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Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

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Issue 2 Summer 2014

Between a rock and a hard placeFrom Zimbabwe to UK

• My Life in • Fostering the UK – BME childrenSharon’s Prim’s Story Story

• Police • A Hate Free on Hate Norfolk…. Crime & Domestic Violence

• My experience of volunteering • £18600 income required to bring family to UK

• Erhart & Trudi • Charles and Barbara - Robitschek pioneers of refugee from Checz Republic resettlement

• Diversity•inListthe of Prison BME support Organisations in Norfolk • Services A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


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bout Us - The Bridge Plus+ is a BME (black & minority ethnic) led not for profit, non partisan voluntary community organisation set up for charitable purposes. Our aim is to improve community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery. Our Strategic Goal is - To engage with diverse community members in ways that will make them become independent and accessible; To raise awareness about gaps in service provision to new and marginalised community members; To promote community engagement as a means to improving community perceptions; To improve the knowledge and confidence of community members.

Our Objectives

1. To empower community members with knowledge and information through tailored service delivery and contribute to making sure that mainstream service providers are able to respond to the needs of the new and diverse communities based on accurate information. 2. To facilitate community events, activities, and training opportunities where people can meet, interact and engage better and increase their understanding of each other

3. To identify activities of common interest to community members and encourage group activities around those issues which will give all an opportunity to capture community views and aspirations to better inform local integration policy development. 4. To develop partnership working relationships with local stakeholders and relieve some pressure from existing service provider by providing an alternative source to go for information, advice and guidance.

How we achieve our aims and objectives through service delivery. 1. Information Advice & Guidance (IAG) project: we provide a drop-in and over the phone general information advice and guidance to members of our community and organisations aiming to engage them. 2. Community Engagement/Community Cuisines Events - We facilitate community engagement events, activities and trainings which build relationships between community members. Our ongoing community cuisines events are funded through different small funding pots. We also provide BME representation at key stakeholder meetings and decision making bodies. 3. B-Me Voices Magazine: we launched this magazine is April 2014 to replace our community newsletter with the aim of further promoting diversity by capturing and sharing the views and aspirations of BME communities to a wider network of people. 4. Race Equality project - we manage a member led race equality project, our Norfolk Council for Race Equality & Diversity (NCRED) provides advocacy

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support to BME community members and while working in partnership with local service providers. As an unfunded project activity, our NCRED objectives are achieved mainly through case work and direct intervention support provided to BME community members. 5. Employment Support - following the successful completion of our EU funded Gateway to Employment Project managed by tchc, we continue to provide training and advice to economically inactive individuals to move closer to the job market. Our employment support services aims to address key barriers such as (i) language and communication issues faced by individuals whose first language is not English; (ii) challenges faced by those whose previous work experience has taken place abroad. 6. Other services - we offer free ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes. Interested students should call first for availability and an assessment. The Bridge Plus+ welcomes referrals for people needing information, advice, guidance and advocacy support. Please see how to contact us below: The Bridge Plus+ Suite 209 Sackville Business Place, 44-48 Magdalen Street, Norwich NR3 1JU Email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk Tel: 01603 617076 website: www.bridgeplus.org.uk


EDITORIAL

Here we go again with issue 2 of B-Me Voices Magazine in which we have tried to include as much information as we can about Norfolk based BME community groups and we hope this initiative will encourage more groups to come on board and share information about their groups which is in constant demand. You may notice an interchange of the use of BME or BAME to mean Black/Asian Minority Ethnic which for all intents and purposes means the same in this magazine. Our lead story for this issue was a difficult one, both in putting it together and for the fact that it shares the very personal experience of an older BME resident of Norfolk who has seen racism first hand both in Africa and in the UK. We hope you would like this issue as you did the last one which attracted a lot of interest. We are pleased to share that the magazine has been widely distributed throughout Norfolk. So look out for copies at your local library, thanks to Norfolk Library services. Do grab your copy while they last. We are encouraged by all the positive feedbacks and for sharing your comments such as “This was long overdue”, “A wonderful initiative”. Some said they liked the mag because it represented a good medium for communicating BME views and issues to all. BME people in particular felt that they can relate to it, as they can see themselves in it. To you all, I say thank you in return on behalf of our whole team. Finally please note that you can always access the online version where you can get an improved view of some of the images and documents by zooming in and out at www.bridgeplus.org.uk

INDEX

Sincerely Pa Musa, i2! Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

4 Between a rock & a hard place - from Zimbabwe to the UK 6 £18600 income required to bring family to UK 7 Fostering BME children - Gwen’s Story 11 The True size of Africa 13 Research brief on BME employment outcomes 15 Do’s & Don’ts & Did You Know 19 Map Direction to Norfolk BME Support Services 20 List of BME support Organisations in Norfolk 23 Life in Norwich & Congolese Celebrate Independence 25 Erhart & Trudi Robitschek from Checz Republic 26 Festival of Cultures 27 My experience of volunteering 28 Surviving Cerebral palsy - The Joan Latta Story 29 Immigration News 30 Police on Hate Crime & Domestic Violence 31 Myth busting leaflet…immigrants 33 Immigration Past and Present & Lord Mayor’s Parade 34 Charles & Barbara Pioneers of Refugee Resettlement in Norfolk 35 BME Voices

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SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGEBetween a Rock & a Hard Place This is a true story. The article was submitted by Thulasizwe (not his real name) a Zimbabwean national who would like to remain anonymous. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official position of this magazine.

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he year was 2007. I was aroused from sleep by a wake-the-dead knock. Sound of the intrusion echoed throughout the house, like footsteps of a ghost. The knocks getting louder as my patience grew thinner. Wearing a night gown and a jaw-breaking yawn, I opened the door to face a handful of police officers standing in a steady storm of snowflakes “Can I help you?” After making sure that they were at the right house, their spokesman plunged into the deep side. I had the honour of hosting a dawn raid because the six police officers in full regalia were reacting to an SOS call. I, Thulasizwe, had been reported for breaching the peace of a small Norfolk community. The crime? Causing great concern because I had the cheek to buy a Mercedes Benz E220! How could a marginalized member of the Norwich Black Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) community be so daring? I was living in a very deprived community at the time where majority of the people are on some form of welfare support therefore owning a Merc, I guess, was a mind blower. Although the police did not say it in so many words, all their questioning suggested they had doubts that I could own the car unless it was stolen or borrowed. In which case, there was justification for a proper investigation and dispensation of an appropriate deterrent punishment. So I had to answer all their queries and questions: Passport. Visa. Work permit. Work place. Drivers’ license. Duplicate DL. Insurance. Road tax. MOT. Depth car tyre treads. Indicators. Stop, park and reverse lights. Wipers. Country of origin. Deed of sale. All stones were turned, but no scorpions were found! Still, perhaps, in a concerted bid to calm down the community and appease the whistle blower, I was given a no holds barred ultimatum. Sell the car or leave the community. Like the day before yesterday, I did neither. I could not believe this was modern day Norfolk. I came to the UK to further my education, and I consider myself to be law abiding and God fearing. While in the UK, like any others from the so-called ‘Third World’, I was keen to work hard and earn a decent living. So I decided to invest some of my earnings into something to show for burning kilns with straw. Why not? Hence, there was the car parked at my door, never mind that it boasted of having passed through four hands. But like any saloon of its hybrid, it carried its five-star character to the knacker’s yard. In the process it caused dismay to others. Back home, I was a respected senior government official. In Great Britain, my past meant nothing. But by purchasing a Mercedez Benz, I was drawing undue attention to myself. That had to be challenged. Except that, in this case, they had no grounds.

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wenty-two years earlier, I had also fallen foul of the law of the land. In 1985 I was reported to the Scottish police. The misdemeanour? Using a hedge trimmer. To a bystander, I was attempting to spill blood on British soil. An offence in its own right. Indeed, the hardworking police came to my rescue. I sympathized with their concern and rationale of an eyewitness. As cliché lovers would say, I understood where they were coming from! Much to the disappointment of the whistle blower, I demonstrated to my four uninvited guests that I was capable of using the tool in my hands without breaking the health and safety regulations of the island. I assured the cops that if I wanted to take my own life, a hedge trimmer would not be my instrument of choice. However, the psychological and emotional wounds, these incidents caused, still remain. Not that this was the first slippery slope I had walked on during the journey of my life. In fact, segregation, colour bar and discrimination had been part and parcel of my life like dandruff.

I

was born a Rhodesian (now Zimbabwe). Born in Southern Rhodesia, a few years after WW II bombs had stopped raining. You may remember Cecil John Rhodes (CJR)? He was a British businessman and founder of the modern day territory of Zimbabwe which was named after him in 1895. CJR changed the indigenous name of our country. He christened her ‘Rhodes-ia’, after his surname. Just like that! And we were stuck with it like gum under the sole. By the time I was born, the original name of my mother country had been relegated to archives and historians. Much as rivers, roads, buildings, suburbs, schools, hotels and new human names were re-issued, the country became known as Rhodesia. Similarly, David Livingstone renamed our beloved ‘Mosi-oaTunya’ to Victoria Falls. As if that was not enough, another Boer trekker also named the HQ of the then Rhodesia Defence Forces, King George VI! Today, three decades and half after self-rule, the Defence Forces HQ in the capital of Zimbabwe, Harare, is still proudly and intimately referred to as KG6, a name that sets teeth on edge and leaves a sour taste in the mouth like lemon juice. Were there no kings or queens with names in Dzimbadzemahwe (houses of stones), as my country was originally referred to? Later, in 1965, a cowboy named Ian Douglas Smith entered the arena. He declared Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) from Great Britain. Call it secession. UDI was described by Gerald Austin Gardiner, the then Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, as “… one of the most irresponsible acts in the history of the Commonwealth.” These developments changed the political landscape which kick started the War of Salvation against misrule of the majority by the minority.


I was old enough to be sensitive to the trials and tribulations of first class versus second class citizenship. Most importantly, whether the 1965 UDI was ‘responsible’ or ‘irresponsible’, ‘revolutionary’ or ‘a roller coaster’, I was faced with an identity crisis. It lasted as long as colonialism, and beyond. During the celebrated lifespan of UDI, like some glorified dictatorships on the Mother continent, Rhodesia was isolated and shunned by the rest of the world. It was an unrecognized state. It lacked worldwide diplomatic recognition. And, it was slapped in the face with water-tight economic sanctions. This was a concerted bid to bring Smith’s Rhodesia Front and the geopolitical entity of UDI, to heel. But sanctions accentuated to the difference between a bull rider and a bull fighter. The rogues stuck to their guns for 15 years. Unfortunately, when two elephant bulls lock horns, it is the grass that suffers most. We the native Zimbabweans suffered as a result. For years, the relationship between Salisbury and London bordered on hostility. Citizens in the country were called Rhodesians, however, if Rhodesians travelled abroad, they were referred to as British subjects. In view of that, British subjects, with genuine Rhodesian identity documents, could stroll into a British High Commission and apply for a British passport at any time as a British Overseas Territories Citizens (BOTCs). That was well before the changes brought in by the promulgation of the British Nationality Act of 1981. Hence all Zimbabweans at the time, like myself, were entitled to a British passport as BOTC. In 1972, I was admitted to Ephesus College in Swaziland on a full scholarship but I needed a passport to get there. Swaziland was one of the countries at the time that did not recognised

Rhodesian passports. Although I was entitled to a British passport, I had to travel from Salisbury to the nearest British High Commission, in Botswana, a 1067-kilometre trek by rail or road, to apply for one. So, I embarked on a long journey using my Rhodesian passport to travel to Botswana to obtain a British passport. After receiving my British passport I bought a train ticket to Swaziland which would see me travelling via South Africa, but unfortunately the apartheid government of South Africa, would not allow me to transit through their country. Therefore, in order to reach Swaziland, I had to re-trace 628 kilometres back to Zimbabwe, first and then, head to Mozambique then known as Portuguese East Africa (PEA) to complete my journey to Swaziland. This latter route was not a simple journey, because although I already had a ticket, I found out that the last leg of the journey was a “whites-only service.” I was eventually allowed to board on condition that I remain in my cabin and promise not to annoy white passengers by making unnecessary appearances. During the whole 1348-km journey, it was with great exception that I was permitted to visit the toilet, which was also the only place I could get drinking water. When we arrived at the tri-state border of Mozambique, Swaziland and republic of South Africa, I was held overnight by the Mozambique immigration

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.... Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly (Martin Luther King Jr., 1929 – 1968).

Officers because they wanted to find out how a black Rhodesian ended up with a British passport. I am sure they had solved the conundrum overnight. Next day, I was released unharmed, in time to catch the next coach. What I sustained were bruised emotions, traumatized feelings and plenty of why-me’s. Because of the delay at the border, I arrived late in Swaziland by which time there was no one to receive me on the other end. For obvious reasons, I approached the Police who appeared eager to assist. But, first they wanted to clear the air by establishing few basic facts. Was I who I said I was? Destination? Reason of entry? Length of intended stay? Means of upkeep? Return ticket? Citizenship. And then, the billion dollar question. How come I was using a British passport? Was it a fake? I soon realised that there was no point trying to explain why or how as they seem to care less about my suggestion that they should call the British High Commission. Instead I was threatened with deportation before I was finally admitted entry. The incident at Mbabane Police HQ in Swaziland was replayed two years later when I landed at the Liberian airport on a flight from Johannesburg to Ghana. However, unlike in Swaziland, the representative of the British High Commission to Liberia rescued me from repatriation. The man vouched that my ill-fated passport was genuine, and that, although I was not a British British, per se, I was a Black British Overseas Territory citizen. To that end, having been cleared of any wrong doing,

I was given the rite of passage to Ghana where I remained for a decade on another educational pursuit. In Ghana I felt accepted as one of them. I was even given a new name, Kweku, meaning born on Wednesday. For the first time, I felt free from segregation, discrimination, xenophobia and marginalization. When I was eventually capped, I returned home in 1983. UDI had been dead and cremated three years earlier, after Zimbabwe gained independence to restore majority. The Union Jack was no more but the theory of reconciliation was grudgingly upheld. In 1986, I entered UK for the first time using a Zimbabwe passport on a sponsored DFID education programme. Why UK? You ask. In many cases, for some weird, ironic, fatal-attraction reasons, citizens of colonized countries tend to go to the countries of their colonial masters for everything: education, health services, vehicles, business, shopping, to see mountains and sometimes, to die there. In my case, although I still remain a bona fide British OTC, I was coming back as a Zimbabwean to study. The reality however is that the average citizen could not distinguish between all the visible immigrants who was who, if that mattered. Migrants, ethnic minority, marginalized, vulnerable, BOTC were all one and the same to them. One brush fitted all walls. We are all referred to, in many, if not all respects, as refugees and asylum seekers! Given the twists, turns and tumbles of life I have gone through, I have a deeper understanding of myself, because I have seen and heard it all. Be that as it may, stigma, racism, discrimination, segregation and hate. For instance, on one blowy, teeth-chattering morning in 2000, I was keeping watch for a local commuter bus, half awake, from night duty. A young white mother shared the waiting space with me. Her little girl pointed a crooked finger at me and said, “Mummy, look, baboon.” The mother mouthed malevolent maladies at this innocent, bright and quick learner. That incident somehow illustrated the fact that as long as we continue to be born black and white, the cycle of hate and misunderstanding will never stop if children her age can still learn to see another human being to be so different. “Was this something she learned at home?”

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If your income is below £18,600 you will not be allowed to bring a family member to live with you in the UKHow the UK Immigration Rules are destroying families

• In July 2012, the UK immigration rules were changed in such a way that it is becoming more difficult if not impossible for British citizens and those with permanent residence (Indefinite Leave to Remain-ILR), to bring their spouse/partners and family members from outside the EU. People are now being asked to meet tougher conditions and stringent financial conditions. Below are some of the criteria being applied. This list is for general information only, potential applicants should seek proper legal advice.

you can maintain and adequately accommodate the applicants when they come to the UK, together with any other dependants already living with you in the UK, and without relying on support from the Government. • If you are in rented accommodation, you must provide written evidence of the landlord’s permission to bring in additional household members.

• The applicant must also meet the English Language Requirement, which means they must either be a National of a listed majority English• As a sponsor, you must prove to have a speaking country as defined in the gross annual income of at least £18,600 Immigration Rules or have passed from a job you have been working in at an approved English language test least 6 months. Other sources of income (Common European Framework for such as pension, any maternity or Reference (CEFR) at Level A1) Only bereavement income received in the UK, those applicants over the age of 65, or may also be taken into consideration suffering from a disability, or where exceptional circumstances apply, will • Your savings as a sponsor may be taken be exempt from the English Language into account if your annual income is requirement of the Immigration Rules. less than £18,600. • If the application involves children, an additional £3,800 will be required for the first child and an additional £2,400 for each additional child. • You must also be able to prove that

It is obvious that these changes introduced in 2012 did not consider the disproportionate impact it may have on certain categories of people, such as for example young adults and low income

THE BRIDGE + COMMUNITY CUISINES EVENT of June 2014

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earners, and particularly female single parents. The Rules seem to have no sympathy for part time working parents who are in a relationship with someone from outside the EU. The financial income calculations are complex and confusing when considered with other requirements to be met. The Rules are even tougher for people whose income is generated through self employment, as they are not allowed to rely on cash savings. The financial requirements were being challenged in Court and for that matter the Home Office was holding to all applications that were not able to meet the income threshold until the court decision. However as at end of July 2014, the Court of Appeal has decided that the £18,600 minimum income threshold imposed by the Home Office is lawful. The judgment will mean that, from the 28 July, the 4,000 individuals whose applications are currently on hold, pending this judgment, will now receive a refusal decision. These are applications which met all the other requirements but could not satisfy the $18,600 income threshold.. If you need more information, please contact an Immigration Legal Adviser.


Fostering Black and Minority Ethnic Children in Norfolk Prim’s Story.

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rim Uzor was a foster carer in Norfolk for 20 years, until her retirement last year due to ill health. Prim came to the UK from Barbados in 1970 with her Nigerian husband, and had her own two children here in the UK. Prim says that she thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it, despite going through some pain and hassle. Caring in various ways has been her life, and she was sorry to have to give up, purely because of her own deteriorating health. Prim is a qualified nurse with a degree in Education from the University of East

Anglia. When she first began fostering twenty years ago she was working as a Theatre nurse and studying for her degree, and working part time at a Probation Hostel. Since that time Prim has worked in the hospital’s coronary care unit; been a Marie Curie Cancer Care Nurse; has worked at Ferry Cross Drugs and Alcohol Unit; done weekend workshops for BAME children in care; and, most recently, she set up and worked for Che Jama, a sexual health promotion organisation specialising in work with BAME communities and funded by the NHS. She has also been at various times the Vice Chair of the Norfolk and Norwich Race Equality Council, and a member of a Foster Panel, which helps approve and review foster carers. Throughout Prim has remained true to her ideals of caring for people and fostering the children most in need, particularly BAME and dual and multiple heritage children who had no other role models in their lives. Prim says that she never had any concerns about having young people that she didn’t know in her home, despite the fact that some of them

were big boys who had started to get criminal records. Prim offers very clear, firm boundaries and a caring but ‘no nonsense’ approach to the young people, who benefit hugely from her expertise. Most of her foster children have been long term, and almost all of them are still in her life, still keeping in touch, visiting and phoning, sometimes seeking advice. Christmas is a particularly wonderful time, with the (now grown up) foster children coming around; many of them calling her ‘Mum’. For Prim’s part, she loves them as her own, finds it a pleasure to see the young people settled, having their own children and bringing them round to see her, or phoning up with little problems such as how to deal with their hair. Prim says that she likes being ‘in at the deep end’; caring is where her heart is and she feels she has a lot to give to people who are hurting, and that she gets a lot in return. Prim says “I would encourage anyone to foster children, you get so much out of it, and give so much as well. It’s quite challenging, but then what in life is easy and still worth having. Caring is my life.”

The Late Gwendoline Josephine Martin (18.03.1926 – 20.05.2014)

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wen Martin, a pioneer of the Black, and minority ethnic (BME) community in Norwich, has died at the age of 88 in May 2014. Gwen, known to many simply as Momma, came to Norwich from Barbados 39 years ago at a time when the numbers of the ethnic minority community in Norfolk could be counted on two hands, to support her daughter and to look after her small granddaughter Maria, so that her daughter Prim could work and study. Gwen made her life here, making lots of wonderful friends along the way. She loved to laugh, and had a wicked sense of humour. Gwen lived with her daughter and two grandchildren until her arthritis left her unable to climb stairs, when she moved to a flat in Northfields. Five years ago her health deteriorated to the point where she needed nursing home care, and she spent the last five years living in Hawthornes Nursing Home on Unthank Road, where she was a lively and outspoken presence. When her health deteriorated, her daughter Cleavone and son Jean also travelled from Barbados to spend the last few days with her. Momma passed away peacefully, surrounded by her three children, on Tuesday 20th May, 2014. She is survived by her children Cleavone, Jean and Prim; her grandchildren Adam, Maria, Michelle and Sophia, and a great-grandchild Chantelle. Stories submitted by Sue Gee Chair of NASREF and retired Social Worker

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Latest News from Hate Free Norfolk

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he Hate Free Norfolk Network is going from strength to strength. Based on what Norfolk people told us during the launch of the hate Free Norfolk Pledge, we have now agreed our funding priorities for 2014 -2015.

Headline priorities 1. Improving the Norfolk-specific evidence base to support the need to deliver on the seven elements of the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge. In particular: • Which public, private and voluntary sector agencies pick up hate incidents and hate crime (if they do) and how do they support victims. • What is the real level of under-reporting of hate incidents, are particular groups under-reporting more than others and if so why. • What type of hate incidents are most common, are there any hot spots (of hate incidents) which may not get picked up by the police.

incidents/crime but also to promote peer support for victims

• Work with LGBT people to improve awareness, confidence to report and to develop cope and recovery mechanisms. • Work with BAME communities (Gypsies and Travellers, Black and Asian communities and Migrant Worker/East European communities) to improve awareness, confidence to report and develop cope and recovery mechanisms These priorities will enable the Network to focus its fund-raising activity on key areas of need to Norfolk residents. We welcome feedback on the priorities. We would also like to know if there are organisations or individuals out there who would be interested in working on any of these priority areas, so that we can get together and plan how we might do this and what funding we need. Please email us with any thoughts or ideas. We are also very pleased to announce that we are offering 12 grants of £200 to

voluntary / community groups to enable them to put on an event during National Hate Crime Awareness Week 2014. We believe these events will promote the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge and raise awareness about Hate Incidents/Crime. If you would like us to come and talk to your community or group about Hate Free Norfolk you can request this via our website. Please feel free to invite us to mount a stall at your event. If you have experienced a hate incident please do report it to the police, or if you don’t feel confident to do that, you can also get help and advice from The Bridge Plus+, who are working with me as part of the Hate Free Norfolk Working Group. Please sign the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge and join the Network so you can work with others for a Hate Free Norfolk.

www.hatefreenorfolk.com Michelle de Oude Chair of the Hate Free Norfolk Network

• Mapping current support and advice provision for victims whether that be before incidents, when they happen or after they happen and identifying the gaps. • What support is there for offenders in terms of preventing re-offending in relation to hate crime. 2. Building community-led local networks of key agencies who can work together to deliver the seven elements of the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge and build an evidence base of local provision and local needs. 3. Secure additional funds to increase the capacity of the Hate Free Norfolk Network Working Group to steer and drive work on delivering the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge across the County and to support the development of a strategic, joined-up, community-led approach to tackling Hate Incidents/ Crime in Norfolk.

Additional priorities:•

Making bus travel safer and inclusive by challenging attitudes from drivers and members of the public, but also providing support for individuals • Improving the information and support on hate incidents/crime available to people with learning difficulties • Work with young people to develop awareness and understanding of hate

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www.hatefreenorfolk.com

Pledging to make a Hate Free Norfolk We will: Stand up for the right of everyone in Norfolk to live free from hate Address the issues that cause hate Challenge attitudes and behaviours that can lead to hate Ensure that victims and witnesses are taken seriously and treated with respect Make it easy to report hate and support people to do so Work with others to raise awareness of the impact of hate State the actions that we will take to make this happen


Equality

& Diversity Images & Quotes

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ONE LOVE UNITED A Diverse Community Football Club

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bout the Club-The 2013-2014 Season was the most successful in the short life span of One Love United Football Club, which came into being in time for the 2009 – 2010 season. Our team which plays in the Norwich and District Saturday League promoted for the 2nd year running – this time to Division 1. This team’s playing record was outstanding with only one loss recorded in all the matches played during the season. Our sole defeat during all these months was following a penalty shoot-out after extra time of the Quarter Final stage time at the hands of Jubilee Rangers in the Norwich and District Shoe Trades Cup. In addition to winning the Norwich and District Saturday League Division 2 League title, we also won two other trophies in Cup competitions.

Our record is as follows: 1. Norfolk County Primary Cup Winners, becoming the first Norwich team to win this competition for 17 years 2. Norwich and District Saturday League Division 2 Knockout Cup Winners 3. Now promoted to and set to play in the coming season in Division 1 of the Norwich and Sunday District League The team trains every Saturday from 12 noon at Waterloo Park. We are now registering new players commit to join either our Saturday team, or the newly-formed Veterans’ team which will normally play on Sunday afternoons. All matches for the respective Leagues will start on the weekend of 30/31 August 2014

How to contact us: • Junior (jjsjunior@hotmail.co.uk or 07737 412288) for Division 1Team • Bill (bill1sinclair@aol.com or 07828 477988) for Division 1Team • Joao Cardoso or Alex Cassama (dytuga@hotmail.com / 07528 9879570) of the Veterans’ League • Gordon Turner-Chairman gt21@talktalk.net

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ZIMCAN EVENT

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n the 31st of May, Tambai Community Projects and The Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich (ZIMCAN) hosted a day to celebrate all the different African communities living in Norfolk. The event was entitled Hoza Afrika meaning rise up Afrika and was at the Clover Hill Village Hall, Bowthorpe. There were Stalls selling African inspired goods and crafts. Live music was provided by Afroluso from Greath Yarmouth and Drumskin with Anna Mudeka and Glynnis Masuku For relevant Websites: 1. http://www.zimcan.btck.co.uk/ 2. http://www.annamudeka.com/ 3. http://mudekafoundation.com/about-us/


The true size of Africa

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id you know that Africa is as big as parts of Europe, the whole of China, USA, India, Japan and the UK combined. The map shows countries by their area in square kilometres, and then fitted into Africa’s borders. The graphical layout of this map is meant purely as a visualization to illustrate the fact that Africa is much larger than almost everyone assumes, which is a typical example of the worldwide misjudgement of the true size of Africa. This image and table embody the massive scale of the continent of Africa.

NETHERLANDS

BELGIUM

SWITZERLAND

ERMANY

ITALY

FRANCE GERMANY

SPAIN

ITALY

PORTUGAL

FRANCE

EASTERN EUROPE

EASTERN EUROPE

UNITED STATES

INDIA

Kai Krause 2010

UNITED STATES

COUNTRY

CHINA

x 1000 km2

USA

9.629

China

9.573

India

3.287

Mexico

1.964

Peru

1.285

France

633

Spain

506

Papua New Guinea

462

Sweden

441

Japan

378

Germany

357

Norway

324

Italy

301

New Zealand

270

United Kingdom

243

Nepal

147

Bangladesh

144

Greece

132

TOTAL

30.102

AFRICA

30.221

Just for Reference: The Surface of the MOON

INDIA PART 2

AREA

37.930

CHINA

CHINA PART 2

JAPAN

UK

Largest Countries

1 Russia 2 Canada 3 China 4 United States 5 Brazil 6 Australia 7 India 8 Argentina 9 Kazakhstan 10 Sudan 11 Algeria 12 Congo 13 Greenland 14 Saudi Arabia 15 Mexico 16 Indonesia 17 Libya 18 Iran 19 Mongolia 20 Peru 21 Chad 22 Niger 23 Angola 24 Mali 25 South Africa 26 Colombia 27 Ethiopia 28 United Bolivia States 29 Mauritania 30 Egypt 31 Tanzania 32 Nigeria GERMANY 33 Venezuela 34 Namibia ITALY 35 Mozambique 36 Pakistan 37 Turkey 38 Chile 39 Zambia 40 Myanmar 41 Afghanistan Europe 42 Somalia 43 France 44 C. African Rep 45 Ukraine 46 Madagascar 47 Botswana 48 Kenya 49 Yemen 50 Thailand 51 Spain 52 Turkmenistan 53 Cameroon 54 Papua New Guinea 55 Uzbekistan 56 Morocco India 57 Sweden 58 Iraq 59 Paraguay 60 Zimbabwe 61 Japan 62 Germany 63 Rep o.t. Congo 64 Finland 65 Vietnam 66 Malaysia 67 Norway 68 Côte d'Ivoire 69 CHINA Poland UK 70 Oman Japan 71 Italy 72 Philippines 73 Burkina Faso 74 New Zealand 75 Gabon 76 Western Sahara 77 Ecuador 78 Guinea 79 United Kingdom 80 Uganda 81 Ghana 82 Romania 83 Laos 84 Guyana China 85 Belarus 86 Kyrgyzstan 87 Senegal 88 Syria 89 Cambodia 90 Uruguay 91 Suriname 92 Tunisia 93 Nepal 94 Bangladesh 95 Tajikistan 96 Greece 97 Nicaragua 98 North Korea 99 Malawi 100 Eritrea TOP 100 TOTAL

AREA km2 17.098.242 9.984.670 9.596.961 9.629.091 8.514.877 7.692.024 3.287.263 2.780.400 2.724.900 2.505.813 2.381.741 2.344.858 2.166.086 2.149.690 1.964.375 1.860.360 1.759.540 1.628.750 1.564.100 1.285.216 1.284.000 1.267.000 1.246.700 1.240.192 1.221.037 1.141.748 1.104.300 1.098.581 1.025.520 1.002.000 945.087 923.768 912.050 824.116 801.590 796.095 783.562 756.102 752.612 676.578 652.090 637.657 632.834 EASTERN 622.984 EUROPE 603.500 587.041 582.000 580.367 527.968 513.120 505.992 488.100 475.442 462.840 447.400 446.550 441.370 438.317 406.752 390.757 377.930 357.114 342.000 338.419 331.212 330.803 323.802 322.463 312.685 309.500 301.336 300.000 274.222 270.467 267.668 266.000 256.369 245.857 242.900 241.038 238.539 238.391 236.800 214.969 207.600 199.951 196.722 185.180 181.035 176.215 163.820 163.610 147.181 143.998 143.100 131.957 130.373 120.538 118.484 117.600

132.632.524

% 11,50 6,70 6,40 6,40 5,70 5,20 2,30 2,00 1,80 1,70 1,60 1,60 1,50 1,40 1,30 1,30 1,20 1,10 1,10 0,86 0,86 0,85 0,85 0,83 0,82 0,76 0,74 0,74 0,69 0,67 0,63 0,62 0,61 0,55 0,54 0,53 0,53 0,51 0,51 0,45 0,44 0,43 0,43 0,42 0,41 0,39 0,39 0,39 0,35 0,34 0,34 0,33 0,32 0,31 0,30 0,30 0,30 0,29 0,27 0,26 0,25 0,24 0,23 0,23 0,22 0,22 0,22 0,22 0,21 0,21 0,20 0,20 0,18 0,18 0,18 0,18 0,20 0,17 0,16 0,16 0,16 0,16 0,16 0,14 0,14 0,13 0,13 0,12 0,12 0,12 0,11 0,11 0,10 0,10 0,10 0,09 0,09 0,08 0,08 0,08

89,34

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Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk Celebrate Diversity

T

he Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk Celebrated diversity in Norfolk on 7th June 2014 in grand style in Gt Yarmouth. The event was attended by over 200 people with about 50 attendees transported from Norwich by The Bridge Plus+ .

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Community Cohesion Feedback Lunch by The Bridge Plus+ – 17th July 2014

T

he purpose of this meeting was to share the findings of a short Bridge Plus survey carried out back in March this year into community interactions, relations and experiences of racism in Norfolk (see last B-Me Voices magazine page13). The key points of the survey were covered in that article but inviting people to a shared lunch gave the opportunity of discussing the findings in a more interactive forum. In addition, two Police Diversity Liaison Officers were also invited to attend the meeting to provide insight into the current situation regarding hate crime incidents and reporting systems. Almost 25 people participated in the meeting and there were a lot of lively and informative discussions. Julie Bringloe and Hau Yee Lam from the police were able to give important information on when hate crime incidents can become actual crimes and many of the participants were willing to share their experiences so the group could discuss how they dealt with them. One of the key messages was that if you feel unfairly discriminated against, the incident should always be reported, if not directly to the police, then via County Hall, Social Services a through your local

Housing Association. You can always ask not to be contacted directly by the police and your anonymity will be safe guarded. Information on how to report hate related incident or crime as below In an emergency always call 999, For all non-emergencies call 101 and Text Messaging (non-emergency) 07786 20077. To report incidents online: (1) reporthate@norfolk.pnn.police.uk (2) enquiries@norfolk.pnn.police.uk (3) www.report-it.org.uk (national) Reporting through a Third Party- You can report a hate incident or hate crime to another organisation if you would prefer to do that. They can give you advice and support and they can report the incident for you if you wish to stay anonymous. Any local authority such as Norwich City Council, Norfolk County Council and other local district councils should be able to help. If unsure, you can contact any police officer and they should be able to assist you. Contacts for Diversity Liaison Officer – To contact any Diversity Liaison Officer, please call 101 and ask for the name of the officer • PC Julie Bringloe for Norwich East, Norwich North and Broadland • PC Ashely Grant: for Gipsy/Roma & Traveller Liaison Officer • PC Natalie Garrard for Kings Lynn & West Norfolk • PCSO Chris Shutt for South Norfolk • PCSO Hau Yee Lam for Norwich West and South

How place influences employment outcomes for ethnic minorities

T

his research report published in May 2014 by Joseph Rowntree Foundation was written by Mumtaz Lalani, Hilary Metcalf, LeilaTufekci, Andrew Corley, Heather Rolfe and Anitha George. It examined the influence of place on employment outcomes for ethnic minorities.

KEY POINTS • Ethnic minorities are concentrated in areas of high deprivation with relatively poor employment opportunities. In these areas, they do disproportionately worse in the labour market. • Racism in education and employment varies by locality, contributing to differences in outcome by place. • Knowledge of education and labour market systems, and how to negotiate them, affects employment outcomes. • Social segregation and migration tend to reduce knowledge and negotiating ability, leading to differing employment outcomes by place. Whilst social segregation may provide support, it can also reduce employment performance, limiting social networks

and inhibiting labour market knowledge. For some ethnic groups, segregation reinforces cultural norms of women’s role as nurturer rather than breadwinner. Self employment appeared to exacerbate social segregation, especially where labour was limited to family. • There was some evidence that the relative size of ethnic minority groups in a locality might affect employment outcomes, with local policies likely to serve the largest ethnic minority group. This would contribute to differences in employment outcomes by place and should be explored further. • The extent to which education policies support all groups to benefit equally from education and careers support varies with place and differences in outcomes by ethnicity and migrant history result. • Providers of educational, careers and employment services need to reduce variations in access to services. Appropriate approaches may or may not be targeted at or tailored towards specific groups by ethnicity. However, it will be important to monitor by ethnicity how well key groups are served, particularly if the approach is not targeted.

B-Me VOICES

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Images from Black History Month July 2014 fundraising event

B

lack History Month (BHM) was first celebrated in Britain in 1987, and since 2003, Norfolk has boasted of hundreds of events and activities each year throughout the county. The events are aimed at celebrating and promoting the contributions, achievements and heritage of the Black communities in Norfolk. The lead organisation behind the achievements of Black History Month in Norfolk is the Norfolk Black Heritage and Culture (NBHC), a charitable organisation. BHM events are planned by a Steering Group of partner organisations and individuals from a range of voluntary, community and statutory sector organisations. The events have over time proven that there is a continuous need to share knowledge of our common human ancestry in Africa and of the continuous presence of Black people in Britain for at least 500 years. According to the BHM website, there remains a lack of knowledge about Black achievement. Norfolk, for example, is often perceived as a white only county. Ißn reality there are several historical evidences in the persons of people like the formerly enslaved writer and activist Olaudah Equiano, Dr. Allen Minns (Britain’s First Black Mayor, elected in Thetford in 1904) and Pablo Fanque (Britain’s first Black circus owner) “BHM serves as an education project as well as an entertaining experience for those who know little of, or are just curious about, African, Asian and Caribbean culture and the British connection. [Every] year we have organised a variety of events for different ages and tastes from talks and lectures to theatre and music, from family fun to children’s activities.” online quote from chair of BHM, Mr. Abraham Eshetu Source http://www. norfolkblackhistorymonth.org.uk/

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Dos & Don’ts and Did you Know ii. In the UK, being gay is a right. For example, in November 2013, Michael Salter, the Prime Minister’s Head of Broadcasting announced that he would be marrying his partner when is becomes legal to do so. In July 2014 the Equal marriage bill was given Royal assent and became law in England and Wales. ii. According to one long time resident of Norfolk, BME people have been traditionally associated with the hospital and university. She recalls a BME couple who moved to Norwich back in 1968 and 1976. Both are still here. iii. Car & driving-Did you Know that at 30miles per hour you travel 4ft per second. Your head is the heaviest part of body. Reduced car accident fatalities are linked to the modern shape and design of cars. Car Air conditioning consumes about 5-7% of fuel iv. It was 10 years ago that music downloads first started. v. They say, if you have to keep a plant, get a cactus. You only have to water it three times a year vi. Next time you board the train please make sure you are in the right car. We have had people who got into trouble for being in first class with a standard ticket. It turned out they boarded the train from the part that leads them straight into first class. One person said, where I am from there are no trains and I had no idea there was a difference. No excuses, but if you don’t know, just ask. vii. Did you know that they no longer issue national insurance Number (NINO) cards. All you need now is the number. viii. 5 families in the UK have a combined wealth of more that 20% of the population. ix. Children born in America automatically become American citizens regardless of their parent’s immigration status. However this is not the case for children born in the UK. Since 1983, the UK changed its citizenship law so that children can only be British if one of their parents has a settled status, meaning a child has to be born to a British or someone with Permanent residence (Indefinite Leave to Remain) to be born British. x. The 10 top most spoken languages around the world: 1-Mandarin (Chinese); 2- English; 3-Hindistani;

4-Spanish; 5-Russian; 6-Arabic; 7-Bengali; 8-Portuguese; 9-Malay(Indonesian); 10-French xi. Is there an over-representation of black and minority ethnic people at the ‘hard end’ of the mental health system-i.e. that is those entering services via the police or other emergency services, detained under the Mental Health Act or admitted to secure services. One should wonder. xii. If you are granted an entry visa with the endorsements Indefinite Leave to Enter (ILE) by a British Consulate abroad, this means there is no time restrictions on you right to stay in the UK. The moment your passport is stamped at the port of entry (e.g. airport) your visa automatically becomes an Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR otherwise known as Permanent Residence). ILE carries the same entitlement as ILR, therefore anyone who has ILE does not have to apply for ILR when in the UK. xiii. They make it sound like Africa is one country, but did you know that as an African, the first time I met people from other parts of Africa was when I came to the UK. Though I don’t feel offended, when someone sees me just as an African, it suggests some form of ignorance to me because it takes away some of my cultural identity. It is like saying all Europeans, that is the Brits, Latvian, Hungarian and Polish are all the same, which is nothing different from calling an English man an Eastern European. Am sure even in Eastern Europe, the people from the various countries are different in some form. For example, Nigeria in West Africa is over 6500km away from Zimbabwe in the East of Africa =while it is 4790 km to London.

Norwich City Council building headstone

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What does Language Level A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 and C2 mean? The Common European Framework divides learners into three broad divisions which can be divided into six levels:

regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.

• BASIC SPEAKER o A1 Breakthrough or beginner o A2 Waystage or elementary

• INDEPENDENT SPEAKER o B1 Threshold or intermediate o B2 Vantage or upper intermediate

• PROFICIENT SPEAKER

Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

o C1 Effective Operational Proficiency or advanced o C2 Mastery or proficiency The Common European Framework describes what a learner is supposed to be able to do in reading, listening, speaking and writing at each level: Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/ herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in the most complex situations.

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes

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Saudi Society Open Day in Bowthorpe May 2014

Community Places of worship good for engaging communities

1. Living Waters Pentecostal Fellowship church has been in Norwich for the past three and a half years. It is a multi-cultural church with membership of believers from the UK, Zimbabwe, Kenya, South Africa and Tanzania. The best way to describe our church is welcoming, charismatic, multi-cultural, family-friendly, spirit filled and Jesus focused to name a few. We have a vibrant pastoral support team led by Rev.Tapiwa Kundoro and a must see worship team. We meet every Sunday morning at 10am at the Jubilee Community Centre, Long John Hill, Lakenham, NR1 2ET. We run a pick up service every Sunday if you wish to join us: Call us on 07944224321 or email info@ livingwaterspentecostalfellowship.org. 2.

B-Me VOICES

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Norwich City Community Centres Community Centre Location Post Code Contact Name Belvedere Community Centre

Belvoir Street

NR2 3AZ

Cadge Road Community Centre

Cadge Road, NR5 8DG North Earlham

Catton Grove Jewson Road NR3 3RQ Community Centre Chapel Break Chapel Break Community Centre Village Hall, Harpsfield

Phone Number & email address

Centre phone number

c/o centre

t: 01603 616894

Booking secretary - Dee

07758 804809

t: 01603 440305

Chair - Heather Didwell

01603 401266

t: 01603 487329

c/o centre

t: 01603 442059

NR5 9LG

Clover Hill Community Centre

Humbleyard, NR5 9BN Sally Evison c/o centre Bowthorpe

t: 01603 741818 e: office@cloverhillvillagehall.com

Eaton Park Community Centre

South Park Avenue

NR4 7AZ

c/o centre

t: 01603 259079

Frere Road Community Centre

Frere Road

NR7 9UT

Joyce Plaster

01603 437788

t: 01603 441048

Greenfields Community Centre

Ives Road

NR6 6DY

Christine Chrismas

01603 404223

t: 01603 788495

Harford Peterkin Road, NR4 6LQ Ian Wells 0844 6651034 Community Centre Tuckswood

t: 0844 665 1034 e: info@harfordcentre.org.uk website: www.harfordcentre.org.uk

Jubilee Community Centre

Jubilee Park, NR1 2EX Long John Hill

t: 01603 616957 e: jubileecommunitycentre@hotmail.com

Marlpit Community Centre

Hellesdon Road

NR6 5EQ

c/o centre

t: 01603 746173

Norman Centre Community Centre

Bignold Road, Mile Cross

NR3 2QZ

c/o centre

t: 01603 408140 e: pillingpark@hotmail.co.uk

Booking secretary - c/o centre Helen Busby

Pilling Park Pilling Park Road NR1 4PA Community Centre

Chair - Zoe Skerritt

c/o centre

Russell Street Russell Street NR2 4DZ Community Centre

Chair - Jenni Whipps

01603 667573

Wensum Community Centre

Hotblack Road

NR2 4HG

Parks Locations

West Earlham Wilberforce Road NR5 8ND Community Centre

Booking secretary - Christine

Norwich Parks

c/o centre

t: 01603 627943

07881 874111 or 01603 478210

t: 01603 501265

1. Castle Green - Roof of Castle Mall, City Centre 2. Castle Gardens - Castle Meadow, City Centre 3. Chapelbreak Open Space - Harpsfield, Bowthorpe 4. Chapelfield Gardens - City Centre 5. St Clements Park - Woodcock Road 6. Earlham Park - University Drive, Earlham Road 7. Eaton Park - South Park Avenue 8. Harford Park - Ipswich Road 9. Heigham Park - The Avenues 10. Jubilee Park - Long John Hill 11. Mousehold Heath - Gurney Road 12. Lea Bridges Park - Coleburn Road 13. Sloughbottom Park - Drayton Road 14. Waterloo Park - Angel Road/Aylsham Road 15. Wensum Park - Drayton Road 16. Sewell Park - St Clements Hill 17. Jenny Lind - Vauxhall Street 18. Bowthorpe Park - Clover Hill 19. Heartsease Towers - Sale Road 20. Lakenham Recreation Ground - City Road 21. Woodrow Pilling Park - Harvey Lane /Pilling Park Road 22. Alderman Walker Park - Frere Road 23. Brittania Barracks - Brittania Road 24. James Stuart Gardens - Recorder Road 25. Mile Cross Gardens - Aylsham Road

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© Crown Copyright and database right 2012. Ordnance Survey 100019747.

16 NEW ROUTES

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4 MIND

CITIZENS 7 ADVICE BUREAU

CITY REACH SERVICES

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8 THE ARC 6

A& E

NORFOLK AND NORWICH UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

JOB CENTRE 11 PLUS

12 POLICE

1

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BRITISH RED CROSS

13 CILC

POST OFFICE 10 THE (INSIDE THE CASTLE MALL)

5 TIMBER HILL WALK-IN CENTRE

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BOOTS PHARMACY

CONTRACEPTION AND SEXUAL HEALTH CLINIC

3

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NORFOLK SOCIAL SERVICES

Self Referral

Shower

Sexual Health

Washing

Accommodation Advice

Healthcare

Advice

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Food

Open 24/7

NORWICH SUPPORT SERVICES FOR REFUGEES, ASYLUM SEEKERS AND THOSE WITH NO RECOURSE TO PUBLIC FUNDS 17

13

British Red Cross 11 Prince of Wales Road, Norwich, NR1 1BD

Timberhill Health Centre Walk-in Centre 115-117 Castle Mall, NR1 3DD

Norwich City Council City Hall, St Peters Street, NR2 1NH

CILC 85 Prince of Wales Road, NR1 1DG

CAPS Bishopbridge House, 45 William Kett Close, NR1 4FD

t. 01603 623041

t. 0300 0300 333

t. 0344 9803333

t. 01603 662077

t. 01603 666563

10

6

2

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City Reach Health Service Under 1 Roof, 100-102 Westwick Street, NR2 4SZ

A&E Norfolk & Norwich Hospital, Colney Lane, NR4 7UY

Post Office Castle Mall, Castle Meadow, NR1 3DD

Contraception and Sexual Health Clinic (CASH) Grove Road, NR1 3RH

t. 0800 612481

t. 01603 286286

t. 0845 7223344

t. 01603 287345

The Bridge Plus Suite 209, 44-48 Magdalene Street, SackVille Place NR3 1JU t. 01603 617076

3

11

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Norfolk Social Services Carrow House, 301 King Street, NR1 2TN

Citizens Advice Bureau St Crispins House, St Georges St, NR3 1PD

Norwich Jobcentre Plus Kiln House, Pottergate, NR2 1BZ

Pharmacy - Riverside Unit 5, Riverside Way Retail Park, Albion Way, NR1 1WR

t. 0344 8008020

t. 0844 4111444

t. 0845 6043719

t. 01603 662894

4

12

8 MIND 50 Sale Road, Norwich, NR7 9TP t. 01603 432457

The ARC 28 Pottergate, NR2 1DX t. 01603 663496

16 Police Public Enquiry Office, Bethel Street, NR2 1NN

New Routes Catherine Wheel Opening, St Augustine's St, NR33BQ

t. 101

t. 01603 662 648

Produced by

Published February 2013. Updated Aug 2014

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List of BME Community Organisations

T

his list is just a guide aimed at encouraging more organisations to share information. Please note that some of the smaller organisations are very fluid in nature with their lead contacts, who are mainly volunteers, changing very often.

1. Afroluso (Portuguese Dance Group in Great Yarmouth)- https://www.facebook.com/afroluso.luso 2. Bangladesh Welfare Association 3. Bulgarian in N&N (BNN) 4. Chapelfield Foundation – community hub – www.chapelfieldfoundation.org 5. Congolese Community Association Norfolk 6. EriEthiopian community Association 7. Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk (in Great Yarmouth)- Norfolkema@gmail.com 8. Gambian African Network (GAN) 9. GYROS- Tel: 01493 745260 Email: admin@gyros.org.uk

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15. Ni-Chema- see full brief about the organisation in this issue 16. NORFRESA (Norfolk French Speakers Association) 17. Norwich Association of Malayalese (NAM) 18. Norwich International Youth Project (NIYP) 19. Norwich Mind Inclusion Project- see full brief about the organisation in this issue 20. Norwich United Karate 21. One Love Football Club – see full brief about the organisation in this issue 22. Philipino Community Association 23. Portuguese Association of Thetford 24. Portuguese Delicatessen – O Brinquinho – Portuguese & South African products, Dereham 25. Saudi Society of Norfolk

10. Hala’s House 2 Home – resettlement – halasamir@live.com or

26. Society Alive

11. NEAD – local justice and equality, see full brief about the organisation in this issue

27. Tambai Promotions – African music & dance, tel: 01362822194, www.annamudeka.com

12. NEESA Project - provides social and educational activities primarily for women and children 01603456505) - www.theneesaproject.co.uk

28. Tiger Football Club

13. Nepalese Community Network

30. WORD Trust International

14. New Routes - see full brief about the organisation in this issue

31. Zimbabwe Community Association of Norfolk (ZIMCAN)- see full brief in this issue

29. Totem

Name of Community Groups/ Organisation in Norfolk

Contact

A brief summary of what you do, e.g. kind of service provided to BME communities

4ward Project @ 4 women resource centre

18 Colegate, Norwich, NR3 1BQ Phone: 01603 212530 Email: becci.lloyd@homegroup.org.uk

One to One and group support for women aged 16 and over from BAME Communities. Clients may self-refer or can be referred by another professional. Clients require an initial assessment which can be accompanied by a tour of the centre, questions answered etc.

Ormiston Families

Tel: 01473 724517 Email: enquiries@ormiston.org Website: www.ormiston.org

Ormiston Families is the leading children’s charity in East Anglia. We offer support to children and families affected by imprisonment, work with families from Gypsy and Traveller Communities, run children’s centres and offer a range of support to parents:

B-Me VOICES


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WITS & HUMOUR

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About life in Norwich with comments on health services and community church life A story as told by our volunteer Frances Middleton

T

his is a short recount of the life experience of two couples Mrs. Anna Machosi & Mr. Kiza Mnena, and Mrs. Mwajuma Neema & Mr. Bayombe who were resettled in Norfolk. This story starts in the Democratic Republic of Congo, many years ago, when Anna and Kiza, Byaombe and Mwajuma were young, and lived in their traditional villages, happy in the lives that they all still remember, after so much time, and so many changes. The next scene is in Tanzania, where they were living as refugees after fleeing from their country and culture. In the camp, Kiza was a plumber and Byombe a medical practitioner while Anna and Mwajuma looked after the children. Then came the biggest change of all when they were offered a new life in the UK through the Gateway Resettlement Programme to come and live in Norwich. Both families are well settled now; the children are in school and college and they all are part of the family at Chapelfield Methodist Church.

They are at home in the Larkman area, and find their neighbours friendly and helpful. This was not so in the beginning for Anna and Kiza, who suffered annoyance and racial abuse from their first neighbours. However, after help from the police and the County Council, they were rehoused and their new neighbour babysits and gives them eggs! Anna and Mwajuma have African friends who were settled in the North of UK in Bradford and Manchester, and they feel that the system in Norwich, of spreading refugee families across the city, is better than elsewhere, where all the families are in one area. “Norwich is a lovely place to live” say the two women. It is truly multicultural. The Bridge Plus has also been a source of help and friendship. Meeting and talking, and eating, at the community meals has been good. Anna and Mwajuma have both had babies since they moved here, in fact Anna has had two! Amisa arrived just 2 months ago. So they are well able to judge the local maternity services. They are very happy with everyone who helped with their babies. There was a translator available in the hospital when the need arose, and Mwajuma’s doctor actually spoke a little Swahili! Kiza remembers the births of his “British” daughters”, because he was able to be present when they arrived –

something that would never have happened in Africa, where of course, child-birth mainly a women’s work! He has a part-time job at Aviva, thanks to help from the Job Centre Plus, and uses the city-centre church car-park to get to work – something his work-mates are very envious of! All the families are an important part of the life of Chapelfield Church. The children and teenagers are active in the Junior Church, and the adults all say they feel very at home there. The Gateway Assimilation groups were held here, and the Bible and Prayer Group still meets. Byaombe made the decision that the Methodist tradition would be his family’s new place of worship, and he leads the African Fellowship on Thursdays. Anna specially wanted an English church so that she could improve her language skills, and she says that the church is “number one” for her – a place where people look after you, and ask about you “The church cares!” In our services, we are very lucky to hear African music and songs regularly. Last month the youth group, which is largely African, made a huge impression on the congregation with a terrific Rap, on the parable of the wise and foolish men. So a good news story of two families who are happily living in our midst – adding their bright colours to our city’s rainbow community!

CONGOLESE COMMUNITY CELEBRATES INDEPENDENCE DAY ON SATURDAY 5TH JULY 2014 THE NORWICH CONGOLESE COMMUNITY GROUP celebrated the Congolese Independence day at the Chapelfield Methodist Church which saw a good turnout. The current chair of the group Mr. Odon, thanked all present as encouraged his community members to take an active role in community life.

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• Attendance Allowance

• Income Support & income-based JSA

Lower rate_______________________________ 54.45 Higher rate ______________________________ 81.30

Personal allowances Single – under 25 _________________________ 57.35 – 25+ _____________________________ 72.40 Lone parent – under 18 ____________________ 57.35 – 18+ ________________________ 72.40 Couple – both under 18 ______________57.35 / 86.65 – one under 18 _______ 57.35 / 72.40 / 113.70 – both aged 18+ ___________________ 113.70 Dependent children________________________ 66.33

• Bereavement Benefits Bereavement Allowance aged 45–54 _____________________ 33.36–103.42 standard rate __________________________ 111.20 Widowed Parent’s Allowance ________________ 111.20 child dependant _________________________ 11.35 (f)

Premiums Carer ___________________________________ 34.20 Disability – single _________________________ 31.85 – couple_________________________ 45.40 Disabled child ____________________________ 59.50 Enhanced disability – single person/lone parent _ 15.55 – couple ________________ 22.35 – child __________________ 24.08 Family __________________________________ 17.45 Pensioner – single (JSA only) ________________ 75.95 – couple _______________________ 112.80 Severe disability – per qualifying person _______ 61.10

• Carer’s Allowance

• Child Benefit Only/eldest child __________________________ 20.50 Other children ____________________________ 13.55

• Disability Living Allowance Care component

• Employment and Support Allowance Basic Allowance(a) – single/lone parent ________ 72.40 – couple___________72.40 / 113.70 Work-related activity component _____________ 28.75 Support component _______________________ 35.75

lower rate ___________ 21.55 middle rate __________ 54.45 higher rate __________ 81.30 lower rate ___________ 21.55 higher rate __________ 56.75

Mobility component

Basic allowance(a) _________________________ 72.40 Work-related activity component _____________ 28.75 Support component _______________________ 35.75

• Pension Credit

• Guardian’s Allowance________________ 16.35

Minimum guarantee Single _________________________________ 148.35 Couple_________________________________ 226.50

• Incapacity Benefit Long term ______________________________ 104.10 age addition under 35 ____________ 11.00 aged 35–44 ___________ 6.15 adult dependant ________________________ 60.45 child dependant _________________________ 11.35 (f)

Additional amounts Severe disability (per qualifying person) _______ 61.10 Carer ___________________________________ 34.20 Savings Credit Threshold – single _______________________ 120.35 – couple _______________________ 192.00 Maximum – single_________________________ 16.80 – couple ________________________ 20.70

• Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Standard rate _____________________ 33.20–166.00

• Jobseeker’s Allowance

(c)

Standard allowances Single – under 25 _______________________ 249.28 – 25+ ___________________________ 314.67 Couple – both under 25 ___________________ 391.29 – one or both aged 25+ _____________ 493.95

Under 25 ________________________________ 57.35 25+ ____________________________________ 72.40

• Maternity Allowance Standard rate ___________________________ 138.18

Child elements Only/eldest child _________________________ 274.58 Other children ___________________________ 229.17

• Personal Independence Payment Daily living component

Disabled child elements Lower rate______________________________ 124.86 Higher rate _____________________________ 362.92

Mobility component

Limited capability elements For work _______________________________ 124.86 For work and work–related activity __________ 311.86

standard rate ________ 54.45 enhanced rate ________ 81.30 standard rate ________ 21.55 enhanced rate ________ 56.75

• Retirement Pension Cat A __________________________________ 113.10 Cat B late spouse’s or civil partner’s NI _______ 113.10 Cat B spouse’s or civil partner’s NI____________ 67.80 Cat D non contributory, aged 80 or over _______ 67.80 Age addition (aged 80 or over) _______________ 0.25 Adult dependant (with Cat A) ________________ 64.90 Child dependant (with Cat A and B) ___________ 11.35 (f)

Carer element _________________________ 148.61 Childcare costs elements (maximum) 1 child _________________________________ 532.29 2+ children _____________________________ 912.50

• Housing Benefit(d)

• Severe Disablement Allowance

Personal Allowances Single person/lone parent – aged 65+ ________ 165.15 Couple – both under 18 ____________________ 86.65 – one under 18 ____________________ 113.70 – one or both aged 65+ _____________ 247.20

aged under 40 _______ 11.00 aged 40–49 ___________ 6.15 aged 50–59 ___________ 6.15 Adult dependant __________________________ 36.30 Child dependant __________________________ 11.35 (f)

Premiums Family – lone parent rate ___________________ 22.20

• Statutory Adoption, Maternity

• Working Tax Credit(e)

and Paternity Pay ___________________ 138.18

Basic element _________________________ 1,940.00 Couple/lone parent _____________________ 1,990.00 30 hours element ________________________ 800.00 Disability element ______________________ 2,935.00 Severe disability element ________________ 1,255.00 Childcare costs (70% of up to) 1 child (weekly rate) ____________________ 175.00 2+ children (weekly rate) ________________ 300.00

• Statutory Sick Pay

___________________ 87.55

(a) Paid at a reduced rate to certain claimants during 13 week assessment phase. (b) Reduced where claimant entitled to ESA component. (c) Monthly amounts. Universal credit benefit cap applied at £2,167 for couples and lone parents; and £1,517 for single people.

• Child Tax Credit

(e)

(d) Where different to Income Support, income-based JSA, ESA or Pension Credit. Housing benefit cap applied at £500/week for couples and lone parents; and £350/week for single people.

Family element __________________________ 545.00 Child element _________________________ 2,750.00 Disabled child _________________________ 3,100.00 Severely disabled child __________________ 1,255.00

(e) Annual amounts. First threshold £6,420 (£16,010 if not entitled to WTC). (f) Reduced for an eldest/only child where CB is payable.

Source: rightsnet.org.uk rightsnet.org.uk 24

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news

_____ 73.75

Age addition

case law

discussion

training

jobs

advice support

publications

benefit and tax credit rates

• Employment and Support Allowance

Carer, enhanced disability, pensioner(b) and severe disability premiums paid at the same rate as Income Support/income-based JSA

• Universal Credit

___________________ 61.35

Adult dependant __________________________ 36.10 Child dependant __________________________ 11.35 (f)

2014/2015

non means tested

means tested


Erhart & Trudi Robitschek by T G S Dunsby

Norwich society life frequenting the local theatres, galleries and museums. After the war Erhart became a history teacher at the Earlham Boys Schools, now an academy, and Trudi became a popular member of staff at the newspaper offices, working as a librarian, telephonist and copy typist. She also was involved with helping at the Castle Museum and at the BBC after she retired. They were eventually naturalised as British citizens and were very proud to be accepted into this country. One of the beautifully restored cottages in Gildencroft became their home and I can remember visiting the house many times with my mother. I always had to be on my best behaviour whilst having tea and biscuits as the house was full of interesting items. Erhart died in 1966 and unfortunately Trudi took her own life in 1974. I believe they were both much liked and admired and maybe at the end of Trudis’ life the past was too much to cope with without Erhart by her side. I’m afraid I do not know much about their previous life or families in Czechoslovakia but it would be interesting to discover more. They were lucky to escape the Nazis and find a new life in Norwich, but I imagine their families were not so fortunate. Cuttings courtesy of Archant

M

y sister and I would often visit my grandfather’s house when we were young and there would usually be a couple in the house that spoke in a very strange way. Being young and inocent we always found them very amusing and would imitate their accent. When I grew older I was told that they were Jewish refugees from a country called Czechoslovakia and that my grandparents had offered them sanctuary in their home. This meant very little to me at the time but sounded quite romantic. Now of course I look back and realise what Trudi and Erhart must have gone through when they fled Czechoslovakia in 1938 and arrived in Norfolk. I also admire my grandparents for taking them in to their home in Norwich and later Thorpe End. Erhart Robitschek was a man of much standing being a doctor of law in Prague and by profession a barrister. They arrived penniless into the UK and were discovered at a restaurant in Cromer by a former editor of the EDP, Trudi washing up and Erhart playing the violin to customers. Trudi also worked in hospitals and later was offered a job at the newspaper offices and Erhart joined the British Army. Erhart later became an interpreter in the Foreign Office as being a linguist and Russian speaker he was much more use than a private in the Army. The couple found a new life in Norwich and being cultured, educated people enjoyed the

Trudi on her retirement from the EDP after 30 years service

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10 YEARS of Norwich Mind Festival of Cultures

10 YEARS! That is how long the Norwich and Central Norfolk Mind

Festival of Cultures has been going on. The event is celebrated every year in the month of August. This year’s event took place on Saturday August 16, Banner made by Mind clients 2014 from 11am-4pm at the Forum. During the event, ethnic groups active in Norwich, as well as people with a passion for their culture of origin, came come out in their numbers for a rich celebration of the diverse food, music, crafts, culture, stories and history of the communities that live in our lovely city. The Deputy CEO Sandra Flanagan said: ‘’the Festival of Cultures is a unique opportunity to celebrate and explore the diversity of Norfolk culture. It is an exciting event that demonstrates the vibrant communities that have chosen Norfolk as their home and how they have enhance the county, the festival gives everyone the opportunity to be part of an international celebration with groups from all over the world, it promotes a cohesive society and understanding and is a fantastic fun day for all the family’’. It offers a great time to meet with people from different cultures, learn People of the Festival about their countries and their work in Norwich, participate in workshops in traditional singing and dancing, practical and interactive activities such as; henna tattoos, learning to write one’s name in another language, complementary therapy, and musical and dance performances and buy from our World Market from local businesses. The event aims to strengthen the community spirit and forge partnership working for a more cohesive society. Everyone is always welcome! For more information visit: www.norwichmind.org.uk or call 01603432457. Norwich CCG BNN performers with the Lord Mayor

NEESA stall

Embira- African Jewellery

Bulgarian food

Japan

Poland

Time to Change

Norwich Mind CEO with the Lord Mayor

Indian food stall

Sithabile Dube

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Lord Mayor with Society Alive


My experience of volunteering with the Refugee Services of the British Red Cross by Gina Adams

I

started volunteering at the Red Cross Refugee Service in Norwich a year ago whilst studying for my MA in Media and International Development at the University of East Anglia. Throughout my time at the service I have met some extraordinary people amongst the staff and clients. Whilst I have learnt a considerable amount about life in other countries, I have also learnt a lot about life in the UK and Norwich (my home city) as experienced by people completely new to the country and city. Immigration can be a controversial topic in the UK, and unfortunately some people remain rather misinformed about the asylum process and the reasons people claim asylum in the UK. I have had some interesting conversations with people who ask me about my volunteering role and the work that the Red Cross does with asylum seekers and refugees; whilst sometimes people may initially be unclear about the facts

and figures concerning asylum in the UK, they are receptive and interested in understanding the reality. The majority of the people are surprised to learn the hardships asylum seekers and refugees face both in their home countries, and unfortunately, in the UK. I have certainly come to appreciate that once someone has been granted leave to remain in the UK, the challenges of settling into life in the UK and integrating into the local community remain. It has been extremely humbling to work with people who have experienced great difficulty in their lives, yet remain optimistic, strong and resourceful. My role as a Caseworker involves assisting our clients with solving problems and supporting them to live life fully in the UK. I have greatly enjoyed my role, and it has shaped my future career: now that I have finished my degree I am aiming to pursue working fulltime with asylum seekers and refugees in the UK.

How to complain about NHS services If you feel that your concerns are not being addressed appropriately, take the next step in the complaints process by following these arrows

If you have concerns about any aspect of your care, or the service you receive, it is best to first speak with a member of staff involved with your care.

If you find that staff cannot help you, or you are not comfortable speaking with them, you may wish to make a formal complaint...

Do you need help to make an NHS complaint?

Independent Complaints Advocacy Service POhWER Telephone 0300 456 2370 pohwer@pohwer.net www.pohwer.net

PALS is a confidential NHS service designed to support patients, relatives and carers

James Paget University Hospital Telephone 01493 453240 pals@jpaget.nhs.uk www.jpaget.nhs.uk

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

I would like to make a complaint

Telephone 01603 289036 pals@nnuh.nhs.uk www.nnuh.nhs.uk

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Social care

Primary care

Other health care

Residential care Home care Carer’s services Children’s services

G.P. Dentist Pharmacy Optician

Hospital Community Ambulance Mental Health NHS commissioning

East of England Ambulance Service

Contact the PALS team to find out how to make a formal complaint

Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust

Norfolk County Council Telephone 0344 800 8020

complimentsandcomplaints@norfolk.gov.uk

www.norfolk.gov.uk

The Local Government Ombudsman Telephone 0300 061 0614

advice@lgo.org.uk www.lgo.org.uk

Follow the local complaints procedure

NHS England

Telephone 01553 613351 pals@qehkl.nhs.uk www.qehkl.nhs.uk

Telephone 0800 028 3382 eoeasnt.feedback@nhs.net www.eastamb.nhs.uk

Telephone 0800 279 7257 pals@nsft.nhs.uk www.nsft.nhs.uk

East Coast Community Healthcare

Telephone 0300 311 22 33 england.contactus@nhs.net www.england.nhs.uk

Telephone 01502 718666 ECCH.patientliaison@nhs.net www.eastcoastch.co.uk

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman Telephone 0345 015 4033 phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk www.ombudsman.org.uk

Norfolk Community Health and Care Telephone 0800 088 4449 pals@nchc.nhs.uk

www.norfolkcommunityhealthandcare.nhs.uk

Please contact Healthwatch Norfolk if you have any questions or comments about this information Telephone 01603 813904 enquiries@healthwatchnorfolk.co.uk www.healthwatchnorfolk.co.uk

Norfolk

If you want to complain about the purchasing and planning of NHS services, contact Anglia CSU

Anglia Commissioning Support Unit (CSU) Telephone 0800 587 4132 angliacsu.pals@nhs.net www.angliacsu.nhs.uk

B-Me VOICES

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NI CHEMA

NI CHEMA - (a Swahili word meaning (a Swahili word meaning ‘good will’) ‘good will’)-is a community-based organization whose core business is together growing up, relationships the promotion of sexual health (SH) and consequences of poor behavioural and general wellbeing with a view to sex lifestyles. preventing members of the BAME communities in Norfolk, from contracting, • Drama shatters shyness, inhibition and transmitting and spreading STIs (sexually being withdrawn; transmitted infections) in general and HIV • Overall drama gets actors and audience in particular. Confidentiality is our motto. to talk openly about sexual related Education: We run sexual health issues which would otherwise not be promotion (SHP) training/workshops mentioned in public. for BAME youth (12+ to <24), women General health and wellbeing-In both and men. our workshops and outreach work, we underscore the fact that reproductive and Objectives: To sexual health form part of one’s social 1. raise SH awareness. wellbeing. That is the reason why we 2. increase SH knowledge. promote regular, voluntary screening for instance. 3. break down barriers of myths and taboos to SH. 4. build confidence so that people make informed, life-saving decisions instead of taking unnecessary life-threatening risks. 5. foster interest in post-exposure treatment and counselling.

Drama:

• Ni Chema uses drama to educate both the actors and members of the audience. • Theme of the acted-out story knits

Community Outreach Service (COS):

• In the spirit of good will, we spearhead COS by distributing free condoms, femidoms, dental dams and lube to both marginalized and non-marginalized communities. Target groups: hotels, casinos, bars and night clubs. • Train voluntary sexual health workers. • Encourage and advise youth to adopt

positive self-management programs like using free chlamydia testing kits. • Distribute sexual health promotional pamphlets written in layman’s language. • Signposting to SH support groups • Operate an open door policy.

How we deliver:

• Drop-in- the office is run by a dedicated team of trained volunteers, so we encourage to please book an appointment by phone or email. Please respond to all enquiries within 24 hours. • Partnerships:-In order to deliver comprehensive HIV prevention and SH promotion programs, we build partnerships and networks that support our course. Funded and Supported by Norfolk County Council (NHS, Sexual Promotion Unit), EDP/ Big Lottery Fund.

Our Contact:

Ni Chema, Office No. 6 Charing Cross Centre 17-19 St. John Maddermarket Norwich NR2 1DN Phone: 01603 470703, 07875504515 Email: nichema70@yahoo.co.uk

Surviving cerebral palsy The JOAN LATTA Story

M

y name is Joan Latta, I am 21 years old and live in North Norfolk. When I was born I was starved of oxygen for twenty eight minutes. My body was dark purple all over and I had no heartbeat. The Doctors spent more than an hour establishing my breathing. They said that I would not be able to survive my first twenty four hours. I was tube fed as I couldn’t swallow. I needed a sucker to suck out the catarrh and saliva. I couldn’t move my left arm. My neck was not strong enough to hold my head up. Once I had survived the first few days, the Doctors diagnosed long term brain damage which would affect my eating, walking, smell, speech, and movement and said that I may survive, but wouldn’t

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be able to do very much in my life. When I was little, I had to do many different forms of exercises most days to help with my co-ordination, strength and to help my stamina. They thought that I wouldn’t be able to go to school like able bodied children. I insisted on studying triple science amongst my GCSEs, and passed them all with a grade B but mind you I did work extremely hard for them. I went through some very hard training in terms of walking and running when I was a teenager. So far my longest run is 18 miles long in an open event and the longest hiking trail I have completed is The South West Coastal Path which is 650 miles long. At the beginning I used to complain all the time because walking such a long way was very difficult for me. I would like to pass the message onto every family, that unconditional love can go a long way. My personal experience has taught me a lot. As a teenager I did some voluntary guest speaking about

my life at High School and Colleges. Following my talk, students have spoken openly and in class about the disabilities they have, when they wouldn’t otherwise have done so – and many students and their teachers/lecturers have been very supportive of my talks. I believe my talks opened eyes and minds to the reality of cerebral palsy, and the positive ways forward. I do hope my story will be of interest to you. I am trying to start a self-employed speaker business about my life and Cerebral Palsy - and hoping to expand my services in the future. I am available to give free talks if my travel expenses will be covered. The talk will be for an hour. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you would like any further information about my services and I look forwards to hearing from you. Would you like to come and hear my full story? Email: joan@cerebralpalsyaliveandkicking.com


Immigration News To find the full story on any of the briefs below, please use the words in bold as key search words

There will also be a requirement for temporary migrants with time-limited immigration status to make a financial contribution to the NHS. The Bill also limits the number of immigration decisions which can be appealed which has been cut from 17 to 4. • Romanian and Bulgarian data for 2014 shows up immigration ‘scaremongering’ – New Statesman article. This article reports on the data around Bulgarians and Romanians movement to the UK during the first quarter of 2014, which although showing an increase over the first quarter of 2013, shows a drop from the preceding period, the last quarter of 2013. • UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) publishes information to help employers prevent illegal working and understand the fines they face if employing illegal workers. The series of documents about preventing illegal working and illegal working fines (also known as civil penalties) for employers and in includes guidance on preventing illegal working, codes of practice for civil penalties and avoiding discrimination and a right to work checklist for employers.

• The UK to ease Visa Requirements for Chinese Nationals-The Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, made a promised during a trade promotion visit to China that UK visa requirements for nationals of China will shortly be linked to the EU Schengen Visa system. The Schengen visa is a unified visa system entered into by 26 European countries (not including the UK) which means the holder of a visa of one member state can visit any of the other states. It is aimed at simplifying travel within Europe. For example, if a visitor has a visa for Germany, they can use the same visa to visit all other Schengen member states. However, if the visitor wants to visit the UK during the same visit, they will have to apply for a separate UK visa from a British embassy/consulate, which means additional fees, expenses and processing time. The Chancellor’s announcement was made following complaints from UK businesses who felt that they are missing out on attracting high value tourists from the newly-emerging middle class in countries such as Brazil, Russia, India and China (known as the BRICS nations). The Chancellor’s plan for tackling the problems in attracting Chinese tourists will allow applications to be dealt with on the basis of information provided on Schengen visa application forms. No mention has been made as to whether similar concessions will be offered to

• New Life in UK and English language settlement criteria enter into force. There were major changes to the rules affecting applicants who want to settle permanently and/or become a citizen in the UK which came into force. Applicants must now hold a B1 level English qualification in addition to passing the Life in the UK Test.

citizens of the other BRICS nationals who are known to be also unhappy with the UK visit visa they are currently required to obtain. It can be expected that, having registered the principle that middle class tourists from China will have the benefit of the Schengen system to decide their applications, there will be heavy lobbying to extend this to other countries as well. Full story Source: http://www. migrantsrights.org.uk/news/ • Immigration Bill becomes law The Immigration Bill received Royal Assent on 14 May making way for a series of reforms designed to make the immigration system fairer to British citizens and legitimate migrants and tougher on those with no right to be here. Among the changes the act introduces are that private landlords will need to check the immigration status of tenants to prevent those without a right to be in the UK from accessing private rented housing.

• Conservatives promise to scrap Human Rights Act after next election-Theresa May tells conference that her party is prepared to withdraw from European Convention ‘if that is what it takes to fix law’ (source Migrant children’s project) Key S • The Government changes its mind on introducing a visitor visa bonds. As monitored from the Migrant’s Rights Network news, it was reported in an article in the Sunday Times that the controversial visitor visa bond scheme, which was scheduled to be piloted, has now been dropped by the Government. The scheme would have requested a £3,000 bond from ‘high risk groups’ coming to visit the UK from six non-EU countries including India, Pakistan and Nigeria. So why did the Government see the light on visitor visa bonds? It seems that the Lib Dems, who strongly advocated the introduction of bonds back in March, were the ones to pull the plug in the end. In an apparent 180 degree about-turn, Nick Clegg (who made a new bonds scheme the centerpiece of his major speech on immigration) reportedly blocked the scheme, leaving the home secretary with no option but to drop it.

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Norfolk Police Diversity Team on Hate Crime & Domestic Violence

1 Hate Crime-

Do you know what a Hate Crime is? Would you know if one happened to you? Would you know what to do if you were the victim of one? Norfolk Constabulary takes Hate Incidents and Crime very seriously and urges people who feel that they may have been a victim to report to them. Well the good news is that you don’t have to worry about all this on your own as Norfolk Constabulary have a dedicated Diversity Team which includes seven Diversity Liaison Officers spread across the county who are there to help. But let’s start at the beginning: What’s the difference between a Hate Incident and a Hate Crime? A Hate Incident is defined as any incident where the victim (or any other person – this could be a witness or police officer) perceives that something has happened to them but is not a criminal offence and is motivated by prejudice or hate. A Hate Crime is any hate incident which constitutes a criminal offence (so this could be an assault or criminal damage to your property), perceived by the victim (or any other person) as being motivated by prejudice or hate. So what do mean by being motivated by prejudice or hate? Well the police have a duty to record incidents and crimes that have happened to you because of: • Your age • Or you live with a disability, • Your gender (you are a man or women) • Your Race (your physical appearance, such as skin

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color, eye color, hair color etc • Religion or Belief (or no religion or belief) • Sexual Orientation (who you are attracted to sexually) • Gender Reassignment (if your moving from being a male to female and vice versa) Hate can take many forms and can range from being called nasty names to someone damaging your home or car right through to being assaulted or even murdered. Once reported to us an officer will get in touch and arrange to come and see you to get as much information from you as possible. A Diversity liaison Officer can help support you through this process and beyond by being a friendly face who you can get further help and support from. Diversity Liaison Officers are spread right across Norfolk so it doesn’t matter where you live someone will cover your area.

2 Norfolk Police Dealing with Domestic and Sexual Abuse

This is a Multi-lingual campaign to tackle domestic and sexual abuse for which, Norfolk Constabulary has assigned dedicated officers that investigate and safeguard vulnerable adults and children who may be subject to abuse such as domestic abuse, including Honour Based Abuse, Rape and Public Protection. Like Hate Crime, we know that domestic abuse is vastly unreported and that could be for many reasons such as fear (that things might get worse), shame (people will know what’s been happening) and loss (of children or lifestyle). Domestic Abuse is always about the perpetrator having power

and control over their victim. The new definition of domestic abuse now states: ‘Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate patterns or family members regardless of gender or sexuality’. Earlier on this year Norfolk Constabulary was able to start the Trailblazer project which was made possible thanks to a £15,000 grant from the Home Office. As a result they were able to start this innovative project aimed primarily at children and young people which encouraged them to speak out about domestic abuse and sexual abuse. A series of colourful posters were created in support of the scheme which also aimed to spread the message to migrant communities with the art work being translated into Latvian, Polish, Lithuanian, Russian and Portuguese. Thousands of children and young people attended special workshops and sessions aimed at promoting healthy relationships with the aim of ensuring that young people from all communities across Norfolk were aware of the rights and wrongs of relationships, whilst knowing where to go for help and advice when things in a relationship make them worried or upset, whether it’s at home or school. A very important part of this project was to spread the word to Norfolk’s migrant communities. In addition to the workshops and sessions, multi-lingual leaflets and posters in English, Polish, Lithuanian and Russian were designed to give all ages advice on domestic abuse, including information on Norfolk’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC), also known as The Harbour Centre. The posters were displayed on First Buses, GP surgeries, hospitals and shopping centres including Market Gates in Gt. Yarmouth, Castle Mall and Chaplefield Mall in Norwich. This local campaign supports the ongoing Home Office ‘This is Abuse’ initiative and comes on the back of the Norfolk and Suffolk Constabularies Time to Stop initiative aimed at reducing rape and sexual violence in both counties. For more information on the Trailblazer campaign material please visit: www.norfolk.police.uk/safetyadvice/ personalsafety.aspx To report a Hate Crime see opposite page. If you would like further information regarding Hate Crime or other Norfolk Police initiatives please contact the Diversity Team at Diversity@Norfol.pnn. police.uk Picture of the Chief Constable (in suit) with the Diversity Team and staff launching Hate Free Norfolk at Police Head Quarters, Wymondham


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07/06/2013

10:08

SO, WHAT DO WE MEAN WHEN WE SAY…

?

Asylum Seeker

Refugee

Migrant

Someone who is fleeing persecution in their homeland, has arrived in another country, made themselves known to the authorities and exercised the legal right to apply for asylum.

Someone whose asylum application has been successful and who is allowed to stay in another country having proved they would face persecution in their home country. Refugees have the same rights as permanent residents of the UK.

A person who moves from one country to another for the primary purpose of work or study, whether permanently or temporarily. Many of these migrants have arrived from other European Union states, as they are entitled to do under the European Treaty.

THE UK TAKES MORE THAN ITS FAIR SHARE OF MIGRANTS THE UK EXPERIENCE OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION IS NOT REMARKABLE WHEN COMPARED WITH OTHER WESTERN COUNTRIES The UK operates in a global economy where people will migrate to and from areas responding to the supply and demand needs of the labour market. Not only has the UK’s immigration grown in line with world migration, but the UK has a smaller proportion of immigrants and lower rates of net immigration than the US, Canada, Australia and several large European countries. Icons.pdf

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Icons.pdf Less than 3% of the world’s migrants1 live07/06/2013 in the UK compared with 5% in Germany and 20% in the US.

(Finney and Simpson, ‘Sleepwalking to segregation’? Challenging myths about race and migration 2009) Many of the migrants arriving in the UK from Eastern European countries during the economic boom of the early 21st century have since returned home

WHAT DO MIGRANT WORKERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE UK ECONOMY? MUCH MORE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK In 2011, migrants paid 37% more in taxes than was spent on the public services that they received. Migrant workers pay income tax and National Insurance contributions. According to the Home Office, migrants and refugees made a net contribution of about £3billion to the UK economy – that’s worth 1p on income tax. The UK has an ageing population as a result of declining birth rates and the fact that people are living longer. Migrant workers are needed to ensure that there is a sufficient skilled workforce to fill available jobs, especially after the recession, and pay the taxes that will fund pensions in the future. (Britain’s Immigrants: an economic profile IPPR)

x123249_SRTRC_p3_lw.indd 1

THEY’RE TAKING OUR JOBS

MIGRANTS BRING CRIME TO OUR STREETS

NOT TRUE

THERE’S NO EVIDENCE

Migrant workers move to areas where there are vacancies, and they are filling vacancies where there are skills shortages. Icons.pdf 1 07/06/2013 10:51 Under the new ‘points based’ system, migrants from outside the EU are only permitted to take jobs where there are recognised skill shortages and where they can prove before they enter the UK that they have qualifications, skills and abilities, and are sponsored by an employer. 07/06/2013 10:51 10:51 The North

East has a long history of recruiting workers from abroad, and as many as one in four businesses depend on migrant workers to stay in business. This includes the National Health Service with all the benefits that this provides to citizens of the North East. (UKBA; IPPR)

MIGRANT WORKERS ARE DRAINING THE REGION’S PUBLIC SERVICES

The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) say that offending rates among migrant communities are in line with the general population. However, migrants are more likely to be victims of crime, suffering harassment in the community and discrimination in the work place.

MIGRANTS ARE GIVEN PREFERENTIAL ACCESS TO SOCIAL HOUSING IT’S JUST NOT TRUE Recent research commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission found no evidence of migrants being given preferential access to social housing. Pressure on housing is caused by changing household structures (the trend for smaller household numbers and larger houses) rather than population growth through immigration.

NO - QUITE THE OPPOSITE! Migrants are more likely to be young, healthy and well qualified, and contribute more to the tax and benefits system than they receive. Far from acting as a drain on public services, new migrants help to deliver vital services in areas such as social care, education, construction, and particularly in the health service.

THEY’RE ONLY HERE FOR THE BENEFITS… NO …MIGRANTS ARE LESS LIKELY TO CLAIM WELFARE BENEFITS AND LIVE IN SOCIAL HOUSING THAN PEOPLE BORN IN THE UK National Insurance data shows that migrant workers overwhelmingly come to the UK to work, not to claim benefits. Migrant workers are often highly educated people – more than a third left full time education after the age of 21 – twice as many as in the UK population. Despite higher education and skill levels, their wages are substantially lower than UK born workers. (Migration Observatory 2012)

12/06/2013 11:03 B-Me VOICES

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NEAD (Norfolk Education & Action for Development) is known for exploring and highlighting ‘global issues’ across Norfolk and how the county is connected to the rest of the world. Well known projects have included ‘We Are Norfolk’ looking at community cohesion between established and new communities, ‘The Windmill Project’ which addressed sustainability and active citizenship, and helping to build up Black History Month, Refugee Week and Fair Trade Fortnight within the region. Now NEAD is offering the Eco-Team Challenge to young people in formal groups outside of the classroom – youth groups, Scouts & Guides, ASDAN and after-school clubs. The project is funded by Paul Hamlyn Foundation and challenges young people to develop their communication skills, confidence and team-working abilities through connecting with their local natural environment. So far, groups taking part have enjoyed team building activities and trips to the Norfolk Broads to explore the unique habitat on their doorstep and take practical action to help conserve it. Group Leaders have also been supported to introduce speaking and listening practise for the young people they work with as part of their ongoing activities. Groups have included New Routes, Norwich International Youth Project, Parkside Special School, the Girls Friendly Society, Chillax... and many more from across the county. They have visited Barton Turf, How Hill, Hautbois Hall, and some have taken community actions closer to home such as building African

Keyhole Gardens to improve both their composting and vegetable growing. Next, NEAD is planning a Green Weekend Challenge, where Eco-Teamers can further build their skills, with presentations, meeting local sustainable business entrepreneurs, and thinking more about their personal future aims and how to achieve them. For more info contact Eco-Team Project Coordinator Michelle Stuckey: T: 07425609221 or 01603 610993 E: Michelle@NEAD.org.uk For full details please visit: www.NEAD.org.uk NEAD is supported by Paul Hamlyn and Broads Authority

Taking a New Route to work with new communities

F

inding New Routes and Building New Roots are the first steps to a new life in a new environment. The Re-Launch of New Routes, (previously known as Interface Learning) took place on Friday 20th June 2014. The event celebrated the achievements of New Routes as a recently registered charity, re-achieving Approved Provider Status with the Mentoring & Befriending Foundation, moving buildings, changing name and securing some new funding streams. The event was hosted by the new Lord Mayor of Norwich who formally opened the centre, and welcomed 14 Councillors, Norfolk’s Police Commissioner and the Norfolk Fire & Rescue Service. It also achieved good media coverage, while highlighting Refugee Week. Other community groups who came to congratulate New Routes included Norwich Mind, Red Cross and Bridge Plus +. The achievements of service users were celebrated, with many volunteers receiving Mentoring & Befriending certificates for their participation in the New Routes Mentoring project. Visitors also enjoyed an international buffet including Caribbean, Indian, Korean and Kurdish foods. Young people involved in putting on Our Big Gig in Wensum Park on July 12th treated guests to their performances. Norwich Social Centre on Catherine Wheel Opening, just off of St Augustine’s Street, was previously the base for Norwich Social Centre for the Blind, who sadly

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closed down, leaving the centre available for New Routes. With the help of the County Council, New Routes have been given a 3 year lease. Having the new premises makes programme delivery a lot more comfortable, and provides somewhere appropriately friendly and welcoming. The previous building, a workshop in Beckham Place, was very cold during the winter and very hot during the summer, making running activities difficult. New Routes has been running projects in Norwich for 10 years, affecting the lives of many Refugees, Asylum Seekers and other recently settled ethnic minorities. The aims of the charity are to encourage community cohesion, reduce isolation and promote integration. Over the years, hundreds of people have come through our doors to participate in our projects several of whom have become very positive influence in the community. More than 100 mentee/ befriendees have engaged with the project, finding the support needed to put down roots and find new directions for their life in Norwich. “Being part of the mentoring project has helped increase my confidence, self-esteem and communication and I have experienced

great improvement in my school work”. Mentee. “The Befriending project helped me find someone with a friendly ear and assisted me in participating more in things within the community”. Befriendee. New Routes run different projects which include: Mentoring and Befriending, English Classes, Women’s Dance Fit, Homework clubs, International Families Club, Sewing group, alongside initiating community events such as Our Big Gig (Showcasing future musical talents from young people with diverse backgrounds). We are most grateful to our committed volunteers and community participants who give their time to support our work. We also heartily thank our funders. The effective growth and development of a community depends on the improvement and sustainability of its community groups and charities. We encourage others to get involved too… give us a call, and let’s see what we can achieve together! “The reception given to those applying for asylum, is an illuminating indicator of the state of a society’s health”. Cardinal Basil Hume (Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster) For youth mentoring contact Enefola ‘Sam’ Apeh (Youth Coordinator): 07713 118 220 youth@newroutes.org.uk For other projects contact Dee Robinson (Projects Coordinator): 07799 661 009 projects@newroutes.org.uk Website: www.newroutes.org.uk Office: 01603 662 648


IMMIGRATION – Past and Today Diverse Britain

Immigration has always been part of British culture. Historically, Britain has been a culturally diverse nation that has embraced the foreign and the new and ended up calling it British. Things we consider as being the very ‘Britishness’ have been introduced from overseas: tea came from China via India, fried fish (as in ‘fish and chips’ fish) was brought into Britain by Jewish refugees from Portugal and Spain. And so it continues: diverse communities of people add colour and liveliness to our collective culture, also bringing economic benefits in the form of a workforce. The much admired NHS could not survive without them. Today there are 85,000 immigrant nurses registered in the UK and recent General Medical Council figures suggest 37% of all NHS doctors qualified abroad. (Info4Migrants, Extracted 28-5-14 from IPPR web site]. In Norfolk itself there has been a long tradition of sucessful BME migration from the 1700s onwards, some were former slaves who went on to set up businesses and campaigners against slavery. Dr. Allan Glaisyer Minns was made Mayor of Thetford in 1904, thus becoming Britain’s very first Black mayor.

Unease

A recent article (dated 31st May 2014) in the Guardian newspaper by a famous author, Hanif Kureishi, notes how collectively ‘we like to believe there was a time when the world didn’t shift so much, everything appeared more permanent, and we were all alike’. In fact, as noted, there has always been waves of ‘strangers’ or migrants to this country throughout history. He suggests that the idea of ‘the immigrant’ creates anxiety only because he is unknown, has no individual face or status, so we don’t hear his voices. Thus the migrant can be given the status of an object about whom anything can be said. Former migrants, now settled in the new country, can often be the most opposed to newer arrivals. It may be that when immigrants arrive in larger groups rather than individually, it causes more unease within host communities. Looking back through history and even today, we can see that the arrival of each new group of people has given rise to feelings of unease. Unease is especially evident in times of economic instability, when people, understandably, feel afraid of losing their jobs or rights and are looking for someone or something to blame. The media plays on these fears inflating numbers of asylum seekers, refugees and immigrants. Language used to describe immigration is highly negative across all newspaper outlets, with ‘illegal’ and ‘bogus’ the most commonly used terms to describe immigrants and asylum seekers. [Katie Peyton-Lister, European Projects Manager at Careers Europe, representing the UK careers guidance community in Europe]

Overcoming fears

Research does give us hope though about overcoming these barriers. A recent 10 year study, led by Oxford University psychologists, shows that when different cultures mix, prejudice is reduced. The study findings show that even prejudiced people who normally avoid contact with other groups become less prejudiced when they live in areas where different ethnicities mix. ‘We have shown that positive contact between people belonging to different ethnic groups leads to more tolerant societies overall’ [Professor Hewstone, senior author of the study and Director of the Oxford Centre for the Study of Intergroup Conflict]. From our own life experiences, most of us would have noticed this happening over time in different communities. Many BME community members talk about feeling more comfortable in London where local people are used to much more diverse ethnic groups and cultures. The way forward then is to continue working to promote more cross-cultural exchanges so we get to know each other better. In this way, people don’t remain locked into their own backgrounds and familiar territory. If you the reader have any experiences and examples of this or suggestions on how to overcome these differences, please send us your thoughts or ideas.

NORWICH LORD MAYOR’S JULY PARADE

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NAS RE F

(Norwich Asylum Seekers and Refugees forum) • NASREF (Norwich Asylum Seekers and Refugees forum) is a multi agency forum that brings together a network of statutory, voluntary and community organisations working with asylum seeker, refugee and migrant worker in Greater Norwich. The overall purpose of NASREF is to develop a co-ordinated approach to planning across stakeholder to promote a culture of understanding, sensitivity and integration of asylum seekers and refugees which can lead to better community cohesion with an improved well-being of the client group in Norfolk. The Group has existed since 2004 and meets once every two months on the first Tuesday of January, March, May, July, September and November at Norwich City Council from 10am-12pm.

NASREF in 2014

• The main activities of the group are to share information and good practice; to inform regional and local policy, to improve awareness and understanding of asylum & refugee issues in all sectors, to support effective partnership working, to contribute to and build links with initiatives to support community cohesion in Norfolk, to contribute to and build links with initiatives which promote the well being of migrant workers. • Membership is open to any organisation or individual involved with support, advice or delivery of services to asylum seekers, refugees, migrant communities and marginalised communities in Norfolk.

NASREF in 2009

• Key Partners include: Norfolk Children Services, Norfolk Library Services, Norwich City Council (Housing), YMCA, Health Service providers, British Red Cross (Refugee Orientation Project), The Bridge Plus+ ; New Routes, G4S; Norwich City College, and several other support service organisations from the voluntary, statutory and community sector.

An Appreciation – Charles and Barbara Cornish Submitted by Gervais a family friend

I

would like to use this opportunity to celebrate the lives of the late Charles and Barbara Cornish, who made a massive contribution to improving the lives of refugees in Norfolk and nationally. Charles was born in Norfolk, and after meeting and marrying Barbara the couple travelled the world following Charle’s career as a British Army Officer. Their son Simon was born in Egypt, and daughters Rose in another foreign country. On retiring from the army, the family returned to Norfolk and took over responsibility for the family farming business in Trunch. Barbara was a devout Roman Catholic (some years later Charles also converted to Catholicism) and she became the national lead within the Catholic Women’s League for Refugees and Asylum Seekers. In 1998 Barbara joined the Norwich and Norfolk Refugee Support Group (NNRSG), which at the time was the only organisation working with refugees in Norfolk, partnering with social workers Gerardo Rodriguez, Sue Gee, Ann Lewis and representatives from the Church of England Diocesan Board of Social Responsibility. Charles had always supported Barbara’s work, and became the Hon. Treasurer of the NNRSG. When Asylum Seekers were first artificially ‘dispersed’ to hotels in Great Yarmouth by London Boroughs and Kent County Council, Barbara became actively involved with other group members in visiting isolated asylum seekers in Great Yarmouth, arranging for them to be transported to Norwich to attend the Norwich International Club on Sunday evenings, and assisting them with finding legal advice and support. The then Director of Social Services also played a key role by allocating transportation to NNRSG to

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attend events over the weekends. The NNRSG was very pro-active in lobbying for proper and safe arrangements to be made for the housing and support needs of asylum seekers and, at a series of meetings, protective safeguards were put in place. Those multi-Agency meetings organised by NNRSG, laid the foundation for the current multi-Agency NASREF (Norwich Asylum Seeker and Refugee Forum). Barbara and Charles brought their many years of experience and expertise to their work with the Refugee Community in Norfolk. They were a very concerned and generous couple who provided individual support where they could identify a real need with wisdom and kindness. NNRSG at that time also started Drop In advice sessions for asylum seekers and refugees at the Quakers Meeting House on Friday mornings which Barbara led together with Ann Lewis. A service later picked up by the British Red Cross which continues into their Refugee Services Project to this day. Barbara was also a kind and caring hostess, who hosted lunches at White House Farm in Trunch during the summer for the young people who attended the NIYP, and for adult refugees. She was a superb cook, and many of us would struggle to achieve her standard of hosting. Barbara and Charles were forward thinking people, who, in their latter years, planted an arboretum at White House Farm. They knew that they would not live to see the arboretum mature fully, but wanted to leave something behind for the coming generations. Barbara and Charles are survived by their son Simon and daughter Rose and their grandchildren.


BME VOICES I am a Muslim but did you know that because of my children, for every Halloween and Christmas, I have a budget similar to what an average Christian will spend. My children grew up here and this is what they know. I can’t exclude them from what is happening around them. Christmas for them is a time of gift sharing not a religious occasion. I was a computer engineer back home, and I still have those skills. I really don’t need any higher level of education to become operational. But the Job Centre Plus keeps insisting that I should get a job at the McDonalds or KFC. All I need is for someone to give me an opportunity to prove my skills. Sadly I am caught up by the same old problem: No experience, no job, yet no one will give me the opportunity of the experience. I am employed full time as a care worker, but I would have never believed my job in the UK would have been about taking care of the elderly parents of other people. Where I am from, children take care of their parents when their parents can no longer take care of themselves, just like our parents took care of us when we were young and unable. Perhaps this is something that will take me years to understand. I learned English by watching children’s channels because my children were too young and all we had to watch was CBBC. I found that level of English easier to understand, because they spoke to communicate with viewers who are learning. So thank you CBBC for teaching me English.

I have always wanted to be accepted and recognised as a refugee. It took several years before the Home Office would grant me my status. But now I hate the name refugee for all the negative things associated with it. How different am I to former refugees who are not visible minorities? Why are they still not seen as refugees? Well I think the answer is simple, they are not visible minorities, so they can blend in easily. .

I have been in the UK for about four years now and no one has ever asked me about my educational background. I became convinced that they had assumed as I had assumed, that because I arrived with no English, that I had no formal education. The fact is I have been to school. Actually I went to university, and I graduated with a bachelor’s degree. I became silent because my life changed all of a sudden. I used to have a good job, a house, a maid and I was happy before having to leave my country. I have lost a lot about who I am through my journey to settling in the UK. Yes you are right to ask me how far I have been to school, because you cannot look at me now and think that I am an educated person. My own life has taught me a lot about making assumptions. Although I am thankful to the UK government for giving me a new lease of life, however my life today was not a life I had imagined for myself when I graduated from university several years ago.

I receive so many papers and letters from my children’s school which I never read. I rely on my children telling me what the correspondences are supposed to be about, because I cannot read. So I have taken on the habit of piling them in a box which is now overflowing and am tempted to take it back to the school to show them how many trees they could have saved.

I am an asylum seeker. I entered the UK on a valid visitor visa because that was the only way I could enter the country legally. Several people and family members helped me through the process. It was costly and it separated me from my family, but worth the sacrifice. That was the only way to do it if you were me and many others like me whose lives were in danger. There was no way I was going to be able to get an entry visa to the UK by approaching the British embassy and telling them that my life was in danger and that I need a visa to come to the UK to claim asylum so that I would be recognised a refugee and be provided protection under the UNHCR (United Nations Higher Commission for Refugees). But now that I am here, my claim for asylum was refused because I was considered to be someone who was not credible and truthful about my initial intentions of coming to the UK. I arrived in UK full of hope and sense of security, but the asylum system and how everyone claimant is treated as liars was a real Like in the UK Test for me.

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Call Call 111 111 when when you you need need medical medical help help fast, fast, and and it’s it’s not not an an emergency emergency 111 111

The The 111 111 service service is is free free and and it’s it’s easy easy to to use use

When When you you call call 111, 111, a a local, local, trained adviser will ask trained adviser will ask you you questions to find out what questions to find out what is is wrong. wrong. They They can can give give you you medical medical advice advice over over the the phone phone or or help help you find a doctor or nurse. you find a doctor or nurse. Your Your adviser adviser can can get get an an interpreter if you need interpreter if you need one. one.

If If it’s it’s not not urgent urgent you you should should call call your your GP GP

B-Me Voices Magazine-Summer 2014 issue 2  
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