Page 1

Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 1 Spring 2014

Meet Gervais – Not born but partly bred here

• Bulgarians Celebrate In Norfolk

• My Life in the UK – Sharon’s Story • A Hate Free Norfolk….

••• UKBA news, Brits Abroad and many more inside •••

• Diversity in the Prison Services

• Norfolk Active in Kicking Racism Out of Football

A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


INDEX

4

Meet Gervais-Not born but partly bred here

6

Community Cuisines

7

Warm & Well Community Cuisines Feedback event

8

Hate Free Norfolk

10 Zimbabwe Community celebrates Diversity 12 Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk 13 Survey on community interactions

14 Norfolk Active in Kicking Racism Out of Football 17 Bulgarian’s Celebrate In Norfolk 18 My life in the UK – Sharon’s Story 22 Jobs Fair Organised by Bridge Pus+ 23 BME Disability Project 24 Housing Benefits 26 Diversity in the Prison Services 28 Brits Abroad & Map of the EU 29 UKBA News 30 Heads of Key Institutions in Norfolk 31 Ethnic Food 32 Politics-Who is your MP

This page is available for your advertisement needs. Please contact us for details office@bridgeplus.org.uk You can also view the magazine free online at www.bridgeplus.org.uk 2

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EDITORIAL

Welcome to the first issue of B-Me Voices Magazine aimed at promoting diversity and improving community cohesion. B-Me Voices will focus on projecting positive images of minorities in the UK, which I hope will have an impact on improving understanding between people from different backgrounds. In this magazine you should expect to read about issues that affect all of us such as housing, health, education, employment, but which disproportionately impact more on minorities, like racism and discrimination. We will be sharing stories about people’s real life experiences and about communities celebrating diversity. For example in our cover story at page 4 and in the Life in the UK story at page 18, we share two people’s experience of living in Norfolk as a minority. At page 35 we echo some held believes. It is a challenge to be different. And I challenge anyone to try to be B-Me: a black and or a minority in UK. They say we are hard to reach, we say they are hard to engage. But does it really matter who is right. I draw reference to a report by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) which states that people with few or no personal relationships with minority ethnic communities were more likely to express overtly negative or racist views about them.

I hope and expect this magazine will reach out to all the hard to reach from both sides. I believe such a medium will be an effective tool to build lasting bridges of understanding and respect. This is a pilot project which will see us through three issues in a year, but I hope it will become a regular publication that could be maintained beyond its funded life. We are open to ideas and suggestions and everyone is welcomed to contact us about contributing, which can be done by sharing stories, events and or securing an advert space. The magazine will be made available for free throughout Norfolk using a network of contacts from the statutory, voluntary and community sector and individuals. It will also be on offer to all learning institutions and public locations such as libraries and local businesses. You can view the magazine in its entirety at www.bridgeplus.org.uk Until next time Sincerely

Pa Musa contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

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My name is Gervais –

Gervais in a community spirit

M

y name is Gervais. I used to find it hard for people to understand my name, until I found out about Ricky Gervais, so I got into the habit to telling them, “as in Ricky Gervais.” I am originally from CongoBrazzaville. That is the other Congo, the one that you don’t hear much about. I grew up in a big African family. I left my country a long time ago due to war and I went to live in Ivory Coast, where I was able to quickly establish myself and move on with my life. Unfortunately another war started in Ivory Coast and I had to flee again which brought me to the UK. I am in my 40’s, and I believe perhaps my story is very similar to several other people who had to suddenly leave their country to move somewhere else foreign. I am a single parent with two young daughters. Coming to England was nothing I had planned. It was circumstances of life that got me here. I would have never thought that one day I will be living in an English speaking country, especially England. 4

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Norfolk has been home to me for the past 10 years. My oldest daughter knows nowhere else but Norfolk. I am not even sure if she remembers much about her life back home, because when we arrived in the UK she was just 7years old, and we had already spent a few years in Ivory Coast. In effect she has spent more than half of her age in the UK. For me, moving here felt like being born again. I suppose you can say I went through a rebirth here in Norfolk. So, although I was not born here, I could say with confidence that I was “partly bred” here, if that is a correct terminology to use. Imagine after going through primary, secondary and university education back home, moving here meant I had to go through that educational journey all over again in a new language-English. All of which was in addition to being a single male-African parent. I don’t think that is an experience I share in common with a lot of people in England. When I first arrived in Norfolk, it was a difficult start, because Norwich was predominantly White. You could hardly see a black person

in town, and I was the only visible minority on my street where I lived. I know that to be accepted in any community is not an easy thing, because there are always local concerns about a foreigner arriving in an area. This is not unique to Norwich or Norfolk. It is a human thing. I have had my own experience of discrimination, the sort that is difficult to prove. I also had to deal with the odd bus journey experience where people refuse to sit next to you even if that was the only empty seat, or getting the strange looks from someone sitting on their own as you board the bus. But I don’t blame them. I still wonder if that was their first experience of meeting a black person, but I still don’t believe it requires someone to be prejudice to others. Overall, I feel happy here. Norfolk has become more diverse, and although racism still exist, thing have improved and I think Norfolk should be proud of itself as a safe and lovely place to live. I personally have lots of friends from all ethnic background, Black, White and Asian. I found making friends to be very effective in people understanding each other. I am a Catholic. I attend the Cathedral Church on Unthank road. We have several minorities involved in my local church. When I joined that church it was predominantly white. But now we have lots of Philippines, Polish and Africans. I am also a member of the church parish council representing minority voices. I found the church to be one thing people will look for when they move to settle in a new place. I think the church plays a very important role in people’s lives and it is one thing that continues to play a traditional role in fostering

Gervais with the then Lord Mayor of Norwich in 2012

Gervais with Bishop of Norwich


– not born but partly bred here!!! understanding and tolerance. However not everyone is religious or church going. The local churches in Norfolk have been very supportive of BME communities, and my own church priest is a very good example for me. How I ended up in England is a complete different story, but I thank god for my life. Arriving in the UK was very reassuring because I knew that it is a model country for human rights and democracy. I feel safe and protected here.

Parenting

Gervais engaging with communities

How did I become a single parent? Well war is a very terrible thing. It breaks up families and destroys lives. When it comes, you can’t predict what will happen. The war took me away from my country and put me in a position where I had to flee with my daughter. About me being a single parent, well in life sometimes we have to make decisions for ourselves, and fleeing with my daughter was something that was done to safe both our lives. My daughter has experienced a lot in her life. It has always been a priority for me to look after her. For me, being available for her, giving her all my love and devotion was paramount. I think she has become very mature considering what she has been through. She is growing up into a very strong and determined woman, which makes me proud of her. Her mother in back home, we got separated after the war and she is now remarried. I have since managed to get my youngest daughter join us a few years ago.

Gervais with Norfolk Police & Crime Commissioner, Steven Betts

of life. I am currently working for the British Red Cross as a service coordinator helping other people who have moved to the UK to start a new life. Coming here has in fact changed a lot about my professional life. The level of English I arrived with was not one that I could even have the simplest of conversations with someone. I took English as a foreign language in high school just to pass a grade, and that was it. Coming here was a challenge. There are certain things that are best understood through personal experience. And I don’t wish such experience on anyone. Back home and in Ivory Coast, I was able to utilise my French education, skills and experience, because I already had a bachelor’s degree in Geography. I was managing a very successful travel agency business. But to arrive in a country where you don’t speak a word

of the functional language, and finding your previous education to be of no use is a real life challenge for anyone. So that is why I keep saying that coming here meant starting all over again. I had to learn English from scratch. First I had to enrol in an ESOL (English for speakers of other languages) class. At the same time I enrolled in an A ‘Level courses in sociology and psychology which I managed to pass. But I know I like challenges. My own life has always been a challenge. I think that is what made me the type of person I am today. I now have a second degree in International development from the University of East Anglia. So here I am, I started off with no English and now it is my second language. So, yes I still maintain that I am partly bred here in Norfolk!

Professional Life

I consider myself an international development professional, which means I am interested in issues related to peace, conflicts, and how the environment affects our way

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COMMUNITY

CUISINES

O

ur Community Cuisine events are based on an idea developed and tested in September 2012 by The Bridge + steering group of volunteers and service users. It builds on our experience of co-ordinating food events like Refugee Week and Big Lunch which we found to be very effective in bringing communities together. These events are made possible through the active support of our core volunteers and other community members, who take turns to prepare taster dishes and run event logistics, with support from Bridge+ staff. Invitees and regulars attendees include minority ethnic and British residents as well as representatives from local services who are given the opportunity to share information about their services and engage with our service users in a relaxing and friendly environment.

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A Community Development Foundation survey back in (Aug 2003) noted that indicators of community involvement may be: • Community influence: % of adults who feel they can influence decisions affecting their local area • Community cohesion: % people who feel their local area is a place where people from different backgrounds can get on well together • Social Capital: % people who have helped or been helped by others (unpaid and not relatives) over the past year or months. Think about yourself too and whether you have given any unpaid help to others in the past 12 months? – possibly in some of the following areas:

Warm & Well Community Cuisines Feedback event

• Children’s education • Youth clubs/ activities outside school • Education for adults • Sports/exercise – taking part/coaching/ watching • Religious groups • Politics – local council • The elderly • Safety first • The environment • Justice and human rights • Local community groups • Hobbies/ recreation,/ social informal groups • Health, disability, social welfare

“What I do on a normal day”-A Winter Warm & Well Community Cuisine Feedback event hosted by The Bridge Plus+

Some of the responses from participants about how they spend their free time

During one of our shared community cuisine lunches, funded by Norfolk Community Founation, we talked about whether we felt connected in our local communities. A number of people reported feelings of isolation and they were from a range of different backgrounds; older, young mothers, men and women of varied nationalities and circumstances. In exploring why this might be, people took turns in describing their typical day. Some people did not see many others outside their home and had not found their own ethnic community to be very supportive either. Reasons for feeling isolated may include: language, lack of money for transport or entertainment, need to stay at home to look after children, not being aware of local groups or facilities, or someone to accompany them and help motivate them to participate more in local activities. Research suggests that people on low incomes have limited chances for social interactions in their local areas. ‘Some groups such as refugees or migrant families become socially isolated in their new communities’. (J.Rutter “Back to Basics. Towards a successful and cost-effective integration policy”, ippr March 2013) Others though have managed to make a number of connections in their local community through activities such as volunteering, learning English, parent groups, meeting informally with friends at the library for example, or attending social clubs which were not dependent of having more money.

• Calling back home • Exercise, running to deal with stress. I used to work, but since my work permit ran out, while am waiting for a decision, I did not know what to do outside of work. • Raising chickens keeps me busy. • Going to appointments: GP, JCP, schools etc • School runs, watching CBBC with my children • Took on religion, going to church or mosque takes up my time • I wake up at 5 am, pray, and start preparing the children for school. I am a single mother and I struggle to cope with the demand of activities to do and paying attention to the children’s needs. It is not easy. • Volunteering in community activities and projects • Attending English classes • Jumping from one project activity to another because that is all there is to do. • Whether I wake up early or late makes no difference because I have nothing to do. My child is too young to go to school and I cannot find a job. • There are not enough programmers for people with children. Anywhere you would like to go, they don’t have a crèche. • I attend swimming but my friend with a child could not, so sometime I just stay with her. • Because of transport costs I could not attend many free events.

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Do you want to live in a Hate Free Norfolk?

I

Beatrice from Bridge Plus

n the first week of March 2014 the Hate Free Norfolk Network launched the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge, and we would like as many members of the BAME community as possible to sign up as well. What is the Network? There are a lot of people in Norfolk who are working together to raise awareness, tackle hate incidents and hate crime and to provide support and help to people who are victims. Together these people and organisations are called the Hate Free Norfolk Network. By working together, we can build hate free communities and create a Norfolk that is free of hate and hostility towards people. When you join the network you get a monthly e-newsletter that tells you about what is going on in Norfolk and how you can get involved. Most people and organisations that join the Network also sign the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge, which is a promise to do something 8

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Michelle with CHief Constable Bailey

on hate incidents and hate crime. The Pledge has seven commitments which are: • Stand up for the right of everyone in Norfolk to live free from hate • Address the issues that cause hate • Challenge attitudes and behaviours that can lead to hate • Ensure that victims and witnesses are taken seriously and treated with respect • Make it easy to report hate and support people to do so • Work with others to raise awareness of the impact of hate • State the actions that we will take to make this happen You can sign up to the Pledge via the website www.hatefreenorfolk.com. The Bridge Plus has signed the Pledge, and their coordinator Pa Musa Jaborteh gave the following words of support: ‘Black and Minority Ethnic communities in Norfolk

support the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge. For many foreign born residents, the UK represents freedom and human rights, which is why people want to live in a place like Norfolk where they feel safer and respected so that we can fully contribute to a diverse and vibrant Norfolk’. Please join the Network, sign up to the Pledge and play your part in building a Hate Free Norfolk. A hate incident is any incident which may or may not constitute a criminal offence and is perceived by the person, or any other person as being motivated by prejudice or hate A hate crime is any hate incident, which constitutes a criminal offence Association of Chief Police Officers By Michelle de Oude, Chair of the Hate Free Norfolk Network, www.hatefreenorfolk.com


EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY –

Images & Quotes

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Zimbabwe Community Celebrates

DIVERSITY

T

he Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich (ZIMCAN) was formally launched at an event on 31st October 2009. The Executive Committee meets once every month and sometimes more often when event planning takes place.

The Aims of ZIMCAN are:

1 The advancement of education of members of the Charity and the Community through culturally appropriate activities; thus promoting closer integration and potential for development within the community, by fostering closer ties between members and the general public. 2 The promotion of health and social care through a range of activities intended to promote well-being of individuals within the community of people of African origins, specifically Zimbabweans. 3 To facilitate the relief of poverty, sickness and distress through a support network offering support, advice and assistance, including prison visiting, to members and relevant others of African origins who are in distress. 4 To promote the cultural richness and history that supports the development of cultural and personal identity, particularly for children and isolated individuals in Norfolk.

Our year round regular activities include: 1 Quiz and chips fund raising event to support our

community projects. 2 Africa Day Celebrations to celebrate the heritage and identity of Africans in Norfolk. 3 Family day out at The Whitlingham Park, canoeing, sailing, kayaking, archery & Walks. 4 The annual ZIMCAN BBQ at Morley Village Hall in Wymondham with several activities lined up including 10

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football, drumming workshop, Music, dance workshop and jumping the castle. 5 Organising events in partnership as in previous years with the following groups: Tambai Promotions, The Bridge Plus+, Norwich Mind and Mashinga Trust. 6 Celebrating Norfolk Black History Month (BHM) to which our previous guest included: • Mr Mwanaka, a Zimbabwean farmer based in Essex, featured in a BBC documentary. • Mr Francis Ampofo a British Flyweight boxing title holder with five consecutive wins, which won him the Lonsdale belt. Francis now runs a Free-Range farm in Norfolk. • Celebrating the achievements of Zimbabwean born English Premier League footballer, Benjamin Mwaruwari, fondly known as Benjani. He played for Portsmouth, Manchester City, Sunderland and Blackburn. He also played a total of 44 times for the Zimbabwe National Team and was the team captain for many years. • Mrs Mollin Delve, founder and Director of the charity P.H.O.E.B.E which is an inspirational organisation promoting greater inclusivity and encouraging a greater number of black and ethnic minority women and children to receive support and services in Suffolk.

Other project activities: • The ZIMCAN Burial Society • The ZIMCAN Football team Contact: 07956473813 Email: zimcan@live.co.uk Website: www.zimcan.btck.co.uk Face Book: Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich


African Countries Independence Days and Former Colonial Rulers 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

Country

Independence Date

Prior ruling country

Algeria, Democratic and Popular Republic of Angola, People’s Republic of Benin, Republic of Botswana, Republic of Burkina Faso, Popular Democratic Republic of Burundi, Republic of Cameroon Republic of Cape Verde, Republic of Central African Republic Chad, Republic of Comoros, Federal Islamic Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville), Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa), Democratic Republic of the Côte d’Ivoire, Republic of (Ivory Coast) Djibouti, Republic of Egypt, Arab Republic of Equatorial Guinea, Republic of Eritrea, State of Ethiopia, People’s Democratic Republic of Gabon, Republic of Gambia, Republic of The Ghana, Republic of Guinea, Republic of Guinea-Bissau, Republic of Kenya, Republic of Lesotho, Kingdom of Liberia, Republic of Libya (Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya) Madagascar, Democratic Republic of Malawi, Republic of Mali, Republic of Mauritania, Islamic Republic of Mauritius, State of Morocco , Kingdom of Mozambique, Republic of Namibia, Republic of Niger, Republic of Nigeria, Federal Republic of Rwanda, Republic of São Tomé and Principe, Democratic Republic of Senegal, Republic of Seychelles, Republic of Sierra Leone, Republic of Somalia, Democratic Republic of South Africa, Republic of South Sudan, Republic of Sudan, Democratic Republic of Swaziland, Kingdom of Tanzania, United Republic of Togo, Republic of Tunisia, Republic of Uganda, Republic of Western Sahara- was immediately seized by Morocco Zambia, Republic of Zimbabwe, Republic of

3 July 1962 11 November 1975 1 August 1960 30 September 1966 5 August 1960 1 July 1962 1 January 1960 5 July 1975 13 August 1960 11 August 1960 6 July 1975 15 August 1960 30 June 1960 7 August 1960 27 June 1977 28 February 1922 12 October 1968 24 May 1993 5 May 1941 17 August 1960 18 February 1965 6 March 1957 2 October 1958 10 September 1974 12 December 1963 4 October 1966 26 July 1847 24 December 1951 26 June 1960 6 July 1964 22 September 1960 28 November 1960 12 March 1968 2 March 1956 25 June 1975 21 March 1990 3 August 1960 1 October 1960 1 July 1962 12 July 1975 4 April 1960 29 June 1976 27 April 1961 1 July 1960 31 May 1910 July 2011 1 January 1956 6 September 1968 9 December 1961 27 April 1960 20 March 1956 9 October 1962 28 February 1976 24 October 1964 18 April 1980

France Portugal France Britain France Belgium France Portugal France France France France Belgium France France Britain Spain Ethiopia Italy France Britain Britain France Portugal Britain Britain Britain France Britain France France Britain France 2 Portugal South Africa France Britain Belgium Portugal France Britain Britain Britain Britain Sudan Britain/Egypt Britain Britain France France Britain Spain Britain Britain

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Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk 2013 Cultural Event in Great Yarmouth EMA Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk, is a Great Yarmouth based black and minority ethnic led community group which was founded in 2012 in direct response to requests from local residents, who felt increasingly disconnected and isolated from each other, and who needed support to re-connect to their local

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community and neighbourhoods. Our objectives are to support activities in the community, promote peaceful co-existence between people from all denominations and provide relief assistance where necessary. We organise events and activities and we also support other local voluntary and community groups’

around the county by promoting diversity and understanding between cultures.


of community organisations. Questioned on where they would seek help, just over half mentioned the police and 11 people cited voluntary organisations such as The Bridge Plus (9 respondents) or the Red Cross and Citizens Advice Bureau.

Short Survey on community interactions Bridge Plus short client survey on community interactions, relations and experiences of racism-March 2014. To explore some of the issues raised in a more systematic way, 32 of the Bridge Plus service users representing 18 different nationalities, were individually asked a standard set of questions relating to community interactions or any personal experiences of racist incidents in Norwich /Norfolk. Approximately two-thirds of the group were women and the overall ethnic background comprised; 7 white other, 17 Black African, 4 Asian, 1 Caribbean and 3 Arab or Kurdish. The majority, 16, had been living here between 1-5 years, whilst 11 had been here between 5-10 years. The largest age group, 18, were between 40-54 years with 11 respondents aged between 26-39 years. One question asked them to rate on a scale of 1-5, whether they felt people from Norwich/Norfolk had made them feel welcome, and the average score given was quite high at ‘4’. Thirty out of 32 respondents reported that they have made friends in Norwich and 62% have at least one local friend from the host community. In contrast, 38% said that they haven’t made any friends from the local community and all their friends are from a migrant background. Regarding loneliness two-thirds of respondents told us they do experience feelings of isolation, noted as just ‘sometimes’ for 42% but 19% ‘often’ felt lonely. Interestingly, only 3 of those were actually living alone. In contrast, just over a third 34% (11 respondents) told us they ‘never’ or’ rarely’ feel lonely, which included two people who were actually living by themselves. In other words, living with other people or children does not always prevent feelings

of isolation, the situation is more complex than that, and is likely to include some of the factors shared in the Warm & Well Community Cuisines feedback featured at page 7, as well as a whole range of individual and personal reasons. Over half (58%) of the respondents stated that they have good relationships with their neighbours. For 19% it was just on a greeting basis with some neighbours and about 23% of respondents report having no relationship at all with them. Overall, the findings regarding neighbours seem to reflect the respondents’ understanding of the situation in general here in this country. Racism in Norwich: It happens! – was the view of 85% of respondents in the survey. For the majority (61%) it only happens ‘sometimes’ or ‘rarely’ (11%) and just 3 reported the occurrence as ‘often’. The incidence of racism was not shown to be associated with ethnic background. It happened mostly in the street or on public transport i.e. from people who do not know them or unfriendly neighbours. Over half of those victims of racism didn’t report it or did not take any action. Mostly it was random, passing comments in the street so difficult to evidence or remedy the situation, but those in a regular setting did take constructive steps e.g. alerting staff or volunteers

How could community relations between host communities and BME individuals and groups be improved? All survey respondents mentioned informal gatherings such as various cultural activities around food, music, dance etc. bringing together people from different backgrounds and thus encouraging mutual exchanges. The settings of the racist incidents is perhaps an indication of ignorance about other cultures and suggests a need for greater awareness raising to overcome the barriers of diverse cultures. Those respondents who had lived in other parts of the UK, noted that they found the situation better in Norwich/Norfolk than other cities here, apart from London where diversity is quite usual and thus more accepted. We would be very interested to hear your feedback and thoughts on any of the findings or points raised in this article. A general feedback and discussion workshop is also planned in the coming months and it would be good to hear your views and suggestions together as an interactive group.

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Norfolk Active in Kicking Racism Out of Football

The Let’s Kick Racism Out of Football campaign was started in 1993 by the Commission for Race Equality (now EHRC). It is primarily a campaigning organisation which enables, facilitates and works with the football authorities, professional clubs, players, fans and communities to tackle all forms of discrimination. The campaign has been pivotal in persuading and supporting the game’s stakeholders to take their equality responsibilities seriously. Since Kick It Out’s inception in 1993, huge progress has been made in tackling all forms of discrimination while the campaign goes on with a strive for a game completely free of prejudice. (Source and for more info visit http://www.kickitout.org/).

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?


DID YOU KNOW?

? • Tax documents- is it a P45 or P60?

P45 is the tax document your employer gives you when you leave a job showing how much tax has been paid to date. A P60 is the document everyone who has been employed in the current tax year gets, showing how much has been paid to the end of each year. • It wasn’t until 1567 that the first books were printed in Norwich? And did you know that a refugee from Antwerp printed those books? In the 16th century a large number of Dutch refugees settled in Norwich. This group, who became known as the Strangers, brought new skills and trades with them. Two of the refugees, Anthony de Solempne and Albert Christian, were printers and soon began printing books in Norwich. • For hundreds of years, refugees have travelled to Norfolk bringing new skills, language and customs, and that at one time almost half the population of Norwich were refugees. Just before the Second World War, the British government agreed to take in Jewish refugee children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland. The children, aged between 7 and 17, were in danger of religious persecution in their homeland. They fled their home countries through a network of trains known as the Kindertransport.

? ??

• It is widely known that ‘The Canaries’ is the nickname of Norwich City Football Club, but did you know that it is thanks to refugees that Norwich is associated with the bird? In the 16th century a large number of Dutch refugees settled in Norwich. This group, who became known as the Strangers, brought their pet canaries with them. By the early 18th century canary breeding had caught on in Norwich and the City had developed its own varieties. Norwich City Football Club adopted the canary as its badge in 1922 but the team was commonly known as ‘The Canaries’ from soon after its formation in 1902. • Eleanor Rathbone an MP in the 1930 housed Checz couples and supported refugees in UK

• There are more than 6 million CCTV cameras in use in the UK, which is more than anywhere in the world.

• Date of Birth of foreign nationals:

Many people from rural parts of the developing world don’t know their actual dates of birth, but for most people in the West, it is a given. The registration of births is not necessarily compulsory in other countries. Most third world children are therefore not registered at birth, so don’t have a birth certificate, and their exact date of birth would have been lost in the mists of time. UNICEF thinks that around 50 million babies each year are not registered or given a birth certificate, but they can’t be certain of the exact number because, obviously, there is no record! In some countries, UNICEF thinks as many as 6 out of every 10 children do not have a birth certificate. For many people, providing a date of birth becomes necessary in later life, especially when people are about to go to high school, or if they need a national ID card or passport. This means guessing, tracing and/or relating their date of birth to a historical event around the time they were born. If you encounter someone from a foreign country struggling to remember their date of birth, it may be that for them, it isn’t a straightforward question with a straightforward answer!

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Norfolk Library & Information Service Norfolk & Norwich Millennium Library

Gaywood Library Tel: 01553 768 498 River Lane, Gaywood, King’s Lynn PE30 4HD

Plumstead Road Library Tel: 01603 433 455 Plumstead Road, Norwich NR1 4JS

The Forum, Millennium Plain, Norwich NR2 1AW Telephone Number: 01603 774 774

Gorleston Library Tel: 01493 662 156 Lowestoft Road, Gorleston NR31 6SG

Poringland Library Tel: 01508 494891 Overtons Way, Poringland NR14 7WB

Acle Library Tel: 01493 750 693 Bridewell Lane, Acle NR13 3RA

Great Yarmouth Library Tel: 01493 844 551/842 279 Tolhouse Street, Great Yarmouth NR30 2SH

Reepham Library Tel: 01603 870 474 Bircham Institute, Market Place, Reepham NR10 4JJ

Attleborough Library Tel: 01953 452 319 31 Connaught Rd, Attleborough NR17 2BW

Harleston Library Tel: 01379 852 549 Swan Lane, Harleston IP20 9AW

St Williams Way Library Tel: 01603 434 123 Williams Loke, St Williams Way, Norwich NR7 0AJ

Aylsham Library Tel: 01263 732 320 7 Hungate Street, Aylsham NR11 6AA

Hellesdon Library Tel: 01603 427 790 Woodview Rd, Hellesdon, Norwich NR6 5SR

Sheringham Library Tel: 01263 822 874 New Road, Sheringham NR26 8EB

Blofield Library Tel: 01603 712 902 The Reading Room, Blofield NR13 4RQ

Hethersett Library Tel: 01603 810 188 Queen’s Road, Hethersett NR9 3DB

Sprowston Library Tel: 01603 408 426 Recreation Ground Rd, Sprowston, Norwich NR7 8EW

Brundall Library Tel: 01603 714 576 90 The Street, Brundall NR13 5LH

Hingham Library Tel: 01953 850 621 The Fairland, Hingham NR9 4HW

Stalham Library Tel: 01692 580 794 High Street, Stalham NR12 9AN

Caister Library Tel: 01493 720 594 Beach Road, Caister NR30 5EX

Holt Library Tel: 01263 712 202 9 Church Street, Holt NR25 6BB

Swaffham Library Tel: 01760 721 513 The Pightle, Swaffham PE37 7DF

Costessey Library Tel: 01603 742 669 Breckland Rd, Costessey, Norwich NR5 0RW

Hunstanton Library Tel: 01485 532 280 Westgate, Hunstanton PE36 5AL

Taverham Library Tel: 01603 260 545 Sandy Lane, Taverham, Norwich NR8 6JR

Cromer Library Tel: 01263 512 850 Prince of Wales Road, Cromer NR27 9HS

King’s Lynn Library Tel: 01553 772 568 / 761 393 London Road, King’s Lynn PE30 5EZ

Thetford Library Tel: 01842 752 048 Raymond Street, Thetford IP24 2EA

Dereham Library Tel: 01362 693 184 59 High Street, Dereham NR19 1DZ

Loddon Library Tel: 01508 520 678 31 Church Plain, Loddon NR14 6EX

Tuckswood Library Tel: 01603 452 038 Robin Hood Road, Norwich NR4 6BX

Dersingham Library Tel: 01485 540 181 Chapel Road, Dersingham PE31 6PN

Long Stratton Library Tel: 01508 530 797 The Street, Long Stratton NR15 2XJ

Watton Library Tel: 01953 881 671 George Trollope Road, Watton IP25 6AS

Diss Library Tel: 01379 642 609 Church Street, Diss IP22 4DD

Martham Library Tel: 01493 740 212 Black Street, Martham NR29 4PR

Wells Library Tel: 01328 710 467 Station Road, Wells NR23 1EA

Downham Market Library Tel: 01366 383 073 Priory Centre, Priory Rd, Downham Mkt PE38 9JS

Mile Cross Library Tel: 01603 425 906 Aylsham Road, Norwich NR3 2RJ

West Earlham Library Tel: 01603 451 881 17/18 Earlham West Centre, Norwich NR5 8AD

Earlham Library Tel: 01603 454 338 Colman Road, Norwich NR4 7HG

Mundesley Library Tel: 01263 720 702 18 Cromer Road, Mundesley NR11 8BE

Wroxham Library Tel: 01603 782 560 Norwich Road, Wroxham NR12 8RX

Fakenham Library Tel: 01328 862 715 Oak Street, Fakenham NR21 9DY

North Walsham Library Tel: 01692 402 482 New Road, North Walsham NR28 9DE

Wymondham Library Tel: 01953 603 319 Back Lane, Wymondham NR18 0QB

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Dates shaded white must be open for pupils. Yellow shading indicates pupil holiday. Red shading indicates bank holiday / County Council closure. Five Professional Development days must be taken within pupil holidays, we suggest 3-4 September, 6 January, 22 April and 26 June.

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Bulgarians in Norwich and Norfolk (BNN) celebrate International Women’s Day by Galya Clark

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bout 50 people of mixed nationality backgrounds joined the Bulgarian community at “The Base” on the 8th of March2014 to celebrate international women’s day, an event supported by Norwich Mind. Bulgarians in Norfolk usually celebrate three very special days every year, two of which are linked to Bulgarian tradition and one an international event. 1st of March is called Baba Marta in Bulgaria (Baba is the Bulgarian word for “grandmother” and Mart is the Bulgarian word for the month of March). The Bulgarians exchange so called martenitsa’s – which are white/red woollen badges or bracelets. They are worn from March 1st until around the end of March, or at the first sighting of a stork, swallow, or budding trees. It is a way to welcome the arrival of spring. Legend has it that Baba Marta reflect the changes in

mood of every woman, which is believed to be the reason why some days in March are sunny and wonderful but others are with pouring rain or even snow storms. 3rd of March is the Bulgarian National Day of Liberation from the Ottoman. For five centuries Bulgaria was under Ottoman rule and on 3rd of March 1878 the Liberation came with the signing of a treaty between Russia and the Ottoman Empire after the end of Russian-Turkish war 1877-1878. 8th of March is International Day of Woman and Bulgarians love and celebrate it with parties, flowers and presents for the women. This year at The Base, all the ladies present received a tulip, a greeting card and a martenitsa from the organisation to honour their presence. Galya Clark, the coordinator of the BNN gave a speech in Bulgarian and English, followed by a congratulatory talk by the

manager of Norwich Mind, Amrita Kulkarni. One of the children, Kristina, charmed the guests with her national costume. The girl and several other ladies read poems for Baba Marta. The event was followed by various activities including a quiz on Bulgarian history and geography, for which there was a winners prize. People stayed on the whole day mingling and sharing taster Bulgarian food and wine, while others left with recipes of Banitsa, a kind of cheese pastry with rice and spinach, and Sarmitchki a popular Balkan dish). Guest of the event included representatives from Norwich Mind as well as Lydia Martin, one of the community engagement officers for Norwich City Council who continues to work tirelessly with BME communities.

B-Me VOICES

17


My M Life in the UK

y name is Sharon but most people know me as Mrs Masudi. I was born in Congo DRC. I did some of my education there until the war came. Then I had to flee with my husband whilst 2 months pregnant with my oldest child to seek shelter at the Maheba Refugee camp in Zambia. When I left Congo, I spoke no English and my French was not that good either but I did not let that stop me from trying to be involved in things going on around me.

In the UK

Sharon Masudi

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I arrived in the UK in December 2006 after being in the refugee camp for nearly 10 years. My family was amongst the first cohort of refugees to be resettled in Norwich through the UK government’s Gateway Resettlement programme. After being in a refugee camp for so long with no prospect of being able to go back home, this was an opportunity for us whose lives had been devastated by war to find a permanent home at last. When I arrived in the UK, I found everything to be very difficult . It was like going through a whole transformationchanging culture, language and friends. I realised that some of the basic expectations of my culture, such as exchanging greetings with people, getting to know your

neighbours, were almost impossible here as the customs were so different. When we first arrived, we were being supported for the first year by the Gateway Resettlement Team who gave us a lot of help and encouragement. We were taken to several gatherings to meet people and officials. That was how I met a retired White British lady by the name of Rachel who introduced me to the Earlham Christian Centre Church (now called Eternity Christian Centre). Here she said I would be able to meet people from different cultures, and that through basic conversations, I would improve my English. In fact, I had first started learning English in Zambia as it was an English speaking country.

Community Life

I think the bonus of attending different classes and community activities was that anywhere I go, I make new friends. And from every new friend, not only do I get to practice and improve my English, but also learn new ideas and things. I have to say that it took me quite some time to understand the local ways. Coming in as someone new from a different cultural background, I had to make a conscious decision and commitment to understanding the community I now live in, and use that as a means to build up my own community life. At first I could not understand local people either not responding when I say “hello” or just giving a smile back that didn’t mean anything, I was not even sure if I was offending them by saying hello. Where I am from, saying hello to someone is very important. It is a simple and polite courtesy that is expected and given. I have gotten used to that side of things and I now know that here you are not expected to say hello to someone you don’t know. I found New Routes integration project to be particularly supportive in helping me set up a women’s group which we named at the time ‘Rafiki Women’s Group’. When I started that group, it was mainly for Congolese women, and then soon we started having women from other nationalities joining us. That was why we decided to rename it the ‘International Women’s Group’ a project activity that continues to be run by New Routes.


It was primarily a women’s support group, through which we shared basic skills and ideas, as well as provided peer to peer support. We would sometimes invite the police, social services, health visitors to teach us some basic things about society here. For example, most of us coming from a foreign country were used to spanking children as a form of discipline, something we found out to be unacceptable in the UK. Above all, we made lifelong friends and I think we have learned a lot from each other. It was all fun. Sadly in July 2009, my husband passed away and I could not continue to be active in most of the things I was doing.

Volunteering

My first formal volunteering job was with the Red Cross back in the refugee camp in Zambia, where I helped orphaned children in the camp. Eventually I got a job with the UN as a team motivator overseeing a group of support workers responsible for food distribution and other essential needs of the camp residents. In total, I worked for about 8 years with the UN both as a volunteer and a paid staff. I still actively volunteer in different ways here, as that is one of the best ways I see in giving back to the community. I currently help three elderly white British people, visiting them and cleaning their houses, and they also teach me how to cook a traditional English meal. Over time, I have volunteered for a number of different projects such as; churches, community groups and at my children’s schools.

Work Life

How did I really get my job? Again for me it was through training and education. About three years ago, a good friend referred me to a housing association course. At this time I was still in deep mourning as it took me a long time to recover from the impact of the sudden death of my husband. However, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity and my husband had always encouraged me to study. It took two years to complete the training and I had to sacrifice a lot of time away from my family attending training sessions in London. The way I am today is not because I stayed home waiting for things to happen. I think the reason I have a job today and am driving around has

to do with the effort I made. I really missed my husband who was always encouraging me to become independent. I remember calling him once to pick me up, and he said, “Sharon, you really need to learn to drive. What if I died oneday, who will you call?” That remark had always been ringing in my ear especially when he died, but it kept me motivated. So I added learning how to drive to my list of priorities. I had always wanted to become a nurse and I knew I would need transport for some of my target jobs. After completing the Housing Association course, I applied for placements with different employers including City Council, Stonham Home Group, and the private sector. I was accepted by Stonham. It was a difficult start, but the team were very supportive. I remember the managers Vicky and Becky encouraging me and giving me challenging assignments. I can see how they found it difficult at times to try to teach me on the job, but they never gave up on me. It was difficult for me too in the beginning as mostly I could not understand their accent, and am sure they must have found it more difficult to understand me when I spoke. After a six months placement, I was offered a job working on the night shift. When I look back, I am very thankful to all my colleagues as I now have a position as a project support officer.

Integration

If you knew my late husband, you would remember him as someone who is friendly and always approachable. He would greet and introduce himself to anyone he meets, even if he does not know them. From there on, we started making friends, attending different project and community activities. Becoming involved in the community was what actually started the process of integration for me and my family. I came to the realization that to be fully integrated, I would have to learn English. So I started to enrol in all the available English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes on offer. I went through all the ESOL Entry Levels 1 to 3, then I did two GCE subjects, an ECDL and NVQ courses, and the list can go on. There is no community based ESOL class that I have not attended. From Bowthorpe, Castle Mall to classes in churches, I took them all.

My husband and me spent a lot of time juggling between child care and attending evening and night classes to get through. I think we were both equally committed to learning English, because we saw it as the only way to be fully integrated. If I were to show you my folder of certificates, they are a bag full, and I cherish every one of them. My children are doing very well in school and when they speak, with your eyes closed, you could hardly distinguish them from a native Norfolk person. My oldest son is now a football referee, plays guitar, enjoys drama and music and is doing very well. I had a tough time getting to where I am now having come from a war torn country. I am very appreciative of all the support I received from people in Norwich, both black and white. For me, Norwich is a very nice place to live. When I came people did not at first appear very friendly, and I think that is partly due to my misunderstanding of their culture. But I also think that things have changed a lot, because Norfolk has become more diverse and people are becoming more understanding and accepting of different cultures. Personally, I have not had any problems in Norwich. I have been to other parts of Norfolk, but mainly on day trips. I have visited one other city outside of Norfolk, and when I came back, I really appreciated Norwich more. I think anyone who comes to Norfolk will soon appreciate how a good place it is to live if they are prepared to understand the local people. Although I hear a lot of people I know complaining about their neighbours, my own experience has always been positive. Our children play together and I found my neighbours to be very helpful. Integration for me means getting to understand and know the people and the place where you have moved to. For me the best way of doing that is by being actively involved in your community through direct participation in local activities, church gathering and learning English. Learning the language was the one thing that made feel empowered to achieve all the other things. My life in the UK has been a positive struggle and I know that this is not the end, so am not slowing up, nor am I giving up on continuing to improve my situation.

B-Me VOICES

19


The Bridge Plus+

CELEBRATING

DIVERSITY IN NORFOLK

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B-Me VOICES

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Jobs Fair

Organised by The Bridge Plus in November 2013

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Equal Lives Introducing a new project for BME disabled people of Norfolk

List of grassroots BME Community Groups known to us in Norfolk (Non-exhaustive).

E

qual Lives is very excited to have a dedicated organiser working with disabled people and their families in the BME communities in Norfolk. The project, called Empowering Disabled BME people, will support and enable disabled people of ethnic minority background to realise their potential. Hélène Rinaldo is our dedicated community organiser. She will listen to people and their concerns, encourage dialogue, build relationships with individuals and their community. Hélène will also bring people to work together and help them to take action on local issues that matters to them.

1. Bangladesh Welfare Association People can take action through their project to empower themselves and their communities. It could be to set up a sport club, a cooking club or a small enterprise. The world is an oyster where ideas can become projects that will promote well-being and integrate BME communities better in Norfolk. Are you a disabled person? Do you care for a disabled person? Are there concerns you would like to see addressed? Then this is an opportunity not to be missed. Please contact Hélène, Helene.rinaldo@equallives.org.uk Mobile: 07795 451 770

ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) The Bridge Plus+ offers informal English classes for various

levels provided in small groups on Tuesdays, by arrangement. Contact us for more information. Suite 209, Sackville Place, 44-48 Magdalene Street, Norwich NR3 1JU. Tel-01603 617076 Email office@bridgeplus.org.uk Website www.bridgeplus.org.uk

2. Black History Month-Black Heritage & Culture Norfolk 3. Bulgarian in Norwich & Norfolk (BNN) 4. Congolese Community Association 5. EriEthiopian Community Association 6. Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk (in Great Yarmouth) 7. Great Yarmouth Resettlement Orientation Services-GYROS 8. Kings Lynn Area Resettlement Support-KLARS 9. Neesa Project – provides social & educational activities for women & children 10. Nepalese Community Network 11. New Routes Integration project 12. Ni-Chema- promoting community based HIV prevention and sexual health promotion 13. NORFRESA (Norfolk French Speakers Association) 14. Norwich Association of Malayalees (NAM) 15. Norwich International Youth Project- NIYP 16. Norwich United Karate 17. One Love Football Club Tiger Football Club 18. Portuguese Association of Thetford 19. The Bridge Plus+ 20. WORD International 21. Zimbabwe Community Association of Norfolk (ZIMCAN)

B-Me VOICES

23


Housing Benefit Changes as of April 2013 – A brief summary • You could get Housing Benefit to help pay your rent if you’re on a low income or are receiving welfare benefits. It can pay part or all of your rent depending on your income and circumstances. • You can apply for Housing benefit whether you’re unemployed or working. • You may also be able to get help with your rent if your benefits stop • There’s no set amount of Housing Benefit and what you get will depend on whether you rent privately or from a council. A ‘benefit calculator’ is used to determine your eligibility and amount payable. • You probably won’t be able to get housing benefit if you are someone who is ’subject to immigration control’ – for example an asylum seeker, if you need official permission to enter or stay in the UK but you have not received this yet. • How much you get depends on: o your ‘eligible’ rent level o if you have a spare room o household income – including benefits, pensions and savings (over £6,000) o your circumstances e.g. age of people in the house, disability etc. o if you live with a partner, only one of you can get Housing benefit o the amount is based on the Local Housing Allowance (LHA) in your area.

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How you’re paid – It is paid by your local council as follows: • Council tenants – into your rent account (you won’t receive the money) • Private tenants – directly into your bank account or building society (rarely by cheque)

Things you must tell you council when your circumstances change There is a long list of changes that you should tell your council e.g., a child leaves school, you go away for more than a month, someone moves in, you have a baby, you change type of benefits, you get a job, become a full time student etc. Also, under the new rules a husband and wife living in a two bedroom flat, will be considered to have one spare bedroom and will get less Housing Benefit as a result. It doesn’t matter if you think you need your spare bedroom. For example, you may think you need your spare bedroom because: you and your partner need to sleep apart because of a medical condition, or your children have moved out but you keep a spare room for when they come and stay. But there are some people who may be allowed a spare bedroom, like disabled person who needs an overnight carer to stay with you.

How to claim – If you’re claiming other benefits contact Jobcentre Plus to claim Housing Benefit along with your claim for: o Employment & Support Allowance (ESA) o Income Support o Jobseekers Allowance – Jobcentre Plus will send your details to claim Housing benefit directly to your local council o If you’re not claiming other benefits, get a Housing Benefit claim form from your local council.

What else you need to know: • You may be able to backdate your claim or claim in advance by up to 13 weeks • You may also get extra help from your council by a ‘discretionary housing payment’ if your Housing Benefit doesn’t cover your rent. • If your benefits stop if you go to work or earn more, you could get an extra 4 weeks of ‘Extended Payment of Housing Benefit’ – if eligible the council will contact you.

Further Information This is a complicated benefit system and varies with each individual case, so it is useful to read up the details on: www.gov.uk/housing-benefit/ or www.shelter.org.uk/advice


B-Me VOICES

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DIVERSITY IN THE PRISON SERVICES

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t’s hard enough visiting a loved one in prison, but just imagine the level of distress if you couldn’t speak English, you couldn’t understand what you were being told, no-one understood your questions, and you couldn’t explain your fears and sadness. Just imagine you want to breastfeed your baby but you don’t feel you can do that in a room full of men and women you don’t know. You want to have the comfort of prayer but the only private place for contemplation is the toilet. You would like your imprisoned husband to be able to record a Story Book Dads story to send to your young son but you know he can’t read or speak English. You know that your brother is too reserved to tell his prison officer that he doesn’t understand how to make an appointment with the prison nurse. You want to do something to help – but you don’t want to draw attention to yourself, and you feel people are looking at you. Everything just seems too difficult. The Ormiston Families team at Norwich Prison understands how traumatised and fearful people can feel when they find 26

B-Me VOICES

themselves in such unknown territory. From the moment people arrive at the Centre, they have the chance to recognise their own language in the Welcome signpost, find translations of key information resources on the reception desk, and watch the Information video available in various languages and subtitles matching the prisoner population. We can also make use of a telephone translation and interpreting service if the need is there. We hope that the Centre demonstrates that we welcome all families from all communities. They may see that our crèche children are making lanterns for Diwali’s Festival of Lights, or crafts for Chinese New Year; someone is using the private room for prayer or breastfeeding; the prison Imam has come over to talk to a Muslim family about their prisoner cousin; there are displays about heritage in Black History Month; a Chinese-speaking prison officer is talking to a Chinese family with little English; a newly-arrived Polish family are reading a Polish children’s book to their young son; a member of the Ormiston Families team is helping a member of

the Travelling Community to fill out a form to claim travel expenses; another is phoning the prison medical team to tell them of a family’s worries about their son’s mental health. Inside the prison, the officers are fully committed to meeting the needs of diverse communities, such as respecting sacred calendars. For example, the Muslim prisoners can observe the practices of Ramadan and follow the fasting and dietary requirements of their faith. The prison Chaplaincy team is multi-faith and supports all prisoners – those of a specific faith as well as those who are not. The Ormiston Families team ensures that no prisoner dad or granddad is

excluded from the Story Book Dads scheme due to language, literacy or cultural barriers. We have helped prisoners with very little English to record a story through this scheme to send to their children wherever they are in the world, so that the child knows their Dad is still thinking of them and still loves them as much as ever. We know we always have a lot to learn, and we rely on representatives of minority groups to advise us on how we can improve the service in ways that we may not have recognised. Please let us know if you feel you can contribute – we will always be glad to hear from you. This article is provided by Ormiston Families, the leading children’s charity in East Anglia. It offers support to children and families affected by imprisonment. It also works with families from Gypsy and Traveller Communities, runs children’s centres and offers a range of support to parents. Ormiston Families runs the Visitors’ Centre at HMP Norwich Prison, supporting the children and families of the men held in the prison. Debbie Campbell is Service Manager.


What’s on and Upcoming June 20 is World Refugee Day.

What is Refugee Week? Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and educational events that celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and encourages a better understanding between communities. Every year during Refugee Week, over 500 events are organised across the UK. These will range from big music festivals and art exhibitions to political debates, film screenings, conferences, school activities, sports and community events take place all over the country to celebrate the day. Refugee Week 2014 in the UK and in Norfolk will be observed from the 16– 20 June. Last year, over 30 events and activities took place in different locations throughout Norfolk. For more information about the UK wide initiative please go to: www.refugeeweek.org.uk for a copy of last year’s Norfolk events booklet visit www.bridgeplus.org.uk/refugee-week/ • The 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees at Article 1.A.2 defines a refugee as any person who, owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable to or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country. Images from previous events

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BRITS ABROAD

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n estimated 5.5m British people live permanently abroad, this is one of several findings published by the Institute for Public Policy Research, which is almost one in 10 of the UK population. The emigration of British people has happened in cycles over 200 years. The trend is now rising again: some 2,000 British citizens moved permanently away from the UK every week in 2005. Full story accessible from http://news. bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/in_depth/ brits_abroad/html/

Brief heads up: 9 European nations have 20,000 or more British residents – Spain has the most.

29 Brits live in Spain for every one

found in Italy. Spain is the second most popular destination in the world for emigrating British citizens.

190 People in Albania represent the smallest European cluster. 1.3 million ex-pat

Brits live in the USA and Canada – the same number can be found in Australia.

24% of Brits in the

USA are thought to be pensioners.

2,500 Britons live part of their year in Mexico.

BRITS ABROAD: THE TOP COUNTRIES Country Resident name Britons Australia 1,300,000 Spain 761,000 USA 678,000 Canada 603,000 Ireland 291,000 New Zealand 215,000 South Africa 212,000 France 200,000

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Case studies

From Portugal: I came to Portugal as

I was attracted by the lifestyle, sense of community, traditional values, and the beauty of the country. The UK had become too oppressive to live in. I am semi-retired, and my hobby is sailing, so this is the perfect place for me. From Sweden: I lived in London for 12 years and spoke to my neighbours three times. Fed up with the stress of my job, long days and expensive cost of living, I left the UK to see the world. I met my girlfriend whilst travelling and we spent five months together before she had to return home. She then emailed me to ask me if I would come to Sweden to visit and maybe stay a while. I have children now and have no desire to see them in an English school that has classrooms of more than 30 pupils and a lack of discipline and respect. I can now take a walk at night without the threat of being attacked. I do miss the quintessential English pub tradition though.

From the USA: I live in Santa

Monica, a beach community in Los Angeles. I’ve lived here since 2002. I am originally from London. I left the UK because I felt claustrophobic there. From the The Gamba:

(This added by Bridge Plus:) I moved to The Gambia permanently about 15 years ago after several repeated visits in the 5 years prior. I moved because I found out that the weather is good for my medical condition. Back in the UK, I was seeing my doctors every week. In The Gambia, I hardly ever do and it is cheaper. Because I am retired, I sold my house in the UK and bought a home in The Gambia. There is already a strong community of retired Brits out there. I love it out there, and people call me by my first name wherever I go. I never had that friendly relationship with my neighbours back in England, where I lived alone for 30 years after my wife passed away.


UKBA News • Immigration Minister resigns after finding out that his cleaner does not have a valid visa. Mark Harper has resigned from the government after it emerged his cleaner did not have permission to work in the UK. James Brokenshire MP has been appointed as the new Immigration Minister. Please follow this link to read his letter of resignation in full: BBC News - Mark Harper resignation letter: http://www.bbc. co.uk/news/uk-politics-26102599 • Immigration Knocking on Doors: On Tuesday 19th November 2013 a local Norfolk paper reported a story about a Cromer businessman and his American-born wife who were left angry and in turmoil after her visa application to stay in the UK was turned down. This may be news to many but it is actually a fact of life for many immigrants who are married to British nationals. • Banks acting as immigration PoliceIllegal Immigrants in the UK will no longer be allowed to open Bank Accounts, according to widely spread news. The government has contracted a private organisation to oversee proposed bank account controls as set out in the new Immigration Bill which is one stage removed from getting the Royal Assent. This would mean that banks will now be required to check all applications for opening new accounts to ensure that anyone who is in the UK illegally will not be allowed an account. The Home Office immigration department has given powers to CIFAS to act as it’s so called “anti-fraud” watchdog, who will have access to all data known about illegal migrants. The measures are not intended to affect anyone with an ongoing immigration applications or appeals that is still being considered, nor will those who have been granted permission to be here legally. The contractors CIFAS, are a leading not-for-profit anti-fraud organisation which has many banks and building societies as members. Over the last two years, CIFAS and the Home Office have worked with UK financial service providers to avoid fraud amounting to £25 million.

• Is this really necessary? Universities forcing international students to give fingerprints-Universities forcing international students to give fingerprints to prove their attendance at lectures have been condemned by the national students union (NUS). The universities of Sunderland and Ulster have introduced systems to check foreign students, but not British students. Both universities brought in the fingerprinting system after the Home Office demanded all international student attendance be monitored. Sunderland brought in fingerprinting at its London campus earlier this month, while Ulster implemented it at its London and Birmingham campuses in January. Newcastle University decided against using the system last year after the students’ union voted against it. The Home Office has recently ramped up its surveillance of international students, after it was revealed that over 100,000 foreign students were suspected of using the education system to get into the country last year. Full story accessible at http://www.independent.co.uk/ student/news/is-this-reallynecessary-universities-introducefingerprinting-for-internationalstudents-8894007.html

• Is it UKBA or? One thing we know is that UK immigration control is a function that lies within the Home Office. Back in 2008, the UKBA (UK Border Agency) was created as an executive agency with the merger of the short lived Border

and Immigration Agency (BIA), UK Visas and the HM Revenue & Customs. However back in March 2013, just before we got used to the name, the Home Secretary, Theresa May decided to abolish the UKBA and replaced it with two new organisations: UK Visas & Immigration and Immigration Enforcement. So for now, it is best to stick to referring to it as the Home Office’s department dealing with immigration matters as no one knows what the elections next year will bring. • The Briton who married an American and moved to France to get into the UK. Is this reported story similar to the one above? British citizens are bypassing immigration rules to get their relatives into the UK, using the Surinder Singh route, named after an historic court case which ruled that if an EU national works in another European country for three months, they can apply to bring their family members into the UK under EU rather than British law on their return. Under UK law, a person can only bring their partner who is a non-European Economic Area (EEA) citizen, into Britain if they can show that they earn at least £18,600 a year. There is a list of specific incomes that can be factored in. So even if you are married to a British citizen, you may be asked to leave and probably be banned for 10 years if you have overstayed or were convicted of a crime. By exercising your rights under European freedom of movement, your status as a European citizen takes priority over your status as a UK citizen, and when you return to the UK you are allowed to bring your Non-EEA spouse without having to meet the £18,600 minimum earnings requirement which applies to Britons. This is not the kind of news you will find on the UKBA website. (source http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ uk-23029195)

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Heads of key organisations in Norfolk List of Leaders of the individual parties Cllr George Nobbs, Leader of the Labour Group and Leader of the Council-1603 222936 Cllr Bill Borrett, Leader of the Conservative Group07767 768511 or 01362 860200 Cllr Toby Coke, Leader of the UKIP Group07717 881289 Cllr Marie Strong, Leader of the Liberal Democrat Group-07920 286597

The Leader of Norfolk County Council is the political head of the council which usually is the party with the majority of elected members. The current leader is Labour Councillor George Nobbs, who was elected to the post by a coalition of different political groups. On the 15th November 2012, 41 Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) were elected across England and Wales to replace the former Police Authorities. The main aim of the office of the PCC is to cut crime and deliver an effective and efficient police service within their force area. The role of the PCCs is to be the voice of the people and hold the police to account by effectively making the police answerable to the communities they serve. This also means that the PCCs as elected officers are responsible for the hiring and firing of Chief Constables/ Police. To achieve their objective, they are expected to work in partnership across a range of agencies at local, national and community level to ensure that there is a unified approach to preventing and reducing crime (source: http://apccs.police.uk/role-of-the-pcc/)

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Managing Director (previous title was Chief Executive) of Norfolk County Council - Dr Wendy Thomson appointment confirmed, due to assume office in August 2014. She will be responsible for the day to day management of the council’s business.

Police & Crime Commissioner Stephen Betts

Deputy Police & Crime Commissioner Jenny McKibben

Cllr Richard Bearman, Leader of the Green Party Group-01603 504124 Cllr Alexandra Kemp, Leader of the Independent Group-07920 286636

Chief constable Simon Bailey

Chief Fire Officer Nigel Williams

Deputy Chief Constable Charlie Hall

Deputy Chief Fire Officer Roy Harold


Ethnic Food Ethiopian green beans and potato (vegetarian) Diced potatoes cooked with onions, garlic, green beans, cabbage and spices.

Fish or vegetable pie otherwise known as Indian Samosa very common in Africa too.

Maize meal (vegetarian, Southern African) known as sadza, pap, nshima or fufu. Made out of corn flour and cooked in water into a mash like consistency which slightly hardens when allowed to cool. Normally served with a vegetable side and a meat dish.

Fried plantain (vegetarian, West African)

Injera (vegetarian, Ethiopian) pancake like flat bread made from slightly sour dough served with vegetable side and a meat dish.

Jollof rice (vegetarian, West Africanmain staple of the Jollof people of Senegal and Gambia) Spicy rice cooked with tomatoes, tomato paste, onions, spices, chilli and pepper and a choice of meat, chicken or fish.

Lentil stew (vegetarian, East African) Lentils cooked in garlic, onion and spices.

Chakalaka (vegetarian, South African) Tomato, onion, chilli, garlic, carrots in curry and spices.

Puff puff or pancake or Begne-these round pancakes go by different names

Borewores (South African sausage) Fried garlic flavoured sausage.Goes down well with the mazie meal and chakalaka!!

Iraqi Stuffed vegetable leaves is a very popular Middle East recipe.

Kenkey is a common Ghanian food made out of fermented corn dough, wrapped in corn or plantain leaves and cooked into consistent solid balls (also known in other areas as dokono, dokon, kokui, tim or komi).

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Norfolk’s 9 Members of Parliament & their Constituencies 4 5 1 2

3

6 7

9 8

1. Keith Simpson MP - Broadland Conservative-Tel: 01603 865763

7. Simon Wright MP - Norwich South Liberal Democrat - Tel: 01603 627660 Email: office@simonwright.org.uk

2. Brandon Lewis MP - Great Yarmouth Conservative - Tel: 01493 652928 Email: brandon.lewis.mp@parliament.uk

8. Richard Bacon MP - South Norfolk Conservative - Tel: 01379 643728 Email: richardbaconmp@parliament.uk

3. George Freeman MP - Mid Norfolk Conservative - Tel: 01953 600617 Email: george.freeman.mp@parliament.uk

9. Elizabeth Truss MP - South West Norfolk - Conservative - Tel: 01842 757345 Email: elizabeth.truss.mp@parliament.uk

4. Norman Lamb MP - North Norfolk Liberal Democrat - Tel: 01692 403752 Email: norman.lamb.mp@parliament.uk

• Member of European Parliament (MEP) for the eastern region Richard Howitt Labour -Tel: 01223 240202 Email: richard@richardhowittmep.com

5. Henry Bellingham MP - North West Norfolk - Conservative - Tel: 0207 2198234 To Find your MP using postcodes and names of MPs or constituencies, Email: bellinghamh@parliament.uk or fragments from this link: http://findyourmp.parliament.uk/ 6. Chloe Smith MP - Norwich North Conservative; 01603 414756 Make sure you are registered Email: chloe@chloesmith.org.uk

to vote in the next elections!!!

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WHAT TO DO WHEN A FOREIGN NATIONAL DIES IN THE UK

I

n most ordinary circumstances, a dead person’s nearest relative has the responsibility of making the necessary decisions and arrangements. Funeral arrangements for most foreign national will usually involve the repatriation of the decease to their country of origin. Religious place of worship or community groups with which the deceased was associated are known to be very supportive, helpful and knowledgeable in this area. Some immigrant community groups are also known to have their own informal funeral arrangements which may involve collecting contributions towards the cost of repatriating the deceased. It is strongly recommended to check with the local embassy or consulate of the deceased first to find out if they provide any assistance in this respect. Most embassies don’t have the resources but are very helpful in providing specific advice relevant to the culture of the deceased. Sending bodies abroad requires the permission of the coroner (a government official who confirms and certifies the death of an individual within a jurisdiction) and at least four days notice should be given before the body is to be moved. The paperwork required and regulations are dependent on the country of destination and need to be checked with the relevant Embassy or consulate. Please note that you will have to book the flight for repatriating the coffin with the airline separately. The cost will include transportation of coffin plus any accompanying person. Please note that a coffin is treated as cargo and will be charged according to its weight or volume/size weight, whichever is highest. WHAT HAPPENS WHEN NO ONE CLAIMS THE BODY If somebody in the community passes away and it appears that no suitable arrangements have been made then according to Section 46 of the 1984 Public health act the local authority (district, city or borough council) has a responsibility to arrange for the burial or cremation of dead persons within their administrative area. If a local authority cannot find friend or family member willing or able to deal with the deceased’s estate and pay for the funeral, then local authorities will try to establish the religious background/faith of the deceased and arrange a service. If the faith cannot be determined, then generally a simple ceremony takes place followed by a burial or cremation. Under their obligation the local authority will deal with all aspects of the arrangement of a state-assisted funeral. There is some variety in terms of what each authority provides as part of a public health funeral, but it will generally include a hearse, coffin and minister. Other aspects offered often include a notice in the paper, bearers or a small floral tribute. Where possible authorities will try to meet any identified wishes of the deceased, for example in relation to whether there is a burial or cremation, or any religious requirements. WHAT HAPPENS IF SOMEONE DIES IN HOSPITAL OR CARE HOME The NHS may arrange and pay for the funeral, if there are no relatives or friends who are willing or able to do so. However, before doing so, an NHS Trust may approach the local authority to see if they are willing to arrange and pay for the funeral. Staff will contact the person named as the next of kin. An appointment is made for the bereaved to collect any 34

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personal belongings and complete the formalities. If the doctor knows the cause of death he or she will provide a certificate which states the cause of death. If the doctor is unsure about the actual cause of death or has not seen the patient within a fourteen day period he or she cannot sign the death certificate. The coroner must be informed. People on low incomes can apply for a Government Funeral Payment to help fund arrangements. In general, a person can be eligible for a Funeral Expenses Payment if they are in receipt of a qualifying benefit. Please seek proper advice from an agency like your local benefits office or CAB (Citizens Advice Bureau). REGISTERING A DEATH In England, Wales and Northern Ireland a death must be registered within five days. If the Coroners’ office is involved, the registration period can be extended as long as the registrar is informed of the circumstances. It is up to whoever is arranging the funeral to inform the registrar. Deaths must be registered by the Registrar of Births and Death for the sub district in which the death occurred. You will find the address in the telephone directory under Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages or make enquiries at the local council, post office or police station. The registrar will provide a Certificate for Burial or Cremation and a Certificate of Registration of Death for Social Security purposes which should be filled in and sent to the local Social Security office so that they can deal with pensions or other benefits. A Death Certificate is needed for pension or insurance claims, there is a fee. Several copies may be needed and it is cheaper to purchase them when registering the death rather than later. THE COST OF FUNERALS IN THE UK It should be noted that funeral services are a business in the UK. Funeral Directors can provide quotes for a whole range of funeral services from basic to very elaborate. Discuss your requirements and ask for an itemised quote. The deceased may have a Pre-Paid Funeral Plan. Look for it in the papers and check with the funeral director what services it covers. It may not pay for everything you want so that will cost extra. You may be entitled to help from the Benefit Agency. This will depend on the financial status of the responsible person not the deceased. The bill will be sent fairly soon after the funeral. All the major banks release funds from frozen accounts. DEALING WITH THE DEAD PERSON’S BELONGINGS AND PROPERTY The person who deals with everything owned by the person who died is known as the personal representative or the executor, if they are named in a will, or the administrator if no executor is named or no will. The personal representative is responsible for paying all outstanding debts, including funeral expenses from the deceased estate (i.e. the deceased property and possessions). Even if there is no will the deceased possessions can only be distributed when all expenses have been paid. The personal representative will have to apply to prove the will, or, if there is no will, apply for a grant of administration, which gives the person permission to deal with the deceased’s estate and pay bills. You do not have to use a solicitor but should you decide to do so seek advice as to whether you are entitled to legal aid when dealing with the estate. This information is collated from different sources including the internet.


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NOT LETTING YOU GO OUT BY YOURSELF • SHOUTING • PHYSICALLY ASSAULTING YOU • TELLING YOU THAT YOU’RE CRAZY • HURTING YOU • CALLING YOU NAMES • TAKING YOUR MONEY • ISOLATING YOU FROM FRIENDS AND FAMILY • BELITTLING AND BULLYING YOU • MAKING YOU FEEL WORTHLESS AND UNLOVED • THREATENING YOUR CHILDREN • DENYING THAT THERE IS ANY • Telephone • Advocacy ABUSE TAKING helpline PLACE • MAKING YOU CRY • FORCING THEMSELVES ON YOU • SAYING IT’Svictim YOUR support FAULT • NOT • Advice surgeries • Male LETTING YOU SEE YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY • HURTING Services for children • Multi agencyLIES training OR•THREATENING FAMILY PETS • TELLING ABOUT young people YOU&• HUMILIATING AND MOCKING YOU • CALLING • Emergency refuges YOU A FAILURE • DESTROYING YOUR PROPERTY • MAKING YOU FEAR FOR YOUR CHILDREN’S LIVES • STALKING OR FOLLOWING YOU • SLAPPING OR KICKING • INTIMIDATING OR THREATENING YOU • NOT LETTING YOU GO OUT BY YOURSELF • SHOUTING • PHYSICALLY ASSAULTING YOU • TELLING YOU THAT YOU’RE CRAZY • HURTING YOU • CALLING YOU NAMES • TAKING YOUR MONEY • ISOLATING YOU FROM FRIENDS AND FAMILY • BELITTLING AND BULLYING YOU • MAKING YOU FEEL WORTHLESS AND UNLOVED • THREATENING YOUR CHILDREN • DENYING THAT THERE IS ANY ABUSE TAKING PLACE • MAKING YOU CRY • FORCING THEMSELVES ON YOU • SAYING IT’S YOUR FAULT • NOT LETTING YOU SEE YOUR FRIENDS YOU•HELP? Volunteering, Fundraising,FAMILY Donations ANDCAN FAMILY HURTING OR THREATENING PETS • email: admin@leewaynwa.org.uk TELLING LIES ABOUT YOU • HUMILIATING AND MOCKING YOU • CALLING YOU A FAILURE • DESTROYING YOUR For further information call 0845 241CHILDREN’S 2171 PROPERTY • MAKING YOUplease FEAR FOR YOUR www.leewaysupport.org LIVES • STALKING OR FOLLOWING YOU • SLAPPING Registered Charity No. 1079214 OR KICKING • INTIMIDATING OR THREATENING YOU

Supporting adults & children in Norfolk who have experienced or are still experiencing domestic abuse

Registered charity number: 1079214, company no: 3208084 V1 August 2013

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B-Me VOICES MAgazine

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