, 10:30; Mon-Wed 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:05; Thur 1, 3:15. Race to Witch Mountain Fri-Sat 10:25 a.m., 11:25 a.m., 1:05, 2, 3:55, 4:30, 6:35, 7:05, 9:10, 9:55; Sun 10:25 a.m., 11:25 a.m., 1:05, 2, 3:55, 4:30, 6:35, 7:05, 9:10; Mon-Wed 1:10, 2, 3:55, 4:30, 6:35, 7:05, 9:10, 9:30; Thur 1:10, 2, 3:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30. Slumdog Millionaire Fri-Sat 10:35 a.m., 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 10:30; Sun 10:35 a.m., 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 10:15; Mon-Thur 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 10. Taken Fri-Sun 10:05 a.m., 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:10; Mon-Thur 2:30, 5, 7:35, 9:50. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Fri-Sun 10:10 a.m., 3, 8:05; Mon-Thur 1:25, 4, 7, 9:25. Watchmen Fri-Sat 11:55 a.m., 3:35, 7:10, 10:50; Sun 11:55 a.m., 3:35, 7:10, 10:30; Mon-Thur 2:25, 6:15, 9:40. Laemmle’s Fallbrook 7 Cinemas, Fallbrook Mall, 6731 Fallbrook Av, West Hills, (818) 340-8710. Confessions of a Shopaholic Fri-Sun noon, 2:30, 5, 7:40, 10:10; Mon-Thur 1, 3:30, 6, 8:40. Coraline Fri-Sun noon, 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:50; Mon-Thur 1, 3:20, 5:50, 8:30. Duplicity Fri-Sun 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:10; Mon-Thur 1:40, 4:50, 8:10. I Love You, Man Fri-Sun 1:40, 4:20, 7:20, 10; Mon-Thur 2:40, 5:20, 8:20. Knowing Fri-Sun 12:30, 3:40, 7, 9:55; Mon-Thur 1:30, 4:40, 8. Two Lovers Fri-Sun 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15; Mon-Thur 1:10, 3:40, 6:15, 8:50. Watchmen 1, 4:30, 8:10.

MARCH 19-25, 2009 17 LACITYBEAT

MUSIC L I V E

Don’t Let Our Youth Go To Waste Avi Buffalo’s possibilities are endless By Chris Ziegler Avi Buffalo was once a blues guitarist out in the corridor cities, learning guitar from a man he calls a mentor with obvious respect still undiminished in the expression. But then high school started to kick in, and Avi’s collection stretched and spread (Neil Young’s unreleased Chrome Dreams makes him sit down and write; Ariel Pink and Haunted Graffiti’s Scared Famous makes him jealous) and the bedroom demos Avi recorded only on software that comes for free began to demand a new full band to correctly carry them out into the world. About a year and a half later, Avi Buffalo (whose band includes Sheridan Riley on drums, Rebecca Coleman on keys, old man of the band Arin Fazio on bass and another guitarist to be locked in later) has an album recorded with Amnion founder and Elliott Smith sideman Aaron

Embry almost done, the kinds of labels who descend only rarely from the clouds sending him polite inquiries and he is still in high school. But not for much longer. As the man once wrote: “The possibilities are endless.” “The cute factor still haunts us,” says Buffalo now. But the cute factor falls off after a song or two – Buffalo is a meticulous writer and arranger, puzzle-piecing together his first generation of demos on Audacity and Garageband. (“Jeff Tweedy said a song is good when you can play it acoustically and it’s still a good song,” explains Buffalo.) These bedroom sessions are absolutely furry with ambiance – sounds like Bill Fox or Bill Fay, loners who didn’t really warm up to taping until everything immediately around them had sufficiently cooled down. “I love noise

and atmosphere,” he says. “I think atmosphere is one very important element to making music. I know I relate to the sound of wind or birds better than I can relate to a dead recording booth.” But for this next set of songs, he’s learned to delegate, working with Embry, who recorded what’s by now almost a finished album and who taught Buffalo about “real microphones.” Instant winners like “What’s In It For” still show the seams – Buffalo audibly walking his band in for “chorus chords,” for instance – but that sort of thing will be polished away by the time this record is ready for everyone. Pro Tools was a big upgrade for Buffalo, but he’s learning the language he wants: “I don’t think anyone could have done a better job than Aaron,” he says. “But there’s still nobody who understands how to record my music like I do. I have very specific visions for how I like to record sound, but I’m not very good at articulating them.” This buffed-up Buffalo finds songs bent at the edges like Built to Spill, in harmony sometimes despite themselves like the early Shins, and vibrating with the morning-shakes like Akron/ Family farmhouse tapes. They’re obvious bait to labels but to writers and musicians and fans, too, disregarding the band’s uncommon age and location (they drive up to L.A. from homes around Long Beach and the edge of L.A. county) because of Buffalo’s preternatural grace and confidence and arresting teenage frankness. (“A lot of my writing comes down to the fact that I’m just a hormonal teenager,” says Buffalo.) Polishing off the cute factor, too: “Please oh please oh please oh please don’t write them off as another cutesy kid band that play indie rock,” wrote Ashley Jax at RockInsider last year. “Their professionalism, musicianship, and focus put them in a class all their own.” Six months ago – during summer break, and just before he started recording this album, and before the labels came chasing and the writers started writing and the cute factor supercharged another set of fan – he was worried he’d burn out by 25, right in the middle of moment when youth historically wrecks out of roc – guys like Emitt Rhodes or Chris Bell or Jay Kaye, loved one year and lost the next. But now he says he feels differently: “I think I’ve got a lot of music in me. Life is so short, though. To quote Neil Young – ‘Time is better spent searching than finding.’” ✶ Avi Buffalo, with the Spires, Karin Tatoyan and the Coral Sea at Spaceland, 1717 Silver Lake Blvd., Silver Lake; clubspaceland.com. Fri., 8:30 p.m. $8. 21+.

LACITYBEAT 18 MARCH 19-25, 2009

R E V I E W

Shwayze March 11 @ House of Blues Sunset Strip Cisco “Son of Lou” Adler is Malibu rapper Shwayze’s wingman, and together the two are like the Abbott and Costello of hip-rock, rap-rock, hip-pop … whatever you wanna call it, these guys have got it down. Lyrically and melodically, Shwayze is as smooth as goose shit. They also know how to work a crowd – they made a lot of eye-contact with the girls in the first few rows, which may explain the army of under-21 chicks dressed in skintight T-shirts made to look like dresses – and the audience happily complied with the gimmicks, which included tossing two blow-up dolls out like beach balls at an outdoor music festival. The audience at this particular show was practically brainwashed with adulation, and was singing along – albeit overly loud – to such tunes as “Carona and Lime.” Still, Shwayze is almost too polished: The between-song banter sounded rehearsed, and they do a lot of name-dropping – their name, to be exact – and the delivery recalls every pop star ever caught lip-synching. It feels like they’ve got a big productionPR machine behind them, despite (or probably because of) a shtick completely mired in misogyny and binge drinking. And weed. Lots of weed. The duo are what Linkin Park would be if they graduated from the ODB school of hiphop – over-the-top, irreverent and fully plugged into pleasing the masses. ✶ –Sarah Tressler

ART

A Moment In Time Panthers in black and white By Ron Garmon At this remove, it’s almost mind-boggling to hear that in 1968, Life magazine commissioned two African-American journalists to do a story “humanizing” the Black Panthers. History – so busy elsewhere that fateful year – fails to record the number of RPMs the stillrecent corpse of founding publisher Henry Luce spun in the family cemetery back in South Carolina, but such postmortem exertions no doubt had some effect, as the story was inevitably spiked. Writer Gilbert Moore went on to express himself decisively elsewhere, but Howard Bingham’s photos – a combination of irreplaceable documentarian impulse and summit-scaling artistic achievement – are only now on revelatory display at the California African American History Museum through June 7. Bingham is best known for being Muhammad Ali’s photographer, interpreting

through his lens the ferocious grandeur emerging from a nimble braggart from Kentucky who would never prove too smart for his own good. That there will likely be an Ali cult five centuries from now is in large part due to the character arc snapped by this onetime photographer for the Los Angeles Sentinel who was at the top of his game by the late 1960s, the golden age of the slick newsmagazine. These few dozen photos, clustered in a cozy maze within this stylish cavern of a museum, increase what we know of the Panthers, their supports and of Bingham himself, whose stark and seamed images here educate our memories of the superstar sports photog. Moore and Bingham followed the Panthers leadership – Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, Eldridge and Kathleen Cleaver, David Hilliard and others – up and down the West Coast, with most of the photos snapped in Panther strongholds,

overwhelmingly represented here by the street life in South Central. These iconic faces seem fixed in the long backwardtrack of history, but the photographer’s studies of individual foot-soldier Panthers tell as compelling a story of dignity and back-to-the-wall resolution – and in some ways a vastly fresher tale. Pop histories often deify leaders and academic studies follow the practice, but Bingham’s images are as contemplative when depicting cop brutality or the happy-warrior dedication of the movement’s multiracial supporters as with the wiseass knowingness of Stokely Carmichael or Kathleen Cleaver’s pop-star beauty. The compositions show a newsman’s imperative for the instantread truth of any matter coupled with slow-hand painterly patience. A majority of the images were shot in L.A. and the relentless accumulation of physical detail of the era begins to have a subtly

MARCH 19-25, 2009 19 LACITYBEAT

transporting effect. By the end, the Angeleno spectator is in an age where heroism was an imperative – not just one more hard choice. Expect these matters to receive further piquant airing at the museum’s “Living the Legacy/Lessons Learned” event this Saturday at 1 p.m. – a panel featuring onetime Black Panther Party members Roland Freeman, Mohammed Mubarak, Robert Lee Johnson and Michael D. McCarty, plus Carlos Montes, former Minister of Information for the Brown Berets. They will share experiences, prognoses and prospects for radical action. ✶ A Moment In Time: Bingham’s Black Panthers at the California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., Exposition Park, Los Angeles, (213) 744-7432. caa.museum.org. Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Through June 7.

ART

carol rosegg

frost/nixon: lost in space

Plastics Do film hits ‘The Graduate’ and ‘Frost/Nixon’ work better on stage? By Don Shirley I’m a believer in the gospel that a live experience, happening before our eyes, is worth a pricier ticket than anything prerecorded on film or video. But I wouldn’t choose Frost/Nixon as Exhibit A for that argument – especially if the stage version takes place in a theater as large as the Ahmanson. Most Angelenos who might be drawn to the play’s subject – the David Frost interviews of the disgraced Richard Nixon – probably have seen the movie. In postOscar runs at cheap movie theaters, you could see it for two bucks. By contrast, tickets at the Ahmanson start at $20, with most of the best seats going for $80 (if you’re a single-ticket buyer, as opposed to a Center Theatre Group subscriber). In this recession, how many people are going to spring for the play when they could have seen the movie for as little as one-fortieth of the cost? One of the main themes of Frost/ Nixon is the power of the close-up screen image. It’s no surprise that this is a subject better suited to the screen than to the stage – or that it would be better suited

to an intimate theater than it is to the Ahmanson Theatre. Perhaps recognizing this, stage director Michael Grandage uses video imagery in the play. A big screen hovers over the stage, and it replicates what we’re seeing during the interview segments. It also offers glances of some of the surrounding scenery in other parts of the play. Yet for some unfathomable reason, the on-stage screen is divided into 36 little squares by large black lines that criss-cross it, like a giant tic-tac-toe board. Even when close-ups finally appear on that screen during the play’s climactic interrogation, the images are fragments. But surely aficionados will pay to see Alan Cox and Stacy Keach in the title roles, in addition to the movie’s (and Broadway’s) Michael Sheen and Frank Langella? Sorry, but Cox’s Frost is more lightweight and less compelling than Sheen’s. And while no one would ever call Keach a lightweight, his imposing presence doesn’t capture Nixon’s physical awkwardness nearly as well as Langella did. Part of the problem is that Peter

Morgan – who’s primarily a screenwriter, not a playwright – wrote both scripts. If someone else had brought a different voice to one of the scripts, the two projects might have been sufficiently different to justify seeing both of them – especially if the stage version were produced in a space that was designed to bring the audience closer to the action. That is exactly what has happened in the West Coast Ensemble’s revival of The Graduate. Terry Johnson adapted his stage play from both the original novel by Charles Webb and the screenplay of the iconic 1967 movie by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry. Fans of the movie could easily spend at least an hour discussing how the play is not only different but in some ways, yes, better than the screenplay. The character of Elaine Robinson – the young woman whom Benjamin pursues despite his cheerless affair with her mother – is much more substantial in the play than in the movie. Her thoughts and feelings are better articulated than her cinematic counterpart’s, and her final decision feels more justified, thanks to a nimble plot twist.

LACITYBEAT 20 MARCH 19-25, 2009

At the same time, Benjamin and Elaine are not quite the same avatars of youthful rebellion that the movie made them. Their aimless confusion is better expressed. A big-theater version of Johnson’s play drew harsh reviews a few years ago, including a tour that played the Wilshire Theatre in 2003. But the play is a comedy of manners, not an epic, and it snaps much more crisply in the tiny El Centro Theater, as staged by Jules Aaron. Ben Campbell, as a very callow Benjamin, makes the movie’s Dustin Hoffman look relatively mature. And Kelly Lloyd’s Mrs. Robinson is as utterly commanding as she is utterly nude.✶ Frost/Nixon, Ahmanson Theatre, Music Center, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown L.A. (213) 628-2772. CenterTheatreGroup.org. Tue.-Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 and 8 p.m.; Sun., 1 and 6:30 p.m. Dark March 25 and 26. $20-$80. Closes March 29. The Graduate, El Centro Theater, 800 N. El Centro Ave. Hollywood. (323) 460-4443. tix. com. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. $18-$20. Closes April 5.

EIGHT DAYs IN L.A.

Edited by Tom Child

2009, Larry Brownstein. Prints available at larrybrownstein.com

Lalop at the pier, Friday

L.A. City Beat hand picks calendar selections from among the myriad events that happen weekly in Los Angeles. In order to be considered, please submit all information at least two weeks in advance to calendar@lacitybeat.com or write Calendar / L.A. City Beat / 5209 Wilshire Blvd. / Los Angeles, CA / 90036. No faxes or phone calls, please.

Terrakroma mobsters and departing Ninja Skillz alumni The Bodyrock DJs perform their “Farewell to L.A. Clubs” set. King King, 6555 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 960-5765; kingkinghollywood. com. Fri., 10 p.m.-4 a.m. $10 before 11 p.m.

CLUBS

Visionshock Fridays, the “Biggest Asian Friday Night Party in L.A.” Le Cercle Supper Club, 721 S. Western Ave, Los Angeles, (213) 384-3366; lecerclela.com. Fri., 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

Compiled by Ron Garmon

Avaland presents Steve Angello and Sebastian Ingrosso. The Avalon, 1735 N. Vine St., Hollywood; avalonhollywood.com. Sun., 10 p.m.-4 a.m. $25 presale. Club DNA cuts to the Thursday night chase, promising “models & bottles” for the discriminating, dual-minded clubhopper. Dress code is “Hollywood chic” and you know what that means. Club Tatou, 333 S, Boylston St., downtown Los Angeles, (213) 482-2000. Every Thur., 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ladies on guest list free before 11 p.m.; gentlemen, $10. Guest list signup inhousemusicgroup.com. Club Work It invites you to check out your favorite lesbians. The Medusa Lounge, 3211 Beverly Blvd., Silver Lake, (213) 382-5723; medusaloungela.com. Sun., 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free. Deep’s debuts Rocco plus Marques Wyatt returns to run the voodoo down this Sunday night. The Vanguard, 6021 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. (323) 463-3331; vanguardla.com. Sun., 10 p.m.-4 a.m. $15 presale.

MUSIC Compiled by Sarah Tressler Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Conga Room, 5364 Wilshire Blvd., downtown Los Angeles, (213) 7490445; congaroom.com. Thur., Mar. 19, 9 p.m. $33-$58. Rick Springfield: Voices of Uganda Fundraiser. Key Club, 9039 W. Sunset, West Hollywood, (310) 2745800; keyclub.com. Thur., Mar. 19, 7:45 p.m. $50. The Adicts with The Dickies. Key Club, 9039 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, (310) 274-5800; keyclub.com. Fri., 7 p.m. $20 in adv.; $23 the day of the show. TV Stole My Name. Whisky A Go Go, 8901 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, (310) 652-4202; whiskyagogo.com. Fri., 8:15 p.m. $12 in adv.; $14 at the door.

Ten Out of Tenn, featuring ten performances. The Troubadour, 9081 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood, (310) 276-6168; troubadour.com. Tue., 8 p.m. $12. Dark Meat featuring Grampall Jukebox. The Echo, 1822 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (213) 413-8200; attheecho.com. Tue., 8 p.m. $10. The Muy Caliente Tour feat. PIMPBOT. Bluebeat Lounge, The Knitting Factory, 7021 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 463-0204; la.knittingfactory.com. Wed., 9 p.m. $5.  Tricky. The Music Box at Henry Fonda Theater, 6126 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 464-0808; henryfondatheatre.com. Wed., 8 p.m. $25. Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks. El Rey Theater, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 936-6400; theelrey.com. Thur., Mar. 26, 7 p.m. $28. One Splendid Evening with John Mayer, Gavin Rossdale, and Jordin Sparks for VH1’s Save the Music Foundation. Carnival Cruise Line’s Carnival of Splendor, Port of San Pedro; onesplendidevening. com. Thur., Mar. 26, 6 p.m. $150-$1,000.

THEATER

Compiled by Don Shirley

Funky Sole is DJs Miles and Clifton working this long-running confunkshun, a weekend mainstay since the memory of Clubland runneth not to the contrary. The Echo, 8122 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (213) 413-8200; attheecho.com. Sat., 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free. 21+.

Blue October. Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., downtown Los Angeles; clubnokia.com. Sat., 8 p.m. $31.50-$35.

Hot Butter Fridays puts the glide in yo’ stride with DJ Lady Sha. Dakota Music Lounge, 1026 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica; dakotalounge.com. Fri., 9:30 p.m.-2:30 a.m. Free before 11 p.m.; $5 after.

APLA Benefit: The Brothers Gershwin – George and Ira. Wilshire Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, (866) 679-0958; wtbh.org. Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. $50-$220.

Hussy Saturdays, with DJ Myles Hendrick and the beautiful people. The Beauty Bar, 1638 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 464-7676; beautybar.com/la. Sat., 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free.

PJ Harvey & John Parish. El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 936-6400; theelrey.com. Mon., 7 p.m. $48.

Beggars in the House of Plenty. John Patrick Shanley’s expulsion of his pain over growing up in an unloving Irish American family doesn’t go far beyond refracted therapy, thematically speaking. But Shanley’s style of splintered surrealism hooks our interest, and Larry Moss’ terrific cast seals the deal. Chris Payne Gilbert plays Johnny from age five into young manhood. Jack Conley is a brutal presence as the rock-hard father, with Francesca Casale the brutalized but hardly whimpering mother and David Gail the vulnerable older son. Lena Georgas and Denise Crosby briefly elevate their smaller roles, and the designers create a forbidding hellhouse. Theatre/Theater-Pico, 5041 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (800) 838-3006; brownpapertickets.com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. $18-$25. Closes Sun., March 29.

Steel Panther. Key Club, 9039 W. Sunset, West Hollywood, (310) 274-5800; keyclub.com. Mon., 9 p.m. $20, under 21; $18.

Daddy’s Dyin’, Who’s Got the Will? Del Shores’ first hit comedy - originally set among white small-town Texans - receives a mostly

Incognito invites you to groove until the tiny hours of Saturday morning with Jon Rundell plus

Black Mountain. Echoplex, 1154 Glendale, Echo Park, (213) 413-8200; attheecho.com. Sat., 8:30 p.m. $12 in adv.; $14 the day of the show.

LACITYBEAT 21 March 19-25, 2009

African American-cast revival, staged by its original producer, Theatre/Theater’s Jeff Murray. The racial transformation is working well, not only in the makeup of the audience but in the ease with which most of the lines are adaptable to African American voices within the same small town. There are two different casts. I saw this show earlier at Theatre/Theater’s Pico Boulevard venue; it had some memorable performances but could have used a tightened pace. Theatre/Theater-Hollywood. (323) 954-9795. theatretheater.net. Sat., 8.p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. $20-$25. Closes Sun., April 12. Divorce! The Musical. Erin Kamler’s lively and witty musical focuses most of its arrows on attorneys and other professionals who capitalize on troubled couples. Her splitting-up protagonists, a Brentwood radiologist (Rick Segall) and a would-be actress (Lowe Taylor) are shallow and materialistic. Still, a little more background on their initial attraction might help us care about their fate as they’re buffeted by their attorneys (Gabrielle Wagner, Leslie Stevens) and their mediator (Gregory Franklin). It’s almost an evening of musical sketches instead of a full-fledged narrative, but director Rick Sparks gets maximum mileage from it. Hudson Mainstage Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 960-1056; divorcemusical. com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. $25-$34.99 Closes Sun., April 26. Dracula. Ken Sawyer directed The Woman in Black in 2002 – and it was so deliciously scary that it played at two venues for much of the next year. Now he offers a variation of the genre in this lush, lively version of Bram Stoker’s vampire tale, adapting a script from the ’20s versions by Hamilton Dean and John Balderston. This edition is set in the ’20s, never leaves England for Transylvania and changes Dr. Seward into a woman (Karesa McElheny). But at its heart is a dashing Dracula (Robert Arbogast), often clad only in black leather pants, and his current love interest Lucy (Darcy Jo Martin). The designers Desma Murphy, Luke Moyer, Paula Higgins and Sawyer (on sound) envelop the audience in spooky sights and noises. NoHo Arts Center, 11136 Magnolia Blvd., North Hollywood, (818) 508-7101; thenohoartscenter.com. Fri.Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. $20-$25. Dark April 12.

CALENDAR

BUY NOW WITH CODE  -69 ;0*2,;: rLN 

BLACK MOUNTAIN

*90;0*Âť:70*2

Black Mountain’s 2005 self-titled debut (Jagjaguwar) was somehow casual and calculated at once – precise, respectful and literate in the vocabulary of heavyrock as actually used the first time by bands like Can and Hawkwind, but presented without a self-conscious hiccup or sense that anybody involved was struggling to deliver their lines. (“Others talk about it – we do it,� as another band who enjoyed dropping songs from high orbit explained.) 2008 follow-up In the Future – with beautiful cover by keyboardist Jeremy Schmidt, owed a back page ad in Metal Hurlant someday – shed obvious (but adorable) genre work (like 2005’s winning “Satisfaction�) for songs fearlessly hard or soft in the same way as just-past-Syd Floyd or the United States of America. If anyone says this sounds old, they aren’t being clear – perhaps they really just mean it sounds primal. Echoplex, 1154 Glendale, Echo Park, (213) 4138200; attheecho.com. Sat., 8:30 p.m. $12 in adv.; $14 the day of the show. 18+. (Chris Ziegler)

Backstage

WRITTEN BY

ANTHONY NEILSON DIRECTED BY

TIMOTHY HASKELL STARRING

MEITAL DOHAN SHOWTIME’S WEEDS

JOHN VENTIMIGLIA HBO’S THE SOPRANOS

Closes Sun., April 26.

“BREATHTAKING IN ITS INTENSITY�  - Variety

“THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE EVENING IS DOHAN: DROLL AND FEROCIOUS,  SHE PROWLS THE STAGE LIKE A FASSBINDER DIVA� - LA Times “QUIETLY MOVING AND HIGHLY PERSONAL...SUPERB PERFORMANCES.�  - LA Splash

STRICTLY LIMITED ENGAGEMENT THROUGH APRIL 5 3PSSPHU;OLH[LY‹3PSSPHUWH`‹ 

StitchingThePlay.com

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Mike Daisey

How Theater Failed America

+ Mar 18 - 21 at 8pm

The Last Cargo Cult

A DouglasPlus work-in-progress + Mar 22 at 3pm. Tickets $5!

The Projectionist

Written by Michael Sargent Directed by Bart DeLorenzo + Mar 26 - 28, April 2 & 3 at 8pm April 4 at 7pm & 9:30pm * Limited to just 50 seats

Venice

A DouglasPlus workshop

Written by Matt Sax & Eric Rosen Directed by Eric Rosen + April 15 - 18 at 8pm

Kirk Douglas Theatre

213.628.2772 CenterTheatreGroup.org 9820 Washington Blvd. at Duquesne in Culver City

All ic T kets

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Falling Upward. Ray Bradbury’s comedy about the men who frequent a small-town Irish bar dillydallies too long, until an amusing story about an inherited wine legacy finally kicks into high gear just before intermission. Then the second act is something else entirely – Mediterranean-style “fairies� invade the bar and establish a kind of amity with the regulars. Tim Byron Owen’s revival features a cast of 24, who occasionally break into Irish music, alternately mournful and rambunctious. Pat Harrington’s genial narrator keeps the disparate parts loosely connected; Mik Scriba plays the bartender who defuses tense situations with offers of free drinks. It makes an interesting St. Patrick’s Month companion to Theatre Tribe’s A Skull in Connemara, in the smaller theater next door. El Portal Theatre, mainstage, 5269 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood, (866) 811-4111; raybradburysfallingupward.com or plays411.com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. $30-$40. Closes Sun., April 5. Film. In 1964, Samuel Beckett (Phil Ward) arrives in New York to monitor the shooting of his experimental short screenplay Film by novice filmmaker Alan Schneider (Bill Robens), a stage director who helped introduce Beckett’s plays to America. At the taciturn Beckett’s suggestion, the great silent film comic Buster Keaton (Carl J. Johnson), now hard-boiled and almost 70, is the star. Playwright Patrick McGowan treats this stellar alignment with winningly whimsical surreality in Trevor Biship’s staging. The focus is split among Keaton’s memories of his own years as an experimental artist (Mandi Moss as the young Keaton), Beckett’s bumbling flirtation with a prop girl (Deana Barone), and Schneider’s exasperation over his inability to master film, in comparison to his rival Mike Nichols (Trevor H. Olsen). Schneider and Nichols become vaudeville partners in Schneider’s dream, and Nichols gets all the laughs. Theatre of NOTE, 1517 N. Cahuenga Blvd.,, Hollywood, (323) 856-8611; theatreofnote.com. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. $18-$22. Closes Sat., March 21. Grand Motel. In Michael Sargent’s droll new comedy, the Tennessee Williams-like playwright Cornelius Coffin (Dennis Christopher) retreats to a clothing-optional gay motel in Palm Springs during the premiere of his latest Broadway fiasco. As in the Grand Hotel template, other guests and less welcome intruders pass through, under the fretful eye of the proprietor couple (Craig Johnson, Erik Hanson). Coffin and everyone else are drawn to the naked model (Andy Hopper, almost a Brad Pitt ringer) who’s apparently drifting into oblivion, but Coffin’s female friend (Shannon Holt) has other plans for the playwright before he enters his own coffin. Sargent’s playful but rueful script and his excellent cast are treated to a deluxe simulation of the tacky milieu by designer Chris Covics. Unknown Theater, 1110 Seward St., Hollywood, (323) 4667781; unknowntheater.com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 6 p.m. $18-$24. Closes Sat., March 28. Grease. Kathleen Marshall’s revival of the cheesy Jacobs/Casey musical started with a TV reality series that helped pick the cast of the Broadway version. Now the tour continues its relationship with the same genre by casting American Idol finalist

LACITYBEAT 22 MARCH 19-25, 2009

Taylor Hicks as the Teen Angel, who appears in only one scene, and then giving Hicks a chance to flog his new CD by singing a number after the show itself ends (however, he won’t be there March 18 and 19). With roots like these, what do you expect? It’s a show for TV fans who don’t much like theater. The actual stars are Eric Schneider as Danny and Emily Padgett as Sandy, boldly blazing the path that would be trod in the following century by the couple in High School Musical. Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd. (213) 365-3500; broadwayla.org. Thur.-Fri., 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 & 8 p.m.; Sun., 1 & 6:30 p.m. $25-$85. Closes Sun., March 22. At Orange County Performing Arts Center, Costa Mesa, April 28-May 10. The Jazz Age. In yet another speculative dramatization of the lives of Scott (Luke Macfarlane) and Zelda (Heather Prete) Fitzgerald, plus Ernest Hemingway (Jeremy Gabriel), Allan Knee concentrates on suggestions of homoeroticism between the two men and an attempt by Zelda to seduce Hemingway. Michael Matthews’ staging features fine performances and Ian Whitcomb’s original music performed live by the composer and two other musicians. But it can’t shake that beenthere, prospective-miniseries feeling. Blank Theatre, 6500 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 6619827; theblank.com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. $22-$28. Closes Sun., March 29. Laws of Sympathy. Oliver Mayer is on to something here, in his depiction of how a mother (Anita Dashiell) and newly grown daughter (Diarra Kilpatrick) who have survived civil war in Somalia encounter culture shock and possibly worse exploitation in their new life in Atlanta. Despite the watchful eye of their primary resettlement counselor (Ahmad Enani), his colleague (Celeste Den) entangles the women with a scandal-tainted ex-track star (Will Dixon) when other job possibilities seem hopeless. The women are drawn to smiling kidvid characters as consolation for their woes. Jon Lawrence Rivera’s staging for Playwrights’ Arena seems fairly sturdy, although the playwright had to play Enani’s role, script in hand, at the performance I saw, after Enani called in sick. Perhaps this had something to do with my feeling that the counselors were over-emphasized at the expense of the women themselves. Studio/stage, 520 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles, (213) 627-4473; playwrightsarena.org. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. $20. Closes Sun., March 29. Mammals. A London housewife is going bonkers tending her two young daughters (played by adults) while her husband travels for his job. When he returns home, he announces he’s in love with a colleague – the perfect moment for a couple of childless friends to stop by. John Pleshette’s U.S. premiere of Amanda Bullmore’s play is a funny, dead-eyed glance at the bending and breaking of two couples. Half of the roles are double cast, but the group I saw was exactly right, including the women playing rambunctious kids. Lost Studio, 130 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (800) 595-4849; tix. com. Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 4 p.m. $25. Closes Sun., April 5. Stitching. The audience has to stitch together much of what happens between scenes in Anthony Neilson’s slim two-hander about a couple (John

CALENDAR 8 p.m.; Sat., 2 & 8 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m. $20. Closes Sun., March 29.

PAUL OAKENFOLD Superstar DJs come precious little more celebrated than Oakenfold, U.K. disciple of U.S. soul and hip-hop, Ibiza institution and arguably the world’s best-known DJ and remixer. The cherubic Mr. Oakenfold appears tonight with Calvin Harris, electroclash bad-boy whose 2007 debut I Created Disco bids fair to become an all-time Clubland classic. Another hypertrophied night from Giant. The Vanguard, 6021 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 463-3331; vanguardla.com. Sun., March 8. 10 p.m.-4 a.m. $25 presale. (Ron Garmon)

Ventimiglia, Meital Dohan) who aren’t sure whether to abort their fetus. As the play winds down, some of what happens between those scenes sounds remarkably momentous – but it’s hard to tell whether these events are “real� or whether they’re simply throwaway lines in the couple’s fantasy role-playing. In place of solid information, the transitions are filled with intrusive music that occasionally starts too soon in Timothy Haskell’s staging, overpowering the actors’ lines at the end of the preceding scene. Then again, Dohan’s Israeli accent makes her sometimes difficult to understand even when she has no competition. It’s a largely forgettable experience. Lillian Theatre, 1076 Lillian Way, Hollywood, (323) 962-7782; stitchingtheplay. com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 7 p.m. $25. Closes Sun., April 5. The Threepenny Opera. Jules Aaron’s staging for International City Theatre is the best rendition of this Kurt Weill/Bertolt Brecht classic that I’ve seen in the Southland. Aaron never forgets the show’s goal of satirizing capitalism by demonstrating how its precepts are adopted by thieves, murderer and whores. He chose Michael Feingold’s scabrous translation instead of Marc Blitzstein’s gentler, more familiar version. And he places the musical numbers front and center because these astringent songs are intended to explode directly in the audience’s collective face. The actors have big voices and supremely authoritative deliveries. Jeff Griggs is a dynamo as the charming and creepy criminal boss Macheath. As his bride, Shannon Warne segues smoothly from naivete to the self-confidence necessary to strip down to her underwear in order to sing “Pirate Jenny� at her own wedding. Tom Shelton and Eileen T’Kaye are commandingly snappy as her parents. Zarah Mahler sizzles as Jenny Diver, Macheath’s prostitute lover, but Rachel Genevieve is her wily match as Lucy Brown. The occasionally gender-flipping chorus adds to the wonderfully entertaining rogues’ gallery. Center Theatre, Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd, (562) 436-4610; ictlongbeach. org. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. $30-$45. Closes Sun., March 22.

The Trial of the Catonsville Nine. Daniel Berrigan’s 1971 docudrama, about his and eight fellow Catholic activists’ trial for burning draft records during the Vietnam War, is famous in L.A. for Gordon Davidson’s premiere at the Taper, which was rumored to have been monitored by the FBI. Yet Jon Kellam’s revival is rather staid, especially in contrast to that other recently revived Vietnam protest docudrama The Chicago Conspiracy Trial. Andrew E. Wheeler achieves the requisite passion as the author. In a bit of cross-gender casting, Adele Robbins plays the judge, who was entirely too polite and reasonable to generate much dramatic fire. Actors’ Gang, 9070 Venice Blvd., Culver City, (310) 838-4264; theactorsgang.com. Thur.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Closes Sat., March 28. Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light. Billed by Native Voices as a “world premiere play,� it’s really more of an indie music/spoken word act. Joy Harjo talks about her sad early life as a Mvskoke Indian in Oklahoma, occasionally punctuating her remarks with riffs on a saxophone, accompanied by Larry Mitchell on guitar. She has no apparent training as an actress, which might have helped her vary her wooden poses. If director Randy Reinholz tried to help, it isn’t readily apparent. Autry National Center of the American West, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Griffith Park, (323) 667-2000; autrynationalcenter.org. Thur.-Fri.,

For more reviews, go to Currently Playing at lacitybeat.com.

DANCE/COMEDY/PERFORMANCE/SIGNINGS COMPILED BY GUELDA VOIEN

Josh Bazell presents and signs Beat the Reaper, 8818 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 659-3110; booksoup.com. Thur., March 26, 7 p.m. Free. Beyond Tolerance: Interfaith Action in the World, A Conversation with Gustav Niebuhr and Eboo Patel. Richard Riordan Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles, (213) 228-7025; lfla.org/ aloud. Thur., March 26, 7 p.m. Free.

UPCOMING IN-STORES at AMOEBA!

Cabaraet Meditteranea. Highways Performance Space, 1651 18th St., Santa Monica, (310) 3151459; highwaysperformance.org. Fri., 8:30 p.m. Sat., 7:30 p.m. $20.

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Defusing Armageddon: Inside NEST, America’s Secret Nuclear Bomb Squad with Jeffrey Richelson. Richard Riordan Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles, (213) 228-7025; lfla.org/ aloud. Wed., 7 p.m. Free. Do What Thou Wilt: Kenneth Anger on Aleister Crowley and the Occult. Billy Wilder Theatre at the Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 443-7000; hammer.ucla.edu. Thur., March 26, 7 p.m. Free. Earlene Fowler discusses and signs Love Mercy. Vroman’s bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 449-5320; vromansbookstore. com. Wed., 7 p.m. Free. Aris Janigian presents and signs Riverbig. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 6593110; booksoup.com. Sun., 5 p.m. Free. Laugh Out Loud Comedy: A Benefit for

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Dhani Harrison and friend Oli Hecks release their first album as Thenewno2, which borrows as much from Brian Eno and Massive Attack as it does from his dad’s band. You Are Here comes out March 31st on Vagrant Records. “... combining musique concrète, backward recordings and ambient synth flourishes into pop gems ...From the loud and liberating to the airy and psychedelic.â€? — Rolling Stone

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MARCH 19-25, 2009 23 LACITYBEAT

clubland

LALOP at the Pier The Los Angeles League of Photographers celebrating the centennial of the Santa Monica Pier opens its “LALOP at the Pier” exhibit this Saturday night at the Carousel Hippodrome. The jutting hunk of old wood and whimsy is one of California’s great treasures, and the League has been busy since February snapping and developing studies certain to enchant fans of the taken image. Carousel Hippodrome, 200 Santa Monica Pier, Santa Monica, (310) 458-8786; lalopblog.blogspot.com. Exhibit opens Fri., March 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free carousel rides at opening! Through April 18. (Ron Garmon)

To boldly sue ...

Lifeworks. The Laugh Factory, 8001 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 656-1336; lifeworksmentoring. org. Tue., 8 p.m. $30. Los Angeles Ballet. Alex Theater, 216 N. Brand Ave., Glendale, (310) 998-7782; losangelesballet. org. Sat., 2 p.m. $30-$90. Masters of Dance: Karen Goodman. Gym 104, Santa Monica College, 1900 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, (310) 434-4856; smc.edu. Thur., March 26, 11:15 a.m. Free. Dr. Drew Pinsky in conversation with Dr. S. Mark Young present The Mirror Effect: How Celebrity Narcissism is Seducing. Vroman’s bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 449-5320; vromansbookstore.com. Thur., March 26, 7 p.m. Free. Skylight Books Literary Salon. 1818 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 660-1175; skylightbooks. com/NASApp/store. Sat., 4 p.m. Free. Zócalo in Hollywood: An Evening with Craig Newmark. ArcLight Hollywood, 6360 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 464-1478; zocalopublicsquare.org. Wed., 7:30 p.m. Free.

Cash Money, Y’all BY RON GARMON A Boy & His Subsidiary Rights: If you haven’t seen Harlan Ellison’s muchcirculated “Pay the Writer” rant on YouTube, you’re short a vastly condensed version of the fight this corrosive and much-loved fellow has waged with the Hollywood power structure since the first roseate blush of the Great Society 1960s. The old gadfly was in rare form last week for a screening of A Boy and His Dog (the 1975 romp based on his classic science fiction story) at the New Beverly Cinema, taking his own sweet time taking down friend, foe and bystander alike in a furious hail of badinage. The hour grew advanced, but still he jabbered, spinning pie plates of experience, philosophy, epistemology, roorback, metaphor and off-the-chuckleheads rhetoric, and the second feature was strung through the projector and forgotten. He trotted out the old anecdotes, Bojangles-like, and set them to dancing in between talk of money woes. But at no time did the writer mention he was about to drop the mother of all lawsuits on Paramount, preferring to leave until Friday official announcement he was going after every penny of royalties unpaid since the company filmed his Star Trek episode – the acclaimed “City on the Edge of Forever” – some four decades ago. The midnight hour was drawing near when Harlan wound down, the lights dimmed and The Day the Earth Caught Fire finally began its 98-minute hurtle toward a crisper humanity. Hollywood Schwangin’: While the lights, noise, conviviality and estrogen

ART smorgasbord of Clubland see to most of the needs notched on Maslow’s hierarchy, there are other times when I prefer the cool cave of contemplation that is a movie house. Back at the New Bev, I let the amusing antique puzzlebox of William Peter Blatty’s The Ninth Configuration (1980) lay on all pleasant disassociation unprovided by a largish dose of cubensis consumed as the washed-out Metro color narrative clattered along. I drifted out after the credits, legging it up to join the Saturday night flotsam and jetsam on Hollywood Boulevard. It was close to midnight and the Boulevard was haunted by the usual tourists, B-boys, fugitive hipsters, chicks in minis and guys with blue and prognathous jaws. One unusual sight was a half-dozen-or-so Guardian Angels. These soft, paunchy-looking vigilantes with their red berets and TV-bred sneers ser ve as waddling, two-legged reminders of how desperate times have become on even a safe street heavily patrolled by cops. Rounding Vine and padding into the Avalon, I found the Sander Kleinenberg trance extravaganza going at full om for a packed house of distracted clubkids, most of them looking deep into some weekend psychodrama or other. My own freshwashed psyche took in the great Dutch DJs roaring strophes and dainty filigree while idling in the balcony with my head on fire as the crowd surged and primped around me. Clubland may stimulate and drugs transpor t, but only such sonic textures may truly get one out of both irritable crowd and whimsical head. V

Compiled by Ron Garmon Drawing on a Printing Machine. Superstar artist David Hockney thinks Photoshop superior to any other kind of painting, but printing an image far too slow for commercial appeal, thus making the practice fine art by default. Opening reception Thur., 7-9 p.m. L.A. Louver, 45 N. Venice Blvd., Venice, (310) 822-4955; www.lalouver.com. Through Sat., March 28. Edward Hagedorn: California Modernist. The dynamic and truly weird vision of the late San Francisco eccentric. Opening reception, March 14, 6 p.m. Couturier Gallery, 166 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (310) 829-2156; couturiergallery. com. Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Through Sat., May 2. Explosions in a Mental Sky features the startling abstract landscapes of David O’Brien and “Double Dip”, the lysergic inspirations of Tofer Chin. Opening Reception, March 14, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Cerasolic Gallery, 8530-B Washington Blvd., Culver City. (310) 945-5974; cerasoligallery.com. Tue.Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. The Getty Commodus: Roman Portraits and Modern Copies. Focusing on the provenance of a single bust of the much-reviled Roman emperor. The Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Dr., Los Angeles, (310) 440-7300; getty.edu. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Free. Through Mon., June 1. Illiterature. A group show featuring the visual jump, jive ’n’ wail of abstract art. Opening Feb. 21st. Arena 1 Gallery, 3026 Airport Ave., Santa Monica, (310) 397-7449; santamonicaartstudios. com. Tue.-Sat., 1-6 p.m. Through Sat., March 21. Institute: Under Hand. Seeking to upset “the traditional activity of the artist who makes unique objects or manipulates and retouches found objects under the “authority of the hand,” this exhibit highlights the ways storytelling, a/v recordings and disintegrating ephemera can document how the hand of the artist may construct untruth as readily as truth. If art is supposed to a true representation of the world, what are we to make attempts at deception? The Institute of

LACITYBEAT 24 March 19-25, 2009

Cultural Inquiry, 1512 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 273-7181; culturalinquiry.org. Regular hours: Thur., noon-4 p.m.; every odd Sat., noon-5 p.m. Free. Through Sun., March 29. Jenna Colby. On the gallery’s Project Wall hangs the artist’s swollen-headed, bleary-eyed moppets, each a study in comic defeat and resignation. Black Maria Gallery, 3137 Glendale Blvd., (323) 6609393; blackmariagallery.com. Tue.-Sun., noon-6 p.m. Free. Through Sat., April 4. Mannequins: Undressed. Beck Starr’s latest exhibit “combines traditional photography and digital art to capture an iconic look” at the female form. Advocate & Gochis Galleries, The Village, 1125 N. McCadden Pl., Hollywood, (323) 8607300; lagaycenter.org. Mon.-Fri., 6 p.m.-10 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Through Sat., April 18. Michael Pukac: Pukac Safari. Yet another showing by this rising young master of the absurd, but this time the theme is the members of the animal kingdom and the 1001 weird uses to which they can be put. Bailey Gallery, 564 S. Main St., Los Angeles, (213) 438-0900; pussyandpooch. com. Tue. & Thur., 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Wed. & Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., noon-5 p.m. Free. Through Sun., March 29. My Refrigerator, the Wormhole. Free beer and unicorns at this celebration of Bernie Madoff’s address change. C4 - Cucaracha Club of Culver City, 2646 La Cienega Ave., Los Angeles, (310) 922-6678. Sat., 7 p.m.-11 p.m. $5 donation. Rock, Paper, Scissor. Showing off works done by artists with backgrounds in the music biz, among them Raymond Pettibon, Daniel Johnston and Thurston Moore. Opening reception Sat., Feb. 28, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Robert Berman Gallery, 2525 Michigan Ave., Bergamot Station; C-2, D-5 Galleries, Santa Monica, (310) 315-9506; robertbermangallery.com. Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Through Sat., March 21. Short Stories bids you enter the tiny universes of sculptor Diem Chau and photographer Wendy Given. Opening Sat., March 21, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Fifth Floor, 502 Chung King Ct., Chinatown, (213) 6878443; fifthfloorgallery.com. Thur.-Sun., noon-6.p.m. Superschool. A group show at the Copro Nason curated by Lola (whose “Natural Beauties” show is also running at the same Westside gallery) purporting to represent “a select cross-section from contemporary masters of the visual equation.” Copro Nason, Bergamont Station, 2525 Michigan Ave., Bergamot Station; C-2, D-5 Galleries, Santa Monica. (310) 829-2159. copronasoncom. Tue.Sat. 1 p.m.-7 p.m. Free. Through Sat., March 28. Twilight. The Eastside museum named for the preeminent movie monster is fitting host for this showing by Reno ceramics sculptor Rebekah Bogard, whose whimsical fantasy insects are like dainty pornography for fans of David Cronenberg movies. The Vincent Price Art Museum at East Los Angeles College, 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez, Monterey Park, (323) 265-8841‎; myspace.com/ vincentpriceartmuseum. Mon.-Wed., noon-4 p.m.; Thur., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon- 4 p.m. Through Thur., April 23. Vintage Futurism: Recent Works on Wood & Paper. Presenting former graffiti artist Kofie One’s bold, fantastically detailed abstract cityscapes. Opening reception Fri., 7 p.m.-10 p.m. 01 Gallery, 530 S. Hewitt St., Barker Block- Suite 141, Los Angeles, (213) 689-0101; 01gallery.com. Tue.-Sat., noon-6 p.m. Free. Through Sun., March 29.

MARCH 19-25, 2009 25 LACITYBEAT

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1 BD $1150. Newer Bldg. Totally Remodeled. Gated entry & parking, AC, fridge, stove, dw, Pool, Laundry Room, BBQ Area

Balconies 9929 Sepulveda Blvd.

FURNISHED VERY COOL HOUSE FOR RENT

6253 Lankershim

HOME RENTAL NORTH HOLLYWOOD

Bel Air Beverly Glen. fully restored 1928 enclosed Cape Cod cottage w awnings, 2 bd., 1.5 ba, 2 car garage, manicured yard w flowers, 5’ Jacuzzi, aqua therapy, includes spa, pool, gardener, utilities, 1 yr lease + security deposit, $4,250,

3 bdrs.2 baths Interior all brand new Large yard with pool No credit check. $999 per month.

$1395, 1 bed, 1 bath in excellent location-- Compston Ave. and Lankershim North Hollywood Arts District. Brand new building, tiles, granite, marble and carpeting. Close to Metro, schools and shopping. 1 month FREE rent with approved credit!

Call 866-599-6584

Take a look at our website and get your business out to the public. ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM

call Diane 760-602-5076 NO HO ARTS DISTRICT LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE:

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse!

Goto www.lacitylist.com

Visit: www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Jr 1 BD $985+up. ALL UTILITIES PAID, Totally remodeled. A/C, Fridge, stove. Laundry, Balcony, Ceramic tile, Gated Entry. & Parking.

FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR? Place your rentals, apartment, condo or loft advertisement in www.lacitylist.com.

5751 Camellia Ave. 818-761-6620. 2 WEEKS FREE WITH ONE YEAR LEASE

(310)395-1495 see yourself living here

1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments and townhomes available BEVERLY

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Apartment Homes & Spa directly across from the Grove Short term and Furnished Apartments avaliable. We Cooperate with Real Estate Agents.

MARCH 19-25, 2009 29 LACITYBEAT

6220 WEST 3RD STREET LOS ANGELES, CA 90036

High Quality Cannabis~ Nothing Over $60 an Eighth. (323) 445-0164 1570 S. Western Ave. #212 (2nd floor) cross st. Venice Blvd.

Sunday Grab Bag Free GRAM from the grab bag w/ every donation

Monday Madness 10% off ALL items (OZ specials not included)

Two Stamp Tuesdays Receive and EXTRA stamp for your rewards card

Free Joint Wednesdays FREE joint every Wednesday

Bluegate Collective

(323) 263-3009 3428 Whittier Blvd. Los Angeles, CA

Happy Hour Thursdays 3PM-5PM Your choice of a FREE joint or 2 stamps Monday - Saturday 11am - 8pm Sunday 11am - 7pm - Knowledgeable and friendly staff - Wide selection of quality meds - Easy parking and wheelchair accessible

The Bluegate Collective realizes the benefits that patients will gain from using medical cannabis and is here to provide safe and affordable access for those suffering from carpel tunnel, chronic pain, insomnia, multiple sclerosis, anorexia, glaucoma, and other serious conditions. We provide a wide variety of medications; including dried herbs, edibles, extracts, and concentrates for patients and primary caregivers who are in full compliance with the California Health and Safety Code 11362.5 (Proposition 215) and SB 420.

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    3 5 . 3 % 4 " , 6 $   . $ & , / / 2 ( / , , 9 7 / / $

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FREE

gift for first time patients with any donation.

LA CITY BEAT

DOT COM

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To Advertise Call 323-938-1001

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MARCH 19-25, 2009 31 LACITYBEAT

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To Advertise Call 323-938-1001

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(213) 384-2403 3567 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90020 www.ktowncollective.com MARCH 19-25, 2009 33 LACITYBEAT

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Be on the BACKBEAT 323.938.1001 Any Size, Any Car. Call us and give us your tire size and we will mark it up ONLY $2.00 per tire.

F R E E

No minimums, no restrictions. Just mention this ad. Featuring Toyo Tires along with other fine products.

PREGNANCY TESTS Women's, Pediatric, Youth Services and

Holiday Recession SALE 360 degrees of Service & Satisfaction

FREE

United Alignment Tire Center Versado LX

Pregnancy Tests. Call 323-644-3888 or walk in.

11251Burbank Blvd. N. Hollywood, CA 91601

Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, Inc.

(In the Heart of the NO HO Art District.)

1530 Hillhurst Avenue, Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90027

Phone: (818) 980-8550 E-mail: unitedalignment@gmail.coms

www.aphcv.org

• All purchases must be installed in house. Mounting, Balancing, and EPA fees extra. No Carry Out.

WORK FROM HOME - INTERNET JOB MAKE $12,700/MONTH (START TODAY!) 100% FREE INTERNET MARKETING SYSTEM 22+

HAVE YOU BEEN FIRED? SEXUALLY HARASSED? DISCRIMINATED AT WORK? UNPAID WAGES & OVERTIME? FREE CONSULTATION: (310) 789-2240

Streams of Passive Residual Income “I generated 3,568 fresh live leads, 156. New business associates and $73,568. In my first 3 months!” ***** Grab your FREE system today *****

HAVE SEX/GET PAID:

www.HBSTOP.ws (818) 745-5657 Visit our support site: www.HBstop.com

New Adult Film Employment Guide. Earn $5000/wk locally. Call for FREE information 24/7.

Aggressive & Dedicated Law Firm

Law Offices of Frank Hakim

MOHEBAN LAW FIRM

1-818-487-5596

Call Toll Free: 1-877-MOHEBAN (664-3226)

UNPAID OVERTIME? DENIED BREAKS?

UNPAID OVERTIME? DENIED BREAKS?

We recover $$$$ for unpaid overtime or denied breaks Call Atty.

We recover $$$$ for unpaid overtime or denied breaks Call Atty. Eric Kingsley

Eric Kingsley 818.990.8300 www.unpaidwages.com

818.990.8300 www.unpaidwages.com

REAL ESTATE INVESTOR Seeks students for real estate education. Call Joe at (310) 621-1006, or email JosephYoderREI@yahoo.com

ROBERT DEAN - MAGICIAN Magic for all Occasions! robertdeanmagic.com 310-793-6757

• Need a Warrant Recalled? • Want to Smoke Pot on Probation? • All Criminal Defense, from Drugs to Murder.

Harvard Law, Affordable Office: 323-653-1850 (Ok to call from custody, 24-hours services)

MARCH 19-25, 2009 35 LACITYBEAT

MARCH 19-25, 2009 7 LACITYBEAT


Vol 07 Issue 12