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K y u n g J a e

B l a i c h


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PROFESSIONAL

The Souk, Comercial and Residential Complex Makkah Oasis, Hotel Design Competition Ruwais Hotel, Hotel Design Kuala Lumpur City Center, Master Plan

ACADEMIC

Le pli, Tourist’s Hyper Center Link, Transitional Housing Urban Void, Affordable Housing Black Box Theater, Experimental Theater Archi-on, Architecture Cultural Center Samsung Media Center, Suwon Hwaseong Architectural Competition Open School, Elementary School

ART

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The Souk ‘ COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX, JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA, 2012 ’

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GN

SITE ANALYSIS

Development Context

red sea fountain

HEART OF JEDDAH SITE site

SOUK

port

REGIONAL CONTEXT: JEDDAH, KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA

NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEXT : HEART OF JEDDAH

SOUK SITE CONTEXT WITHIN HEART OF JEDDAH

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JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA Jeddah is the second largest city in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It is growth continues to reach skyward like much of the new buildings and developments currently being built there. It’s location close to the Red Sea and on the pilgrimage route to Makkah, make it a densely populated place to travel through and dynamic place to live. The Heart of Jeddah development in Jeddah is part of a larger effort to generate contemporary energy in a historic setting. This urban scale project will be a visually stunning, technologically innovative, programmatically comprehensive and culturally sensitive. The souk development is a subset of the larger Heart of Jeddah project and will manifest the innovative, programmatic and culturally

informed goals as well. The animated and densely populated souks of yore are unlike newer types of developments that are often on a grand scale. Souks hold a special significance in Middle Eastern culture because they have traditionally created character and identity on deliberately human scale. The new souk in HOJ will be a correspondingly smaller scale intervention within an iconic neighborhood. “ The souks of Saudi Arabia are a lingering reflection of social norms. Tolerance, simplicity, kindness brought back to life in these souks”


DESIGN PRINCIPLES

CONNECTIVITY Using the Souk as a counduit link geographically remote places and experiences.

SHADING AND PRIVACY

SERENDIPITOUS MEANDER The design will seduce and attract people to explore the Souk. The Souk must provide a clear logic and spatial hierarchy while maintaining serendipitous routes through the market.

SENSITIVITY AND RESTRAINT

Shading will be the primary environmental and privacy strategy. The Souk employs strategies to cope with the extreme climate and to resolve privacy concerns.

The Souk will be world class design contextually informed. Among the other more iconic structures of HOJ the Souk provides an intimate experience at the human scale. The design incorporates traditional Islamic architectural elements in a contemporary, restrained expression.

Muntalaq

Business Hotel

Jumah Mosque

N Qib la

Souq 6

MUNTALAQ ARRIVAL AND DROP OFF

SOUQ WATERFRONT Terraced pedestrian promenade with promontories and overlooks of the water features. Planting areas and shaded overlooks. Waterfront restaurants and retail venues. SUNKEN PIER Sunken pedestrian walkway which gives visitors a water level experience of the fountain features.

AXIAL CONNECTION TO BUSINESS HOTEL Luxury Hotel

Exhibition Center Hotel

High Density Residential

Exhibition Center

EXHIBITION CENTER ARRIVAL AND DROP OFF


DESIGN STRATEGY 0m 35

?

+ SITE

SITE

= FOOTPRINT OF TRADITIONAL SOUK AL BALAD

+ SITE VIEWS OUT

CULTURALLY INFORMED DESIGN

PROXIMITY: MOSQUES

= CONNECTING DESTINATIONS

SOUK WOVEN INTO SITE CONTEXT

WATERFRONT

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CONTEXT: CULTURAL AND PHYSICAL The massing and pedestrian patterns of Jeddah’s Al Balad district mapped onto site. What results is an informal organizatonal strategy for cadencing and choreographing the expeirence of the new Souk . The overall design of the souk has been shaped by two macro forces. The first, is the physical context the second is the cultural context. The physical context can be understood with regard to 6 major characterisitics: PEDESTRIAN POINTS OF ENTRY

SITE CONDITIONS

PEDESTRIAN PATHS

1. The unique characteristics of the souk neighborhood formulate a kind of DNA which scripts generally how the souk will be manifested. 2. There are two mosques within walking distance. Accomodating the pedestrian traveller is of utmost importance.

3. With a contemporary and newly developed townscape surrounding the site, the patrons of the souk will enjoy dynamic and exciting views. 4. Access to the site is encouraged by three main thresholds that fall on fairly major and well trafficked pedestrian paths and vehicle streets. 5. An ecompassing and lively waterfront focal point and promenade define the western edge of the site. 6. The pathways between all these various landmarks hardwire an active, interesting set of pedestrian opportunities.


PRIVACY AND SHADING

90% OPACITY

40% AND 65% OPACITY

15% OPACITY

Used in areas where privacy if of paramount importance. Patterns of this variety will cover areas where residential balconies exist behind the screen

Used in intermediate areas where transition between closed and open screen patterns. Balconies exist behind the screen.

Used in areas where permeability is of paramount importance. Patterns of this variety will cover areas with no residential balconies in proximity.

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RETAIL + RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL TYPE A + RESIDENTIAL TYPE B

PRIVATE SPACE FORMED BY OVERLAP


ns

WAYFINDING

Muntalaq drop off

drop off anti-pier

fountain

hotel DIRECT TRAVEL PATTERNS

exhibition A

Souk Direct Travel Patterns - unmitigated speed and path of travel

Souk DeFocused Travel Patterns - mitigated speed - unmitigated paths of travel

C

D

Souk Desired Travel Patterns -

mitigated speed mitigated paths of travel scripted and choreographed views direct lines of sight prevented direct lines of travel prevented

A

C

Souk functions as a lens, initiating refracting patterns B

INDIRECT TRAVEL PATTERNS D

Souk DeFocused Travel Patterns - mitigated speed - unmitigated paths of travel

nitiating refracting patterns

Patterns

B

MEANDERING TRAVEL PATTERNS

PEDESTRIAN FLOW

Souk Desired Travel Patterns - mitigated speed - mitigated paths of travel

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SCREEN: RETAIL WAYFINDING AND RESIDENTIAL SHADING Souk Desired Travel Patterns -

mitigated speed mitigated paths of travel The climate of Jeddah is characterized by high temperatures and high scripted and choreographed views humidity. Arabic architecture has traditionally incorporated elaborate direct lines of sight prevented direct lines of travel prevented screening and shading mechanisms to harvest shade for passive

cooling and dappled relief from the sun’s intense glare. Additionally, protecting the privacy of the home is a prescribed and honored practice. Screening and shading accommodate for this important concern while also mitigating extreme climatic conditions. The screen is manifested throughout traditional Arabic architecture and is a very important cultural element. With this kind of design mechanism privacy is maintained without sacrificing design. In fact instead of subverting aesthetic experience to rigid control, screens are an opportunity for highlighting prestige through their functional, intricate

and complex filigree patterning. “ the inner courtyard is not only an element of design but also provides a well balanced climate in the building the circulation of the air and the indirect light ing naturally counter act the heat development in the rooms. ” “ the facades appear to be closed [but have ] an introverted flair only allow certain direct light in an interplay of openess and closeness as well as light and shadow ...”Niemann, Christiane Ed.“Arabian Design”2007


PROGRAM AND CIRCULATION

service retail specialty retail food and beverage back of house

vertical circulation horizontal circulation

4 br unit 3 br unit 2 br unit 1 br unit residential amenity

residential lobby areas ground level circulation above grade connection to Muntalaq and Exhibition Center

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SUMMARY

SCREEN

RESIDENTIAL

HORIZONTAL CIRCULATION

RETAIL

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

WATERFRONT

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SOUK The resolution of the Souk design creates a unique and dynamic experience for the residents and visitors to the Heart of Jeddah. By carefully crafting the ground floor layout, a colorful, multi dimensional and exciting retail expeirence is generated. Connections to the Muntalaq, Hotels and waterfront reinforce the active nature of the Souk retail. Extensive shading throughout proivides continuous routes of comfort for pedestrians. Screening and screen overhangs mitigate the extreme climate and create a physically pleasant space for the patrons. As a contemporary interpretation of the mushrabiya this screening also serves to create privacy for the residences. In sum, the nature of the Souk architecture serves as finely tuned and

responsive connective tissue for the Heart of Jeddah development. All the while being restrained enough to allow for the iconic structures of the Muntalaq and Convention Center to take center stage. The Souk Community is a culturally informed sustainably sophisticated design for a new mixed use neighborhood 23, 941 sq meter site within the Heart of Jeddah development. A total of 32,365 square meters of residential space in 9 structures housing a total of 222 units will be generated. In addition 11,780 square meters of leasable retail space and 48,500 square meters of parking facilities will also be developed. These faciliities will be connected and shared with the neighboring Muntalaq.


DRAWINGS

Retail 2nd Level Connection Retail Vertical Circulation Food and Beverage Retail Amenities

First Floor Plan

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4br 217 m2 25 count

3br 185 m2 52 count

2br 135 m2 89 count

1br 84 m2 64 count

UNIT PROTOTYPE


DRAWINGS

1. Souk Level Retail 2. Food and Beverage 3. G -1 Level Retail 4. Retail Vertical Circulation 5. Retail 2nd Level Connection 6. Residential Units 7. Balconies 8. Visitor Parking 9. Residential Parking

Ground Floor Plan

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6

7

7

6

7

6

7

6

5

5 1

1

4 4

8

1

4 3 9

A-A’ SECTION

1 8

2


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Makkah Oasis ‘ HOTEL DESIGN COMPETITION, MAKKAH, SAUDI ARABIA, 2011 ’

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PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

VEHICLE ACCESS

MAKKAH CONTEXT

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MAKKAH, SAUDI ARABIA Extensive large scale development is redefining Makkah, and the The Jabal al Ka’aba site represents a unique opportunity for YALJ to build a successful and culturally significant project on one of the city’s most prominent sites The design team at RNL has approached this project with this sensitivity to the city and the Grand Mosque as a primary focus. Hotels are energy and water intensive buildings, but many strategies have been considered to reduce the project’s impact. RNL approaches all projects with our own Design For One Earth values that address sustainablity from the environmental, social and economic factors. Specific strategies such as prefabrication and

modularity could address issues of build quality, material conservation, energy goals, construction speed, and use of local labor all in one solution. Energy consumption and water use would be tightly tracked for conservation. This is a project with a responsibility to the city of Makkah and all Hajjis to be a sensitive, contextual, forward thinking development.


DESIGN PROCESS

1. hotel volume

2. two zones

3. formation of courtyard

4. height modification

5. additional hotel

6. plaza

7. ring road

8. articulation of path

10. mass

11. atriums: vertical connection

12. screen: horizontal connection

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9. prayer and gathering rooms


+298 +288 Al Saddah St.

Service Road

Ring Road

NEW DEVELOPMENT

ZONE A

PHASE 01 BUILDING

EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD

ZONE B

DESIGN STRATEGY +307 Jabal Al Ka’aba St. +298

Service Road

HILL

+307

HOTEL

PATH

OASIS

HOTEL PLAZA

PODIUM

PODIUM

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VIEW / COMPOSITION / PEDESTRIAN

PATH + OASIS + HILL The design presented here centers around three main design principles to accomplish our objectives; the hill, the path, and the oasis.

NATURAL LIGHT / VERTICAL CIRCULATION

The hills in and around Makkah, while challenging for development, are a natural asset to the city. Restoration of the topography on this site is a central idea, and the resultant form allows for advantageous program areas and, most importantly, reconnection of the two plots now split by a freeway. This constructed topography of ramps and terraces enables the idea of the path. Unimpeded pedestrian flow across the site is the most important factor to the pilgrims experience. We have provided extensive walkable area that is activated by restaurants, prayer rooms, bazaars, hotel functions, and cultural components to create a rich experience. The last element is the oasis,

these are formed by the shaping of each hotel block and the visual focus of the path. The courtyards are shaded, lush, and feature water elements that reflect the traditional architecture.


PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION

SITE PLAN

COMMERCIAL NODE

N

Business Center

Centralized Transit Lobby

Retail Shops

NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTION

Group Meeting Area

Dining Hall

Group Check-In and Out

PLAZA

Al Saddah

Hotel Rooms

Restaurants

VISUAL CONNECTION TO HOLY MOSQUE

Rin gR oa d

Exhibit Facilities Spa

Prayer Areas

Residential Component Club

HOTEL AMENITIES

SPIRITUAL RETREAT St. abah Al Ka Jabal

PUBLIC SEMI-PUBLIC SEMI-PRIVATE PRIVATE

VOLUME AND ADJACENCE

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Umm Al Qura

PLAZA LEVEL: PEDESTRIAN ROAD LEVEL: VEHICLE

20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 -1 -2 -3 -4

Typical Rooms

Lobby Central Transit

HOTEL AMENITIES

Group Check-In and Out

DinPrayer Business Group ing Center Meeting Hall Club Areas Spa Exhibit Facilities Area

SPIRITUAL RETREAT

Retail Shops

Restaurant

COMMERCIAL NODE

VERTICAL RELATIONSHIP


PROGRAM EDICATION AND EXHIBIT FACILITIES

PRAYER AREA

BUSINESS CENTER

PLAZA: PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION THROUGH PROJECT TO HOLY MOSQUE

HAMMAM: SPA FACILITIES

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SPIRITUAL RETREAT Central to all of these principles is the focus of this project as a spiritual retreat. Prayer rooms are the primary element on the building facades, taking the form of traditional mashrabiyas and articulated just as finely to provide privacy while affording views of the mosque. The oasis and building form provide a sheltered and reflective environment off of the street, while still providing views out and extensive connections to the mosque. Visitors to the Jabal al Ka’aba should be welcomed by the architecture and landscape elements, while still being able to focus on the spiritual purpose of their trip. We have accommodated all program elements in a form that follows the city regulations and achieves the maximum built up area allowable. Program areas are positioned to compliment the main pedestrian path

and hotel functions.


FACADE Arabesque : screen and window

Mashrabiya : prayer area Base : atrium Iwan : bazaar retail shops

ARABESQUE

Al Saddah St.

private

SCREEN

Hill

Ring Road

Bridge

Ring Road

Hill

Jabal Al Kaaba St.

unfolded elevations

decoration Islamic view of the world

VISUAL CONNECTIVITY

WINDOW AND SCREEN

MASHRABIYA

shade and cool air human scale enclosure

MASHRABIYA

PRAYER AREA

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view of holy mosque increasing usable space pattern

exterior, folded

BAZAAR RETAIL SHOPS

IWAN

intermediate between outdoor and indoor

BASE

public

ATRIUM inviting space

A structural diagram of the building’s exterior, unfolded

CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIVITY

HORIZONTAL CONNECTIVITY


DRAWINGS

SERVICE ROAD LEVEL

PODIUM LEVEL

HOTEL LEVEL

PLAZA LEVEL

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Jabal Al Ka’aba Street South Courtyard North Courtyard

Bridge

Bridge North Courtyard

South Courtyard Umm Al Qura Street

Al Saddah Street


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Ruwais Hotel ‘ HOTEL DESIGN, RUWAIS, UAE, 2010 ’

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REGIONAL CONTEXT

AERIAL SITE DIAGRAM

ADNOC Refinery

Ruwais Waterfront (Proposed)

Prevailing Winds

Ruwais Housing Complex

Mar gina l Exte rnal Views

Ruwais Towncenter (Proposed)

SITE

Summer Sun

To Ruwais Housing Complex

Winter Sun

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RUWAIS, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES The Ruwais Hotel will be a model for hotel development in the region. The design is driven by the desire to develop a unique and highly identifiable hotel brand, create a first class experience for the business traveler, and be extremely energy and water efficient. This hotel will include approximately 40 hotel rooms and 30 serviced apartments. Amenities will include meeting and training rooms, fitness center with outdoor pool, and three restaurant operations. The serviced apartments will be used by long term business travelers and teachers. RUWAIS MASTERPLAN

This hotel is seen as a prototype for other communities throughout the region. Saudi Arabia, Doha, and Khalifa Port are excellent expansion

opportunities. Additionally, it is envisioned that this hotel may expand beyond 70 rooms, up to 150 rooms. Depending on local market conditions, the number of keys, meeting rooms, and food & beverage operations may vary at the various sites. As growth occurs over time at any individual site, additional rooms may be added. It is therefore desirable to have a‘modular’design that allows for future hotel expansion.


FUTURE EXPANSSION

105 PARKING SPACES

SERVICE ROAD

PARKING

PARKING

70 ROOM HOTEL + AMENITIES

STAFF HOUSING AND BACK OF HOUSE

SERVICE ROAD

PARKING

ACCESS AND DROP-O FF MAIN

SITE PLAN

FUTURE EXPANSSION

EXPANSION

LOBBY DROP-OFF FITN ESS ENT RY

SMALL MEETING ROOMS

LARGE MEETING ROOM

BUSINESS CENTER

MAIN ENTRY

G+0

G+1

G+2

FITNESS CENTER

TRY T EN RAN U SPECIALTY A T RES RESTAURANT

LOBBY

HOTEL ROOMS

RESIDENTIAL COMPONENT

STAFF HOUSING AND BACK OF HOUSE

CAFE POOL MAIN RESTAURANT

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VOLUME AND ADJACENCE

SUSTAINABILITY: MODULAL DESIGN The pre-engineered structural construction system is based on a 1m x 3m panel. The panel is constructed of cold rolled steel framing members around the perimeter, fiber cement panel facing on both sides, and a polyethelene insulation in the cavity. This system continues to be in use and has shown extraordinary durability over time. The structural system for the hotel will consist of pre-engineered wall panels made of regularly spaced cold rolled steel framing members. Trusses made of cold rolled framing is then laid across the structural wall panels to form the floor and roof. Additional stories of the building are then added. The system is very similar to western wood framing. This system has several advantages: Pre-engineered and factory fabricated panels significantly reduce site construction schedules. Steel

framing has high recycled content and is recyclable. Lateral bracing can be engineered directly into the panel design based on contractor requirements, prefabrication can be expanded.


horizontal louver 50mm x 2m

vertical louver 50mm x 2m

DESIGN STRATEGY 100% density - spacing 100mm

50% density - spacing 200mm

25% density - spacing 300mm

60% density - spacing 100 - 200mm

30% density - spacing 250mm

LOUVER PROTOTYPES

COURTYARD

TERRACOTTA SUNSCREEN LOUVER

POOL AND VEGETAION

WIND CATCHER AND SOLAR CHIMBEY

50% density - spacing gradiently

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SUSTAINABILITY: MICROCLIMATE DESIGN The building is organized around two courtyards. The courtyards are a critical component to our energy efficient design strategy. The courtyards, with their lush plantings and highly refined design become a significant part of the branded experience for the hotel. A terra cotta screen, placed around and over the building, is an icon for the hotel and reinforces the hotel brand.

AIR FLOW SYSTEM

The screen also significantly reduces the surface temperature of the walls and roof, which has a dramatic impact on the energy required to cool the building. According to the sustainable design research, the roof temperature is reduced from 76 degrees to 39 degrees. Because it is shaded and enclosed, the courtyards create a microclimate that is cooler than the surrounding area. The microclimate effect is further

enhanced by the introduction of cooling breezes from wind catchers located in each courtyard. This microclimate effectively extends the number of days that guests can comfortably use the outdoors. It also significantly reduces the heat entering the building, reducing the amount of energy required for air conditioning.


WEATHER

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TEMPERATURE

SUN

WIND

PASSIVE STRATEGIES


SYSTEM WATER

LOADS

ENERGY

SURFACE TEMPERATURE

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(PV)

N (PV)


DRAWINGS

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SITE PLAN

TO ADWEA

70 ROOMS

140 ROOMS

SITE AREA = 21,720 SM (120 x 181)

SITE AREA = 27,512 SM (181 x 152)

SITE AREA = 32,761 SM (181 x 181)

70 ROOM BASE MODULE WITH AMENITIES, RESTAURANTS, AND BACK OF HOUSE FUNCTIONS

1

35 ROOM EXPANSION MODULE WITH LIMITED BACK OF HOUSE FUNCTIONS

PARKING

35 ROOMS

PARKING

PARKING

4 33

2

5

3

6

MAIN ENTRY / DROP OFF

TO E11 BYPASS

FUTURE EXPANSTION


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Kuala Lumpur City Center ‘ MASTER PLAN, KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA, 2010 ’

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Canopy Structure

Trees in Sunken Garden Railing Beyond (Glass) Trolley

Bridge cross Sunken Garden

Ground Level Concourse Level Escalator

Terraces Beyond Cascading Water + Gardens

Fountain Circular Sunken Garden

Boardwalk

Stepped Terraces

BOARDWALK SECTION B

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SOUTH GATEWAY The South Gateway is located at the Convention Center. Section B

The centerpiece of this area is the major pedestrian connection that links the street directly to the park. There are connections at many levels to create a dynamic three dimensional experience: elevated pedestrian bridges connect to the Pavilions and Monorail Station to the south, Four towers are planned to animate the south side of the park and realize the full development potential in this location: three over the Convention Center and a 70-story landmark tower at Lot 91. This latter tower is intended to create a strong axial relationship with Kia Peng from the Pavilions and mark this important Gateway. The planning of the East Gateway is intended to create a clear

distinction between the convention use and the heavy public usage that is going to other locations at KLCC. A large circular space is created at the center of the convention center and is intended to unify both the upper and lower levels and the private and public uses of the South Gateway.


Canopy Structure Pedestrian and Transit Bridge Trolley

Bridge across Sunken Garden

Terraces Beyond Cascading Water + Gardens

Ground Level Concourse Level

Escalator

Retail Zone

Sunken Garden

Boardwalk

Stepped Terrace

Patio

Park

BOARDWALK SECTION A

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EAST GATEWAY The East Gateway is planned as a new major node at KLCC to balance the Suria. The focal point of this area is the new landmark tower that is meant to be a secondary icon for KLCC after the Petronas Towers. It is complemented by a cluster of residential buildings that step down to the mosque and form an urban village. Between these two is the main gateway element: a large overhead canopy structure similar to the other two gateways. This creates a strong entry to the park from Jalan Binjai and also welcomes pedestrians from Jalan Amapang and the Ampang Park LRT Station. The large car/truck tunnel is also a central feature of the east gateway. The landmark tower is placed to mark this strong axis and create a visual gateway for all vehicles coming from the east. The building

bridges the tunnel so that Lots M and N, with Lot L1, make up the landmark tower site. Jalan Binjai is intended to be activated with use as well as the pedestrian connections adjacent to the tunnel.

Section A


Bridge to Cultural Trolley

Glass Wall

Ground Level Concourse Level

Escalator Sunken Garden

Boardwalk

Bridge

Children’s Museum

Patio

Park

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Gateway Canopy Structure

Pedestrian and Transit Bridge

Pedestrian Bridge from Suria

Bridge at Edge of water Ground Level Concourse Level

Waterfall Stair Beyond Fountain

Escalator

Circular Sunken Garden

Stepped Terrace

Pool and Fountain at Suria

BOARDWALK SECTION C

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NORTH GATEWAY

Section C

The North Gateway is intended to create a strong pedestrian gateway from Jalan Ampang to the park. Currently, because of the size of the Suria, there are no strong connections from the park to the exterior streets in this part of the site; the park is very hidden and thus underutilized. This gateway creates a grand public space that unifies the inside and outside edges of the park, connects the Suria to the retail podium on Lot 185, and links the Concourse level below with the ground floor boardwalk. A feature building should be located at Lot 185 as a visual marker for this gateway. Permeability through the podiums is maintained by respecting existing rights-of-ways as pedestrian connections. The podiums are intended to all connect across these pedestrian spaces

both at the Concourse Level and with bridges at the upper levels. A plaza is located on Lot K and is an extension of pedestrian activity of the Boardwalk. It is intended to be a focused area of cafes and restaurants to support the entertainment uses that might happen within the podium.


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Le Pli ‘ TOURIST’S HYPER CENTER, DOWNTOWN, DENVER, 2010 ’

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TRANSPARENT AND OPAQUE

DESIGN STRATEGY

First I drew diagrams pointing a spot and sitting it inside but drawing it outside. Gathering the points I tried to create the repetitions of the inside and outside space. This repetition idea was from the discussion of authenticity which is repeatable and can be repeated like a signature. Creating this study model I found out “folding”can be a means to create a space when “whenever you are in, you are going outside and whenever you are out, you are going inside”.

TOURIST

NATIVE

IN

OUT

SITE

SEPARATION

CONNECTION

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TOURIST AND NATIVE Premise 1 There is no NATIVE without a TOURIST. There is no TOURIST without a NATIVE. 2 From INside always looking OUT From OUTside always looking IN Separation: Tourist will always look outside Native will always look inside Identification by activity: Tourist is tourist. Native is tourist.

That means, there are NO tourist and native. Connection: Tourists will always look outside. Natives will not look inside when they are outside. Natives will look outside only when they’re inside. Identification by activity: A Tourist is tourist. A native is native. A native is only a tourist inside.


16 th St. M all

SITE PLAN

Colfax Ave.

Lincoln St.

Colfax Ave.

Broadway 16 th St .

Civic Center Park

BROADWAY ST, DENVER The site is located on a very critical location. At the end or start of 16th st. mall, between the diagonal downtown grid and the rectangular grid of southeast Denver at the point where high-rises end and a flat space starts. It is between very private office spaces and public park and museum districts, also the height of the land starts to rise up from this point. These red marks affect to the site approximately. I marked with the lines where the space you can only read with the façade in the site. My site strategy consisted of grabbing and directing the movements happening around the site and keeping the experimental cycle in the site. The sticks are located to help direct and rotate the movements. Based on the sticks, my design proceeded to the layering and massing of volume and space and to the exterior and interior material.

My program consists of bookstore, a multi-purpose gallery and information and cafĂŠ on this volume. A cinema, pool and bicycle rental station reside on the other volume. This volume works as an information center and the other volume works as an entertainment center.

Lincoln St.

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Denver Art Museum Denver Public Library Colorado History Museum

Broadway

State Capitol


A-5 E-5

D-4

E-3

C-5

F-3

B-4

C-4 C-3

G-3 G-2 G-1

A-4

B-5

E-4

G-4

F-2 F-1

DESIGN STRATEGY

D-5

C-2

D-3

E-2

D-2

C-1

A-3 B-3 B-2 B-1

1

A-2

A-1

D-1

A

B

A

2

B

E-1

3 PLANAR FIGURE SEPARATION

GF E

CONNECTION + SEPARATION

A D

B C 45

FOLD(ING) There is a separated space between A and B. If you fold this space, you are connecting A and B and at the same time you will separate the spaces 1, 2 and 3. “Folding is a method by which buildings arise through the unfolding of land, materials and spaces into continuous form. Popularized by a generation of architects, who had been educated by the likes of Peter Eisenman and had read Gilles Deleuze’s Leibniz, or The Fold, this method seeks to replace the alienating experience of creating separate spaces that remove themselves from the rest of reality and that re-articulate the laws of gravity. Folding is also possible because of the plasticity if modern materials and this dates back to the first experiments in concrete at the beginning of 20th century. Folding has become much

easier to achieve and more popular because of the use of computers, plastic and compounds in the building process. Here, the formal results of systems thinking intersect with the romantic tradition of form-making that is intuitive and anti-hierarchical.“ - AARON BETSKY -


DRAWINGS cinema 1

void

cinema 2

pool potential retail space

bicycle rental station ticket office

void

rental office

potential retail space

BASEMENT PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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information center

cafe book store

book store void

void void

multi-purpose gallery void

1ST FLOOR PLAN

2ND FLOOR PLAN


SITE PLAN

1

2

2

3

4

5

6

3

1

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TOURIST’S HYPER CENTER After the discussions about tourism I set two premises. 7

First: there is no native without a tourist and there is no tourist without a native. This idea is based on a structurism idea. The second premise was simple, from inside you are always looking out and from outside you are always looking in.

1. mass 2-4. volume 5-6. space 7. exterior 8. interior 8 9. material

In design if you design something like the Eifel tower, not only tourists but also natives will look inside. That will make the native a tourist because the activity is a tourist activity. That means there is no tourist because there is not a native. My strategy of design was breaking the separation of inside and out-

side space.


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1/8”=1’-0” physical model

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Link ‘ TRANSITIONAL HOUSING FOR IRAQ AND AFGHAN VETERANS AND HOMELESS, ELYRIA, DENVER, 2009 ’

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historic landmark _ El centro su teatro

Stock Show

railroad

DESIGN STRATEGY

High St.

E Brighton Blvd.

recreation center

47th Ave.

library

town center

Purina factory

Denver Coloseum highway

downtown 51

ELYRIA-SWANSEA, DENVER

LAND USE

FIGURE GROUND

STREET LAYOUT

GREEN

The site of this project is to the north side of I-70 in Denver, wedged between industrial parks and railroad tracks. It would be a hard place to maintain a unified peaceful neighborhood in any city, but with proper revitalization the area could also be a bastion in an area not known for its community aspects. On the east side of the building is high street, and on the south side is 47th avenue. 47th is a busy and central street to the neighborhood, and will serve as the face of the complex. Just down 47th avenue is the town center, and it serves as the main thoroughfare for the neighborhood. This is incredibly important for my design because this is one of the shortest lengths along the property, but is incredibly important for how the building will be viewed.


RESEARCH Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Transitional Housing Residents Now 6 months later Income Median Income

$35,950(2007) : $55,212 (CO average) $0

$15,000 - $35,000

Employment Unemployment Rate 6% 100% 0% Car Means of Transportation 55% drove a car alone 0% 60% 27% carpooled 30% 30% 8% bus 70% 10% Age Median Age 28.4 32.5 Education Education Level

40% completed high school

85%

Culture Major Population

81% of Hispanic population

56%

Family Single-Parent Households

52

40% of parents 100% of parents 864 (180 men, 684 women) : 1,979 married couples with children

Residence Period of Residence

40% moved out in 5 years

6 months - 1 year

House Renters Rate

39% : 33% (CO Average)

100%

CULTURAL CONTEXT: COMMUNITY AND RESIDENTS It is crucially important that this building not only serve as a home but as a safe haven for a group of people that has seen the worst a human mind can endure and need safety as much as they need shelter. This cannot be obtained without a clear and friendly link to their new community or without the proper amenities to help them adapt back into society. To the point of creating a friendly link with the community, I felt it was important to have facilities on site that not only helped the residents, but could also help to improve the local community and foster goodwill within that community. The low housing prices attract younger and immigrant families who are just starting to scratch by, and for which finding meaningful and gainful employment can be hard, especially for those new to this coun-

try who may not trust local or state authorities to help them. For the Veterans moving into this housing finding trust among strangers may also be very hard. Women subjected to the stresses of wartime need to have opportunities for as much solitude or socialization as they need to be able to properly recover and re-adapt to society.

HOMELESS WOMEN VETERANS - Approximately 8,000 women veterans are homeless - Numbers are expected to increase as more women return from Iraq and Afghanistan (200,000) - Women veterans are four times as likey to go homless than their civilian counterparts

RISK FACTORS FOR HOMELESSNESS COMBAT-RELATED STRESS - Half suffer from substance or alchohol dependence - One third have mental illness (PTSD) MILITARY SEXTUAL TRAUMA - 23 out of 100 women reported experiencing sexual - Assualt in the military - 75% report experiencing sexual abuse, in the military or in civilian life

TRANSITIONAL HOUSING - Of 500 VA veterans shelters, 300 say they accept women - 15 VA shelters have women-only programs - None can accept women and their children (70% of women veterans have children)


exisitng residnece

PROGRAM alleyway

town center

public transit

exisitng residnece

47th St.

library

High St.

exisitng residnece density

ry nd lau n ize cit d r’s oo ve rh o en b oD igh s nt ne nt pe to ide c: o pen es bli ll r :o pu lic oa ub nt i-p pe m :o se ate riv i-p d m se se clo te: iva pr

ce offi n he are c yc kit da nity u en m rd m ga co ity er un nt m ce m t co en ym s it plo un em ing us ho 32

PROGRAM + VOLUME STUDY

site

53

COMPONENT LOGIC AND RESPONSE On 47th St. I have designed an employment center and community garden to encourage integration of my building into the community. The employment center is incredibly important because it is a shared building, it is on this property but it is built to serve the members of the community as much as it is to help those people living in this complex. It is not only a link between the two, but a positive facility designed to enrich the lives of anyone who may need it. Behind it is my main structure. The structure consists of 32 units, with buildings angled to receive a maximum exposure to natural light. Each unit also has a private garden area and patio to give residents an area of outdoor seclusion. The private patios are important because finding a secluded outdoor space can be very hard in a metropolitan environment and a link with the

outdoors and natural light is crucial to the mental health of those that would be living in this building. Many veterans will also have companion animals to help their healing, and an outdoor area like this that is easily accessible is important not only for the owners of those animals, but the animals themselves.


DESIGN PROCESS

2. community garden up on employment center

3. following residential context of High St.

4. for daylighting, aligned two mass merged and got higher

5. programs layout following existing building configuration

6. as merging two masses, day care can have space for a playground

7. historical landmark

8. to reveal its facade, residential mass is moved

9. the mass angled for visual and contextual connection to 47th St.

10. for daylighting, mass is stepped down

11. exisitng building volume

12. for better connection to the neighborhood, the entire High st. side has steps.

1. volumes of the programs

54


recreation center

existing residence

SITE PLAN existing building

RESIDENTIAL

High St.

DAY CARE

OFFICE/CLUB HOUSE

High St. 47th Ave.

COMMUNITY KITCHEN COMMUNITY KITCHEN AGRICULTURE

RESIDENTIAL

PETS

DAY CARE

COUNSELING

EMPLOYMENT CENTER/CLINIC CLINIC town center

public transit

EMPLOYMENT CENTER

library

47th Ave. existing residence

55

TRANSITIONAL HOUSING There are two things I wanted to achieve with link. I wanted the tenants of link to feel safe and secure and have a place of their own. I also wanted the building and people to have a link to the community itself, to help rejuvenate their minds and spirits. To do this I’ve created onsite facilities with this design that allow residents the choice of either seclusion or to socialize, to allow them to develop their own comfort zone and heal. The height of the model steps gradually up to link the buildings to the surrounding community so that the buildings flow naturally upward and aren’t an imposing presence in the neighborhood. I fell that this is also very important to my theme. If my structure is disconnected from the neighborhood, then the residents may feel like intruders, no one

wants to me separated onto an island in their own neighborhood.; The building itself is made primarily of wood and glass to evoke a warm and natural feeling. Hallways are designed to create a “safe place” and while being open to the outside are sheltered by the surrounding buildings. The overall effect will be a quiet environment; which is so critically important for those that may themselves be suffering from PTSD.


DRAWINGS

Type A 1br 600 sq ft.

Type B 2br 950 sq ft.

Type C 1br 620 sq ft.

Type D 2br 1300 sq ft.

internal - external relationship

bedroom

living zone

green zone

56

UNIT PROTOTYPE

2ND FLOOR PLAN

CIRCULATION

1ST FLOOR PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


3/32”=1’-0” physical model

57


Black Box Theater ‘ EXPERIMENTAL THEATER, BROADWAY ST, DENVER, 2008 ’

58


downtown

+ DESIGN STRATEGY

Speer blvd.

1000’

600’

200’

59

BROADWAY ST, DENVER

Broadway St.

Escapism can take many forms. A trip to the theatre isn’t just a night out; it’s a vacation for a night, experiencing a story under an assumed identity. The theatre is the port for this trip and should in its own way be as exotic and unique as the stories housed within. The Black Box theatre is designed to be a destination that itself is as enjoyable as the escape to its stories. Using the site to inform the creation of a marquee led me to the concept I held when creating the program schematics of my building. The site is located on a rather complex and interesting intersection. On the north side there’s not much activity and as you walk south there is an increase in pedestrian activity. I refer to this intersection as multimodal. This building will be seen by many different types of people from dif-

ferent angles, both on foot and at speed in their car. The building has to reflect this by providing an interesting face at every angle, while maintaining cohesion as a complete structure.


recreation traffic

MARQUEE

weekday - daytime

catering

retail

parking

leisure

office residential

recreation traffic

weekday - night

catering

retail

parking

leisure

office residential

recreation traffic

weekend - daytime

60

MARQUEE DETAIL

MARQUEE DESIGN

catering

retail

parking

leisure

office residential

MARQUEE recreation traffic

The marquee was an attempt at creating a reaction to these conditions. When leading the user into the building they are asked to enter a world which they have never experienced before. This is my definition of experimental theatre. I want it to be something which has not been seen, experienced, or written before. This can be related back to my biggest concept of multimodal. There is an individual, group, community and public level at which the building should be experienced. As an experience no individual trait can feel out of place, so creating a flow of consistent elements that are unique but inter-related is at the very core of the experience of this building.

weekend - night

catering

retail

parking

leisure

office residential

KINETIC WALL IMAGES_Kinecity

ACTIVITY ANALYSIS


SITE PLAN

Broadway E 2nd Ave.

Lincoln St.

Broadway St.

Broadway

E 1st Ave.

61

EXPERIMENTAL THEATER W

My concept is to lead the user through unique spaces. I am trying to use different spaces to influence the user into a non-traditional role. I am interested in displaying the user, in turn making them a performer in their own play.

E Broadway

This space is meant to be kinetic, experimental, and intriguing on all levels. Using spaces to display people becomes a unique challenge. Much like a play or any artistic performance there is a sequence of events. Allowing people to move through difference spaces in which there are multiple meanings is what I am trying to create. This dichotomy is also what I find to be intriguing about the multi-faceted spaces I have to create. Based on this I created a long precession

from the entry as to lead you to another world.


PLANS

+4.5’ cafe +12’

retail -4’

shop

+0’ lobby +6’

amphitheater

void

void

ticket booth control booth +24’ atrium -4’

void lobby -6’

toilet toliet

administrative office

void

void

+6’ green room +6’

+18’ experimental theater (50’x50’) +6’

dressing room +6’

costume shop/ laundry +18’

void

+24’ temporary scene storage scene shop +6’

+21’

void

scene loading storage dock +6’ +0’

+24’

+0’ 62

-6’ GROUND FLOOR PLAN

+6’ 1ST FLOOR PLAN

+18’ 2ND FLOOR PLAN

circulation hierarchy

user

program

primary circulation secondary circulation vertical circulation actor administration supporting performance commercial toilet

PROGRAMMATIC CONFIGURATION


site

2nd Ave.

1st Ave.

ELEVATIONS

Broadway St.

CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS

63

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION


SECTIONS

A

B

C

64

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

-6’

+6’

+12

+18’

+24’

+30’

+36

+42’

retaining wall cast in place concrete wall concrete column primary steel column secondary steel colum primary beam secondary beam steel beam

STRUCTURAL PLAN


1/2”=1’-0” slice model

65


Urban Void ‘ AFFORDABLE HOUSING, FIVE POINTS, DENVER, 2007 ’

66


SITE PLAN

high-rises

modern ad ditions

site

downtown: diagonal grid

e. Av th 0 2

ve. Park A

FLOATING

his tor ica l ur ban fab ric East Denver neighborhoods: rectangular grid

WAVING

67

FIVE POINTS, DENVER One of Denver’s oldest neighborhoods, with block after block of Victorian homes mixed with luxury lofts and new housing developments, Five Points is one of the few predominantly African American-owned commercial strips in the country. Some have referred to the area as the “Harlem of the West” for its long-standing jazz history, where many of the greats, including Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, and more played at clubs like Rossonian and the Rainbow Room. The area was mentioned frequently in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. The Stiles African American Heritage Center, The Blair-Caldwell African American Library, and The Black American West Museum tell the story of the African-American in the West. This site is wedged between a historic district and encroaching mod-

ern housing. To better mesh the two on the site, the complex is built on a raised platform that flows smoothly down to Benedict Park, granting a subtle transition between the modern designs and the valuable historic areas in five points. The building itself is raised above this platform on pylons to increase visibility of key historic areas.


HYBRID STRUCTURAL MODEL

Material

Materiality

white transparent acrylic

transparent

Application

sanded

Spatial Relations

50% of 2 br - private

vs black transparent acrylic

opaque

others - private

acrylic

solid

urban fabric

mesh

flexble

historical fabric

mesh

grids

structural flexibility

fiber glass

stranded

natural flexibility

acrylic with pixel

magnified

community

mesh with woven wire

bases

open to public

screw + bolt + washer

rigid

primary structual

pliable

secondary structual

vs

vs 68

vs

vs wire + rubber joint + metal ring


Co ur t

Pl.

e. Av rk Pa

Cl ev ela nd

Pl.

SITE PLAN

nd 22 . St

20th Ave. Penn St. 69

AXIS The surrounding of the site has many different characters and elements. Broken down, this area has a serious identity crisis. I continued the elements of the site with lines and the lines made junctions. Based on the junctions, I modified my first master plan based on the required size and volume. This Apartment and Condominium and Townhouse were laid out for the direction of the roads. These terminations of series of dwellings adopt a different orientation to this complex. They are smoothly inserted into the mass of the condominiums and apartments, but do not coordinate with the linear system. So they introduce different types of space like an apartment building. This axis will play a decisive role to connect different types of dwellings for the community of the complex. So the position that this axis is going and the junctions

are massed is planned as a support space of this complex building.


ELEVATIONS

APARTMENT CONDOMINIUMS TOWN HOMES

Park Ave. Court Pl. Benedict Park

3D STRUCTURAL MODEL

VIEW

MATERIALITY

NORTH-EAST ELEVATION

70


+0’ Jogging

+14’ +3’

Skate bording

+12’

Movie night

Music Concert +9’

apartments

PROGRAM

-3’

+9’

Community

condominiums

Actvities

+9’

Farmers Market

town homes

Cycling

+12’

Gardening

condominiums

Relaxing

town homes

Park Ave. +6’

Tubing Sunbathing

Court Pl.

Basketball +0’

PLATFORM PLAN_ activities

1br_ 700sf x 35 2br_ 1,000sf x 54 3br_ 1,200sf x 16 4br_ 1,450sf x 4 109 units

PROGRAMMATIC CONFIGURATION

Benedict Park

AFFORDABLE HOUSING The goal with this building was to implement several unique ideas into a building that also maintained a responsible design and modest budget. Each unit has been designed to be modular which not only reduces initial building costs, but allows further expansion to the building when necessary. Along the bottom of the building a platform has been implemented that was designed to give open space to residents and to encourage them to socialize and develop a strong bond of community. Each unit is also designed with a large outdoor patio that allows residents more room and outdoor space attached to their own living areas, while having a low cost of construction. Furthermore, the open patios give residents a chance to be outside in familiar surroundings and accept the context of the surrounding neighborhoods.

71


DRAWINGS

WALL SECTION

2BR UNIT SECTION

platform Park Ave.

platform parking

ground floor retail

72

basketball court

1BR UNIT SECTION

town homes

Benedict Park 20th Ave.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

3RD FLOOR PLAN

4,6,8TH FLOOR PLAN


1/4”=1’-0” scale structural model

73


Archi on ‘ ARCHITECTURE CULTURAL CENTER, NAMSAN, SEOUL, 2003 ’

74


Changduk Palace Gyeongbok Palace

12

Naksan Park

DESIGN STRATEGY

4

Jongmyo (king’s grave)

3 7 9 Duksoo Palace

2

11

6

Stadium Park

8 Namchon cultural area

5

site

1 10

Namsan (south mountain) 75

NAMSAN, SEOUL 1. Myung-dong 2. Guancheurl-dong 3. Insa-dong 4. Book-dong 5. Namdaemun Market 6. Jung-dong 7. Chungjin-dong 8. Korean traditional house village 9. Jongro 10. Jangchung-dong 11. Dong Market 12. University Street

subway station tourist’s destination historic castle wall green main street pedestrian way water

The site is located in the old Seoul area which is surrounded by four gates and walls. There are still numerous national treasures in this area. This site is in the Namchon cultural area adjacent to Korean traditional house village. Even though this area has precious cultural properties, it lost its character because of its thousand years of history. Like other sites in this area the site is in the middle of several very different factors. First; the site’s maximum altitude difference is 11m. There are densely residential districts on the low side that have small scales. On the upper side, there is a large radio station, an art institute, a city library, and buildings. Moreover, Namsan itself is one of the biggest green zones in Seoul, and this is between Namsan Park and the heart of Seoul. This site is located between public and private, small and large scale, green and

gray, high and low. I choose to find urban scale from the physical and theoretical research of the site to solve these issues.


URBAN SCALE

76

SITE CAPTURES

URBAN SCALE Seoul is the capital and largest city of South Korea. The history of Seoul can be tracked back as far as 18 BCE. This site is located in the old city part of Seoul. Seoul of Joseon Dynasty, Seoul of Japanese colonization period, and now, its area has increased. The streets, the buildings, and the facilities’ scale also have increased. Like there is generation gap between even twins, we feel generation gap between buildings constructed several years ago and buildings constructed lately. This site, Jung-gu of Seoul is representative of this issue. We can notice that easily in the air photos. The site looks unbalanced as if a 1/200 scale model and a 1/300 scale model are sitting together at one place. To solve this issue I emptied all factors in this site and analyzed the surrounding factors and adapted the scale that I found from surroundings to this

site. As one of the methods to adapt these factors to this site, I used 2 dimensional composition. 2 dimensional composition expressed with a 3 dimensional concept is used to find the relationship between heterogeneous factors in this site. small scale houses large scale buildings by-street main steet

URBAN SCALE STUDY


Tuegye Blvd.

PROGRAM Material room AV material room Gallery

Audio-visual room

Sitting steps Kitchen

Sop aA ve.

Projection room Restaurant Hall Information

Terrace Office Gallery 2 Gallery 1

Storage Office Information

DECK

YARD

Workshop-gallery Workshop 1 Hall Office

Workshop 2 Workshop 3 Storage

SITE PLAN

In te rc Co han nf ge e As ren se ce m Pr bly ac t Pr ice ac ti Ap ce pr e Ex cia hib tio n Ex ition er c Am ise u Di sem nin en Ing ts fo rm at ion

77

Region Assembly Hall Children’s Cultural Center Women’s Center Lifelong Education Center Region Center Communiry Center Architecture Cultural Center

ARCHITECTURE CULTURAL CENTER Architecture is culture. Architects need to communicate with the public and the public also needs to know about architecture as popular culture. The Architecture cultural center would satisfy this desire to offer a space for their communication. I took this program from an architecture community web site. I explored several architecture community websites and classified their categories to adapt them to real space. Taking programs from a web community is a good way to predict what kind of activity would occur and what kind of place users need. I used this information to make a relationship diagram that separates the different functions of rooms and their relation to eachother, and

used this model in my design.


DESIGN PROCESS

B1 void C1

B2 void

B1

Deck 2 (G.L. +7m)

B3

Main Entrance

A3 A6 A4 1. site

2. empty out the site

void A2

void

A1

Deck 1 (G.L. +7m)

G.L. +7.0m FLOOR PLAN A3 (G.L. +11.4m) A4

3. divide the site into axis

A5

4. decide solid and void space

Yard 2 (G.L. -2m - +0m)

78 B1

B1

Deck 4 (G.L. +0m)

Yard 1 (G.L. +1m)

B4 B6

B5

5. connect solid volumes

Deck 3 (G.L. +1.6m)

6. create spatial relationship and layers of the space

C2 A9

A10 A8

A1 Information A2 Office A3 Audio-visual room A4 Projection room A5 Foyer A6 Terrace A7 Hall A8 Workshop A9 Storage A10 Workshop+Gallery

B1 Gallery B2 Audio-visual material room B3 Material room B4 Storage B5 Information B6 Office C1 Restaurant C2 Library C3 Office

C3

A7 A2

A2 A8 A8

G.L. +1.6m FLOOR PLAN


79


Samsung Media Center ‘ SUWON HWASUNG UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE ARCHITECTURE COMPETITION, SOUTH KOREA, 2002_ SPECIAL PRIZE ’

80


DESIGN STRATEGY Jangan gate

Hwahong water gate Changryong gate

Hwaseo gate

+ Hwaryungjun Hwaseong palace

2002

1911

Paldal Mountain

81 Paldal gate

HWASUNG FORTRESS, SOUTH KOREA Hwaseong, the wall surrounding the centre of Suwon, the provincial capital of Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, was built in the late eighteenth century by King Jeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty to honour and house the remains of his father Prince Sado, who had been murdered by being locked alive inside a rice chest by his own father King Yeongjo having failed to obey his command to commit suicide. Located 30 km south of Seoul and enclosing much of central Suwon including King Jeongjo’s palace Haenggung, UNESCO designated the fortress a World Heritage site in 1997. The Suwoncheon, the main stream in Suwon, flows through the centre of the fortress. The site is wedged between Hwaseo gate(west gate) and Jangan(north gate). It is also between Paldal Blvd. which is the busy main street connecting south gate to

north gate and historic preservation area which have Hwaryongjun and Hwaseong Palace. These location components make this site perfect for the Samsung media center because Samsung has its main business district in Suwon being critical role for the city’s economy.


MOVIE STILLS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

6

2ND FLOOR 3 8

4

2

7 1

1ST FLOOR

82

5

BASEMENT


n gate Janga

DESIGN STRATEGY

gate) (north

St. Jangan

. l Blvd Palda

Hw ase o ga te (w est gate )

PALDAL BLVD.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION AREA

l gate Palda gate) (south

SITE PLAN

83

MEDIA COMPLEX It is crucially important that this building not only have historical character but high technology character for its program. I started my design from the study of old maps of Hwaseong finding its old street patterns. Since development of the sites in this fortress has been prohibited partly, I could find the old street patterns and buildings remaining around the site. To accomplish the simultaneity and complexity of the site, I overlapped this old pattern to the present street map. The space planned by these lines from the overlapped patterns also has a spatial relationship of Korean traditional architecture. To connect Paldal Blvd. to historic preservation area I used the traditional architecture principal of the sequence of sceneries framed by building structure. The special experience is sequential from the outside to the inside and it is incred-

ibly important to display and exhibit Samsung media technology and Hwaseong history through its media technology.


DRAWINGS

St. Jangan 5

9

9 void

garden

5

lvd. Paldal B

6 void

10 8

4

void

4

1 1 void 2

void

2

garden 1

3 6 void void

void

BASEMENT PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

1ST FLOOR PLAN

84 A’

1. media art gallery 2. movie and photo gallery 3. Hwasung history gallery 4. Hwasung simulation gallery 5. electronics gallery 6. electonics store 7. lobby 8. convention hall 9. restaurant 10. office

B

B’

A

3

3

5

5

6

7

6

6

1

9

8

9

1

A-A’ SECTION

B-B’ SECTION


85


Open School ‘ ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, NOWON, SEOUL, 2002 ’

86


DESIGN STRATEGY

87

PROUN: SIMULTANEITY AND COMPLEXITY El Lissitzky’s PROUN was a acronym in Russian that loosely translates: “Project for the Affirmation of the New.” Just after the Russian Revolution, Lissitzky and a number of artists called the Suprematists consciously went looking for a new way to express, teach and distribute art. This was a direct response to the Russian Revolution and it celebrated the language of industrialization as a language of hope, modernity and a departure from the old. The Suprematists, seeking a complete departure from the representational art and design of the past, expressed themselves in simple, geometric forms that could not have existed in nature. Their graphic works were made to be mass produced as propaganda posters. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT_’neuer’ by El Lissitzky

El Lissitzsky’s PROUNs go beyond the embrace of a new revolutionary

visual language. The PROUNs are a step beyond the Suprematist twodimensional orthodoxy into a realm of new possibilities and endless imagination. The PROUNs defy the surface of the canvas and extend into space adding a third dimension to the modern vocabulary.


PROGRAM

PRIVATE 1

1

1

teacher’s lounge 2

,

4

,classroom 1 cafeteria

5

,

,1 nursing room

,1 q

audio-visual room

,1 q gymnasium

,1 q library

classroom

classroom

8.1m x 8.1m

6

open space

open space

7.2m x 18.0m

3

media room

media room

6.0m x 8.0m

3

teacher’s lounge

teacher’s lounge

6.0m x 5.0m

1

science lab

science lab

8.1m x 12.15m

1

language lab

language lab

8.1m x 12.15m

1

music lab

music lab

8.1m x 12.5m

1

art lab

art lab

8.1m x 12.15m

1

audio-visual room

audio-visual room

8.1m x 12.15m

1

conference room

conference room

5.0m x 6.0m

2

administration

administration

12.0m x 10.0m

1

library

library

8.1m x 16.2m

1

broadcasting

broadcasting

4.0m x 8.0m

1

nursing room

nursing room

8.1m x 4.05m

1

cafeteria

cafeteria

20.0m x 20.0m

1

gym

gym

20.0m x 30.0m

STUDENTS

broadcasting

,1 media space

,1 q

conference room

,

open space 3

1

administration

24

1

TEACHERS

,1 q

lab

q

RESIDENTS

PUBLIC

88

SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP STUDY

COMPONENT LOGIC AND RESPONSE On Dongnamu St. I have designed a gym and special class building to encourage integration of my building into the community. Classifying spaces by level of grade and by occupation time and users is incredibly important to layout the program for both community and students I analysed noise and traffic component of the site. Every four classrooms have a media room and an open space. This will be a cluster of education group units. This cluster unit design helps every different type of space connect directly like the space relationship diagram shows on page 30. These programs are based on open education study preceded before the design phase. Also small outdoor yards between clusters are designed to encourage open education for students. Special classroom clusters are located in the middle of school building to shorten

walking distance from classes because this moving might bother other classes visually and aurally. Also this location has good approach from the main street around the site and next to the gym which is for both the community and students because these special classrooms will be used for the community after school hours.

low grade

private public

mid grade

high grade

PROGRAMMATIC CONFIGURATION


DESIGN STRATEGY Dongnamu St.

Gongruing St.

SCHOOL

playgound

INFORMATION

OPEN AREA

8:00 - 17:00

89

SITE PLAN

OPEN SCHOOL

students teachers residents (%) 100 50

0

17:00 - 22:00

3

6

9

OCCUPANCY PROPORTION BY TIME

12

15

18

21

24 (hr)

By adapting the Proun concept to this program, ambiguous sequence relation, transparency, and destruction of logical relation between spaces and object are created. This Complexity is exactly what the open-school intends. While preexisting methods to teach information was from teacher to student, everybody is given information equally in the modern information-oriented society. Consequently the concept of modern education has changed. Closed- education is no more effective, and open-education to communicate with people and other fields is needed. If a school plan has undefined layers and admits overlapped flow of people around, then the Complexity will create communication among students, residents, and educational programs. It should show layers on the canvas, and the layers should have a rela-

tionship each other. This relationship has uncertainty when they compose 3-dimentional space. This is for experiential construction by layers that build up. The uncertain relationship would be analyzed diversely by users. Thus, diverse spaces and various time fragments exist simultaneously overlapping layers.


DRAWINGS

fountain

nature observation media room

media room classroom

classroom

gym

teacher’s lounge

classroom open space

classroom open space

teacher’s lounge

yard

(computer) (music)

(music)

(art)

(art)

(language)

(science)

(science)

library

library

teacher’s lounge

classroom

open space media room

open space media room

yard

(language)

classroom

teacher’s lounge

classroom

administration

open space

administration

media room

90

yard

GROUND FLOOR PLAN_ hand drawing

1. classroom 2. open space for classroom 3. media room 4. laboratory 5. library 6. audio-visual room

3 yard

3

1ST FLOOR PLAN_ hand drawing

1 1

yard

1

2

1

2 4

yard

SECTION_ hand drawing


91


92

STRUCTURE AND SPACE ELEMENT STAGE OF SPACE, MENTIS 2009

Space is often a derivative of a fundamental code played out on a repetitive stage. At an element stage, a crystal is the seed for a self-repeating and generating structure that results in geologic repetition. What effect can be achieved through regeneration and organization of form in architectural space? 1. Design several variations of 2d structural components considering strength, lightness, form, whimsy, delicacy, elegance, order, or scale. 2. Choose one of these structural components and explore possible spatial compositions. 3. Using the element, define 3d space. Use blocks, layers, scale, and color to manage the space.


93

DESIGN DIAGRAM CONSTRUCTION OF DNA AND SPACE, UDINE by PICABIA 2009

At the life stage, a self-repeating and generating structure called DNA splits and recombines the code of life to create new life. The materials of inorganic and organic structure are the stuff of architectural manipulations. Do architectural design and the creation of form and space mimic these mechanisms and parallel their experience? Does a selfrepeating form and the derivatives of that form hold promise in the directed study of architecture? Are they integral to the creative process? What role can a computer play in this investigation?


94

ARCHITECTURE

BRAZILIAN STUDENT’S BUILDING, CITE UNIVERSITAIRE DE PARIS

PENCIL on PAPER

PENCIL on PAPER


95

REICHSTAG IN BERLIN (GLASS DOME)

CITE UNIVERSITAIRE DE PARIS

PENCIL on PAPER

PENCIL AND COLOR PENCIL on PAPER


CREDITS

RNL DESIGN

PROJECT TEAM 2012

The Souk_Commercial and Housing Complex

Kyungjae Blaich + Michael Brendle + Tom Wuertz + Nathan Gulash + Jeremy Ehly + Brita Gill

2012

Architecture School_School and Student Housing

Kyungjae Blaich + Michael Brendle + Rich Von Luhrte + Tania Salgado + Kevin Keady

2011

Makkah Oasis_Competition_Hotel

Kyungjae Blaich + Michael Brendle + Tom Wuertz + Thanong Poonteerakul + Ryan Meeks + Eric Pearse + Todd Wenskoski

2010

Ruwais Hotel_ Conceptual Hotel Design

Kyungjae Blaich + Michael Brendle + Tom Wuertz + Green team

2010

Kuala Lumpur City Center_Master Plan

Kyungjae Blaich + Michael Brendle + Tom Wuertz + Urban Design and Landscape Architecture team

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER

PROJECT TEAM INSTRUCTOR EXTRA 2010

Le pli_Tourist’s Hyper Center

Kyungjae Blaich

Amir Ameri

Nominated work to AIAS Design Excellence Awards

2009 Link_Transitional Housing Kyungjae Blaich Phillip Gallegos 96

2008

Black Box Theater_ Experimental Theater

Kyungjae Blaich + Keenan Franklin + Xinyi Gao

Joe Colistra

2007

Urban Void_ Affordable Housing

Kyungjae Blaich + Xinyi Gao

Joe Colistra

HONGIK UNIVERSITY

PROJECT TEAM INSTRUCTOR EXTRA 2003

Archi-on_Architecture Cultural Center

2002

Samsung Media Center

2002

Open School_ Elementary School

Kyungjae Blaich

Incheol Kim

Kyungjae Blaich + Bumhee Han + June Yang

Yunsim Park

Kyungjae Blaich

Yunsim Park

Suwon Hwaseong Design Competition, Special price


1999 - 2012

Joanna (Kyungjae) Blaich Portfolio  

Architectural work from 1999-2012

Joanna (Kyungjae) Blaich Portfolio  

Architectural work from 1999-2012

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