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Investing in Community Priorities Infrastructure Investment Plans for Culture, Parks, Recreation and Emergency Response

2013 – 2022

November 2012

Onward/ By 2020, plans for all new and redeveloped communities will include community services infrastructure that accommodates the diverse social, recreational and public safety needs of residents.

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Table of contents

Introduction

3

What citizens and communities need Funding community needs Advancing Council’s commitment to great communities The remaining gap Prioritizing community investments High priority projects 2013 – 2022 Medium priority projects 2013 – 2022 Emerging priority projects 2013 – 2022

5 6 8 11 12 16 20

Projects funded or under way

24

CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 1

26

CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 2 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 3 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 4 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 5 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 6 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 7 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 8 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 9 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 10 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 11 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 12 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 13 CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 14

4

28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52

Investing in Community Priorities

1


Introduction The Culture, Parks and Recreation Infrastructure Investment Plan (CPRIIP) and the Emergency Response Infrastructure Investment Plan (ERIIP) are strategic, long-range capital planning documents that outline community infrastructure investment priorities. These projects reflect citizen and community priorities, and represent the cultural, social, recreational and safety needs of Calgarians. They are essential elements in the vibrant urban fabric that makes Calgary a great place to live, work – and stay. Through extensive community consultation, citizens have indicated that access to sport, art, culture and leisure activities – whether through facilities or parks and outdoor spaces – are vital to their quality of life. Protecting their communities and keeping their homes and families safe through timely emergency response remains important to Calgarians. Communities want to preserve and improve existing facilities and amenities to ensure they remain available for future generations, and also develop new spaces as their neighbourhoods and needs change and grow. The CPRIIP and ERIIP include new projects to address city growth needs, as well as lifecycle needs to address ongoing maintenance and upgrades to existing facilities. The priorities contain capital projects for the following groups: Culture, Parks and Recreation Infrastructure Investment Plan

Emergency Response Infrastructure Investment Plan

Parks

Calgary Fire Department

Recreation

Public Safety Communications

Civic Partners: Calgary Public Library, Calgary Zoo, Heritage Park, Talisman Centre, TELUS World of Science, Calgary TELUS Convention Centre, Aero Space Museum of Calgary, Cardel Place Recreation Centre, Westside Recreation Centre, Fort Calgary, EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts, Calgary Arts Development Authority.

Animal & Bylaw Services

As communities and citizens grow and change, so do their needs. Each year, projects within this plan are reassessed and reprioritized as required to ensure they reflect the current needs of communities.

Projects identified in this plan represent spaces that inspire, motivate, educate and protect citizens. They are core to helping Calgarians build healthier minds, bodies and spirits.

Investing in Community Priorities

3


What citizens and communities need Projects within this plan impact and improve lives for citizens in every quadrant of the city. The facilities and spaces identified span every social and economic class and benefit citizens of every age and culture. Ongoing citizen engagement clearly shows Calgarians strongly support new and upgraded parks as well as cultural, recreation and emergency response facilities throughout the city. The projects in this plan address an array of individual and family needs, and assist and uplift the most vulnerable citizens with improved access to community facilities. Civic Partners are key to helping meet the increasing and diverse needs for cultural, recreational, social and leisure activities in communities. These organizations maintain arms-length relationships with The City of Calgary, yet are a regular part of Calgarians’ lives. As directed by Council in 2010, Civic Partners are now included in the CPRIIP and ERIIP process, and those requesting funding support from The City are put through the same prioritization criteria and process as City projects.

Community facilities and spaces provide opportunities for citizens to come together, exchange ideas and share experiences. They galvanize communities and foster a sense of belonging, security and support.

4


Funding community needs Calgary is fortunate to have multiple funding streams for community projects that include the Municipal Sustainability Initiative (MSI), Pay As You Go/Lifecycle Maintenance and Upgrade Reserve, the Community and Recreation Levy, Legacy Parks Reserve and the Community Investment Fund (CIF). Giving back to Calgarians through the CIF On July 25, 2011, City Council clearly demonstrated its commitment to safe and vibrant neighbourhoods for all Calgarians through the creation of the CIF. As a result of Council’s foresight to provide a sustainable, long-term source of funds for community enhancement, $252 million is being invested between 2012 and 2016 to make meaningful and tangible improvements to the facilities and spaces citizens use and rely on every day. The CIF will provide citizens with a new Central Library, new recreation centres, and upgrades to local arenas, pools and parks. A portion of this fund has been dedicated to the Capital Conservation Grant to help community and social recreation associations make improvements at a grassroots neighbourhood level. This funding will improve accessibility to support inclusion of all residents in the area, attract a broader range of citizens and groups, and expand potential uses for centres, thereby helping community groups become more self-sustaining. This dedicated capital funding ensures the opportunity to help communities plan for the future and fund long-term community infrastructure projects critical to effective capital planning. As part of the next Business Plan and Budget Cycle (2015–2017), community priority projects will be brought forward for Council’s direction to allocate $210 million available between 2017 and 2021. It’s essential to preserve the established base from which community priorities are funded. Going forward this base needs to be retained and indexed to the growth of the overall mill rate, ensuring community priorities are met.

“I’m proud of the first investments from the new Community Investment Fund. We’ve been able to support parks, libraries, recreation and fire halls and equipment using these newly available funds. Soon, we will also see a new Central Library and four new recreation centres in parts of the city that are sorely lacking.” Mayor Naheed Nenshi

5


Advancing Council’s commitment to great communities Through Council’s forethought to establish the CIF, communities can better plan for their future and make significant strides in addressing the backlog of concerns and needs in their neighbourhoods. Building on this model and success, Council can use the CPRIIP and ERIIP to guide and inform their decision making for investing new funding as it becomes available. As shown in pie chart 2 on the opposite page, should there be an opportunity to invest an additional $120–200 million annually from a renewal of the Provincial MSI program starting in 2018, the gap in community infrastructure funding could be significantly reduced.

6


By further securing the sustainability and availability of funds, The City is giving communities the opportunity to make tangible and meaningful improvements in the daily lives of citizens. This commitment of new funds to the CPRIIP and ERIIP priority projects would significantly close the gap in unfunded projects from a projected $1.5 billion to approximately $0.5 billion.

1

Projected 10-year funding gap 2013 – 2022 without anticipated future MSI (in $billions) Projected 10-year funding gap 2013 – 2022 Total community infrastructure without anticipated future MSI (in $billions) needs: $2.5 billion

Total community infrastructure needs: $2.5 billion

Funding Gap, $1.5B Funding Gap, $1.5B

2

Projected Funding, $1.0B Projected Funding, $1.0B

Projected 10-year funding gap 2013 – 2022 with anticipated future MSI (in $billions) Projected 10-year funding gap 2013 – 2022 with anticipated future MSI (in $billions)

Funding Gap, $0.5B

Funding Gap, $0.5B

10-year projected funding without MSI, $1.0B 10-year projected funding without MSI, $1.0B

50% MSI funding $1.0B 50% MSI funding $1.0B

7


The remaining gap Building and maintaining community facilities is more than bricks and mortar; it’s about providing great spaces and gathering places for all citizens from all walks of life. These venues and spaces promote a strong sense of community and contribute to the fabric and quality of life. While Council’s support has provided thousands of Calgarians access to new and revitalized recreational, cultural, social and emergency services right in their own communities, a large funding gap remains. Over the next decade, a projected $1.5 billion in new capital funding is required in order to keep pace with the needs and provide: • More and rejuvenated park spaces. • Increased opportunities for physical activity and community building through new and upgraded recreation centres and aquatic facilities. • Lifecycle and maintenance upgrades to branch libraries, fire stations, as well as protective equipment for responders. • Revitalized tennis courts, sports fields, playgrounds and community and recreation centres that keep residents active and involved. The CPRIIP and ERIIP identify unfunded capital requirements of approximately $2.5 billion over the next 10 years. These unfunded needs include both new infrastructure to address growth as well as critical lifecycle upgrades to existing facility spaces. The following graphs depict the outstanding funding shortfall over the next decade.

8


Projected funding required vs. anticipated future funding without MSI (2013 – 2022) 350

300 $250 million projected funding required /year (average) ($millions)

250 Funding Gap 200

150 $100 million projected funding available/year (average) 100

50

0

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

■ Total projected available funding sources (excluding MSI) (Pay As You Go, Lifecycle Maintenance and Upgrade Reserve, Community and Recreation Levy, Community Investment Fund and Enmax Legacy Parks Reserve)

Projected funding required vs. anticipated future funding with MSI (2013 – 2022) 350

300 $250 million projected funding required /year (average) ($millions)

250

200

$200 million projected funding available/year (average)

Funding Gap

150

100

50

0

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

■ Anticipated future MSI – additional 20% share of total MSI dedicated to community infrastructures (2018 – 2022) ■ Anticipated future MSI – 30% share of total MSI dedicated to community infrastructures (2018 – 2022) ■ Total projected available funding sources (excluding MSI) (Pay As You Go, Lifecycle Maintenance and Upgrade Reserve, Community and Recreation Levy, Community Investment Fund and Enmax Legacy Parks Reserve) Investing in Community Priorities

9


10


Prioritizing future community investments Each year, the projects identified through the CPRIIP and ERIIP process far exceed the funds available. A rigorous, Council-approved process helps to single out the highest priority projects. Criteria used to determine a project’s priority include: • Results of Citizen Expectations and Perceptions research and other citizen engagement activities. • Alignment with Council, department, business unit priorities. • Potential impact on public and staff safety. • Triple Bottom Line impact assessment. • Impact on operating budgets. • Classification of project as maintenance, upgrade, growth, service or critical. • Project readiness. • Use of innovative technology, co-location with other City services, alternate funding and asset management. The unfunded CPRIIP and ERIIP projects include initiatives that support parks, culture, sport, recreation, community, protective services and emergency response services. The projects are ranked and grouped into High, Medium and Emerging priority categories as depicted in the following tables.

Investing in Community Priorities

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High priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 CPRIIP Project Name (Parks) Slope Remediation (Parks) Pathway (Regional and Local) Lifecycle (Parks) Various Emergency Repairs (Rec) Recreation Facility Lifecycle (Parks) Infrastructure Lifecycle

Ward

2,400

City-wide

32,000

City-wide

1,600

City-wide

115,200

City-wide

17,400

City-wide

(Parks) Established Communities Open Space Improvements and Lifecycle

1,600

City-wide

(Parks) River Park/Sandy Beach/ Britannia Slopes Regional Park (Legacy)

8,400

11

300

7

(CP) EPCOR Centre Repair/Replacement of Water Damaged Systems (Parks) Prairie Winds Park Lifecycle & Upgrade (Non-Wading Pool Infrastructure) (Legacy)

10,300

5

(Rec) Foothills Fieldhouse Development

202,000

1

(Parks) Shaw Millennium Park (Legacy)

200

8

4,700

10

(Parks) Forest Lawn Creek Development and Implementation Plan (Legacy) (Parks) City Wide Trail Repairs and Lifecycling

700

City-wide

(Rec) Capital Conservation Grant

42,000

City-wide

(Rec) Centre City Pools (Beltline and Inglewood) Upgrade

10,000

8, 9

(Parks) Downtown and Business Revitalization Zone Streetscape Repairs and Improvements

7,200

1, 9

(Parks) 12 Mile Coulee Park Development (Legacy)

2,100

1

900

11

(CP) Heritage Park Replica of Nellie McClung House (Parks) Regional Parks Various Improvements (Legacy)

4,000

City-wide

(Parks) Marlborough Park – Regional Park (Legacy)

1,700

10

(Parks) Haskayne Regional Park – Phase 1 (Legacy)

15,000

1

2,500

6

300

7

(Parks) Bowmont East Regional Park (Legacy)

6,600

1

(Parks) Paskapoo Slopes Regional Park – Phase 1 (Legacy)

2,000

6

(Rec) Community Mobile Skate Park Lifecycle

2,500

City-wide

(Parks) Playground Lifecycle

21,100

City-wide

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

28,600

1, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13

(CP) Zoo Lifecycle

11,000

9

(Rec) Established Area Arena Upgrades

15,300

6, 9, 11, 14

(Parks) Clearwater Regional Park (Legacy) (CP) EPCOR Centre Health and Safety Systems

(CP) Talisman Centre Aquatic Facility Lifecycle

300

9

(Parks) Sien Lok Park Redesign and Development – Phase 1 (Legacy)

4,400

7

(Parks) Century Gardens (Legacy)

8,100

7

(Parks) Community Innovation Implementation – Park Improvements (Legacy)

5,000

City-wide

(Parks) Bend in the Bow Design and Development – Phase 1 (Legacy)

300

9

(Parks) Edworthy Park Design and Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy)

700

8

u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

12

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

600

600

600

600

**

**

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

**

**

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

4,400*

5,400*

8,800

13,800

13,800

13,800

13,800

13,800

13,800

13,800

**

**

2,800

2,300

2,100

2,000

2,000

2,100

2,100

2,000

**

**

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

500

500

3,700

3,700

200

100

300

3,000

3,000

4,000

3,000

7,000

64,000

64,000

64,000

200

800

300

200

1,100

1,100

1,100

100

200

200

200

100

1,000*

1,000*

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

**

**

800

7,200

200

1,800

800

800

800

800

800

800

800

800

800

300

1,000

800

900

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

200

1,500

900

3,000

5,000

5,000

1,100

300

1,100

1,100

200

100

300

1,300

1,500

1,000

1,500

500

500

600

1,400

500

500

500

500

500

1,300*

300*

2,500

2,500

2,000

2,500

2,500

2,500

2,500

2,500

**

**

200

2,400

4,400

4,400

4,400

4,400

4,400

4,000

2,100

2,100

2,200

2,300

2,300

**

**

300

3,300

3,000

2,700

300

2,700

300

2,700

300

700

3,200

500

800

2,700

4,600

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

300

700

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

13


High priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 cont’d CPRIIP Project Name

Ward

(Rec) Foothills Athletic Park Site Redevelopment

142,200

1

(Parks) Sien Lok Park Implementation – Phase 2

6,900

7

(Rec) Golf Courses Buildings Lifecycle

5,400

5, 7, 8, 11, 14

(CP) CPL Lifecycle Maintenance on Buildings

12,900

4

(Rec) Golf Courses Landscape Lifecycle

8,000

5, 7, 8, 11, 14

(CP) Heritage Park Heritage Buildings Lifecycle

2,400

11

(CP) Heritage Park Infrastructure Lifecycle

1,700

11

(Parks) Bow to Bluff Redesign and Development

5,500

7

(Parks) Sportsfield Irrigation Upgrades

8,800

City-wide

(Parks) Water Management Central Control System Lifecycle

5,200

City-wide

(Parks) Class A Parks Lifecycle Repairs and Upgrades

2,100

7, 8

3,000

9

(Parks) Bend in the Bow Implementation – Phase 2 (Legacy) Sub-Total CPRIIP High Prioity

ERIIP Project Name

$792,500 Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

Ward

(PSC) 9-1-1 Technology Redundancy

30,000

5

(PSC) Critical Technology Upgrades

3,900

5

27,100

City-wide

5,400

City-wide

(Fire) Radio and Mobile Systems Lifecycle (Fire) Equipment Lifecycle (Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle

14,700

City-wide

(PSC) Equipment Lifecycle

3,800

5

(ABS) Radio and Mobile Systems Lifecycle

2,000

3, 8, 9, 14

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

24,000

City-wide

(Fire) East Macleod Emergency Response Station u

16,300

14

16,800

12

(Fire) Shepard Industrial Emergency Response Station u Sub-Total ERIIP High Priority u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

14

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

$144,000


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

23,700

23,700

23,700

23,700

23,700

23,700

2,300

2,300

2,300

1,000

500

500

700

300

700

700

700

200

100

400*

1,300*

300

1,500

900

1,400

1,000

100

3,200

2,800

200

1,900

200

900

700

1,300

500

600

1,200

500

400

300

300

300

100

200

200

200

200

200

400

200

200

200

200

100

100

100

100

100

400

1,100

3,000

1,000

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

300

500

800

500

500

500

300

800

500

500

**

**

1,500

200

200

200

1,000

1,000

1,000

$23,000

$41,500

$121,400

$138,800

$142,600

$72,100

$61,400

$63,500

$63,500

$64,700

Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

6,000*

6,000*

6,000

6,000

6,000

**

**

200

700

700

200

500

900

200

500

**

10,000*

3,800

1,500

3,200

1,400

300

3,100

500

3,300

**

**

200

300

500

2,200

600

400

1,100

100

700*

1,100*

800

1,100

2,900

2,200

1,100

800

1,100

2,900

**

600*

300

100

400

600

400

600

300

500

200*

**

100

300

100

100

700

100

100

300

5,000

5,000

7,000

7,000

3,300

13,000

3,400

13,400

$10,200

$35,700

$19,800

$30,400

$20,800

$6,700

$3,600

$5,900

$3,300

$7,600

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

15


Medium priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 CPRIIP Project Name

Ward

(Parks) Glenmore Reservoir Park Design Development Plan (Legacy)

500

11

(Parks) Olympic Plaza Redesign (Legacy)

500

7

(CP) Fort Calgary Annual Lifecycle Maintenance

2,100

7

(Rec) Willow Park Golf Course Irrigation Water Supply Line

1,700

14

(Parks) River Access Improvements (Legacy)

2,000

City-wide

(Parks) Riley Park Design and Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy)

300

7

(Rec) Irrigation for Athletic Parks – Replacement of Old Equipment and Pipes

9,400

City-wide

(Parks) Blakiston Park Redesign and Development

1,200

7

(Parks) Skyview Ranch Natural Area Regional Park

1,000

3

16,100

City-wide

(Parks) Priddis Slough Regional Park (Legacy)

2,600

14

(CP) Heritage Park Rolling Stock Lifecycle

2,900

11

(Parks) Paskapoo Slopes Land Acquisition (Legacy)

13,000

6

(Rec) Glenmore Athletic Park Redevelopment

92,400

11

300

12

(Parks) Regional Pathways Missing Links

(Parks) Seton Regional Park Design Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy) (Rec) Skateboard Park Planning and Design Development (Parks) Northeast Regional Park – Skyview Ranch (Legacy)

4,200

City-wide

800

3

(Parks) Eau Claire Plaza Redesign (Legacy)

25,500

7

(Rec) Artificial Turf Fields and Bubble Covers

15,000

City-wide

2,600

9

(Parks) Beaverdam Flats Natural Environment Park Management Plan (Legacy) (Parks) New North Regional Park Land Acquisition (Legacy)

10,000

TBD

(Parks) Windsor Park New Open Space Development

500

11

(Parks) Community and Allotment Gardens City Wide

900

City-wide

(Parks) Prairie Winds & Variety Spray Parks Upgrades and Retrofits (Parks) Confederation Park Design Development Plan (Legacy) (Rec) Golf Courses Upgrades (CP) Fort Calgary Hunt House Conservation (Rec) Lakeview Golf Course Non-Potable Water Supply (CP) Zoo North Gift Shop/Snack Bar/Washroom Complex Maintenance (Parks) Park Water Supply System Upgrades

2,600 300 7,000

5, 11 7 5, 7, 8, 11, 14

300

7

1,500

11

600 2,000

9 City-wide

(Rec) Large Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell F u

27,500

3

(Parks) Natural Area Acquisitions in Annexed Land Areas

15,000

TBD

(Rec) Renfrew Aquatic and Recreation Centre Expansion

3,000

9

600

9

5,600

7

300

9

(CP) Talisman Interior Flooring Lifecycle Maintenance (Rec) Sir Winston Churchill Aquatic and Recreation Centre Expansion (CP) Talisman Mechanical, HVAC, Plumbing and Building Envelope u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

16

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

500

500

600

100

100

100

200

200

200

200

200

200

1,700

200

400

400

400

600

300

**

**

1,400

1,000

1,000

1,500

1,500

1,000

1,000

1,000

100

100

500

500

100

200

200

100

100

100

100

100

2,800

3,300

1,700

1,700

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,100

200

300

1,000

1,100

300

400

700

300

200

200

200

200

200

200

13,000

11,800

30,600

30,000

20,000

300

4,200

800

3,500

10,000

10,000

2,000

3,000

7,000

5,000

100

800

1,000

500

200

5,000

5,000

500

100

100

100

200

200

200

1,200

200

1,200

300

100

100

1,300

1,300

1,700

1,500

800

200

200

100

1,500

600

500

500

500

500

16,500

11,000

5,000

2,500

2,500

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

300

2,700

300

300

600

5,000

200

100

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

17


Medium priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 cont’d CPRIIP Project Name (Parks) Green Waste Recycling Infrastructure (CP) Cardel Place Expansion Project u (Rec) Shaganappi Point Golf Course Clubhouse and Maintenance Facilities (Parks) Poplar Lifecycle and Species Diversity Project

Ward

4,000

2, 6, 10, 12

22,500

3

8,400

8

21,400

City-wide

(Parks) Community Park Improvements Linked With Other City BU Initiatives

200

8, 11

(CP) Fort Calgary Deane House Restoration

600

7

40,000

1

1,100

7

400

9

(Rec) Shouldice Aquatic Centre Upgrade (Parks) St. Joseph’s School Site Park Development (CP) Zoo Animal Holding Area and Exhibit (Parks) Sportsfield Lifecycle and Renovations

17,000

City-wide

(Parks) Service Building Infrastructure and Washroom Lifecycle Maintenance

7,000

City-wide

(CP) Westside Aquatic Park Upgrade

1,400

6

(CP) Talisman Washroom Renovation

200

9

(CP) Aero Space Museum Infrastructure Renewal Program

300

3

1,800

7

(CP) EPCOR Centre Air Conditioning and Air Handling Systems Sub-Total CPRIIP Medium Priority ERIIP Project Name

$398,100 Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

Ward

(Fire) Station #16 Replacement

17,200

9

(Fire) Station #7 Replacement

12,000

7

(Fire) Station #17 Renovation

8,900

1

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle

9,000

City-wide

(ABS) Equipment Lifecycle

200

3, 8, 9, 14

(PSC) Technology Systems Integration

200

5

17,300

10

(Fire) Belvedere Emergency Response Station u (Fire) New Training Academy Burn Tower

8,900

10

(Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

4,800

City-wide

Sub-Total ERIIP Medium Priority u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

18

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

$78,500


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

4,000

5,000

8,500

9,000

2,200

3,100

3,100

1,800

2,100

2,100

2,200

2,200

2,200

2,200

2,200

2,200

2,200

100

100

600

4,000

18,000

18,000

100

700

300

400

**

**

2,500

2,500

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

**

**

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

500

800

100

200

100

100

100

600

700

300

200

$22,100

$51,400

$50,600

$42,400

$21,100

$16,800

$21,300

$44,200

$72,500

$55,700

Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

– –

3,700

13,500

12,000

8,900

**

**

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

**

**

100

100

**

**

100

100

3,500

13,800

8,900

**

**

600

600

600

600

600

600

600

600

$12,600

$4,100

$24,900

$14,800

$15,700

$2,200

$2,100

$2,100

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

19


Emerging priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 CPRIIP Project Name (CP) TELUS Spark – Outdoor Park

Ward

1,400

9

700

7

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: West Macleod ASP u

60,000

14

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: Belvedere Area Structure Plan u

59,000

10

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell D u

60,100

2

4,800

8

59,000

12

(CP) EPCOR Centre Theatre Seating Lifecycle

(Parks) Edworthy Park Implementation – Phase 2 (Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: East Regional Context Study – Cell F u (Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell H u

56,900

3

(Parks) Open Space Irrigation and Drainage Upgrades

17,000

City-wide

(Parks) North/South Glenmore Park Design and Development Plan

500

11

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: SW Community Plan u

59,000

13

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: West Regional Context Study u

61,000

1

(CP) Zoo Guest Services upgrade

300

9

(CP) Zoo Design of New Exhibit

200

9

(CP) Calgary TELUS Convention Centre South Building Washroom Maintenance

300

7

(CP) TELUS Spark Photovoltaic System

1,200

9

(Parks) Seton Regional Park Implementation – Phase 2

5,000

12

(CP) Fort Calgary East Elbow Site

600

7

(CP) Fort Calgary 1875 Fort Redevelopment

800

7

(Rec) Inland Athletic Park upgrades

10,000

2

(CP) CADA – International Avenue Arts and Culture Centre (IAACC)

10,000

10

8,000

4

13,900

1

(CP) CPL Lifecycle Maintenance on IT Equipment and Software (Parks) Haskayne Park Site Development – Phase 2 (CP) EPCOR Stage Lighting Dimming System Lifecycle

2,100

7

16,000

City-wide

(Rec) Class Software System upgrade/Replacement

1,200

City-wide

(CP) CPL Automated Materials Handling Equipment

1,900

City-wide

(Rec) Bob Bahan/Ernie Starr Sport Facility Expansion

15,600

10

(Parks) Riley Park Redevelopment – Phase 2

10,500

7

(CP) CADA – Institute of Modern and Contemporary Art (IMCA)

8,000

8

(Rec) Wildflower Art Centre

5,000

8

(Rec) Community Cultural Spaces

(CP) Shaganappi Library Relocation to Transit Oriented Development Space

1,400

8

(Rec) Indoor Racquet Facility Construction

27,000

TBD

(CP) CADA- Glenbow – Visual Art Pavilion

25,100

TBD

(Parks) Biodiversity Strategy and Implementation

15,800

City-wide

u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

20

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

1,400

100

200

400

11,600

4,800

43,600

10,600

4,800

43,600

11,600

4,800

43,700

1,000

1,000

1,600

1,200

10,600

4,800

43,600

8,500

4,800

43,600

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

1,700

500

10,600

4,800

43,600

12,600

48,400

300

200

300

1,200

2,000

3,000

600

800

1,000

9,000

500

4,000

4,000

1,500

**

**

500

700

600

600

600

2,200

1,200

1,600

900

2,000

7,000

4,000

700

800

600

1,600

4,800

4,800

4,800

1,200

1,600

300

1,600

2,000

12,000

500

3,500

3,500

3,000

4,000

4,000

1,000

4,000

1,400

15,000

1,200

10,800

500

2,000

6,800

9,000

6,800

1,000

800

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

21


Emerging priority projects for future investments 2013 – 2022 cont’d CPRIIP Project Name

Ward

(CP) Aero Space Museum Facility Expansion

3,100

3

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping upgrades

6,700

City-wide

(Rec) Land for Tournament Athletic Park

75,000

TBD

5,000

TBD

300

TBD

(CP) CADA – Media and Visual Arts Centre (MAVA) (CP) CADA – New Stride Art Gallery (Parks) Enoch Plaza Sub-Total CPRIIP Emerging Priorities

ERIIP Project Name

2,000

8

$711,400 Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

Ward

(Fire) West Macleod Emergency Response Station u

17,300

14

(Fire) Keystone Hills Area Emergency Response Station u

17,800

3

(Fire) North Annex Industrial Area Emergency Response Station u

18,300

3

(Fire) Shepard Residential Emergency Response Station u

18,900

12

(Fire) South East Emergency Response Station u

18,700

12

(Fire) Providence Emergency Response Station u

19,200

13

(Fire) Far South East Emergency Response Station u

20,000

12

(Fire) North West (Residential) Emergency Response Station u

20,000

2

(Fire) Far North West (Industrial) Emergency Response Station u

20,000

2

(ABS) Property Impound Facility

2,200

TBD

14,600

9

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements

5,800

City-wide

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle

5,600

City-wide

(Fire) Training Academy Equipment Lifecycle

1,200

10

(Fire) East Core Emergency Response Station u

(Fire) Headquarters

91,000

5

(Fire) Training Academy Decontamination/Fitness Facility Upgrade

15,000

10

6,000

City-wide

(Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade Sub-Total ERIIP Emerging Priorities u Anticipated CRL to cover 85% of the capital costs.

22

Total Capital Costs (in 000s)

311,600


Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

900

800

800

600

1,200

1,200

700

600

600

600

600

600

600

75,000

2,000

3,000

300

1,000

1,000

$17,700

$30,700

$50,800

$53,500

$47,600

$69,700

$72,400

$72,000

$112,100

$184,900

Capital Costs for 2013 – 2022 (in 000s) 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

3,500

13,800

3,600

14,200

3,700

14,600

3,800

15,100

3,800

14,900

**

**

3,900

15,300

4,000

16,000

4,000

16,000

4,000

16,000

700

1,500

14,600

200

1,000

400

1,400

400

300

1,000

800

300

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

**

**

100

200

100

200

100

200

100

200

91,000

15,000

4,800

200

800

200

$700

$6,500

$2,000

$4,800

$34,600

$20,000

$129,100

$35,800

$28,900

$49,200

* Dollar figures represent remaining unfunded. ** Projects with existing Council-approved funding.

Investing in Community Priorities

23


Projects funded or under way (2012 – 2014) The following map and table depicts major community priority projects that are funded or under way.

24


Map Legend A AA B

Project Name

Map Legend

Project Name

(ABS) Core Response / Clean to the Core Program

X

(PARKS) Bowness Park Redevelopment

(REC) Seton Regional Recreation Centre Southeast

Y

(REC) Quarry Park Recreation Facility

(ABS) Portland Street Renovation

Z

(REC) Foothills Athletic Park (Facility Renewal)

(REC) Great Plains Recreation Facility

City-wide

(REC) Pool Accessibility Upgrades

(CP) New Central Library

City-wide

(CP) Civic Partners Infrastructure Grant

(REC) Rocky Ridge Regional Recreation Centre West

City-wide

(FIRE) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle

(CP) Signal Hill Library

City-wide

(FIRE) Facility Rehabilitation

(REC) Recreational Facilities – New Brighton

City-wide

(FIRE) Fire Equipment Lifecycle

(CP) Talisman Centre Lifecycle Grant

City-wide

(FIRE) Fire Training Academy Equipment Lifecycle

(REC) Shouldice Athletic Park (Facility Renewal)

City-wide

(FIRE) Light Fleet Lifecycle

(CP) Heritage Park Lifecycle Grant

City-wide

(FIRE) Personal Protective Equipment

FF

(REC) Nose Creek Recreation Centre

City-wide

(FIRE) Replacement Emergencies

G

(CP) Calgary Zoo Lifecycle Grant

City-wide

(PARKS) Cemeteries – Lifecycle

(REC) Soccer Centre – Artificial Turf

City-wide

(PARKS) Cemeteries – New

(CP) New Science Centre

City-wide

(PARKS) Established Communities Open Space Upgrades

(REC) Village Square Leisure Centre – Upgrade

City-wide

(PARKS) Existing Off-Leash Area Retrofit

(CP) Fort Calgary Lifecycle Grant

City-wide

(PARKS) Major Parks – Upgrade/Retrofit

II

(REC) Southland Leisure Centre – Upgrade

City-wide

(PARKS) New Dog Off-Leash Area Development

J

(CP) Outdoor Pool Partners

City-wide

(PARKS) New Pathways

JJ

(REC) South Fish Creek Arenas

City-wide

(PARKS) Open Space & Public Realm Improvements

K

(CP) Sports Hall of Fame & Museum

City-wide

(PARKS) Parks Building Infrastructure & Washroom Lifecycle

(REC) Family Leisure Centre Arena

City-wide

(PARKS) Playground Lifecycle & CSA Compliance

(CP) Mount Royal Conservatory

City-wide

(PARKS) Sportsfield Lifecycle & Renovations

LL

(REC) Westside Recreation Centre Upgrades

City-wide

(PARKS) Wading Pool Retrofits

M

(CP) Calgary Folk Music Hall

City-wide

(PSC) 9-1-1 Telephone System Upgrade

(FIRE) Emergency Operations Centre

City-wide

(PSC) Central Communication Hardware Replacement

(CP) Cantos at the King Eddy

City-wide

(PSC) Critical Technology Upgrades

(FIRE) Seton Emergency Response Station

City-wide

(PSC) Equipment Lifecycle Upgrade

(FIRE) Northeast Super Station

City-wide

(PSC) Systems Integration

(FIRE) Tuscany Temporary Emergency Response Station

City-wide

(REC) Athletic Parks – Lifecycle

(FIRE) Station #11 Replacement/Rebuild

City-wide

(REC) Capital Conservation Grants

PP

(REC) Genesis Centre of Community Wellness

City-wide

(REC) Centre City Wide Pools – Redesign Planning

Q

(FIRE) Symons Valley Emergency Response Station

City-wide

(REC) Established Area Pool Upgrades

R

(FIRE) Bridlewood Permanent Emergency Response Station

City-wide

(REC) Established Areas Arena Upgrades

S

(FIRE) Station #5 Replacement/Rebuild

City-wide

(REC) Irrigation for Athletic Parks

T

(FIRE) Douglas Glen Emergency Response Station

City-wide

(REC) New Arenas

U

(PARKS) Legacy Parks – New Regional Parks

City-wide

(REC) Recreational Facilities – Lifecycle

V

(PARKS) Legacy Parks – Existing Park Enhancements

City-wide

(REC) Recreational Facilities – Sport Facility Renewal

W

(PARKS) Laycock Park Wetland Restoration

BB C CC D DD E EE F

GG H HH I

KK L

MM N NN O OO P

Investing in Community Priorities

25


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 1

26

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 1 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Rec) Foothills Fieldhouse Development

l

B

(Parks) 12 Mile Coulee Park Development (Legacy)

l

C

(Parks) Downtown and Business Revitalization Zone Streetscape Repairs and Improvements

l

D

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

l

E

(Parks) Bowmont East Regional Park (Legacy)

l

F

(Parks) Haskayne Regional Park – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle G

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle H

(Rec) Foothills Athletic Park Site Redevelopment

l

I

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

J

(Fire) Station #17 Renovation

l

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

L

(Rec) Shouldice Aquatic Centre Upgrade

l

M

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: West Regional Context Study

l

N

(Parks) Haskayne Park Site Development – Phase 2

l

O

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

K

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements Q

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Bowness Park redevelopment This $10.5 million project will restore Bowness Park to its 100-year heritage. Carefully balancing a blend of old and new, the redevelopment preserves the integrity and significance of the park while ensuring amenities are modern and up-to-date. Work on the redevelopment began in 2012 following a funding commitment from the Community Investment Fund. The project is expected to take about three years in total.

27


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 2

28

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 2 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle A

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle B C

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l l

D

(Parks) Green Waste Recycling Infrastructure

l

E

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell D

l

F

(Fire) North West (Residential) Emergency Response Station

l

G

(Fire) Far North West (Industrial) Emergency Response Station

l

H

(Rec) Inland Athletic Park Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements I

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Playground and tennis court upgrades Maintaining safe and wholesome places for children to play and families to socialize supports The City of Calgary’s goal of complete communities. Twenty-three playgrounds* were completely replaced and four playgrounds received a new fall surface. Additionally, 28 tennis courts were upgraded at 10 sites across Calgary. • Citadel (183 Citadel Peak Circle N.W.) received a new fall surface. • Hamptons (111 Hamptons Park N.W.) received a new fall surface and tennis court resurfacing.

*Parks Foundation Calgary contributed funding for 17 of the 23 playgrounds through its Building Playground and Communities Grant Program.

29


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 3

30

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 3 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle A

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle B

(ABS) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle

l

C

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

D

(Parks) Skyview Ranch Natural Area Regional Park

l

E

(Parks) Northeast Regional Park – Skyview Ranch (Legacy)

l

F

(ABS) Equipment Lifecycle

l

G

(Rec) Large Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell F

l

H

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

I

(CP) Cardel Place Expansion Project

l

J

(CP) Aero Space Museum Infrastructure Renewal Program

l

K

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: North Regional Context Study – Cell H

l

L

(Fire) Keystone Hills Area Emergency Response Station

l

M

(Fire) North Annex Industrial Area Emergency Response Station

l

N

(CP) Aero Space Museum Facility Expansion

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements O

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Saddle Ridge Multi-Services Centre In 2010, the Saddle Ridge Multi-Services Centre was built to meet the growing demand for emergency services in the Northeast. The facility brings together the Calgary Police Service and the Calgary Fire Department and offers Northeast area residents convenience in accessing protective services. The Saddle Ridge Multi-Services Centre was built with the future in mind and is able to accommodate potential growth.

31


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 4

32

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 4 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle A

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle B C

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l l

D

(CP) CPL Lifecycle Maintenance on Buildings

l

E

(CP) CPL Lifecycle Maintenance on IT Equipment and Software

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements F

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Laycock wetland restoration $6.95 million from the Community Investment Fund has been allocated to the restoration of the wetland within Laycock Park. The restoration will: • Improve the quality of water running into Nose Creek, and ultimately, into the Bow River. • Create enhancements to the overall aesthetic and health of the park and adjacent communities. • Integrate the wetlands within the park to enhance the “family” character of the park.

33


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 5

34

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 5 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Parks) Prairie Winds Park Lifecycle & Upgrade (Non-Wading Pool Infrastructure) (Legacy)

l

B

(PSC) 9-1-1 Technology Redundancy

l

C

(PSC) Critical Technology Upgrades

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

l

Playground and tennis court upgrades

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle D

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle (Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle

E

(Rec) Golf Course Buildings Lifecycle (Rec) Golf Course Landscape Lifecycle

l

F

(PSC) Equipment Lifecycle

l

G

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

H

(Parks) Prairie Winds Spray Park Upgrades and Retrofits

l

I

(Rec) Golf Course Upgrades

l

J

(PSC) Technology Systems Integration

l

K L M

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

(Fire) Headquarters

l

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements N

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

Maintaining safe and wholesome places for children to play and families to socialize supports The City of Calgary’s goal of complete communities. Twentythree playgrounds* were completely replaced and four playgrounds received a new fall surface. Additionally, 28 tennis courts were upgraded at 10 different sites across Calgary. • Pineridge (310 Pinehill Road N.E.) received a complete reconstruction of three tennis courts. • Whitehorn (28 Whitmire Road N.E. and 12 Whitworth Road N.E.) received two complete playground replacements. • Monterey Park (33 Laguna Close N.E. and 270 Laguna Close N.E.) received two complete playground replacements. • Temple (116 Templeton Circle N.E.) received a complete playground replacement. • Rundle (2409 50th Street N.E.) received tennis court resurfacing.

*Parks Foundation Calgary contributed funding for 17 of the 23 playgrounds through its Building Playground and Communities Grant Program.

35


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 6

36

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 6 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Parks) Clearwater Regional Park (Legacy)

l

B

(Parks) Paskapoo Slopes Regional Park – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle C

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle D

(Rec) Established Area Arena Upgrades

l

E

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

F

(Parks) Paskapoo Slopes Land Acquisition (Legacy)

l

G

(Parks) Green Waste Recycling Infrastructure

l

H

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

I

(CP) Westside Aquatic Park Upgrade

l

J

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements K

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Capital Conservation Grant Program The Capital Conservation Grant is available to community associations and social recreation organizations to help maintain safe and healthy facilities by addressing lifecycle needs. The City offers this grant with the understanding that to offer all things that collectively make complete communities requires the collaboration, hard work and commitment of many. An additional $12 million was allocated to the Capital Conservation Grant program courtesy of the Community Investment Fund in 2012. With the additional monies, the program will now be able to provide $22 million in grants from 2012 to 2016 using a 75/25 funding model (grant will pay 75 per cent of project costs) up to a maximum of $300,000. The first round of successful recipients supported 41 projects totalling more than $2.2 million.

37


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 7

38

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 7 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle A

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle B

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

l

C

(Parks) Sien Lok Park Redesign and Development – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

D

(Parks) Century Gardens (Legacy)

l

E

(Parks) Sien Lok Park Implementation – Phase 2

l

F

(Parks) Bow to Bluff Redesign and Development

l

G

(Parks) Class A Parks Lifecycle Repairs and Upgrades

l

H

(Rec) Golf Course Buildings Lifecycle (Rec) Golf Course Landscape Lifecycle

l

I

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

J

(Parks) Olympic Plaza Redesign (Legacy)

l

K

(Parks) Riley Park Design and Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

L

(Parks) Blakiston Park Redesign and Development

l

M

(CP) Fort Calgary Annual Lifecycle Maintenance

l

N

(CP) EPCOR Centre Repair/Replacement of Water Damaged Systems

l

O

(Parks) Eau Claire Plaza Redesign (Legacy)

l

P

(Parks) Confederation Park Design Development Plan (Legacy)

l

Q

(Fire) Station #7 Replacement

l

R

(CP) EPCOR Centre Health and Safety Systems

l

S

(Rec) Golf Course Upgrades

l

T

(Rec) Sir Winston Churchill Aquatic and Recreation Centre Expansion

l

U

(CP) Fort Calgary Hunt House Conservation

l

V

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

W

(Parks) St. Joseph’s School Site Park Development

l

X

(CP) Fort Calgary Deane House Restoration

l

Y

(CP) EPCOR Centre Air Conditioning and Air Handling Systems

l

Z

(CP) Calgary TELUS Convention Centre South Building Washroom Maintenance

l

AA

(CP) EPCOR Centre Theatre Seating Lifecycle

l

BB

(CP) Fort Calgary East Elbow Site

l

CC

(CP) Fort Calgary 1875 Fort Redevelopment

l

DD

(CP) EPCOR Stage Lighting Dimming System Lifecycle

l

EE

(Parks) Riley Park Redevelopment – Phase 2

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Reopening of Devonian Gardens With a $37 million capital fund commitment from City Council, Parks was able to complete a much-needed renovation to the Gardens. • The facility now has 10,000 shrubs and 1.5 million pounds of soil. • There are 550 trees of 18 different species in the botanical gardens.

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements FF

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

39


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 8

40

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 8 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Parks) Shaw Millennium Park (Legacy)

l

B

(Rec) Centre City Pools (Beltline and Inglewood) Upgrades

l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle C

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle D

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

l

E

(Parks) Edworthy Park Design and Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

F

(Parks) Class A Parks Lifecycle Repairs and Upgrades

l

G

(Rec) Golf Course Buildings Lifecycle (Rec) Golf Course Landscape Lifecycle

l

H

(ABS) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle

l

I

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

J

(ABS) Equipment Lifecycle

l

K

(Rec) Golf Course Upgrades

l

N

(Parks) Community Park Improvements Linked with Other City BU Initiatives

l

O

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS l

P

(Parks) Edworthy Park Implementation – Phase 2

l

Q

(Rec) Wildflower Art Centre

l

R

(CP) CADA – Institute of Modern and Contemporary Art (IMCA)

l

S

(CP) Shaganappi Library Relocation to Transit Oriented Development Space

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements T

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade U

(Parks) Enoch Plaza

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Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) In 2012, the new Emergency Operations Centre opened. The space houses the Calgary Emergency Management Agency (CEMA), a back-up Public Safety Communications Call Centre (9-1-1) and The City’s Data Centre.

41


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 9

42

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 9 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Rec) Centre City Pools (Beltline and Inglewood) Upgrades

l

B

(Parks) Downtown and Business Revitalization Zone Streetscape Repairs and Improvements

l

C

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

l

D

(Rec) Established Area Arena Upgrades

l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle E

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Civic Partners Grant Program

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle F

(CP) Zoo Lifecycle

l

G

(CP) Talisman Centre Aquatic Facility Lifecycle

l

H

(Parks) Bend in the Bow Design and Development – Phase 1 (Legacy) (Parks) Bend in the Bow Implementation – Phase 2 (Legacy)

l

I

(ABS) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle

l

J

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

K

(Parks) Beaverdam Flats Natural Environment Park Management Plan (Legacy)

l

L

(Fire) Station #16 Replacement

l

M

(ABS) Equipment Lifecycle

l

N

(Rec) Renfrew Aquatic and Recreation Centre Expansion

l

(CP) Zoo North Gift Shop/Snack Bar/Washroom Complex Maintenance

l

O P Q

(CP) Talisman Interior Flooring Lifecycle Maintenance (CP) Talisman Mechanical, HVAC, Plumbing and Building Envelope (Fire) Facility Lifecycle

Recognizing the increasing financial challenges faced by The City of Calgary’s partners, $17.1 million was allocated for 2012 – 2016, from the Community Investment Fund toward the creation of a new Civic Partner Grant Program. Six partners received a total of $5.326 million from the Civic Partner Grant in 2012 to assist them with an array of maintenance needs that varied in scope, size and cost. Partners who received funding from the Civic Partner Grant Program in 2012 included: • The Calgary Zoo: $2.186 million

l

• Heritage Park: $1.801 million • EPCOR Centre: $813,000

l

R

(CP) Zoo Animal Holding Area and Exhibit

l

• Calgary TELUS Convention Centre: $260,000

S

(CP) Talisman Washroom Renovation

l

• Fort Calgary: $135,000

(CP) Zoo Guest Services Upgrade

l

• Talisman Centre: $131,000

(CP) Zoo Design of New Exhibit

l

T U

(Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

(CP) TELUS Spark – Outdoor Park (CP) TELUS Spark Photovoltaic System

l

V

(Fire) East Core Emergency Response Station

l

W

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements X

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

43


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 10

44

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 10 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Parks) Forest Lawn Creek Development and Implementation Plan (Legacy)

l

B

(Parks) Marlborough Park – Regional Park (Legacy)

l

C

(Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle D

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle E

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

F

(Parks) Green Waste Recycling Infrastructure

l

G

(Fire) Belvedere Emergency Response Station

l

H

(Fire) New Training Academy Burn Tower

l

I

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

J

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: Belvedere Area Structure Plan

l

L

(CP) CADA – International Avenue Arts and Culture Centre (IAACC)

l

M

(Rec) Bob Bahan/Ernie Starr Sport Facility Expansion

l

N

(Fire) Training Academy Equipment Lifecycle

l

O

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

P

(Fire) Training Academy Decontamination/Fitness Facility Upgrade

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements Q

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Playground and tennis court upgrades Maintaining safe and wholesome places for children to play and families to socialize supports The City of Calgary’s goal of complete communities. Twentythree playgrounds* were completely replaced and four playgrounds received a new fall surface. Additionally, 28 tennis courts were upgraded at 10 sites across Calgary. • Marlborough (4220 Marlborough Drive N.E.) received resurfacing for three tennis courts. • Erin Woods (11 Erin Crescent S.E.) received a complete playground replacement.

*Parks Foundation Calgary contributed funding for 17 of the 23 playgrounds through its Building Playground and Communities Grant Program.

45


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 11

46

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 11 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

A

(Parks) River Park/Sandy Beach/ Britannia Slopes Regional Park (Legacy)

l

B

(Rec) Established Area Arena Upgrade

l

C

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle D

E

(Rec) Golf Course Buildings Lifecycle (Rec) Golf Course Landscape Lifecycle (CP) Heritage Park Heritage Buildings Lifecycle (CP) Heritage Park Infrastructure Lifecycle

l

l

F

(Parks) Glenmore Reservoir Park Design Development Plan (Legacy)

l

G

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

H

(Rec) Glenmore Athletic Park Redevelopment

l

I

(CP) Heritage Park Replica of Nellie McClung House

l

J

(Parks) Windsor Park New Open Space Development

l

K

(Parks) Spray Parks Upgrades and Retrofits

l

L

(CP) Heritage Park Rolling Stock Lifecycle

l

M

(Rec) Golf Course Upgrades

l

N

(Rec) Lakeview Golf Course Non-Potable Water Supply

l

O

(Parks) Community Park Improvements Linked with Other City BU Initiatives

l

P

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

Q

(Parks) North/South Glenmore Park Design and Development Plan

l

R

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements S

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

*Parks Foundation Calgary contributed funding for 17 of the 23 playgrounds through its Building Playground and Communities Grant Program.

l

Playground and tennis court upgrades Maintaining safe and wholesome places for children to play and families to socialize supports The City of Calgary’s goal of complete communities. Twentythree playgrounds* were completely replaced and four playgrounds received a new fall surface. Additionally, 28 tennis courts were upgraded at 10 different sites across Calgary. • North Glenmore Park (7305 Crowchild Trail S.W.) court received resurfacing. • Kelvin Grove (1030 Kildonan Crescent S.W.) received a complete playground replacement. • Oakridge (235 Oakside Close S.W.) received a complete playground replacement. • Elboya (521 46 Avenue S.W.) received a complete playground replacement.

47


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 12

48

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 12 priority projects for future investments Map Legend

Project Name

Priority Status

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle A

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle B

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

C

(Fire) Shepard Industrial Emergency Response Station

l

D

(Parks) Seton Regional Park Design Development Plan – Phase 1 (Legacy)

l

E

(Parks) Green Waste Recycling Infrastructure

l

F

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

G

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: East Regional Context Study – Cell F

l

H

(Fire) Shepard Residential Emergency Response Station

l

I

(Fire) Southeast Emergency Response Station

l

J

(Fire) Far Southeast Emergency Response Station

l

K

(Parks) Seton Regional Park Implementation – Phase 2

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements M

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Douglas Glen Emergency Response Station Douglas Glen Emergency Response Station will serve 57,000 Calgarians in the residential communities of Douglas Glen and Douglasdale, as well as Shepard and East Shepard industrial areas.

49


Cpriip/eriip on the map – Ward 13

50

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 13 priority projects for future investments Map Legend A

Project Name (Rec) Established Area Pool Upgrades

Priority Status l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle B

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle C D

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l l

E

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: SW Community Plan

l

F

(Fire) Providence Emergency Response Station

l

G

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements H

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Evergreen Emergency Response Station Evergreen Emergency Response Station will serve the growing communities of Bridlewood, Evergreen, Millrise, Shawnee Slopes, Shawnessy and Somerset, as well as the developing communities west of Bridlewood and Evergreen.

51


CPRIIP/ERIIP on the map – Ward 14

52

l

High priority

l

Medium priority

l

Emerging priority


Ward 14 priority projects for future investments Map Legend A

Project Name (Rec) Established Area Arena Upgrades

Priority Status l

(Fire) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle B

(Fire) Equipment Lifecycle

l

(Fire) Personal Protective Equipment Lifecycle C

(Rec) Golf Course Buildings Lifecycle (Rec) Golf Course Landscape Lifecycle

l

D

(ABS) Radio & Mobile Systems Lifecycle

l

E

(Fire) CFD Heavy Fleet Lifecycle

l

F

(Fire) East Macleod Emergency Response Station

l

G

(Rec) Willow Park Golf Course Irrigation Water Supply Line

l

H

(Parks) Priddis Slough Regional Park (Legacy)

l

I

(ABS) Equipment Lifecycle

l

J

(Rec) Golf Course Upgrades

l

K

(CP) Fish Creek Library Renovation

l

L

(Fire) Facility Lifecycle (Fire) Urban Search & Rescue Equipment

l

M

(Rec) Small Regional Recreation Facility: West Macleod ASP

l

N

(Fire) West Macleod Emergency Response Station

l

O

(Parks) Roadway Landscaping Upgrades

l

(Fire) Miscellaneous Hardware/Software Enhancements P

(Fire) CFD Light Fleet Lifecycle (Fire) Traffic Signal Priority GPS System Upgrade

l

ShowCaSInG SuCCeSS

Poplar Lifecycle and Species Diversity Project Maintaining and sustaining the health of Calgary’s urban forest is a key environmental priority for The City. That’s why The City of Calgary planted 366 trees across the city as part of its Poplar Lifecycle and Species Diversity Project. Made possible by the Community Investment Fund, this $450,000 project included an assessment of The City’s aging poplar trees to determine which trees were in need of replacement due to poor condition and health. The 166 trees identified as reaching the end of their lifecycle were replaced with new trees at a 2:1 ratio. For every one tree removed, two were planted.

53


2012-0855

Investing in Community Priorities  

Infrastructure Investment Plans for Culture, Parks, Recreation and Emergency Response 2013 - 2022

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