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NOT JUST YOUR AVERAGE design portfolio. by

Joe McNeill


THIS IS ME. admiring the fine work of Carlo Scarpa at the Brion Cemetery in San Vito D’Altivole, Italy.


HELLO!

my name is JOE MCNEILL. my goal is to to expand my knowledge and passion for the built world as well as the design world. while my ultimate goal is to work as an architect, i want this portfolio to represent my many areas of interest. i truly believe in a cross-disciplinary approach to all facets of architecture, that which draws ideas from art, people, music, graphic design, travel, history, language and even those built environments that never had an architect associated with them. i hope to immerse myself in a professional experience that will foster my growth as an architect and a life-long student. i intend to work diligently at becoming a better designer, while always remembering my self-initiated values which include: + + + + + 03

understanding craft as a tool but also an end result minding context and the ever-changing societal patterns that drive design using words and creating words to enhance the intent of a project allowing the cross-disciplinary nature of architecture to infiltrate my life and the life of my work super-imposing a lens of simplicity and function over all of my designs.


clemson university

.12

master of architecture

college of charleston

.06

bachelor of arts in historic preservation + community planning

real world

undergraduate

>

*

each represents ~ 1 month of work.

>

jmo woodworks

>

charleston, sc

carpenter - custom woodwork + furniture, construction, millwork + cabinetry, design, installation + finishing

daniel center for building research + urban studies genoa, italy

goff-d’antonio architecture associates january

charleston, sc intern - basic cad work on CDs, feasibility studies, historical research, model building

design collective

05

06

refine.

travel. photograph. sketch. design.

macy’s

baltimore, md

washington d.c. carpenter for interior designer at macy’s HOME store.

summer intern - CDs, historical research, model building

08

07

may

<

graduate [post-bac]

10

09

11

12

love

city

plan

connections

language

private

recycle

sketch

research

intentionality

live

coffee family

materiality

space

diagram

interact

vectors

urban

do it

commitment run

technology

data

design-build

transparency

parti

write words

wood

listen

detail

quality drawing adobe cs5.5 purpose woodworking free-hand concept phenomenology craft travel rhino people experience approach structure revit product local art autocad css public printexperiment design skills sustainable sketchup html idea process architecture create growth typographystudy semi-fluent in spanish graphic design + logos nature model building design section branding passion site graphics inspiration

experience.

joemcneillwork.com

language

learn.

m c n e ill. j o e @ g m a il. c o m

density

cv

joemcneill

mobile: + 001 727 452 8771

engage. • • • •

graduate assistant partner of social activities student publication designer avid runner + ultimate player

clemson university materials lab + woodshop

F.09 | S.10 + F.11 | S.12

graduate architecture student partnership [GASP]

clemson university

annual publication of student work [BRANCH 2.0] everywhere

clemson university all of the time


WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INSIDE?

craft.

6-7

coffee table

8-9

entryway door darby desk

10-11

architecture.

draw. graphic. photo.

12-15

design.build [kiosk] // charleston / sc

16-19

design.build [movie screen] // charleston / sc

20-23

university housing // genoa / italy

24-31

vertical farm // charleston / sc

32-39

culinary arts college // greenville / sc

40-41

drawing leonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s // charleston / sc

42-43

sketching europe // italy + beyond

44-47

print // posters

48-49

print + digital // presentations

50-51

print + web // branding + identity

travel photographs

52-53 54-55

03 05

thank you.


coffee table

constructed with solid 8/4 mahogany finished with cedar stain + clear satin lacquer

07


charleston entryway

Designed and built for a private client, this door and jamb are the essential final pieces to a contemporary renovation of a charleston single house. The private client wanted the highest quality materials (as these doors often take quite a beating) for his exterior entryway door to the piazza. A modern guy in a traditional setting, together, we pushed the limits of traditional charleston entryways with a mahogany two-panel door and large single-pane glass transom. Joinery and fine details made this door a one-of-a-kind.

09


darby desk

This desk was built for a creative little girl who wanted “a fun place to draw and make art.” Constructed entirely of scrap wood, I was able to combine 2 methods of woodworking - contemporary and traditional - into one functioning desk. This 2-in-1 concept also helped to inspire the idea that one of the surfaces could actually be drawn upon. Thus, the “contemporary” side of the desk was finished in chalkboard paint to allow for creative expression directly on its surface. The other 2 “traditional” legs were constructed of square scraps that were laminated together and helped determine the overall scale of the desk. scrap cypress and wenge wood recycled 3/4” MDF finished with clear lacquer + black chalkboard paint

2-in-1

11


F I NAL P RO DU C T


charleston // sc // fall 2010

information kiosk

This information center was part of a design-build semester which aggressively agreed to design and build 2 uniquely different projects for an art exposition in downtown Charleston, SC called Bluesphere. The kiosk was to function as a central beacon and signage structure for the duration of the month-long art exposition. This temporary quality meant that it needed to be erected and dismantled quickly. It was placed in a very site-specific manner in the largest square in Charleston. Full documentation and drawings were completed prior to construction and presented to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of architectural review for official permission. Design work began with individual schemes which were narrowed down to one. The end result is a collective design by the entire studio. Using wood and steel as the primary materials, the structural principles of compression [stacked wood] and tension [steel cables] were employed to create a series of 3 walls that housed the necessary signage for the event. Nearly 90% of all materials used were recycled.

13


F INAL D ESIG N

V

S T US TDU IDO IO FA L L SEMESTER 2010

A SS EMBLY

S T US TDU IDO IO


information kiosk

[cont’d]

The structure embodied a completely different experience at night. The phenomenological effects, while largely intentional, were underestimated in the overall strength of the reaction from its visitors. The signage was created by laser-etching the events and corresponding information onto 1/2” acrylic glass. This glass was edge-lit with blue LED light strips which, in turn, illuminated the etched information. The signs were installed in between the slatted sandwich walls at eye-level. The slats at this level were a greater distance apart to allow for a clearer view to the signage, but still required the user to “peer” into the structure.

*my primary contribution to the project was acting as Chief Welder - the design and fabrication of the steel units - from steel cable assembly to welding and installation of the recycled C-channel steel members. all work, however, was completed, collaboratively, as a studio.

15


charleston // sc // fall 2010

mobile movie screen

Part 2 of the design-build semester was the design and construction of this custom movie screen for the public showing of Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee + The Spirit of the Rural Studio, as the concluding event of the Bluesphere Expo. Again, design schemes were collected by small partnerships and expanded into one, primary design focus. The timeline for the project required a great deal of focus and ingenuity in design and construction. Much of the materials used in this structure were repurposed from the aforementioned Information Kiosk. Large wooden members were created by laminating dozens of repurposed pine pieces and custom-cut and individually fit. A series of rods and bearings were used at the pivot points, while at the base of each arm, a channel cut into the wood allowed for an elliptical sliding action for each arm to move upward and then rest in place. Recycled bike tubes used their tensile strength to hold in place an old silk screen acquired from a local. Old brake discs [welded to large threaded rod] were used for the 4 adjustableheight feet. Cable stays provided lateral stability, while the sheer weight of the structure itself helped keep it grounded. A central dual winch system powered the arms upward into place, and custom tightening of the screen by a few individuals provided the final touch to the structure after it was raised.

17


mobile movie screen [contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d]

Similar to the previous Kiosk project, the movie screen embodied an entirely different aura at night. With the ability to incorporate front and rear projection, the lightly colored wooden arms cast a powerful glow from the light. In addition to the mobile movie screen design and fabrication, the premiere of the Citizen Architect film required marketing and advertisement materials which were also designed and printed by the studio on an oldfashioned letterpress. Delivery to the site was provided by a custom-built trailer which was built entirely by 2 individuals within the studio from 100% recycled steel. This also allowed the movie screen to have an existence beyond the one premiere evening and continued to be used throughout the region.

19


genoa // italy // spring 2011

university of genoa student housing

Nestled between the walls of the old Genovese city and the modern infrastructure that runs parallel to it, the narrow urban site acts as a link between the two opposing urban typologies. The question then comes to light - How can we as architects balance the basic student housing program with the constraints of the site while still enhancing the lives of both the students and the public?

scheme 01 21

scheme 02

scheme 03

final scheme


university of genoa student housing

[cont’d]

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

longitudinal section 23

transverse section


get hooked on ponics.

e ns

ath

t ree t st set n i po

s ve g ro

tree

t

rt cou

2 way

6

et stre

high

port city ponics

et

s stre

simon

ney r om


charleston // sc // fall 2011

port city ponics vertical farm

all work completed with partner, Chris Felegie

25

eet f 0 2

8 fee t 8.5 feet

Port City Ponics does not over-think the architecture of the existing space at 1056 King Street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina. The existing Port City Paper warehouse building has had numerous uses over the years, the most recent being a roller skating rink on the second floor. The large, barrel-vaulted rectangular volume is now a prominent building in the neighborhood of North Central and is being considered the site for Charlestonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Vertical Farm. The design scheme for Port City Ponics is focused on preserving the existing building structure and making an intelligent use of the two rear parcels for a new auxiliary building and market space. The use of the large warehouse space is used strictly for farming. Keeping with the proposed â&#x20AC;&#x153;backyardâ&#x20AC;? concept, this open-air farming space will be filled with retro-fitted and sealed shipping containers called GROWPODS used for indoor farming. The primary method of farming will be with aeroponic technology which uses tall, thin towers and a drip or mist irrigation to feed the roots of vegetables and plants. These towers will occupy each container [17 each], and will provide the surrounding community with farming space available by lease. This communal gardening aspect intertwines with the indoor farming technology and allows members of the community to farm year-round. Additionally, Port City Ponics imagines the potential for these stacked containers to exist in locations outside of the 1056 King site, making them a completely mobile and modular prototype. Each individual container is complete with an intake water line and tank, a wall-mounted conditioning unit, LED grow light technology, a recycling line for the nutrient-rich water, and 17 aeroponics towers. This modular system has the ability to stack vertically, and, using the standard shipping container connection, stairs and walkways can be connected to each growpod for vertical circulation. In their stacked formation within the building, the Growpod that occupies the highest point can be outfit with a solar array to provide necessary energy to the containers themselves and the auxiliary building.

aeroponics technology

retro-fitted shipping container


farming

3 shades of

green

sustainability

cost


Preserve. Connect. Produce. port city ponics

[contâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d]

stacked containers [outside installation]

Within the building itself, the growpods are glazed on their south elevation, and, as a system, all of the growpods are stepped in the north direction to allow for the maximum amount of natural sunlight to enter the pods. The plants are supported by a water collection pond on the south-side which collects rainwater, is then pumped into the building, filtered and mixed with nutrients for the plants, and is then pumped back to each individual pod.

GROWPODS

interior perspective [looking upward] south perspective

27


ground floor scale

HVAC

bathroom

office space bathroom

container stacks

market space

courtyard

water collection pond

HVAC mechanical

bathroom

green roof

bathroom

container stacks classroom 1 classroom 2

courtyard

classroom 3

water collection pond


cross-bracing

port city ponics

[cont’d]

existing concrete column steel base plate bolted to floor poured in place concrete slab floor

overflow drain

welded wire fabric reinforcement EPDM membrane excess water from containers overflow drain water line to pump

2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone

foundation footing below

earth

This semester’s work was a result of the initiated Comprehensive Studio during my final year of school and stressed the importance of thinking about a design project from every angle, or, comprehensively. MEP issues, structure, egress, fire and life safety were all facets that we considered for this building, and therefore, the scope of the project was in greater detail than most others. The drawings here represent this comprehensive design process. 4” green roof trays “GreenGrid” system green roof frame

metal handrail siding metal L-bracket green trays

1” gravel base EPDM membrane 1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top 6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion double glazing

EPDM membrane 1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top 6” x 10” steel I-Beam EPDM membrane spray insulation (not shown) 1” thick density insulation aluminum stud wall spray insulation (not shown)

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top steel C-channel

6

6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion

4 aluminum drop ceiling

double glazing

5

double glazing

EPDM membrane 6” x 6” steel beam

aluminum mullion metal flashing

finish concrete flooring

bolted L-bracket

3

bolted L-bracket

6” x 10” steel I-Beam

6” x 10” steel I-Beam

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

steel base plate bolted to foundation

corrugated metal siding

double glazing steel base plate bolted to foundation poured in place concrete floor

concrete slab on grade EPDM membrane welded wire fabric reinforcement earth 2” layer of sand

EPDM membrane welded wire fabric reinforcement 2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone footing drain

footing drain layer of crushed stone

foundation footing beyond

foundation footing below 1” thick density insulation

corrugated metal siding aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation 1” thick density insulation corrugated metal siding foundation footing below EPDM membrane steel base plate bolted to foundation

corrugated metal siding EPDM membrane foundation footing below 6” x 6” steel column steel base plate bolted to foundation

2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone EPDM membrane earth foundation footing below

2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone EPDM membrane earth foundation footing below

double glazing

double glazing 5/8” gypsum board

foundation footing below steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel column

concrete grass

aluminum mullion steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel beam

high-density insulation steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel column aluminum mullion

foundation footing below

foundation footing below

aluminum mullion

metal corner flashing

plan detail

concrete slab on grade

aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation double glazing steel beam above

8

steel base plate bolted to foundation

concrete slab on grade

steel base plate bolted to foundation

7

wood flooring 1/2” cork subfloor

finish concrete flooring

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top steel C-channel

6” x 6” steel beam

1” thick density insulation aluminum stud wall

double glazing

aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation

wood flooring 1/2” cork subfloor double glazing

double glazing

1” thick high-density insulation 5/8” gypsum board

2 corrugated metal siding

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top C-channel 6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion

1

aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation corrugated metal siding

- corrugated metal

at corner

plan detail at column

- corrugated metal

plan detail

plan detail

plan detail

plan detail

plan detail

glass curtain wall at column w/ interior wall

wall at column w/ interior wall

wall at column

glass curtain wall at column

- glass curtian wall

at column

1

4

6

2

5

7 wall section - classrooms scale 1/4” = 1’

3 29

8


rear auxiliary building // offices // courtyard

front elevation


building and site model

section model

31


THE GREENVILLE CULINARY ACADEMY

a culinary arts college experience in downtown greenville // sc


greenville // sc // spring 2012

greenville culinary academy ACSA // AISC Steel Design Competition

Looking at the urban context of downtown Greenville, density is not a defining characteristic. The city is filled with public space, piazzas, wide sidewalks and tree-lined streets. Through an excercise of engaged and disengaged figure-ground study, it was discovered that a portion of the city’s figure had been removed for what appeared to be a large, diagonal projection into the regularity of the city grid. It was, in fact, a void taken from the city’s pattern. This “slice” of removed pattern was caused by the rail line which runs into the city from the northwest. Not only is the rail a gestural nod to the history of Greenville and its industrial buildings, but it also presents a meaningful glance toward the future. From this study of infrastructure and industry in Greenville, the Greenville Culinary Academy [GCA] was born. A culinary “warehouse” of sorts, built predominantly of steel, it recalls the country of industrial buildings associated with the rail line. At the threshold of dozens of nearby restaurants, the GCA provides culinary students with a truly “back-of-house” experience whilst also opening up the practices and spectacle of cooking and food culture to the public. This gentle, yet difficult marriage between public and private is made possible by a “building within a building” concept. This typology creates not only a place for the public to frequent if desired, but also an indoor micro-climate which can be passively heated and cooled and adeptly brings the outdoors in.

parti model

33

CBD

NE D .02 FIEL

SWLD .01 FIE

FIELD .01

FIELD .02


FLASHING GALVANIZED ALUMINUM ANGLE [IRON]

+

LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM ANGLE LOUVERS [COLLAPSED]

BUILDING ENVELOPE STEEL FRAME + GLASS

CURTAIN WALL MULLION VERTICAL CHASE WALLS 3 x 3 INSULATED GLASS

AISC TYPE 1 RIGID FRAME

3 ROWS OF ADJUSTABLE LOUVERS [FROM INTERIOR]

ADJUSTABLE LOUVER SCREEN SYSTEM

LOUVERS [OPEN]

PATTERN REPEATS AT FLOOR PLATE

louver detail

kitchen wall section

scale // 3/4” = 1’

scale // 1/2” = 1’


[cont’d]

The six “stacked” educational kitchens are on the north side of the site [3 over 3] which allow the heavy and noisy mechanical equipment to occupy a particular space away from the administrative side. These rectangular kitchens maintain a sense of transparency with ample glazing on either 2 or 3 sides. The vertical chase wall between each kitchen exhausts the air from the hoods and also brings in fresh air. These chase walls act as a physical separation between the kitchens and are celebrated as they project through the roof, bringing a particular culinary warehouse identity to the city of Greenville and reflecting the interior functions of the GCA.

SOU TH M AIN STR EET

SUMMER

rest aura nt

1

WINTER 1

2 10

1 4

3

11

16

9

14 6

5

wind

wind

16

d

wind

w in d

wi nd

wind

wind

d

FLOOR

.02

FLOOR

.01

w

wi nd

wi nd

wind

wi nd

7

wind

wi nd

wi nd

wind

w

wind

wi nd

w

wind

14

wi nd

wi nd

w

N

1 TEACHING KITCHENS 2 BAKE SHOP 3 RESTAURANT + ROOF DECK 4 STUDENT LOUNGE 5 DEMONSTRATION LABORATORY 6 WINE ROOM 7 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 8 LECTURE HALL 9 LIBRARY 10 CLASSROOMS 11 PASTRY KITCHEN 12 TRASH + RECEIVING 13 PARKING 14 OUTDOOR SPACE 15 RESTROOMS 16 CIRCULATION

wi nd

wind

w

wi

nd

wind

wi n

D W IN d in

wind

wind

wind

wind in wind wind wind wind wind wind d wind wind wind wind d win wind win wind windwind wind wind wind d wind wind wind winwind wind wind wind wind wind d wind wind i n wind wind wind winddwind wind wind d wind wind winwind n wind wind wind wind wi wind wind wind wind wind wind wind dwind wind wind windwindwind wind wind windwind wind windinwind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind nd windwind windwind wind i wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wind windwind wind wind wind windwind wind wind windwind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind d wind wind winwind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind wind wind

EAS T BR OAD STR EET 8

12

FAL LS STR EET

greenville culinary academy

12

13

site plan

35

structural diagram + plan


study model photos

interior “culinary” avenue perspective [1]

1 2 4

3 AERIAL VIEW

rear entrance + courtyard perspective [2]


greenville culinary academy

[cont’d]

On the south side of the kitchens, there is a large public avenue within the exterior envelope between programmatic volumes. These volumes are connected by “cross streets” and bridge connections which help service the kitchens with cool/dry storage, facilities, freezers and elevator access to ground and below grade levels. This underground level acts as the delivery/ receiving area for the school, as well as parking. A bake shop also fronts the South Main street side, the main thoroughfare for pedestrian traffic. Adjacent to the bake shop is the main studentrun restaurant, “SLICE”, an homage to the design intent and a culinary term. At the termination of the avenue between the two programmatic volumes, the demonstration lab is put on display in a glass cube. This cube appears to float between the two buildings contained within the larger building envelope and acts as the knuckle between academic and administrative program, connecting them on the second floor. The transparency of this culinary cube allows for a visual interaction of the public and students, revealing culinary culture as the “lynch pin” of this architecture and the people who it inhabits.

exhaust + intake fan 37

worm’s eye perspective [4]

central courtyard and southern entrance [3]


SLICE EATERY + BAR


39


detail

492 king street


charleston // sc // fall 2010

drawing // leonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s @ 492 king street

Employing traditional drawing methods forces one to look at a building at a scale which is often ignored. This series of six drawings was done over the course of a semester beginning with the basic Contour drawing and then moving on to Crosshatch, Tone, Perspective with Tone, Detail, and a Final drawing of our choice, where I chose to experiment with a collage format using several methods.

tone

41

contour

crosshatch

perspective + tone

final collage


castello bruzzo // genoa, italy the villa // genoa, italy

genoa genoa harbor

piazza di ferrari // genoa, italy

view from my villa balcony // genoa, italy

genoa hillside

+

sarphatistraat offices // amsterdam

cathedral of notre dame du haut // ronchamp, france

jewish museum // berlin, germany

brion cemetery // san vito di altivole, italy


genoa // italy // spring 2011

sketch // study abroad These sketches were done during my study abroad semester in Italy. I was able to travel all around western europe and sketch many buildings, both old and new. After the experience, I came to the conclusion that sketching buildings with classical proportions and details produced a much more intriguing result than that of a contemporary building. This was an interesting thought considering what we build today. I experimented with several different media, from graphite to ink to water color. Sometimes, I found that a combination of all of them produced a nice sketch. venetian church // venice, italy

+ beyond piazza di pietra // rome, italy

piazza del ferro // genoa, italy

il duomo // florence, italy

43

canal // venice, italy

piazza del campo // siena, italy


GO THE ROUTE

THE CAT BUS IS AT THE FOREFRONT OF CAMPUS TRANSIT.

DO LEE HALL STUDENTS RIDE IT?

WHY OR WHY NOT?

QUESTIONS

Clemson University and the surrounding communities have joined forces to offer free bus services to students, city residents, and visitors alike. Despite the many successful outcomes of this joint program and the collaborative investment by numerous stakeholders, Clemson’s fare free system is underutilized by particular student populations.

Is the CAT Bus underutilized by the Lee Hall student population at Clemson University? (Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, and Construction Science Management students) How frequently do Lee Hall students ride the CAT Bus? What are the primary reasons that Lee Hall students do or do not use the CAT Bus?

POSITION

ABSTRACT

Individuals studying in Lee Hall do not make significant use of the CAT system. This study asks why those students (who are, academically and theoretically speaking, the greatest proponents of public transportation systems and sustainability in general), are not taking advantage of the CAT system as part of their regular routine. There appears to be a disparity between the way students in Lee Hall learn about and design transportation systems and the way that they actually use them. The researchers predict that students avoid using the system because of inconveniences based on routes and schedules, and an overall lack of incentives to ride.

Even though the Clemson Area Transit (CAT Bus) system offers the largest fare-free bus line in the United States in terms of ridership, it remains an underutilized resource by the design student population at Clemson University. The use of the car as the primary mode for commuting to and from campus has profound effects on campus land use planning, parking requirements, community relationships, and air quality. Clemson’s rural setting requires most students to commute to and from campus. Most students commute by car, and therefore create the demand for large on-campus parking lots. The CAT bus aims to ameliorate transportation issues on and around campus.

The study utilizes several qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection. Interviews with the CAT Transit Supervisor provided background data and information regarding the system’s future. The primary research method for this study employed an online survey questionnaire which was administered to students within Lee Hall. The survey collected demographic information, CAT Bus ridership data, and reasons for usage or non-usage. The survey received 147 responses. Findings from these responses show that less than half of Lee Hall students frequently use the CAT Bus. The primary purposes for riding the CAT Bus are to commute to and from campus and to avoid parking. The main reason that Lee Hall students do not frequently use the CAT Bus is due to a general lack of accommodation between public transportation systems and the lifestyle of a design student.

THE ROUTES

THE STAKEHOLDERS

Anderson 4U Pendleton Route Red Route - Central to Clemson Seneca Express Seneca Business Loop Seneca Residential Loop Tiger Route (East and West Campus Routes)

Clemson University City of Clemson Town of Central Town of Pendleton City of Seneca Anderson County SC Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration

LEE HALL

The implications of these results could potentially act as catalysts to improve the system itself, encourage more students to ride, or simply make the population more aware of this transit opportunity.

*BASED ON 2008-2009 FY DATA

CENTRAL

Fare-free public transportation represents the largest form of subsidy, with the entire cost of the transit system being paid by the government or another entity. The CAT system is funded by both Clemson University and the Federal Government. With this arrangement anyone can ride the bus - tourists, citizens, students without directly paying a fare. All Clemson students, however, are required to pay a $33 transit fee per semester. With that fee, Clemson is able to generate > $1 Million in funding for the CAT system.

CASE STUDIES Campuses are excellent places to experiment with alternative vehicle technologies. Universities implement public transportation systems for a number of reasons: to reduce air pollution and energy impacts, to promote healthier lifestyles, to ameliorate traffic congestion on and near campus, to avoid building additional parking lots and structures, and to improve town-gown relationships. A number of university transportation case studies were analyzed over the course of this study, and revealed that the CAT Bus system is a highly regarded and frequently emulated system across the country. Fare-free public transportation systems are an increasing trend among universities. Other successful university transit systems include: Indiana University’s Bloomington Transit and Michigan State University’s Capital Area Transportation Authority. Other universities including Virginia Tech, Mississippi State, Florida State, University of Georgia, University of Alabama, have been reviewing the CAT model for their campuses.

SURVEY TOOL Electronic Questionnaire Emailed to Lee Hall Students [Planning, Construction Science Management, Landscape Architecture, Architecture]

16 Questions Multiple Choice, Open-Ended Demographics, Ridership, Reasons

HISTORICAL DATA

CLEMSON

TRANSIT FEE

The Federal Transit Administration commissions a report on transit programs serving university and college campuses. The CAT system is cited as a model for collaborative approaches to the issue.

CAT [Clemson Area Transit] begins. It is a joint venture between Clemson University and the city of Clemson.

1995

1996

1997

1998

CAT receives the “Best Transit System in South Carolina” award from the SCDOT.

CAT becomes the first transit system in the country to use Google maps / trip planner as a resource to assist its riders in planning trips.

CAT expands to their 4-U routes [serving 4 universities in the area].

CAT expands to10 routes

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

hope to transition to electric buses in the near future use solar

energy collected on new headquarters building to power buses bus system route feasibility

CAT is thorough in analyzing

SURVEY DATA PURPOSES FOR RIDING

REASONS FOR NOT RIDING

REASONS FOR RIDING

26.5%

34.2%

69.4%

37.0%

FULL

1/4 FULL EMPTY-ISH

9.8%

7.6%

44.5%

15.6% 1/2 FULL

midwest

78.8%

*

suburban urban

po

us al

lp

*

*

*

better:

25

7.5% 5

8

yes 30% no 70%

15 10

9 5

IF YOU COULD MAKE ANY CHANGES TO THE CAT BUS SYSTEM, WHAT WOULD THEY BE? SUMMARIZED PARTICIPANT SURVEY RESPONSES:

Have you ever partaken in a school project at Clemson that involved some aspect of public transportation?

improvements to:

add stops to:

signage shelters routes schedules

chimney ridge harts cove lee hall greenville

Red Line to Central campus routes maps

changes to the:

more:

would like to see:

no coffee on the bus rule buses [during peak hrs] late bus schedule routes full bus issues signage incentives to ride

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

15%

How “cool” is it to ride the CAT Bus? [10 = super cool]

text service real-time data response

CONCLUSIONS EVER USED PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION? [EXCLUDING AIR TRAVEL]

yes 98%

no 2%

TO WHICH MODES OF TRANSPORTATION DO YOU HAVE REGULAR ACCESS?

54

136

8

With over 1.6 million riders per year, the CAT Bus provides an important means of transportation to Clemson University and its surrounding communities. The purpose of the study is to understand the level of CAT Bus usage among Lee Hall students. The study defines “frequent usage” as daily or weekly riding, and “infrequent usage” as riding once per month, once per semester, or never. Despite the many successes of the system, less than half of the 147 Lee Hall students surveyed ride the CAT Bus on a frequent basis. 37% of graduate students surveyed use the CAT Bus frequently, while 43% of undergraduate students take frequent advantage of the system. University-wide, private vehicle transportation is the leading method for commuting to and from the Clemson campus. The majority of Lee Hall students surveyed have regular access to a vehicle. The survey demonstrates that students who have regular access to a vehicle are also less likely to ride the CAT Bus frequently. Students who ride the CAT Bus use it primarily for commuting to and from campus. The number one reason for which surveyed students ride the CAT Bus is to avoid the hassles of parking on campus. The leading reasons for not riding the CAT Bus are its lack of accommodation to Lee Hall student schedules and a desire for the freedom and space availble with personal transportation. The survey demonstrates that the type of environment in which students grew up has little impact on their CAT Bus ridership. Students who grew up in rural environments are more likely to frequent the CAT Bus than those from urban or suburban backgrounds, but only by a small percentage. 43.5% of students from rural backgrounds used the system frequently, while 40% of students from suburban backgrounds used the system frequently, and only 32% of students from urban backgrounds used the system frequently. Almost all students had used some other form of public transportation prior to the survey, therefore a lack of familiarity with such systems is an unlikely cause for infrequent usage. Furthermore, the study sought to determine the relationship between design work completed within Lee Hall and the lifestyle choices of design students. Of the surveyed students who had partaken in a school project involving some aspect of public transportation, 52% used the CAT Bus frequently. Therefore, ridership appears to be based on transportation needs moreso than personal values. Criticisms of the CAT Bus system by surveyed students are focused around several recurring themes: issues with existing and non-existing routes, inconvenient schedules, and a lack of signage and real-time responses. Although the study shows little perceived stigma associated with riding the CAT Bus (the “coolness factor” averaged 5.6), several individual responses indicate a negative connotation with ridership. Overall, there are no real incentives in place to encourage students to ride the CAT Bus. Based on a literature review, historical data analysis, and an extensive interview with CAT Bus leadership, the system proves to be a highly valued asset among the University and the surrounding communities. Surveyed students report the buses to be at least half way full for 81.5% of their rides. Although Lee Hall students do not currently take full advantage of the CAT Bus system, as issues of sustainability increase in importance in the design field and the CAT system continues to evolve, this study anticipates an increase in usage.

out of 147

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Keith Moody, Clemson Transit Supervisor Dina Battisto, Professor of Research + Design Methods All survey-takers

Cooper River Bridge Run Poster Design Competition Entry Summer 2011

11.0%

8 southeast

on

*

do es penot rs ac on co e al m pe fre s m rs ed on om che oda d te al a tra nd ule ns s ha po pa ss rta ce le tio of of n sc carr ho y oth ol ing w m er ork a te lo o ri ca tio n th als e an arens bu d o s in f b co u nv s s i fe to e nie p usel u nt s in nc g om th fo e rt ca a t b ble us

le

sir

du

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN DESIGN EDUCATION

5.6

average “cool factor”

12

southwest

3.8%

11.2% 14.7%

01 to get car 02 to get around campus

bu

RIDERSHIP STIGMAS 50

rural

24.5%

s

sc

he

* AVERAGE OCCUPANCY LEVELS

9.5% international

100%

49.7%

01 i live near campus 02 often full 03 takes too long

de

tio n oth er

op ly

*

e

e

en

tim

re

‘g

be

on

g

$

in

nc

$$

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ve

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pa

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co

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sa

r

r

th

te

ve

es

ne

em

ily

kly

on

da

ee w

rm

pe ce on

ce on

01 for a sober ride 02 in bad weather

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

north east

cia

m

15.8%

architecture 63 construction science management 13 planning 10 landscape architecture 14

ur

ng uti m

19.9%

er

26.7%

e

se

s

29.5%

25.3% 24.0%

rs

30.1% 30.8%

oth

37.0%

44.5%

19.7%

so

20.4%

pe

48.6% 19.7%

under graduate

0%

2011

Clemson could be first city in the world to have a battery-powered

6.2%

northwest

2010

KEITH MOODY DISCUSSES THE CAT BUS FUTURE requests for future expansion into 4-6 cities within the upstate

13.6%

WHAT ARE YOU STUDYING?

states

2009

INTERVIEW WITH THE TRANSIT SUPERVISOR

RIDING FREQUENCY

60%

90.5% united

New CAT Headquarters unveiling: November 2011.

2008

EVOLUTION OF THE CAT BUS

The study utilizes a mixed methods approach for data collection. A literature review focusing on case studies of systems on other university campuses provided a basis for comparison and an indication of current trends. An interview with Keith Moody, Transit Supervisor of the CAT Bus, provided helpful insight into the workings of the system and the hopes for its future. Background data was collected through observations made by the researchers during their own CAT Bus rides. The primary research method for this study was through the survey questionnaire which was administered to students within Lee Hall. The survey aimed at collecting demographics information, CAT Bus ridership, and reasons for usage. Data was analyzed to determine the reasons for CAT bus usage or non-usage within this student population.

40%

ARCH

Five Proterra Electric buses are purchased in Seneca to replace older models in the CAT system.

METHODS

graduate

LA

Construction begins on the new CAT Headquarters on West Lane. [Funded by American Recovery Act]

The Appalachian Council of Government (ACOG) publishes a region-wide transit study that includes the CAT system.

“one bus takes fifty cars off of the road”

WHO ARE YOU?

PLAN

New routes are announced to help bring about positive change to on-campus ridership issues.

certain obstacles simply prevent route expansion (ie train tracks at Harts Cove)

SURVEY DEMOGRAPHICS

CSM

Budget cuts and poor economy force CAT to consolidate and retool routes on the Clemson Campus creating a sizeable drop in ridership.

The Clemson Continuity Council is started to help maintain the Clemson student/ CAT relationship and provide insight into ridership issues and concerns.

CAT acquires 3 new state-of-the-art Opus buses, bringing their total to 11.

Clemson hires a transit administrator in response to increased congestion on campus and pressure from students, administration, and town.

147 RESPONSES

54%

0.....................................................FARE 26................................................ BUSES 28....... AVERAGE CAPACITY [SEATED] 100%..........................ADA COMPLIANT 100%................................. BIKE RACKS 1.6 MILLION........ ANNUAL RIDERSHIP 61............................................ DRIVERS 19........HRS/DAY AT FULL OPERATION 33.....WEEKS/YR AT FULL OPERATION 3............................COUNTIES SERVED 5.................. MUNICIPALITIES SERVED 4..................... UNIVERSITIES SERVED 80%...........FEDERAL/STATE FUNDING 20%.................. UNIVERSITY FUNDING

This study is solely concerned with the CAT Bus usage patterns of students studying Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Construction Science Management, and Planning within the confines of Lee Hall. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which Lee Hall students utilize the CAT Bus. Additionally, the study explores particular reasons for CAT bus usage and non-usage. The study defines “frequent usage” as daily or weekly riding, and “infrequent usage” as riding once per month, once per semester, or never.

BACKGROUND

46%

THE SYSTEM

co

SENECA

PROBLEM

LIMITATIONS OF STUDY While the study is successful in analyzing students within Lee Hall, its exclusive focus on that student population limits the generalizability of its findings. Future studies should conduct a similar survey on a different Clemson student population for comparison purposes.

IMPLICATIONS OF STUDY This study hopes to make Lee Hall students aware of the advantages of riding the CAT Bus, and the infrequency with which they use it. The data also highlights shortcomings and offers suggestions for improvement to the system.

PENDLETON REFERENCES

CAT Bus, Clemson Area Transit. Clemson University 2011. Retrieved from http://www.catbus.com Clemson Area Transit. (n.d.). Retrieved October 19, 2011 from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clemson_Area_Transit Markowitz, Frank, & Estrella, Alex. (1998). Campus Moves. Planning, 64 (7) 14-19. “The City of Clemson Comprehensive Plan 2014.” Transit System. TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Synthesis 39: transportation on college and university campuses. (2001). Project J-7, Topic SA-11. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. Wolfe, Michael, Long, Marie, Turner, Trevor, Stubblefield, Adam, Tian, Yanan, & Stricklan, Nathanael. (2010). CAT Bus GPS Tracking System: Planning and Requirements. Clemson University.

Architecture Research + Design Methods Dina Battisto / Fall 2011

25

1st place in Research Poster Design Competition Fall 2011 // Research Methods + Strategies Professor Dina Battisto


graphic design

print // posters I have a passion for typography and print/layout design. While most of my work is non-professional, I always embrace the opportunity to design a layout or infographics for print.

barcelona

berlin carrara copenhagen florence granada

architecture

marseille montpellier

madrid milan oslo

paris

pavia THERE ARE MANY LAYERS.

torino valencia vienna

45

genoa

stockholm venice GRAFFITI IN EUROPE


r

o s ent f o u r

m o m i l en i a n r r e be i v g l h si o hill lia n c wa g nocen eaentn omorrtrihs e nr aecre rt tra s ra o n t h e p te r h h l t e e ast o e h l d e k i aw a

h om

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meetin g t

c ri c o

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t h opevreurrt m a n o o

citad t s i e l l i ottn b s i e g rt ag h no t

es

to o s s ro cr o

b

ar

w

the

joe

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gr n

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o o rou ugh o o rg h dc u maz y kaquuma u r i rf g p f f c l i eu p r bo rloh ouu n o r e u co e g d a o c i p r a bo h r m c o r r on s n t i t h e g e k e e a n so o tba p co e n e i r l t o l c o f ng s r i n b u g h y e r r a

ca n r

m s c satdo h a rl e n c vil l a l

o n

ia l

c o a st u ar d g

k e

m g es h

w

st r e

on m ariu are sq

rs

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mill

s

g

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ping s h op ric t dist

e e

t

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a nd t si i q tr ui ec st

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s tr e e t

marketstree mpal wf

ar r e n c h te on r q u a r t e r r tt k

s c htahrloes b e broad

wha

et

f e o u f ro go

couga

esto harl t

co l a

b

h

he

st r e et

t ow n

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a da b

e

t

t

r

charleston Charleston Map project


graphic design

print // charleston map poster Statement: Charleston has a bit of an identity crisis. Having lived here for quite awhile now, I have bounced around to several different neighborhoods. As a CofC student, I was too busy running around to notice all of them. When I finally began to realize that there was small print above the street name on the signs, I began to think about it. The thing is, I never knew what those neighborhoods really meant. I wondered why they were so different from other cities I had visited. New York has 5 Boroughs [and all of the other awesome neighborhoods within those], so does D.C., so does San Fran, Chicago....etc. In my naive mind, Charleston was just one tiny peninsula with a bunch of stuff all lumped together in a high density urban area. But, that is simply not true. Maybe it’s a good thing that Charleston doesn’t necessarily have “dividing lines” or subway stops that separate our neighborhoods. But it certainly does have invisible lines that most of us are unaware of. I’d like this map to help catalyze a shift in the downtown thinking....Where exactly DO I live, and why? How was this neighborhood formed? Where does it begin and where does it end? What amenities does it have? What doesn’t it have? What could I do to make it better? What are my neighbors like? Are they college students or a young family? Are they an older family? What other areas of town or neighborhoods do I like to visit? Why? What does it mean to live in Wraggborough versus Radcliffeborough? Other cities take great PRIDE in their particular neighborhoods. Why can’t Charleston? [And let’s not blame it on size.] So, where do YOU live?

47


SLICE

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE // AUDITORIUM

PROGRAM

ACADEMIC RESTAURANT DEMONSTRATION LAB UNDERGROUND PARKING

MERGE

RECEIVING TRASH

EXTRUDE

physical model photographs ROTATE

COMBINE DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE RAIL LINE

SLICE RESTAURANT CROSS SECTION SCALE // 1/4” = 1’

bridge perspective

COURTYARD // CUBE // AUDITORIUM

STRUCTURAL CONCEPT DIAGRAM

EXHAUST + INTAKE FAN

LONGITUDINAL SECTION SCALE // 1/32” = 1’

SITE

+

SOU TH M AIN STR EET

GALVANIZED ALUMINUM ANGLE [IRON]

SUMMER

restau rant

1

WINTER 1

2 10

1 4

3

11

16

9

14 6

5

wind

12

FAL LS STR EET

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

16

12

wind

AERIAL VIEW

wi n

wi

REAR COURTYARD

wi nd

w

wind

w

wind

wind

wind

w

1 TEACHING KITCHENS 2 BAKE SHOP 3 RESTAURANT + ROOF DECK 4 STUDENT LOUNGE 5 DEMONSTRATION LABORATORY 6 WINE ROOM 7 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 8 LECTURE HALL 9 LIBRARY 10 CLASSROOMS 11 PASTRY KITCHEN 12 TRASH + RECEIVING 13 PARKING 14 OUTDOOR SPACE 15 RESTROOMS 16 CIRCULATION

wind wind

wind

wind

d wind wi nd in wind wind wind wind wind wind d wind wind wind wind d wind win wind win wind windwind wind wind wind d wind wind wind winwind windwind wind wind wind d windwind wind wind i n wind wind wind wi nd winddwind wind wind d wind wind winwind wind n d wind wind wind wind wind wi wind in wwind wind wind wind wind wind dwind wind wind windwindwind wi nd wind wind windwind wind windinwind wind wind wind windwind wind wind wind nd windwind windwind wind i wind wi ndwind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wi nd wind wind wind wind windwind wind windwind wind windwind wind wind wind wind wind windwind wind wind windwind wind wind wind windwind wind windwind wind wind windwind

wind wind wind d wind winwind wind wind wind wind wind

d

D nd

wind

wind

w

wind

w in d

W IN w

.01 FLOOR

.02 FLOOR

ADJUSTABLE LOUVER SCREEN SYSTEM

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

N

d in

wind

wind

wind

14 7

wind

13

wind

wind windwind wind wind windwind wind windwind windwind

EAS T BR OAD STR EET 8

SCALE // 1/32” = 1’

east elevation

FLASHING

LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM ANGLE LOUVERS [COLLAPSED]

CURTAIN WALL MULLION

THE GREENVILLE CULINARY ACADEMY

3 x 3 INSULATED GLASS

3 ROWS OF ADJUSTABLE LOUVERS [FROM INTERIOR]

a culinary arts college experience in downtown greenville // sc

LOUVERS [OPEN]

PATTERN REPEATS AT FLOOR PLATE

double-skin facade wall section

programmatic housing volume schemes

KITCHEN WALL SECTION SCALE // 1/2” = 1’

2ND FLOOR PLAN SCALE // 1/32” = 1’

street perspective

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

higher learning. higher living.

floor 6 + 7 plan

west longitudinal section

arch 353 | 600

joe mcneill justin miller ben wyszynski

university of genoa | student housing INTERIOR AVENUE

RISE - University of Genoa Student Housing // Final Presentation Boards // Spring 2011

port city ponics get hooked on ponics.

chrisfelegie | joemcneill

Port City Ponics does not over-think the architecture of the existing space at 1056 King Street in Charleston, South Carolina. The existing Port City Paper warehouse building has had numerous uses over the years, the most recent being a roller skating rink on the second floor. The large, barrel-vaulted rectangular volume is now a prominent building in the neighborhood of North Central and is being considered the site for Charleston’s first Vertical Farm. The design scheme for Port City Ponics is focused on preserving the existing building structure and making an intelligent use of the two rear parcels for a new auxiliary building and market space. The use of the large warehouse space is used strictly for farming. Keeping with the proposed “backyard” concept, this open-air farming space will be filled with retro-fitted and sealed shipping containers called GROWPODS used for indoor farming. The primary method of farming will be with aeroponic technology which uses tall, thin towers and a drip or mist irrigation to feed the roots of vegetables and plants. These towers will occupy each container [17 each], and will provide the surrounding community with farming space available by lease. This communal gardening aspect intertwines with the indoor farming technology and allows members of the community to farm year-round. Additionally, Port City Ponics imagines the potential for these stacked containers to exist in locations outside of the 1056 King site, making them a completely mobile and modular prototype. Each individual container is complete with an intake water line and tank, a wall-mounted conditioning unit, LED grow light technology, a recycling line for the nutrient-rich water, and 17 aeroponics towers. This modular system has the ability to stack vertically, and, using the standard shipping container connection, stairs and walkways can be connected to each growpod for vertical circulation.

M O D U L A R [ C O N TA I N E R ] P R O T O T Y P E F O R V E R T I C A L FA R M I N G

LOUVER DETAIL SCALE // 1.5” = 1’

Looking at the urban context of downtown Greenville, density is not a defining characteristic. The city is filled with public space, piazzas, wide sidewalks and tree-lined streets. Through an excercise of engaged and disengaged figure-ground study, it was discovered that a portion of the city’s figure had been removed for what appeared to be a large, diagonal projection into the regularity of the city grid. It was, in fact, a void taken from the city’s pattern. This “slice” of removed pattern was caused by the rail line which runs into the city from the northwest. Not only is the rail a gestural nod to the history of Greenville and its industrial buildings, but it also presents a meaningful glance toward the future. From this study of infrastructure and industry in Greenville, the Greenville Culinary Academy [GCA] was born. A culinary “warehouse” of sorts, built predominantly of steel, it recalls the country of industrial buildings associated with the rail line. At the threshold of dozens of nearby restaurants, the GCA provides culinary students with a truly “back-of-house” experience whilst also opening up the practices and spectacle of cooking and food culture to the public. This gentle, yet difficult marriage between public and private is made possible by a “building within a building” concept. This typology creates not only a place for the public to frequent if desired, but also an indoor microclimate which can be passively heated and cooled and adeptly brings the outdoors in. The six “stacked” educational kitchens are on the north side of the site [3 over 3] which allow the heavy and noisy mechanical equipment to occupy a particular space away from the administrative side. These rectangular kitchens maintain a sense of transparency with ample glazing on either 2 or 3 sides. The vertical chase wall between each kitchen exhausts the air from the hoods and also brings in fresh air. These chase walls act as a physical separation between the kitchens and are celebrated as they project through the roof, bringing a particular culinary warehouse identity to the city of Greenville and reflecting the interior functions of the GCA.

BUILDING ENVELOPE STEEL FRAME + GLASS

VERTICAL CHASE WALLS

AISC TYPE 1 // RIGID FRAME

ENLARGED KITCHEN PLAN SCALE // 1/8” = 1’

AERIAL VIEW

D E TA I L S

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top steel C-channel

2 rows of aeroponics towers for vegetable farming [facing south for maximum sunlight exposure]

wall-mounted [localized] HVAC water filtration

“Plant Cable Pulley” PCP system [for hoisting materials and plants]

Within the building itself, the growpods are glazed on their south elevation, and, as a system, all of the growpods are stepped in the north direction to allow for the maximum amount of natural sunlight to enter the pods. The plants are supported by a water collection pond on the south-side which collects rainwater, is then pumped into the building, filtered and mixed with nutrients for the plants, and is then pumped back to each individual pod.

metal L-bracket green trays

industrial steel frame stairs and walkway

double glazing

1” thick high-density insulation 5/8” gypsum board

2

5

double glazing

double glazing

aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation

wood flooring 1/2” cork subfloor

west elevation

LED “Growmaster” lighting [12 year life span]

east [rear] elevation

scale 1/8” = 1’

scale 1/8” = 1’

finish concrete flooring

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top steel C-channel

courtyard + green roof 40’

corrugated metal siding

scale 3/16” = 1’

stacked container w/ open loop system

individual spread footing longitudinal section scale 1/4” = 1’

slab foundation cross section scale 1/4” = 1’

double glazing

EPDM membrane 6” x 6” steel beam

tranverse section

adjustable height footings

stacked container w/ closed loop system

3

aluminum mullion metal flashing

finish concrete flooring

bolted L-bracket

6” x 10” steel I-Beam

6” x 10” steel I-Beam

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

6” x 6” steel column

8

steel base plate bolted to foundation

steel base plate bolted to foundation

concrete slab on grade

concrete slab on grade

2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone EPDM membrane earth foundation footing below

2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone EPDM membrane earth foundation footing below

6” x 6” steel beam

1” thick density insulation aluminum stud wall

7

wood flooring 1/2” cork subfloor

bolted L-bracket

back-up LED growing lights

overflow water tank

1” gravel base EPDM membrane 1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top 6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion double glazing

EPDM membrane 1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top 6” x 10” steel I-Beam EPDM membrane spray insulation (not shown) 1” thick density insulation aluminum stud wall spray insulation (not shown)

3’ walkway

water line out-flow water line in-flow [behind, on right side of container]

comprehensive studio ARCH 893

6

4 aluminum drop ceiling

double glazing 4” green roof trays “GreenGrid” system green roof frame

metal handrail siding

south-facing glazing

1.5” corrugated metal decking w/ 1.5” concrete top C-channel 6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion

1

6” x 10” steel I-Beam metal flashing bolted L-bracket spray insulation (not shown) aluminum mullion

solar array water tank for storage [with nutrient mixing capability for farming] interior water line for drip irrigation

On the south side of the kitchens, there is a large public JOE McNEILL avenue within the exterior envelope between programmatic volumes. These volumes are connected by “cross streets” and bridge connections which help service the kitchens with PROFESSOR // JULIE WILKERSON cool/dry storage, facilities, freezers and elevator access to ground and below grade levels. This underground level acts as the delivery/receiving area for the school, as well as ARCH 892 STUDIO parking. A bake shop also fronts the South Main street side, the main thoroughfare for pedestrian traffic. Adjacent to the SPRING // 2012 bake shop is the main student-run restaurant, “SLICE”, an homage to the design intent and a culinary term. At the termination of the avenue between the two programmatic AISC / ACSA STEEL COMPETITION volumes, the demonstration lab is put on display in a glass cube. This cube appears to float between the two buildings contained within the larger building envelope and acts as the knuckle between academic and administrative program, connecting them on the second floor. The transparency of this culinary cube allows for a visual interaction of the public and students, revealing culinary culture as the “lynch pin” of this architecture and the people who it inhabits.

Greenville Culinary Academy // Final Presentation Boards // Spring 2012

SECTIONS

E L E VAT I O N S

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

RISE

cross-bracing existing concrete column steel base plate bolted to floor poured in place concrete slab floor

overflow drain

welded wire fabric reinforcement EPDM membrane excess water from containers overflow drain water line to pump

double glazing 5/8” gypsum board

2” layer of sand

aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation

corrugated metal siding

scale 1/2” = 1’

south perspective

concrete slab on grade EPDM membrane welded wire fabric reinforcement earth 2” layer of sand

EPDM membrane welded wire fabric reinforcement 2” layer of sand layer of crushed stone footing drain

footing drain layer of crushed stone

wall section - office

foundation footing below 1” thick density insulation

corrugated metal siding aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation 1” thick density insulation corrugated metal siding foundation footing below EPDM membrane steel base plate bolted to foundation

29’

corrugated metal siding EPDM membrane foundation footing below 6” x 6” steel column steel base plate bolted to foundation

foundation footing below

foundation footing below

double glazing steel base plate bolted to foundation poured in place concrete floor

steel base plate bolted to foundation

foundation footing below

collection pool detail

scale 1/8” = 1’

aluminum mullion steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel beam

high-density insulation steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel column aluminum mullion

layer of crushed stone

earth

north elevation

double glazing

plan detail

plan detail

plan detail

plan detail

glass curtain wall at column w/ interior wall scale 1” = 1’

wall at column w/ interior wall scale 1” = 1’

wall at column scale 1” = 1’

glass curtain wall at column scale 1” = 1’

foundation footing beyond

scale 1/2”=1’ details at 1” = 1’

double glazing steel beam above foundation footing below

1

4

6

2

5

7

concrete grass

steel base plate bolted to foundation 6” x 6” steel column aluminum mullion

metal corner flashing aluminum stud wall w/ spray insulation corrugated metal siding

plan detail

- corrugated metal

at corner scale 1” = 1’

stacked containers outside

plan detail

stacked containers inside the exisiting building structure

at column scale 1” = 1’

south elevation scale 1/8” = 1’

- corrugated metal

plan detail

- glass curtian wall

at column scale 1” = 1’

longitudinal section scale 1/8” = 1’

wall section - classrooms scale 1/4” = 1’ details at 1” = 1’

V E R T I C A L FA R M I N G G R O W P O D S ney

simons

FLOORPLANS solar array 2’ x 4’ modules of 150 watts each these can generate ~ 20 kW hours/day

t stree

rom

street

3

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SITE

8

we approximate that each pod needs ~ 400 watts of power per day, which ~ 3000 Watts per month

s court sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun s u n

athen

ay 26 highw

~ 30,000 kW hours per year

sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun

sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun sun

t

poin

sett

HVAC

stree

HVAC mechanical

bathroom

bathroom

green roof office space bathroom

bathroom

t

east elevation

north elevation

scale 1/4” = 1’

scale 1/4” = 1’

container stacks classroom 1

container stacks

site plan market space

classroom 2

section

e stree grov

CONCEPT

courtyard courtyard

3 shades of green

=

farming

S

classroom 3

water collection pond water collection pond

a custom growpod sustainability

=

S

8 fee t 8.5 feet

cost

t 20 fee

a retrofitted shipping container..... south elevation

growpod plan

scale 1/4” = 1’

scale 1/2” = 1’

ground floor scale 1/8” = 1’

2nd floor plan scale 1/8” = 1’

3rd floor plan scale 1/8” = 1’

Port City Ponics Vertical Farm // Final Comprehensive Review Boards // Fall 2011


graphic design

layout // presentations Presentation skills have become key elements in architecture. In school, how I presented the design work I had done was as important as the work itself. I enjoy working in this medium and finding the right configuration for drawings and photographs so that the viewer can easily understand the intent.

#  #    0 !&)# ' #/$""+# (-/#+(+& ' CHARLESTON VERTICAL FARM 

graduate school of architecture

  



Through a series of community charrettes, members of a variety of disciplines in the Charleston community have the opportunity to share ideas about their expectations for the unprecedented vertical farm. In the first charrette, community members presented pros and cons for each of the three potential historical sites and voted on the most appropriate site for the feasibility study. In the second charrette, students presented project proposals for critique and community#  #    0 members presented a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis for each of the projects. With these suggestions, students redeveloped their !&)# designs for a final public presentation.

' #/$""+# (-/#+(+& ' 

SCHEDULE

Dan Harding Ulrike Heine Bernhard Sill

Design Presentations

students Elissa Bostain Kelly Fehr Joe McNeill Christopher Felegie Jonghoon Ahn Heather Zhang Jared Moore Chris Wilkins Kristin Kolowich Jon Michael Williamson Thomas Jasper Meghan Welford

 

"&35(

thursday december 15th

  

 5:00- 7:00pm ! # DESIGN SOCIAL   &!'($#+ gallery talk

4:00pm



 772 $&& '$#& ,   "&35  &!'($#/$+(&$! #

CHALLENGE

(

By the year 2050, nearly 80% of the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population will reside in urban centers. According to conservative population estimates, the world population will !increase by about 3 billion people during the interim. It is also estimated that about 80% of current farmable land throughout the world is in use. It is likely that there will not be enough farmable land in the future to feed the world population.

  

 

772 $&&  '$#& , '   &!'($#/$+(&$! #



  One potential solution is vertical farming in urban spaces. In Charleston, South Carolina, the EPA has sponsored a grant to explore the feasibility of this yvertical farming solution in a selected site on the downtown peninsula. The existing building must be retained, however, any new construction on or around the parcel is allowed. The height restriction for this neighborhood is  

 a 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122; maximum. The challenge for the students is as follows:

4022%"

     502216022%"

     02.           Balance the aspects of a new production-oriented building with the needs 01.

'   Provide a design scheme that  meets the production needs of a vertical farm within the constraints of the program and existing building envelope on the site in downtown Charleston. This requires that at least 3 floors of the building are dedicated to production only farming. 4022%"

of the surrounding community. This can          be502216022%" through public market space, community gardens, or           educational opportunities within the building.

         

]

Megan Craig Victoria Wright

#

&!'($#

THE TEAM professors

49

Funded and sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Charleston Vertical Farm is a direct continuation of the research initiated by Dr. Gene Eidson and the Clemson Institute of Applied Ecology. The project acts as a feasibility study in collaboration with the Clemson Centers of Economic Excellence in Urban Ecology and Sustainable Development to retrofit an existing historic structure in the city of Charleston.

charleston]

Clemson University

VERTICAL FARM

WELCOME.


FARRELL real estate investors

dc e r

ow design

co .

moo.

uinn

coffee


graphic design

branding + identity // Identity branding is an interesting process. I find my architecture education to be the most helpful in this particular facet of graphic design. Design like this, on a small scale, has the opportunity to do great things. Simplicity, function, vibrance, and beauty all play major roles in the branding of a company or individual. These characteristics are very similar to the necessities of a well-designed building.

  design +build

FIRM5

FIRM5

Caitlin Ra n son design principal 8 6 4 555 5555

55 East Coffee Street Suite E Greenville, SC 29601

AIA, LEED AP cranson@firmfive.com

design +build

FIRM5

FIRM5

Thoma s Ja sper licensed contractor 8 6 4 555 5555

55 East Coffee Street Suite E Greenville, SC 29601

AIA, LEED AP tjasper@firmfive.com

design +build

FIRM5

FIRM5

Ky ungsun O rr landscape architect + planner 8 6 4 555 5555

55 East Coffee Street Suite E Greenville, SC 29601

ASLA, LEED AP korr@firmfive.com

design +build

FIRM5 51

FIRM5

Jo e McNeill architect + interior designer 8 6 4 555 5555

55 East Coffee Street Suite E Greenville, SC 29601

AIA, LEED AP jmcneill@firmfive.com

5 5 5 5

design +build Chri stopher Fele g ie architect 8 6 4 555 5555

55 East Coffee Street Suite E Greenville, SC 29601

AIA, LEED AP cfelegie@firmfive.com

5


photography

photo // i suppose most architects like to consider themselves photographers. i do not, however, have any training in photography, but i believe in the opportunity that film affords us to capture a significant moment - whether it is a person or building - it can only appear that way once. As a designer, it is important for me to be able to recognize these moments, angles or views and capture them. You never know when they might be used again.

53


THAT’S IT!

CARE TO TAKE A LEAP WITH ME?

55

Design Portfolio 2012  

Final collection of work from who-knows-how-many years of design / architecture / graphics / photography work

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