Issuu on Google+

NUTRITION BACK TO BASICS

PLANNING FOR IRONMAN 70.3

MEET

ALI NAJEM DUAL GOLD MEDALLIST


HAMILTON ISLAND

TRAINING WEEK 4-12 MAY

JOIN US FOR AN AWESOME WEEK OF TRAINING IN PARADISE! TRAINING 2X PER DAY, THE WEEK INCLUDES:

• NUTRITION & GOAL SETTING SEMINARS • WHITEHAVEN BEACH & DENT ISLAND RUN SESSIONS • GYM & SPEED SESSIONS • RECOVERY SESSIONS • PLUS LOADS OF FREE TIME TO ENJOY THE ISLAND.

IF YOU FEEL LIKE RACING, YOU’RE IN LUCK! CHOOSE FROM 2 HAMILTON ISLAND EVENTS DURING THE TRAINING WEEK:

• 5 MAY 2013: HILLY HALF MARATHON (7KM TEAMS OR FULL RACE) • 12 MAY 2013: MOTHER’S DAY CLASSIC (7KM)


OPEN TO ALL AGES & ABILITIES, NO

MATTER WHAT YOUR SPORTING DISCIPLINE, BE IT RUNNING, TRIATHLON, FOOTY OR WEEKEND WARRIOR!

$320PP INCLUDES WHITEHAVEN BEACH & DENT ISLAND BOAT TRANSFERS (WITH LUNCH), HIGH PERFORMANCE CENTRE ENTRY FEES. EXCLUDES AIRFARES & ACCOMMODATION. CONTACT US TO FIND OUT ABOUT ACCOMMODATION DEALS.

BOOK YOUR SPOT TODAY » »

INFO@JOCKATHLETIC.COM 0415 998 636


JOCK ATHLETIC PAYS TRIBUTE TO RICKY PONTING & THE TASSIE TIGERS, SHEFFIELD SHIELD CHAMPIONS! RICKY PONTING YOU’VE DONE IT AGAIN. AFTER RETIRING FROM INTERNATIONAL CRICKET LATE LAST YEAR RICKY FOUGHT ON IN DOMESTIC CRICKET TO FINALLY WIN A SHEFFIELD SHIELD TITLE WITH HIS BELOVED TASMANIA, 20 YEARS AFTER PLAYING IN HIS FIRST SHIED FINAL. HE TOLD ME BEFORE THE MATCH THAT HE PLAYED ON TO SPECIFICALLY HAVE A GO AT WINNING THIS TITLE. HE CONTINUES TO INSPIRE AND GIVE 100% TO EVERYTHING HE PUTS HIS HAND TO. IT’S WELL KNOWN THAT HE IS ONE OF OUR FAVOURITES AT JOCK ATHLETIC AND AT 38 YEARS OF AGE STILL A GREAT EXAMPLE TO ALL OUR ATHLETES WHEN HE TRAINS WITH US.

WE’RE VERY PROUD OF WHAT HE HAS ACHIEVED BY WINNING THE SHIELD, SO THIS MONTH’S TRIBUTE IS FOR RICKY AND THE TASSIE TIGERS FOR WINNING A NAIL BITING SHEFFIELD SHIELD COMPETITION LAST MONTH.

Getty Images


EDITOR’S LETTER

The start of the mens 2km Beach Run at the recent NSW Surf Life Saving State Championships at Umina Beach, Central Coast.


OUR COVER SHOT THIS MONTH IS OF ONE OF JOCK ATHLETIC’S OWN, YOUNG GUN RUNNER ALI NAJEM. ALI HAS DONE THE DOUBLE -WINNING BOTH THE NSW SURF LIFE SAVING U19 AND OPEN STATE 2KM BEACH RUN TITLES LAST MONTH. IN A CRACKING RACE IN THE U19’S ALI LED FROM START TO FINISH, WINNING THE RACE BY THE BAREST OF MARGINS WITH A SPRINT TO THE LINE AND THEN COLLAPSED NEEDING MEDICAL ATTENTION AND OXYGEN FROM THE PARAMEDICS. NAJEM THEN WENT ON TO RACE AND WIN THE OPEN AGE TITLE IN ANOTHER BLISTERING RACE 30 MINUTES AFTER WINNING THE U19. IT WAS AN INSPIRATIONAL EFFORT, AND AFTER SEEING HOW SPENT ALI WAS AFTER THE U19’S RACE I WAS WONDERING HOW HE’D GET UP TO RACE THE OPENS, LET ALONE WIN IT. BUT THAT’S ALI, HE KEEPS SURPRISING US ALL, HIS COMMITMENT TO TRAINING AND COMPETITION IS VERY PROFESSIONAL AND HE GOT EXACTLY WHAT HE DESERVED. IT’S RARE THAT THE BIG EVENTS GO YOUR WAY SO PERFECTLY AND HE DID A GREAT JOB. HE’S A GREAT KID WITH A BIG FUTURE AND THE WHOLE WANDA CLUB CAME DOWN TO SUPPORT HIM. IT WAS ONE OF THOSE SPECIAL MOMENTS IN SPORT! ANOTHER ONE OF OUR YOUNG IRONMEN, JAY FURNISS, WON THE U19 IRONMAN RACE AND IS A REAL STAR OF THE FUTURE. THE STATE TITLES IS A WARM UP FOR ONE OF MY FAVOURITE EVENTS ON THE CALENDAR THAT ARRIVES THIS MONTH, THE AUSTRALIAN SURF LIFE SAVING TITLES AT NORTH KIRRA BEACH. I CAN’T WAIT TO SEE THESE BOYS IN ACTION AGAIN AT THE ‘AUSSIES’ AND I KNOW THEY CAN DO SOME REAL DAMAGE AT ‘AUSSIES’.


10 PLANNING FOR A HALF 32 COOL RUNNINGS IRONMAN 70.3 Dan Atkins

20 RUNNING MYTHS Peter Colagiuri

26 BACK TO BASICS

Empirica Research

36 TRACK & FIELD:

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PREVIEW Peter Hadfield

42 GETTING MY WADDLE ON Eloise Wellings

46 ATHLETE NEWS Jock Athletic

Rebecca Gawthorne

EZINE BRAINS TRUST PUBLISHER Jock Athletic EDITORS Jock Campbell / Melissa Campbell ART DIRECTOR/DESIGN Kiss the Sky ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION Melissa Campbell 8

jockathletic.com

CONTRIBUTORS Dan Atkins, Jock Campbell, Peter Colagiuri, Rebecca Gawthorne, Peter Hadfield, Daniel Lane, Michael Martin, Siobhan McCarthy, Craig Stevens, Paul Watson, Eloise Wellings


EDITORIAL OFFICE Jock Athletic | PO Box 1186 Cronulla 2230 0415 998 636 | EMAIL ezine@jockathletic.com www.jockathletic.com

SUBSCRIBE NOW »

APRIL 2013

9


Planning

Half Ir

All images courtesy of Delly Carr www.dellycarr.com.au


g FOR A

DAN ATKINS

70.3

ronman


IT SEEMS NOWADAYS EVERY TRIATHLETE THAT STRAPS ON THE RUNNING SHOES WANTS TO DO AT LEAST ONE 70.3 (HALF IRONMAN) A YEAR (= 70.3MILES). AND NOW THAT QUEENSLAND HAVE A NEW 70.3 IN SEPTEMBER AT MOOLOOLABA, WHICH SUITS A GREAT WINTER BLOCK OF TRAINING, THERE SEEMS TO BE EVEN MORE INTEREST IN RACING OVER THIS DISTANCE.

A lot of athletes I talk to just casually throw into the conversation “yeah I’m just going to do a Half”, like it is as easy as rolling around a sprint distance triathlon.

PLEASE, ALLOW ME BE BLUNT.

A half ironman is 1.9km of swimming in open water, 90km of cycling, usually on dead roads, followed by a half marathon over the lovely distance of 21.1km.

So if you think carefully about it, this is double the distance of an Olympic distance triathlon. Seem a little more daunting now? The best athletes in Australia will do a 70.3 (this equates to 113km of racing) in approximately 3hr 50minutes to 4hrs, at race pace, which is almost at Olympic distance pace. The average 2hr 30min Olympic distance athlete will do a 70.3 in about 5hr 30mins based on the same fitness. So if you’re about to dive into a training program to get ready to race a 70.3 think carefully about how you structure you’re training. I would structure a 6-month plan in place to get through 4 x 6 week blocks of training with a week recovery post every block.

PLAN TO RACE THE RACE Most people can train for an Olympic distance triathlon (1.5km swim, 40km bike, 10km run) on about 9 hours of training a week. So if you’re doubling your race distance should you be doubling your hours spent training? Well, the short answer is yes that would be good, but if time isn’t on your side, I believe that you could do a 70.3 in a time frame of about 12hrs a week, so be prepared to add some more time to your training. I can coach most any athlete to about 16km into the run of a 70.3. The rest of the race is up to you and your heart. But for the most part you need to set up your race in training.


USE THE WEEKEND TO GET THE KM’S UP If you work full time, have a family and all the normal commitments that go with it, you need the early mornings on the weekend to get the needed volume up.

SATURDAY I WOULD BUILD YOUR LONG RUN UP OVER A 6 WEEK PERIOD THEN HAVE A RECOVERY WEEK OR TEST WEEK THEN LOAD AGAIN.

So for example if your longest run is about 12km (60-70mins) you would add 5mins a week over a 6 week block, which by the 6th week would give you a run total of 85mins, at an avg of 5min per km, building your long run over this period is to now approximately 18km. A really good start. As I said, for the better part us as coaches can safely say we will get you 2/3 of the way through the run then it’s up to the commitment of pain!!! With the bike pretty much the same theory. I always program my athletes to ride long on Sunday; can be Saturday if needed but Sunday for me has always just been the day to go long!

APRIL 2013

13


Triathlete Michael Fox. finisherpix.com

BU

LIKE

CON

SUP

STEA

APP

14

jockathletic.com


If the lead up to your Olympic distance triathlon is 80km (3hrs) try to also get another 15mins a week over the 6 week block. That would be a total of 4hr 15min of riding at an avg of 27km/hr would be approx 115km. So now you’re starting to get in the ball game. Once you have had a recovery week you then load again but this time load with some intensity, so add in some race pace specifics. When riding 100-120km feels comfortable add in some time trial efforts of around 15-20km twice through on the bike, but remember only at your 70.3 bike avg pace.

Let your body adapt to the pace you’d like to race at. Too often I see triathlete’s train at a ridiculous pace and then need to have 3 days off. Work hard at being consistent. Every session counts if you are time limited and every km should have a purpose. Whether it be an easy week or a peak week.

Same again with the run, once you have hit the 80min mark comfortably add in some variety and do some variable speed or fartlek running, shorter bursts of intensity over an 8min period, 4 times, will add that extra strength needed when the body is ready to shut down at the 16km mark.

WHAT ABOUT THE SWIM? Structuring the swim is very simple; find a coach and a squad! Swimming is the most technical of the 3 disciplines so get in squad where the coach can pick your technique apart, it is much easier and makes it a lot more fun training with like minded people. There are only a handful of triathlete’s in this world that can follow the black line solo and get somewhere with it. So get and find a pool with a good adult fitness squad and plan for 2 – 3 swim per week. Talk to the coach tells him your goals and let him/ her do the hard work for you, structuring your program. There are so many age group/beginner squads out there you would be silly to train on your own with this discipline.

UILD IT UP

E BUILDING A HOUSE, WE START BY LAYING THE CONCRETE BASE. WE THEN

NSTRUCT THE STRUCTURE AROUND THIS BASE. BUILD IT STRONG AND IT WILL

PPORT ANY SORT OF WEATHER. SAME WITH YOUR BODY. START SLOW AND

ADY AND MAKE SURE YOU LET YOUR BODY BREATHE AND RECOVER, THEN

PLY ANOTHER LEVEL IN THE STRUCTURE.

APRIL 2013

15


KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER: ONE Get a massage every 10-14 days, this is a luxury and your body will thank you long term for it. Forgo a session instead of trying to factor it into your weekly routine, give yourself something to look forward to.

TWO If you get a time trial bike make sure it is comfortable. No use having a $10,000 bike with a $20 set up. Get it set up by an expert who knows your background.

THREE Get new running shoes every 12-15 weeks so factor this into your race budget.

FOUR Train on the nutrition that will be on course, don’t play around with what is the cheapest then find your body isn’t used to the race sponsors products.

FIVE Test yourself every month- if you train on your own you need to test where your fitness is at, do it in a fun run, half marathon, open water swim etc.

SIX When you decide to commit to a race do it in a location the whole family will want to go to, so make a family holiday post race out of it as a thank you to your family’s commitment!

16

jockathletic.com

TALK TO ME I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM ANY READERS WITH THEIR QUESTIONS AND WRITE AN ENTIRE ARTICLE ON QUESTIONS. YOU, THE READER, ARE WHY WE WRITE THESE ARTICLES SO HEARING WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WOULD BE FANTASTIC TO ANSWER!

DAN ATKINS IS THE DIRECTOR OF D.A.T. RACING IN BRISBANE AND HAS SOME 23 YEARS EXPERIENCE AS A TRIATHLON COACH AND ATHLETE. CONTACT DAN DIRECTLY: DANATKINS08@GMAIL.COM

OR CHECK OUT HIS WEBSITE DANATKINSTRAINING.COM.AU


see better run faster supernova pro

adidas.com/eyewear

APRIL 2013

17


18

jockathletic.com


RUNNING

Myths RUNNERS GET THEIR RUNNING KNOWLEDGE FROM LOTS OF DIFFERENT SOURCES - THERE’S SOCIAL MEDIA, NEWS ARTICLES, RUNNING MAGAZINES AND EVEN RUNNING MATES. ALL THESE BITS OF INFO ADD TO YOUR COLLECTIVE AWARENESS OF ALL THINGS RUNNING. BUT WHAT IF SOME OF THIS INFO WASN’T QUITE RIGHT? WHAT IF YOUR “GOLDEN RULES” OF RUNNING WERE NOTHING MORE THAN URBAN LEGEND? CAN YOU PICK THE MYTHS FROM THE PROVEN?

PETER COLAGIURI

SETS US STRAIGHT ON SOME OF THE MOST COMMON RUNNING MYTHS.

20

jockathletic.com


APRIL 2013

21


BAREFOOT RUNNING: FAD OR CURE? Barefoot running has been the subject of many studies and countless rumours in recent years, thanks to books like “Born To Run”. And although most “barefoot” runners aren’t actually barefoot (often choosing Vibram Five Fingers for protection from sharps, etc), the concept of running naturally without heavy running shoes seems appealing. There are some common motivating factors leading runners to switch to barefoot running. Some are supported by research, others are contradicted by research but the vast majority are still in the “undecided” category.

1.

2.

22

BAREFOOT RUNNING WILL STOP YOU FROM HEEL STRIKING. Heel striking is not right or wrong, it all depends on other factors such as speed, so it doesn’t necessarily need to be prevented. Studies have also shown that many barefoot runners still heel strike, although the percentage is slightly less than heel striking in running shoes. BAREFOOT RUNNING PREVENTS INJURIES. Despite several recent studies, the jury is still out on this one. Studies have arrived at different results so there doesn’t seem to be a consensus at the moment. One consistency found

jockathletic.com

in almost all studies is that the mix of injuries seems to be different between barefoot and traditional running shoes. For example, knee injuries seem more prevalent with running shoes but Achilles injuries are more prevalent in barefoot runners. WILL STRENGTHEN 3. BAREFOOT YOUR FEET. Yes and no. It will strengthen the muscles in your feet that are more active with barefoot running but the same effect occurs in running shoes, just in different muscles. Essentially your feet will get stronger for the job that they have to do, regardless of shoes or not.

RUNNING LEADS TO KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS We have long been informed of the “inevitable” knee osteoarthritis that our running will cause, as it loads the knee with thousands of impacts on every run.

WELL, SURPRISE SURPRISE, IT TURNS OUT RUNNING IS ACTUALLY QUITE GOOD FOR YOUR KNEES.


Studies have shown that runners have less osteoarthritis compared to non-runners. The beneficial effects seem to be due to the healthy joint loading that occurs during running and that runners are generally lighter than sedentary individuals. The effect isn’t as pronounced in heavier runners or runners with extreme loading (longer distances or high impact loading).

YOU CAN RUN BETTER WITH MUSIC Funnily enough, it’s true. The type of music that seems to have the best effect is Rap/Hip hop.

THE RIGHT KIND OF MUSIC CAN BOOST PERFORMANCE BY REDUCING YOUR PERCEIVED EXERTION (IT MAKES IT FEEL EASIER) AND IMPROVING YOUR ENDURANCE. The effect is even more pronounced if the beat of your music is matched to your cadence. This is where apps such as Cruise Control can help by selecting your music based on your current pace, even altering the beat slightly to match your cadence perfectly.

APRIL 2013

23


“Clams” the gluteal exercise Gluteal muscles (aka. bum muscles) are necessary for stability around the hip. They consist of three muscles which move the hip backwards and outwards as well as generating hip rotation. Deficits in gluteal function have been linked to numerous injuries, including hip, knee and foot problems. There are countless exercises purporting to target the gluteal muscles; a quick YouTube search for “Best glute exercise” reveals 82,500 potential candidates. But in reality, a good gluteal exercise needs to be designed specific to your needs. The exercise should mimic normal function in a normal range; a simple squat or lunge is a great starting point. In short, if it looks wacky, it’s probably going to be of little use. And then there are “clams” (see image above). These exercises are said to target gluteus medius, a key muscle in maintaining

hip stability. Laying on your side, you rotate your upper leg outwards. But here’s the catch: the target muscle actually rotates the leg inwards, not outwards, and it doesn’t function as a stabiliser away from a neutral position.

ESSENTIALLY “CLAMS” ARE AN EXERCISE BUT NOT FOR GLUTEUS MEDIUS AND NOT FOR RUNNERS.

PETER COLAGIURI IS A SPORTS PHYSIOTHERAPIST, SPECIALISING IN RUNNING INJURIES. HE PRACTICES IN MIRANDA AND MANLY IN ADDITION TO LECTURING AND RESEARCHING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SYDNEYRUNNING.COM.AU, OR BOOK AN APPOINTMENT VIA (02) 9977 1580 MANLY@BIOATHLETIC.COM.AU

24

jockathletic.com


Official partner of:


REBECCA GAWTHORNE 26

jockathletic.com


Back to

Basics SPORTS NUTRITION FUNDAMENTALS - ENERGY.

MOST ATHLETES ARE AWARE THAT WHAT THEY EAT IMPACTS ON THEIR TRAINING AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE. YET PROPER NUTRITION IS OFTEN FORGOTTEN, LEFT OUT, SWEPT UNDER THE RUG OR IS THE VERY LAST COMPONENT INCORPORATED INTO TRAINING PROGRAMS. SO IF THE FOODS YOU EAT CAN MAKE SUCH A DRAMATIC IMPACT ON YOUR PERFORMANCE, WOULDN’T YOU WANT TO GET IT RIGHT?!

APRIL 2013

27


IF OPTIMAL FOOD INTAKE (QUALITY, QUANTITY & TIMING) IS TAILORED TO YOU AS AN INDIVIDUAL ATHLETE, IT WILL MAXIMIZE YOUR ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE. IT WILL ALLOW YOU TO PUT IN MAX EFFORT & GAIN MAX EFFORT FROM TRAINING, COMPETE AT YOUR BEST AND IMPROVE PHYSICAL & MENTAL PERFORMANCE. IT CAN INCREASE YOUR SPEED, AGILITY, CONCENTRATION AND POWER, PLUS PREVENT FATIGUE AND MUSCLE DAMAGE.

ENERGY & SPORTS NUTRITION When Sports Dietitians assess design eating plans for individual athletes, there are keys goals that need to be achieved: 1. Meet the energy demands of training & competition for optimal physical & mental performance 2. Ensure adequate intake of macronutrients (protein, carbs, fats) & micronutrients 3. Maintain body mass & composition for optimal health & performance 4. Optimize hydration status 5. Fast recovery & injury prevention 6. Enhance performance with dietary supplements without the risk of adverse outcomes The first three of these goals are all interrelated - they all focus on energy demand.

28

jockathletic.com

ENERGY DEMANDS & MACRONUTRIENTS Macronutrients provide your body with energy. The three macronutrients are: • Carbohydrates • Protein • Fats As an athlete, professional or amateur, your body needs the right mix of these to ensure you are feeling energetic and perform at your best. Whenever you eat or drink food, ENERGY is coming “IN” to your body (from carbs, protein, fats). Whenever you exercise, ENERGY is going “OUT” of your body.


THE SCIENCE BEHIND CARBOHYDRATES Despite the low-carb, no-carb diet trends currently doing the rounds, carbohydrates are critical for athletes. In fact, carbs should make up the bulk of your energy intake.

CARBOHYDRATES ARE A CRITICAL FUEL SOURCE FOR THE MUSCLE AND CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. BASICALLY THEY PROVIDE YOUR MUSCLES AND BRAIN WITH ENERGY. THEY ARE ARGUABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT SOURCE OF ENERGY FOR ATHLETES.

Once eaten, carbohydrates break down into smaller units of sugar – glucose, fructose and galactose. These sugars are absorbed into your blood stream and used for energy. The sugars that are not used straight away, are stored in the muscles and liver as glycogen for use as energy later on. Carbohydrates need to be eaten before training, and in some cases, even during training/competition. This will maintain blood glucose levels during prolonged moderatehigh intensity events and replenish muscle glycogen stores. Carbohydrates also need to be consumed after training to replenish glycogen stores. If you don’t replenish these stores, you may run out of fuel in your next training session; often referred to as ‘hitting the wall’.

APRIL 2013

29


Adequate carbs will not only fuel your muscles, but also prevent muscle breakdown. If your body doesn’t have enough energy from carbs, it will break down your muscles to make glucose for energy - definitely something we all want to avoid!

The goal for athletes and those who exercise is to ensure healthy amounts of carbohydrates spread around their training and competition. The following table act as a timing guide for your carbohydrate intake.

CARBOHYDRATES IN FOOD

REBECCA GAWTHORNE IS AN ACCREDITED PRACTISING DIETICIAN AND NUTRITIONIST. FOR MORE INFORMATION YOU CAN CONTACT REBECCA BY PHONE OR EMAIL:

What many people fail to realise is that carbohydrates are not just found in bread, potato and pasta. There are lots of different foods that contain carbohydrates - milk, yoghurt, cereals, beans, lentils, corn, fruit, fruit juice, rice, wheat, oats, quinoa, cous cous, spaghetti, muesli bars, muffins, biscuits, smoothies…the list goes on!

REBECCA.GAWTHORNE@GMAIL.COM M: 0425 240 350

Rebecca Gawthorne - Dietitian & Nutritionist

BN utrDiet (Hons I), APD, AN

“Feel, Look & Live Healthier” As an Accredited Practising Dietitian, Rebecca uses the latest scientific evidence to develop personalised dietary plans to help you reach your goals. Plans are tailored specifically to you, the individual, whatever your lifestyle. Rebecca will provide you with expert nutrition and dietary advice on easy ways to eat healthier and achieve your health goals faster. Should I see a Dietitian? If you need help with, or experience any of the following, you will benefit from seeing a Dietitian: ·

Slow or plateaued results from your exercise

Clinical conditions including:

·

Lethargy, tiredness, weak immune system

·

Sport nutrition training and competition diet

·

Diabetes

·

Help with weight loss

·

High blood pressure

· ·

Mood swings, food or sugar cravings Safe muscle building

·

High cholesterol

·

Heart conditions

·

Digestion & gut problems

·

Food allergies & intolerances

Health Fund & Medicare Rebates available.

30

jockathletic.com


2-4 Hours Before Exercise

30-60 minutes Before Exercise

Porridge + reduced fat milk + fruit juice

Fruit

Breakfast cereal + reduced fat milk + fruit

Fruit juice

Toasted muffins or crumpets + honey Baked beans on toast Low fat creamed rice + tinned fruit Pasta topped with low fat tomato based sauce Roll or sandwich with banana Toast with honey/jam/vegemite Fruit salad + low fat yoghurt or low fat dairy dessert Smoothie with reduced fat milk + low fat yoghurt + fruit

Sports drink Slice white toast bread/toast 250ml fruit smoothie Glass of milk

DURING Exercise

(Required if training/competition Is 60-90mins) Sports drink, e.g. Gatorade.

Soy smoothies with soy drink + blended fruit

30-60 minutes after Exercise

Sustagen / Up & Go

Chicken/tuna/turkey sandwich or wrap Fruit smoothie Peanut butter + honey on toast Fruit salad + yoghurt Breakfast cereal + reduced fat milk Cheese on toast/crackers Protein shake made on milk

APRIL 2013

31


Cool

Runnings EMPIRICA RESEARCH

32

jockathletic.com


WITH SUMMER WELL AND TRULY BEHIND US, THE DAYS ARE GRADUALLY BECOMING BOTH COOLER AND SHORTER. NOT SURPRISINGLY, AS THE TEMPERATURE DROPS IN THE LEAD UP TO WINTER, OFTEN SO TOO DOES THE ALLURE OF EXERCISE, WITH MANY OPTING FOR THE SNUGGIE OVER SIT-UPS AND SQUATS.

APRIL 2013

33


WHILE NO AUSTRALIAN DATA IS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE, RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY GALLUP IN THE US SUGGESTS THAT WE DO ACTUALLY EXERCISE LESS DURING THE WINTER MONTHS. The Gallup poll found that the percentage of adults who reported exercising frequently (three or more days per week for at least 30 minutes) was at a high during the peak of summer (54.5%), but dropped by 10 percentage points as winter rolled around. Although braving the chill to stay in shape may not appeal to many, research indicates that there are actually many benefits from exercising outdoors during the cooler months. Staying active over winter helps boost your immune system and as such is a great defense against colds and the seasonal flu. RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY THE MAYO FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION AND RESEARCH FOUND THAT THOSE WHO TRAINED IN THE COLD WEATHER REDUCED THEIR RISK OF MAN-FLU BY 20-30%. SIMILARLY, ACCORDING TO RESEARCHERS FROM IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, SIMPLY RUNNING 45 MINUTES PER DAY INCREASES THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE FLU SHOT.

Exercising in cool climates also trains your body to use oxygen more efficiently, which ultimately boosts your performance. Researchers from Northern Arizona University have found that after regular cold training sessions, you can increase your running speed by up to 29%. Further, exposure to cold climates increases your basal metabolic rate, meaning that not only do you run faster in the cold – you burn more calories too. In addition to these physical benefits, there are also numerous psychological benefits of cold weather workouts. Research has long shown that exercise is mood boosting, with increased endorphin production in the cold


leading to a happier state of mind. In addition, research conducted at Duke University has found that cardio workouts are four times more effective in reducing symptoms of depression than are anti-depressants. Exercise has also been found to reduce the likelihood of developing Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a form of depression that only lasts during the winter months. Not only does it give you an endorphin high, doing exercise outside provides exposure to natural light, which helps to fight off SAD.

Make the effort to brave the outdoors – it will do both your body and your mind a whole lot of good!

EMPIRICA RESEARCH IS A SOCIAL AND CONSUMER RESEARCH FIRM BASED IN MELBOURNE AND MIAMI. FOR MORE INFO CHECK OUT EMPIRICARESEARCH.COM.AU

OR EMAIL CASSIE ON CASSIE@EMPIRICARESEARCH.COM.AU

So the next cold morning you consider hitting the snooze button and sleeping through the Jock Athletic sandhills session, think twice.

APRIL 2013

35


36

jockathletic.com


World Champs:

A Preview

PETER HADFIELD OAM

APRIL 2013

37


THE HEAT IS ON FOR OUR AUSSIE TRACK & FIELD ATHLETES WITH THE DOMESTIC SEASON HAVING KICKED OFF IN FEBRUARY. ‘CRUNCH TIME’ FOR OUR ATHLETES WILL BE AT THE AUSTRALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS IN APRIL, WHERE THEY NEED TO PULL OUT SOME QUALIFYING MARKS IF THEY ARE TO SECURE A BERTH FOR THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN MOSCOW IN AUGUST. SALLY PEARSON’S INABILITY TO RACE IN THE AUSTRALIAN DOMESTIC SEASON DUE TO A 6CM TEAR IN HER HAMSTRING HAS CREATED A DISAPPOINTMENT FOR AUSTRALIAN TRACK FANS BUT HAS ALSO INTERRUPTED HER PREPARATION FOR THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN MOSCOW IN AUGUST. Sally currently reigns supreme in women’s hurdling, with titles at the Olympics, World Championships, Commonwealth Games and the World Indoor Championships. 38

jockathletic.com

Her preparation over the past few years has been a recipe for world success where she has focused on her flat sprinting in the Australian summer, limiting her racing to 100m & 200m and then competing in a few hurdles events in Europe before taking on the major championship of the year. This program has worked perfectly for her and has also helped to manage a chronic and ongoing back problem which affected her badly at the World Champs in Berlin in 2009. Since finishing 5th in Berlin she has been the dominant force in women’s hurdling and much of that success can be attributed to the astute preparation she has maintained. Sally’s exploits at the Australian Track Series meets have been behind the microphone while she has been rehabilitating. The redeeming element of the disruption is that the hamstring injury has happened now which still gives her plenty of time to recover, get back to maximum sprinting speed and then add hurdling to the racing mix to be able to successfully defend her World crown in Moscow. There was talk of an assault on Yordanka Donkava’s World Record set 25 years ago, but I think Sally knows that she will be better served focusing on winning the World Championship race and if a world record comes this season, which will require a 7/100ths of a second PB, then that will be a bonus. A focus on running faster than the 12.21 World Record would be a distraction.


Image: london2012.olympics.com.au

Our male star of the track, Mitchell Watt, silver medallist in the Men’s Long Jump in London, has also had a disrupted start to his Australian season. He jumped 7.54m off a half run-up of ten strides in the Hobart meet but has yet to come to grips with a serious competition, withdrawing from the Sydney Track Classic with calf cramps. Pearson and Watt are automatically selected for the Moscow World Championships but for the majority of the other Australian athletes in contention for selection, their crunch time for a berth to Moscow will come at the Australian Championships on 11-14 April in Sydney. With just a few weeks to go there will be a number of very nervous athletes

desperate to get some selection qualifying marks out in a hurry. Former World Women’s Discus Champion Dani Samuels (pictured above) is one who has been in wonderful form in Australia. Samuels bettered the ‘A’ selection standard for Moscow in five of her six throws at the Sydney Track Classic with a best of 64.46m which puts her in the shape which won her the World Championship Gold Medal in Berlin in 2009. Western Australian Javelin thrower Kim Mickle has also already attained a qualifying mark in Sydney of 62.53m and she too could be a finalist in Moscow.

APRIL 2013

39


The summer track series has been a personal “best-a-thon” for 22 year old Melissa Breen who has bettered the ‘A’ selection mark in the 100m with 11.25 and has also run a PB in the 200m at 23.12. Breen was a contentious selection for London after not achieving the required qualifying mark but was given final selection based on her potential. Also in excellent form in Sydney was 1500m Australian Recordholder Ryan Gregson who ran his best ever performance on home soil with a 3.35.25 second place behind New Zealand’s Olympic medallist Nick Willis. One athlete who does need to perform in the near future to gain selection is former Olympic and World Champion Pole Vaulter Steve Hooker. Hooker has had a case of the ‘yips’ since winning the Commonwealth Games Gold Medal in Delhi in 2010. His warm ups and competitions this summer resemble 40m sprint intervals with a pole – there are very few take-offs! He has managed a couple of nervous bar clearances, the best being a heights of 5.40m across the summer series this year, but this is way below his PB of 6.06m and still 30cm below the required selection mark for Moscow.

Hooker is certainly not the bulletproof competitor who dominated the world from 2007 to 2010. He, like many other athletes, will need to improve markedly over the next month to ensure a spot on the Moscow team. 40

jockathletic.com

With the exception of a host of male and female walkers and marathon runners, there are only four track & field athletes who have achieved an ‘A’ qualifying mark to date – Pearson, Breen, Mickle and Samuels!

I NORMALLY DON’T FEATURE JUNIOR ATHLETES IN MY ARTICLES BUT I FELT THAT I MUST RECOGNISE THE FEATS OF YOUNG QUEENSLANDER MATHEW DENNY. Mathew was named the Champion of Champions at the Australian Junior Athletics Championships held in Perth where he won six individual Gold Medals and set four PBs in the process. His success began when he won the boy’s under 18 Discus with a 66.40m throw on Day 1, before victory in the boy’s under 18 Hammer (74.29m), boy’s under 20 Discus (58.67m, PB) and the boy’s under 18 Shot Put (19.39m, PB). On Day 2 he was triumphant in the boy’s under 20 Hammer (73.29m, PB) and the boy’s under 20 Shot Put (16.92m, PB). Hopefully, I will have the opportunity to commentate on Mathew’s exploits at a major senior championship in the near future.


PETER HADFIELD OAM IS AN OLYMPIC DECATHLETE WHO REPRESENTED AUSTRALIA IN TWO OLYMPIC GAMES AND TWO COMMONWEALTH GAMES, WINNING A COMMONWEALTH GAMES SILVER MEDAL BEHIND OLYMPIC CHAMPION AND WORLD RECORD HOLDER DALEY THOMPSON. AS WELL AS WORKING AS A TV AND RADIO COMMENTATOR AND MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER, PETER PROVIDES TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR SPORTING TEAMS AND INDIVIDUALS.

Life is local Proudly supporting and informing the local community since 1960

www.theleader.com.au

APRIL 2013

41


Getting My

Waddle O I’VE STARTED TO WADDLE. NOT WHILST RUNNING, THAT WOULD BE WEIRD. BUT JUST GETTING ABOUT THE PLACE, WALKING AROUND, ESPECIALLY IF I’VE JUST EATEN A BIG MEAL. I KNEW IT WAS INEVITABLE AND MORE EXPERIENCED FRIEND’S SAY THAT I’M LUCKY THAT I’M ONLY JUST NOTICING MY PENGUIN-LIKE WALKING STYLE AT 32 WEEKS.

ELOISE WELLINGS

42

jockathletic.com


WOMEN IN SPORT & EXERCISE

On

Running Selfie! Classic Eloise Wellings


EMBRACING IT, BECAUSE I KNOW IT’S GOT SOMETHING TO DO WITH THE OL’ PELVIS SHIFTING AND TILTING AND WIDENING TO PREPARE FOR THE BIG PUSH. MAYBE THE ‘GOOD DOCTOR’ CAN ENLIGHTEN US WITH THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE PENGUIN WADDLE ON THE FOLLOWING PAGE! Speaking of labour, it’s only roughly 8 weeks away so I’ve started pondering it a bit more, and, I won’t lie, I’m a little nervous. Kind of like I’m about to start a big race. I will try and mentally treat it like a race. I can call on the mental strategy that I’d use when I’ve been in intense pain when racing. The only difference is that the type of pain won’t be as familiar as the pain I’ve felt when I’m hurting in running! But the mental strategy will be the same, talking myself through it and staying positive etc.

WEEK 32 - Training Diary Sunday: Rest Monday: 48 minute jog, stretching, Pilates 1 hour Tuesday: 28 minute jog, 15 minutes on exercise bike Pilates 1 hour Wednesday: 45 minute jog Thursday: 30 minute jog, stretching Friday: 48 minute jog Saturday: 28 minute jog, 20 minute walk (jogging at approx. 5min KM pace to 5:30min KM pace,depending on how I feel)

ELOISE WELLINGS IS AN OLYMPIC 10,000M AND 5,000M TRACK ATHLETE AND FOUNDER OF THE LOVE MERCY FOUNDATION. FROM

I’m back to the early morning exercise because the summer heat refuses to leave! This suits me anyway because I’m suffering from pregnancy insomnia. Exercising most days seems to have kept my feet from swelling which is a plus. Weird food cravings this month ain’t that weird…just icecream, but only the good stuff.

A PREGNANCY AND EXERCISE

Can somebody please open a Messina in Cronulla?

OR SPECIALIST FOR THE RIGHT PLAN

WADDLE ON. 44

jockathletic.com

PERSPECTIVE, ELOISE’S EXPERIENCES WILL BE INDIVIDUAL TO HER, SO WHETHER YOU’RE THINKING ABOUT HAVING A BABY, ARE ALREADY EXPECTING A BABY, OR WANT TO GO AGAIN FOR THE 4TH TIME, ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR GP AND ADVICE TO SUIT YOU!


WOMEN IN SPORT & EXERCISE

A Word from the “Good Doctor” 32 WEEKS WADDLE.

AND

THE

PENGUIN

At 32 weeks Eloise’s baby will now weigh over 2kg and measure about 40cm. The baby’s eyelids are unfused and they can open and close. The baby’s movements become more obvious as the baby gets bigger and in anticipation of delivery. The skin is reddish but wrinkled with some early fat deposits. The bones of the head remain soft and flexible and the lungs are developing by the day. The baby still sleeps 90 to 95% of the time, but a variation between day and night is becoming more obvious with increased movements around 3am to 5am when you are at rest. This may be due to reduced steroid levels in the maternal circulation in the early hours of the morning and is completely normal. This may also contribute to an altered sleep pattern as Eloise is experiencing with maternal insomnia. It may be helping prepare mum’s for that early morning feed after delivery. 32 weeks is a normal time to start thinking about the birth. Given that it something new for first-time mum’s it can be a source of anxiety. I am always worried more for those Mum’s who are not thinking about the labour at this stage. We all want everything to go

smoothly, from the time labour commences until delivery. It is a good time to start considering a birth plan. Discuss it with your midwife or doctor, so you are all on the same page. Put down the dozen or so issues that are most important to you. A birth plan can facilitate a smooth day and make this special time more meaningful and memorable. In December 2000, Scientific American published an article “Why Penguins Waddle.” The biomechanics of emperor penguins at San Diego Sea World was studied as they were coaxed across a force platform. With their short legs and inefficient forward stride, penguins conserve energy by waddling from side to side. The same applies to mums as the baby grows and there is more weight in the upper body and altered centre of gravity, so energy is conserved by waddling side to side. Perhaps, as Eloise gets closer to term she may consider a new career as a swimmer - that new body shape will help her to glide efficiently through the water!

DR. JAMES OPPERMAN IS ONE OF SYDNEY’S LEADING OBSTETRICIANS AS WELL AS A MAD-KEEN ULTRA RUNNER. YOU CAN CHECK OUT HIS WEBSITE, WWW.DROPPERMAN.COM.AU

OR CONTACT HIS ROOMS AT HURSTVILLE PRIVATE HOSPITAL: 02 9570 5599.


S FROM LT U S E R D N A S YOU NEW G IN R B E W H T EACH MON cket) GUY LOWY (Cri on and his team w ricket) r (C te G e k N TI ic N cr g PO n Y u K RIC This yo ship. ania Tigers sm Ta e th tate Champion in S l 0 ra 2 T s 2 1 U Was integ the d Shield Final, el fi ef h S e th g winnin Awesome. e th of r ye la p prize of also claiming the son. field Shield Sea ef h S ING e th in ar ye SURF LIFE SAV r fo NSW in w er his first ev results from e m so e w a e This win marked m So years of playing 20 cluding: is h in ia Tasman ampionships, in h C Run done mate. l ens & U19 2km el M W . n et pe O ck t ri C 1s : ld Shie Ali Najem

t U19 Ironman Jae Furniss: 1s Wade Relay (Soccer) a Blattman: 3rd dr MARK MILLIGAN en K ed ll &R m Run, 1st W R Milligan, was ca Goman: 4th 2k ah n Defender Mark an H in m Run ger Osieck to be ol H h ac co er: 4th Open 2k lm by Pa up ch it M pain. h sprint final uad playing in S sq os ro ce oc S e Salib: 6th beac e tt th gi ri B s ie ags impress as he tr ly: 8th Beach Fl ol n on C an He continues to h at h N ent starting bert beach Flags an m er p a re cu Blattman: 11th a yk to se m Ja the Flags first 11. Keep up im, 10th Beach os sw ro th ce 14 oc S s: e ve th Ea in Emily

good work mate.

(Running) LUCAS McKENZIE gth, rength to stren st om fr g n oi g Is and e U9 High Jump with a 1st in th the NSW State at al n fi m 0 20 e 5th in th Little Athletics.

46

jockathletic.com

ricket) TRENT BOULT (C n with the NZ ru g n zi a m a n a Has had eir earheading th sp , m a e T t e Crick Draw nt Test Series ce re e th in ck a att d. against Englan


ABROAD. D N A E R E H , S ATHLETE M JOCK ATHLETIC ALL AUDREY AMIYA-H

nd that patience a ct fa e th to t n is testame ntre), coming ce d re tu This young lady ic (p y re ys pays off. Aud a lw a ce n wn and getting o te d is se rs u e o p h e th g a , has been trainin onal Park run in ti a N i back from injury a g n ri u K m up he won the 9k ek she backed it e w results to boot. S g in w o ll fo e h f 34:29min. T hampionships C g in n n blistering time o u R in ta at the NSW Moun ce la p d n 64:35min. 2 in e k il a ta tr to m k 1 1 e tains, running th in the Blue Moun Well done Auds!



Jock Athletic - April 2013