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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome Readers!

November 10, 2018

November/December 2018

Our second issue of The RAC (Reader/Author Connection) Magazine is dedicated to ‘Poetry… How You Interpret It’.

CHAPTER ONE Author Spotlight

Ahh, poetry. Some of us haven’t read a poem since it was required reading in high school. Here, we introduce you to poets you may not know, and new poetry to embrace and reflect on. There’ll be no grading, no timeline, just poetry to enjoy and savor. Some of them you may not care for, but others you’ll come to love and will want to read them over and over again. That’s the power of poetry.

CHAPTER TWO My Favorite Reader

CHAPTER THREE Short Stories & Poems

CHAPTER FOUR Reader vs Writer

CHAPTER FIVE

Enjoy!

Reviews by Sandy

Sandy Vattimo

CHAPTER SIX Guest Reviewer

&

CHAPTER SEVEN

Joanie Chevalier

Ask Thelma & Louise

Co-Founders & Editors Sandy Vattimo & Joanie Chevalier Proofreader Helen Pryke theracmagazine.com Twitter @MagazineRac Facebook The RAC Magazine

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CHAPTER EIGHT Puzzles & Games

CHAPTER NINE Contributors & Sponsors

CHAPTER TEN Help Desk


The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

CHAPTER ONE

Author Spotlight

J. D. Estrada

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2019 Themes

January/February issue Theme: Romance/Anti-Romance Submission deadline 12.10.2018 March/April issue Theme: Carnival: Small-time, Big Tent, Historical, Clowns, etc. Submission deadline 2.10.2019 May/June issue Theme: Transitions: Graduation/ Wedding/Summer Camp, etc. Submission deadline 4.10.2019

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July/August issue Theme: Famous Landmarks (Nonfiction, or My Vacation/ Special Landmark) Submission deadline 6.10.2019 September/October issue Theme: Celebration! Our One Year Anniversary Submission deadline 8.10.2019

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Do you know of an Author to Spotlight? Email your suggestion to theracauthor@gmail.com


November/December 2018

The RAC Magazine

Spotlight Author with J.D. Estrada

share the passions of writing and connecting.

“Poetry to me is a very personal, very intimate and powerful thing. I hide a lot in poetry but reveal just as much.”

This obsession with the human aspect of who we are is deeply embedded in all his work and his first book is no exception. Though still starting its journey towards the top 100 Amazon books, Only Human is the first link within the Human Cycle, a three-book exploration of humanity through fiction.

by Joanie Chevalier When Sandy suggested interviewing JD Estrada for this issue, I shrugged. “Okay, sure, no problem,” I responded, raising my eyebrows at her author crush. Once I started digging into JD’s life, I too, was quickly enamored. First, he has twelve books published on Amazon; okay, as a fellow indie author, I was impressed. Second, his author bio is friendly and personable. He’s an author who seemed to enjoy connecting with his readers; I started liking him more as a real person, not just another good author. Three, I’ve caught him interacting, answering, blogging, retweeting, and generally reaching out to his fans, readers, fellow writers, and admirers. Even though JD Estrada seems to be a complex person (read his bio below to see what I mean), and he writes in a variety of genres, he is simply put, an overall nice, approachable person. I am now a fan. ***

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Poetry - How I Interpret it

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After years working in advertising, JD Estrada decided there were better ways to write fiction. Born on August 13th, he shares birthdays with Alfred Hitchcock and Fidel Castro... an interesting coincidence since his mom is Cuban and he loves a good story. Truth be told, he always dreamt about being an inventor, he just didn’t know he’d end up doing it using words. Where some people choose to invent new products, he has chosen to invent worlds through words. In college, he studied psychology for 3 years before he realized that if he finished, he’d need a psychologist for himself. Not submittheracmag@gmail.com

He has also released the second installment of the Human Cycle, his first bilingual compilation of essays, poetry and short stories, his first Spanish poetry collection, and not one, but two non-fiction books. He is currently working on a sci-fi novella and recently finished a young adult adventure of a boy who dreams of flying. In addition, he consistently writes on the above-mentioned blog (jdestradawriter.blogspot.com) being too enticed by the whole full and rants with zest on Twitter circle nature of that trajectory, via @jdestradawriter. He also he switched to Marketing, has instagram and youtube if Advertising... and Psychology. you want to see what he’s getting He just couldn’t let it go. up to or what delicious cuppa tea he may recommend. An avid reader of Science Fiction and Fantasy, throughout his life, His favorite band is Pearl Jam, he’s always loved writing and he was born in Puerto Rico, he connecting with people. Mind bodyboards and to him, playing you, although he loves those a guitar is as therapeutic as a genres, his reading tastes are as notebook. So by all means, visit, eclectic as his musical passions. say hi, and connect. So from rock to salsa to classical music, he also reads and writes He hopes you are doing well and in a variety of genres and is just that you enjoy your visit to any as satisfied writing a review or a of the literary planets he has poem as he is in working on his lovingly crafted. next novel. His blog is called For Writing out Loud and on this *** blog he’s been able to connect to hundreds of fellow readers who

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The RAC Magazine

Hi JD, it’s so nice for you to be open to an interview for our new magazine, The RAC (Reader/Author Connection) Magazine. I’ve read your Amazon profile and it’s impressive. So you were born in Puerto Rico. Do you currently live in the states? JD: Hi, Joanie and thank you for having me and being kind enough to interview me and my deep thanks to Sandy for the love, support, and at least seven new types of awesomeness. Although home shall always be Puerto Rico, I currently reside in Atlanta, Georgia, which has been a very lovely city. Truth be told, I miss my home a lot, but Atlanta is a beautiful place to live in with a ton of things to do, conventions to attend, and concerts to rock out to (Seriously, you need a freelance job just to cover concert expenses). I see from your author bio that you went to college for Marketing, Advertising, and Psychology. How have these three applications helped you write stories?

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JD: Well the fascinating thing of my major is that it allowed me to engage in such different information. That in itself is a godsend to someone like me because I thrive when I get new, random, and fascinating information. All three invite you to understand and look at human behavior and while psychology is mainly geared to understanding human behavior, marketing and advertising do the same but with the added intention of wanting to understand to influence. It’s a bit Machiavellian in that sense, because in advertising and marketing, we are meant to elicit a response through communication, which is exactly the same as you do with a story, except the medium is different and you’re based on strategy. With marketing, you come into contact with fascinating information of how companies thrive in places and you can easily appreciate the huge impact a small change can make. In marketing, a design change can make or break a product, while in a story, one edit can be the difference between a phrase hitting home and giving you all the feels or falling flat. With

November/December 2018

psychology, you learn to look at things from countless angles and to try and understand. In general, having a diverse educational background means I got to read all sorts of things, and that feeds into my stories. I like mash-ups, I love variety, I love mixing odd things and making them work in new and quirky ways. You seem to be a born natural at connecting with people. Have you always been social? JD: That is very kind of you to say and you know how they say never talk to strangers, well I did that, but I still smiled. To me, it’s always been interesting to connect with people and although a lot of young people have grown up with the Internet, I know the difference of life without the Internet and dreaming about chatting with people and hearing phantom noises of “uh-oh” from my ICQ days. I enjoy connecting with people and in as many ways as I can. It’s something that has brought me a lot of joy and taught me to be smart with how I practice empathy, because a kind word at the right time can www.theracmagazine.com

Poetry - How I Interpret it

make all the difference. People don’t put much importance to words and I can’t disagree more. I know the value of a comment, of genuine encouragement, of telling people something positive but true about themselves. I love telling stories and to me one of the best ways to learn how to tell stories is to exchange stories with people and a lot of people often need a willing ear that won’t judge but will truly listen. Some people wait their turn to talk, others listen to immediately give an opinion, and although I could do either of those, I work hard to listen and only offer feedback when it’s asked or when I think it’s pertinent. Something that’s also been super important to me is to connect with people of all social strata, all races, all genders, all religions, and offer a friendly hello. I am a big believer in equality because I think it is the solution to a LOT of problems. And if you ask me, equality begins by being kind and fair to any and everyone. Since this issue is all about poetry, please tell us about yours. Does it come natural to you to put pen to paper and write a poem? Are there any plans for future books of poetry?

collection. If you read poems in Dark Strands, you know they’ll be dark and a bit elegant. If you read Black Tie Affair, you know you’ll read something that is more for adults and goes great with whiskey. By the same token, Captured Moments offers snapshots of life and some social commentary. Between the Tides, my first collection, has ups and downs and possesses an ebb and flow I enjoy reading to this day. My Spanish poetry collection is very personal and written mostly while waiting while mom went under the knife and me coping with the stress and angst. And Roulette of Rhymes is super varied, but somehow, all the poems make sense in the build-up to the epic 800-line poem The Madness of Jonathan J George. If you also read my fiction, you’ll see I always sneak some poetry in there because I think it’s important and because I enjoy it. It’s liberating, it’s fun, and it’s a very me thing. There are most definitely plans for more poetry because it’s a very important part of who I am and I also enjoy going to comic cons to sell poetry and show that I am in fact a renaissance geek :) As for those plans, I’m designing the interior for my first haiku collection, I’m writing another Spanish poetry collection reflecting on Puerto Rico and what it means as part of my identity. I’m also working on collections with sadness, hope, and love as their central themes. These may take a bit longer because I want to get each of them over 1,000 words and of course if other concepts for collections come about, I’ll start a new one if it feels like something different and worthwhile. In short, the next steps in poetry for me will probably be bigger, possibly explore full concepts, and Spanglish is definitely in the future as well. Anything is possible, but what is for sure is that poetry shall be part of my life as long as I live… and part of my mission is to convince people that poetry is just what their lives needed.

JD: Ah my blessed poetry, without it I would have probably lost my marbles long ago. Poetry has been a go-to coping mechanism since high school and if ever you question whether there is magic in words, you just need to find the right poem to learn how powerful and real that magic is. For me, paper to pen leads to happiness quite often, even when I write sad or angry things because I work hard to practice what I call emotional alchemy (you can read about this in my non-fiction book Peace, Love, and Maki Rolls). I’m also a big supporter of more people reading AND writing poetry and to be more free with it. It seems to me that way too many English professors frustrate students with poetry by either giving the same tried and true poets to discuss in class or by brutally grading papers. Thank you, JD. We wish you great success with all your endeavors. Poetry to me is a very personal, very intimate and powerful thing. I hide a lot in poetry but reveal See JD’s poem, A Wave Goodbye, on page just as much. I treat each collection like an album 18. though, meaning that the poems that are included in one collection NEED to make sense in that *** submittheracmag@gmail.com

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The RAC Magazine

Between the Tides by J.D. Estrada

Review by Sandy Vattimo

November/December 2018

Review Poetry can be intricate Like an allegory or a haiku. It can be informal, Like a free verse about something you knew.

CHAPTER TWO

My Favorite Reader

JD is a master Of painting a picture with words. His skill is a gift He gives to the world. Between the Tides, Lists but a few Of the wonderful works We are all lucky to view.

Sherry Haynes

Thank you, dear friend, For sharing your soul Through poetry and stories Uniting us all.

Curious George First books written by H. A. & Margret Rey

Connect with JD:

Buy your own books by JD

Website – www.jdestradawriter.blogspot.com

Libros 787 - libros787.com/collections/vendors? q=J.D.%20Estrada

Twitter – www.twitter.com/JDEstradawriter Instagram – http://instagram.com/jdestradawriter/ Google+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/ Facebook – www.facebook.com/JDEstradawriter Goodreads - www.goodreads.com/author/show/ 7392536.J_D_Estrada

EBooks - www.books2read.com/u/38gaMw Books are also on Amazon: www.amazon.com/ JD-Estrada/e/B00CP4834O/ref=sr_ntt_srch_ lnk_1? qid=1539563256&sr=1-1

Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/j-d-estrada

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Everyone has a Favorite Reader, be it a reviewer or fellow bibliophile. Use the interview form on our website as a guide. theracmagazine.com/forms Use the website to submit your interview, then look for it to be printed in an upcoming issue.


The RAC Magazine

My Favorite Reader Sherry Haynes Interviewed by: India Kells, Author

Relation to Interviewer: Reader/Fan

Sherry’s Bio: I am an avid reader who

November/December 2018

Fun facts about Sherry: Ebook or Print? Chocolate or Caramel? Books or Movies? Alien or Shi�ter? Libra�� or Booksto�e? Love Sto�� or Myste��? Text or Call? Hammock or Recliner?

Do you have a favorite author and/ or book? Picking a favorite is like picking

Amazon or Walma�t?

C�osswo�d or Sudoku? Netflix or Hulu?

favorites of my children or grandchildren. Just shouldn’t be done.

Sleep in or Stay up late?

What genre do you like to read? I love

Dine in or Takeout?

Are there any you don’t like to read? I

Vacation or Staycation?

tend to stay away from Non-Fiction.

Do you remember your first childhood book? Curious George was my first book I remembered reading but there was always Dr Seuss.

What is your favorite snack/beverage while reading? Pepsi. I never go anywhere

Math or Histo��? Beach or Mountains? Facebook or Twitter? Gi�tca�d or Gi�t? Bloody Ma�� or Shi�ley Temple?

without a Pepsi, a Book and my camera.

Hobbies and interests (besides reading): I love to travel, photography,

cooking, and volunteering.

Curious George was first published in 1941. Having never been out of print, books about Curious George have sold over 75 million copies worldwide. www.curiousgeorge.com

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Poetry

Fiction or Nonfiction?

loves to read anything that has suspense. To me everything else is just icing on the cake as long as suspense is there.

to read anything that offers suspense.

CHAPTER THREE

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Nathan Bush

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Joanie Chevalier

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Cherry Fyfe Christensen

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Michael Allan Scott

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J.D. Estrada

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Raton Ghosh

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Nellie Neves

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Julia Kaylock

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Jane Jago

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Toni Kief

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Harry Kelly

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Janet McDaniel

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Jessica M Baumgartner

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John C. Morgan

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Sara Northwood

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Our Indie Author FB Group

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Annette Spratte

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Joseph Willson

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Kay Castaneda

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Ashley Vattimo

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Karen Mossman

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Kim Wolkens

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Poetry - How I Interpret it

In the Shade of the Cross by Nathan Bush The Cross is a reminder Of the mercy and love, Given to us all, By our God from above. It stands tall and proud, Majestic in our sight. The Lamb bled upon it, To make all our wrongs right. There will be rest For the weary and weak, When the Lord Jesus Christ You ask for, you seek. There will be rest, When you are in need. You can sit with the Lord, Shaded by the Tree.

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Taken For Granted by Cherry Christensen She did things the same way, day after day Worked herself to the bone, yet she received no pay She toiled with one ear always tuned to his command For when he told her to come, she had to lend a hand She raised the kids, cooked the meals, she did all this and more She helped in the fields and gardens, and did most all the chores But through the years she heard no “thanks” for all that she had done The man foolishly took her for granted during every rising sun The years went by and the woman grew older, and this is when she took ill Her body was so old and tired that she couldn’t fight, she didn’t have the will Now the man was left alone and confused in a world he didn’t know For it was the woman who had led him through every winter snow He no longer had a slave to do everything he’d asked He went about his business, trying to learn new tasks This man who never had bothered to show his love, Had thoughts of her circling in his mind like a dove It was too late for him to tell her how much he cared Not that he would have had the nerve, or even dared So, he had to go on with the regret he felt inside As he placed a single red rose by her graveside.


The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

A Wave Goodbye by JD Estrada

from page 10 of Roulette of Rhymes “Alleviate Me” I Alleviate my soggy heart from the hail Storms and tempests threatening my soul Bleak and lightening while thundering flash My temperate childhood smelt the clash II Alleviate my soggy heart from the depressed earth Feeling so dejected I wish to be good for its part While Ups are at war to demolish the downs The dejected mother lost its crown! III Alleviate my soggy heart that drowned in the sea Never! Never! have I seen for long the flying bees Honeyed flowers while waiting for friends The fainted insects weep in pain! IV Alleviate my soggy heart from the deceased earth Beholding pretention I cannot have a start The inborn innocence slowly fleeing from the heart The earthly skeleton takes its start! V Alleviate my soggy heart from the hoarders of earth Living in silence I have no dearth Let me live a life in peace I wish to forget those tempests and storms at ease Ratan Ghosh © 17/09/18

Next month’s theme: Loving or Loathing Romance or Not 18

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The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

In Between Fights Do you ever wonder what happens To heroes day after they win? Does Spiderman spin up a hammock Just to feel the aches and give in? And is it Batman or Bruce Wayne Who calls in vacation days? Does Wonder Woman go jet setting Until the exhaustion’s at bay? No one calls the day after Not when the struggle is done Don’t you think they’re exhausted? Don’t you think they’re a mess? It seems as though they might whine, Just a minute or two. After all they are mostly human, Hardly different than you. I get the headaches and crying I get the bruises and pain. I used to pick up the suffering, Now I just try to begin. But what if they actually do it? What if they actually rest? Then I’m not sick, I’m just healing— A superhero in between fights. Nellie K. Neves

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{

I wrote this after a particularly hard relapse with MS. I nearly died, and I thought, is this my life now? My husband happened to be watching Avengers at the time and this was born. There are so many fighting an invisible fight who used to be so much more than they are now. I like to look at it like this, just resting for the next big fight.

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An offered hand, a welcoming smile A grin that says I like your style A word of kindness in an unkind place On days of sorrow, a shared embrace While on the good days booze and laughter Rambunctious joy that lifts the rafters Or quiet walks to breathe the air Not talking, but just being there Though night falls fast, and most things end ‘Til my last breath you’ll be my friend ©️jane jago 2018

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The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Will Rogers

Modern Life

Will Rogers used to say he never met a man he didn’t like. I admire people like him. But I’m not one of them. I meet people I don’t like every day. It just happens. Little Grudges, my friend Sal used to say. “You have a lot of little grudges.” My neighbor for example, banging the trash can lids Outside my window Two in the morning Not that it woke me up But I get up to look Peek down there Naturally nosey person that I am And he’s pushing pushing What in hell is he pushing at that hour? So, Will Rogers I am not. I probably wouldn’t have liked him either.

Friend. I went by your old place on West 26th Street Your name was no longer on the buzzer. I pushed it anyway. When an Asian woman answered I knew you were gone. Nobody coming out of the building seemed to remember you Just goes to show. I went by the old diner at which we used to eat Same handwritten signs, same menus Same old tables. But no you. I found it strange that the waitress remembered me but couldn’t remember The guy who’d been going there for decades. Maybe I should have brought a photo To spark her memory Maybe I should have reached out to you, Bitten the bullet and swallowed my pride Because now the fight seems trivial Its the rest of the stuff that seems important, All the good stuff we shared. People used to sew patches on old jeans and put new soles on favorite shoes. Modern life has changed. We throw things out and buy new. But some things are irreplaceable. They are worth the effort a repair would require. Friend. My friend.

Harry Kelly

vonharakaly@gmail.com

Harry Kelly

vonharakaly@gmail.com

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What Does it Mean? By Jessica Marie Baumgartner The curser blinks The pen is empty The page sits light But also heavy on my thoughts In my dreams A shadow of truth Takes a peek The curser blinks The pen is empty I chewed the cap And ink flows heavy through my hands On the floor I laugh at myself Try for more The curser blinks The pen is empty What does it mean Life is too heavy for my smile And my dreams But this is where I Need to be

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The RAC Magazine

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November/December 2018

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Poetry - How I Interpret it

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The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

What Happens When You Read I pinched my nose at the musty smell, and lifted you off the shelf. I remember you well, you smelly old book, I put you there myself. I brushed off your dust and gave it a blow. Went right up my nose, you know. This content is racy. Ooh, la-la-la! This author’s a right Romeo. With text so small and very tight, we need a candle for a light. A comfy chair and stool for feet, let’s start reading, we’re in for a treat. After the first line, I was in a blush, it was racy, it was steamy, it was my first crush. He’s handsome and very dark; he bites fair maidens for a lark. He lives in a castle and sings… my heart soars in delight as the words of love did my book bring. He pulled the pins from round my hair, and what he did next? Do I dare... Reveal the places he transported me? Just turn the page and you will see...

A Poem spontaneously written by Authors in Our Indie Author Room FB Group

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Poetry - How I Interpret it

A twinkle, a sparkle, a gleam in his eye. The things he did teach me, my oh my! As the lust and the passion begin to rage - I find I have a missing page! Be still my heart, look high and low, find the page before I blow! I sniffed, my nostrils did flare, I heard a crackling, I could only stare. The mythical creatures had turned back time, the missing pages now were mine. What would I find? What would I read? Hopefully the words would be just what I need! The script, in rhyme and in prose, was meant for me, I suppose. Now see, dear young ones, just what can happen when you read!

Sarah Northwood Trisha J. Kelly Angela Petch Nathan Bush Julie Hatton Joanie Chevalier Kay Castaneda

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The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Autumn By Joseph Willson

Annette Spratte

Send your short story to submittheracmag@gmail.com

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A season, A time. A sense of solitude, comfort, peace. Changes on the horizon, Always of renewal, a beginning of sorts. Serenity, wonder, calm, The intrinsic majesty of all things mature and grand. A season, A time, A person. Reflective, insightful, compassionate yet strong, Nostalgic, intelligent, a friend to all. Caring and kind, a beautiful mind. A season, A person, A time, A wonder of nature. Comparatively speaking, they are one in the same. Yet on their own, will always be known as, A wonder of nature. A season. A time. Most importantly, the person‌

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Going Places with Books by Kay Castaneda Where did you go today? I traveled far to visit with an old woman who told me a tale of when she lived behind a barbed-wire fence. The fence was rusty and sticky with the sweat of a million unwashed hands. Her friends stood beside her, holding her up because she was starving, freezing, shivering, and so hot her head hung down. The women, all of them, supported her and warned her not to cry or whimper any more. When she arrived home, their faces entered into the distant prison of her mind where she guarded them with love so they would be safe and nobody could ever, ever force them to leave. Her name is Hannah, Esther, Paula, Sophia, Bernadette, Margaret, Luella, Greta, Jocelyn, Michaela, Sarah, Anna, Lynne, Unknown.

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Cruel Life A Reverse Poem By Ashley Vattimo

One person lives, another dies. An endless cycle called cruel life. Happiness, sadness, Even suicide. No one is worth taking a life. Even though there is nowhere else to turn. Tears streaming. Hands shaking. Put the blade down. Last breath of sadness. No more tears. No more fear. No more pain. A new life begins.

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Playing by Kim Wolkens The keys are my favorite friends. With them, I can be honest, I can be emotional. I can sit down, hands poised, mind troubled. As I’m playing, I think to my friends: Am I playing well enough? It doesn’t matter, they say. Just play.

Am I playing the right kind of song? It doesn’t matter, they say. Just play. Is my playing better today than yesterday? It doesn’t matter, they say. Just play. Will anybody ever hear me play again? It doesn’t matter, they say. Just play. My friends help me lose myself in the moment There is no future; there is no past. Pulling myself off the bench, I realize My friends remind me that life is OK.

It doesn’t matter, I say. Just play.

Lego bricks on the floor Cups and saucers, spoons too, Turtles and Batman’s galore And a fluffy white kangaroo A long line of cars, A plastic track for a train, A book of football stars, And a supersonic plane. On a Power Ranger beanbag, With a Lion King toy, Fast asleep on his back Is my little boy! by Karen Mossman

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CHAPTER FOUR

Reader vs Writer

The Reader

Sandy Vattimo

The Writer

Joanie Chevalier In this issue...

Book or Movie


November/December 2018

The RAC Magazine

Reader vs Writer A Reader’s

On the downside, a movie cannot include every scene written in a book. There just isn’t enough time View or money. On the flip side, an author isn’t bound by those constraints. A by Sandy Vattimo book is limited only by the author’s Book versus Movie. What? Book, imagination. of course!! Maybe. It depends. Honestly, it’s a matter of perspective. A person can easily loose themselves in movies, as well as books. So, After this topic was proposed, I again, which did you like better? The happened to see the listing for movie in your mind or the movie on a lecture series about How to the screen? Appreciate Great Movies. I only watched the first half of the first lecture, but it directed me to an “Aha!” moment. The question isn’t book or movie, it should be whose interpretation do you find more pleasing – yours or the team of professionals working together to realize their collective vision?

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Movies are an artform. The costume department uses their knowledge of fashion, fabric type, buttons and trimmings to tell an inner story while making the actors blend with the setting. The set designers transform an open field into a dystopian world or an empty warehouse into colorfully whimsical shops of the East Indies. Lighting affects the scene’s mood and helps direct the audience’s attention. The sound and music direct the audience’s emotions. Actors add a bit of themselves when transforming into a believable character. The director and producer ensure their vision comes together seamlessly.

As for me, I prefer to read the book first. I enjoy knowing the entire story. I like the preview to determine if I’d enjoy the movie. I’ve read a variety of books by Stephen King. I look forward to seeing some of them on the big screen, while the others remain locked away in the furthest corners of my mind. A few years ago, my son wanted to watch The Hunger Games, but I wasn’t too sure about the premise of a movie where children are chosen to kill each other for the viewing pleasure of the Capitol’s residents. I didn’t want anyone in my household to watch that. (Censorship is real in my house.) I didn’t understand how the movie could be so popular. What else could I do? I still didn’t want to watch the corruption, but I had to give it a chance. I read the book. I loved the book. I bought the movie.

Conclusion: Always book before movie – never movie before book. Remember, a movie is merely a representation of others’ interpretation.

(Side note: GreatCoursesPlus.com offers hundreds of educational lectures on nearly everything. It’s a paid service, but I love the variety.)

An Author’s View by Joanie Chevalier As I tackled the topic of book vs movie, I forced myself into author mode. I have to admit here that I was on the bandwagon of read a book and never watch the movie because the story will be ruined. After all, I thought, how could we get inside a character’s head by watching a movie? (What was she really thinking?) Why be disappointed to discover the hero’s hair wasn’t curly, as I had imagined it in my mind while reading?

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Book or Movie and members in The RAC Mag’s …And some comments received “I always watch the movie, but only at home because I spend most of the FB group, what they thought. from FB group/twitter: movie correcting the plot changes and The outcome of all of this? I had an “I usually avoid watching the movie that would get me kicked out of the epiphany: a book and a movie are after I have read the book. But, if I theater.” different, and both can be equally see a good movie, I will then read the This is my favorite comment. It enjoyed! (*collective gasp from book book.” sums up this book vs movie debate lovers all over the word*) “I prefer to read the book. I don’t quite nicely: When I realized books and movies necessarily need to watch the movie as are like comparing apples and I’d be constantly comparing the film “Movies are for size, sound and if oranges, written word vs motion, ying against the original vision which to me, you are lucky a decent plot. They’re also over very quickly but can leave vs yang, etc., I relaxed a little. After takes precedence.” you with a short term emotional all, they are both creative outlets, right? Reading books and watching “With movies-it’s all show and action, involvement. They are quick fix movies can both be enjoyed and which can make the story more entertainment. Books are to be taken called for what they truly are: modes real…but can limit the full character at your own pace, to be saved and cherished, and will never go out of of entertainment. I convinced myself development.” fashion. Their emotion is always there that if I could look at it this way, I would be able to cope with this new “…sometimes the movie makes you for you to revisit. They are never a concept. But…you still can’t force fall in love with the story all over quick fix.” me to watch the Outlander series (by again.” The good news for authors? Watching Diane Gabaldon). No way, no how. James Fraser is MINE and I prefer “I see them as different things. It’s a movie may tempt people to read to keep him in my imagination. interesting to see someone else’s a book. And perhaps your book is creative vision compared to your something similar to what they had Ahem, enough said. imagination. I look at remakes the just watched. same way. One version takes nothing from the other as the other will A win-win for all! Twitter Poll Results: away still be there. They might also tempt people into reading.”

7%

“Basically, apples and oranges. I like both but they can rarely be compared to one another. Knowing they’re not going to be the same will allow you to enjoy both.”

To keep an open mind, I searched google (and found this impressive blog about books being made into movies: www.bookbub.com/ blog/2017/12/26/book-adaptations2018-movies); I created a twitter poll, and then asked friends and family, www.theracmagazine.com

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Follow the conversation at:

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November/December 2018

The RAC Magazine

Writ�n� Ch����n�� Cinquains:

five-line poem that describes a person, place, or thing dessert cold, creamy eating, giggling, licking cone with three scoops ice cream

found on www.readwritethink.org

Example a one-word title, a noun two adjectives three -ing participles a phrase a synonym for your title, another noun

CHAPTER FIVE

Book Reviews by Sandy

Breathe, Breathe

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Little Moments of Calm

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The Weightless One

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by Erin Sweet Al-Mahairi

Limericks: popularized by Edward Lear in his first Book of Nonsense (1846)

by Sarah Northwood There was a (an)

from/in adjective

Whose

noun (person/animal)

noun (place)

was/were -ly adverb adjective

He/She /It Add a sentence he�e about something that happened

And Add mo�e about what happened next

That same adjective as first line

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same noun as first line

from/in

found on www.education.com

noun (�eatu�e)

same place as first line

www.theracmagazine.com

Anais Chartschenko

Perfect Break

Anais Chartschenko

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The RAC Magazine

Breathe. Breathe. by

Erin Sweet AlMehairi As I sit here, I’m contemplating what to write. Erin’s words were deeply moving. As I read, I posted a few comments on Twitter. We don’t know each other, but maybe she’d respond? It began with my initial reaction to her book. Her words were pleading. Each poem was a cry for help. My heart hurt. My soul was bleeding. She was glad I was able to grasp her pain. I then commented on the short story, The Madness of the Woodpecker. The ending was an amazing twist. I did not see that coming. She told me it was based on a true creature who’s incessant drilling naturally led to a story of insanity, and she just wanted to have a bit of fun. Even though we saw humor in the inspiration, the story itself is serious. Much of the population doesn’t understand mental illness. This story is a creative peek inside the mind of madness. I also came across a set of short stories set in Loveless, Ohio. I told her I loved the lane they all resided on. The revenge was sweet. She had fun writing that part. By the time I was finished reading, my emotions had run the gambit. I was depressed, hurt, angry, scared. I told her she should sell her book as a kit. One needs the emotional support while reading her pain. This turned into joking back and forth. How inappropriate, I know. I just experienced her tortured past as if it was right in front of me. I could see the helplessness in her red, blood-shot eyes. The salt from her tears creating permanent rivulets down her face. And I was laughing. This book was written as a way to heal. It is an outlet to keep emotions from turning into a time bomb. Another part of recovery is being able to see the lighter side of things. Being able to smile and share a laugh or two is also therapeutic. A balm for the soul. There was no disrespect. Only the glimpse of happiness for a woman who deserves only the best. Here’s to the charter members of Woodpecker’s Anonymous! May we all find a smile beneath all the crazy. Follow Erin on Twitter @ErinAlMehairi and be sure to check out her website hookofabook.wordpress.com

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November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Little Moments of Calm

Perfect Break &

by Sarah Northwood

The Weightless One by Anais Chartschenko

“First impression? Quotable Quotes.” I am a lover of nature so, naturally, I felt connected to each of these simple moments of inspiration. The words, precisely arranged on each page, unlocked feelings of solace and motivation. Through Sarah’s soul, I felt tension release as waves of calm gently blanketed my being. I also love the accompanying photos. The rich images add fuel to the poems. A flower bud is shown. As you imagine the petals unfolding, your inner beauty releases. Steps taken, little or large, can lead you to your future. Look back if the urge overwhelms you but remain steady towards your true destination. Wind in the sails, cotton specks far away in the night sky, a paint brush to inspire a new day… Thank you, Sarah. I love your thoughts. I love your talent. I’m going to borrow your ideas for an inspirational gift for my daughter.

Sarah has written a variety of books for both children and adults; one of which I reviewed for The RAC Mag’s Sept/Oct 2018 issue, entitled She’s Not Gone. Sarah can be found on Twitter @northwood_ sarah, Facebook @SarahNorthwoodAuthor, and head to sarahnorthwood-author.com to join her mailing list.

www.theracmagazine.com

“Two very different stories written in verse.”

Oh my gosh!! I remember the days of teenage drama. The turbulence was erratic enough to make the strongest of souls wary. Fortunately for me, my teenage years were a breeze compared to Claire and Madison.

This painstakingly beautiful story written in verse was a pleasure to read.

Follow Anais on Twitter @anaisbelieve and be sure to check her website anaischartschenko.weebly.com for updates.

I applaud the author’s creativity. I am honored to have been given the opportunity to experience her work.

Many people use the therapy of writing to expel their experienced torment. Word by word, the trauma is transferred from the In general, girls are masters of emotional heart, through the ink, and then becomes upset. Anais is a master of verse. I love her permanently soaked into the paper. Little by unique format. Best friends, forced apart by little, the process eases the heaviness upon summer vacation, remain in contact through one’s soul. email. We learn of their trials and tribulations over the long weeks. This is the summer of The next step is to look upon those words change. through the eyes of an observer. Phrases should be rewritten, moved around, or deleted I loved the realism of the situations. I loved altogether. After much deliberation comes the yen for positive outcomes. I appreciated the most difficult step; allowing others into the forked paths of self-discovery. I remain the most painful moments of the writer’s life. Anais took this therapeutic method to a whole unsure of my feelings towards Justice. new level. The format is decided. Her story Anais has become one of my favorite writers. is laid out. Focus on each word is essential. Flamboyance doesn’t exist when you’re exposing yourself to the world.

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November/December 2018

The RAC Magazine

CHAPTER SIX

Guest Reviewer

Advertise with us

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Annette Spratte

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November/December 2018

The RAC Magazine

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Poetry can not only be found in poems!

Guest Reviewer

When browsing books to find my next read, I usually follow four steps: Look at the cover, read the blurb, read the first paragraph, and then open the book at random and see if what I read there pulls me in. There have been books which made me buy them for the sheer lingual beauty of the first sentences. ‘Cold Mountain’ by Charles Frazier is such a book. And ‘Tall Chimneys’ by Allie Cresswell. I do not only read to enjoy a story. I also read to enjoy the language.

Annette Spratte As a certified translator and bilingual author, Annette provides affordable literary translations. chatwithannette.wordpress.com/translation

I have lived in both the US and Germany and am fluent in both languages. Having worked as a legal secretary in interna�onally opera�ng law firms and other companies, transla�ng has been my daily bread for many years. I was cer�fied as a translator by the German Chamber of Industry and Commerce. It is my aim to keep the style of the author alive while rendering the text into a natural flow in the other language. – Anne�e Connect with Anne�e:

www.facebook.com/authorannettespratte https://chatwithannette.wordpress.com

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I am a bilingual writer and professional freelance translator living in Germany close to Cologne. English is the language of my heart while German is my mother tongue. I have published books in both languages: The Way of Life series in English and the Jabando children’s series in German. I love to support Indie authors with beta reading and transla�ons in English and German. A growing fan base is enjoying my reviews and character interviews at my blog “A Chat with Anne�e” (in English). Transla�ons English to German as well as German to English Price: 120 € (140$) per 10,000 words Beta Reading I’ve been reading nearly all of my life and enjoy a good story in most genres (except Ero�ca and Horror). A little while ago I decided not to waste �me reading books I don’t enjoy, so before accep�ng a book for beta reading, I will take a look at the book’s descrip�on and a sample. If I’m interested, I will gladly give the author detailed feedback. I might even discover a typo or two! Price: 35 $ www.theracmagazine.com

In school we were given a hand-out with a paragraph from Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. I loved it so much that I bought the book, which I had a very hard �me struggling through. Unfortunately, there was a lot of poli�cal discussion interspersing the beau�ful descrip�ons. The poetry of beau�ful language touches me and fills me with a deep sense of gra�tude, much like a gorgeous sunrise or the magical secrecy of mist. Thus, reading ‘Tall Chimneys’ made me very grateful.

in the story I had not seen coming at all. Though I am usually a fast reader, prone to cross-reading through exci�ng sec�ons in my hunger to learn what will happen, this book forced me to read slowly by the sheer poetry of language. I did not want to miss a single word of the beau�ful descrip�ons. To give you an idea, here’s a small excerpt: It was easy, speaking in the dark like that, surrounded by the benevolent spirits in that comfortable stronghold, pouring my life story into the endlessly pa�ent and reliable vessel that was Kenneth. He sat in the dark and listened and said ‘I see, I see,’ from �me to �me, immobile in the chair across from mine. He remained implacable in the face of my anger and my tears, but nodded, and stretched out the receptacle of his understanding un�l it encompassed my whole life. (Allie Cresswell, Tall Chimneys) I regard this novel as a piece of art and will certainly read it again. Anne�e Spra�e

The story of Evelyn Talbot is an unusual one. Born as a late child into an old English family with a country seat in the Yorkshire moors, she was lonely most of the �me and developed an almost supernatural bond to the house in which she lived. Perhaps readers find her feelings and reac�ons illogical or hard to understand, but being a late and lonely child myself I must say that many of the emo�ons and ac�ons described in this novel ring true. The lack of self-esteem, the fear of anything strange, the strong affinity to hiding away and not venturing out into the world as well as ge�ng lost in hopeless rela�onships are oddly familiar to me. In that, Evelyn’s experiences are absolutely plausible. The story is very quiet, in perfect accord with the grand old house and the silent moor surrounding it, but it is by no means boring. There were passages that had me breathless with an�cipa�on, fearing the worst, while at other �mes I was hit by a twist submittheracmag@gmail.com

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The RAC Magazine

What’s in a Name? A German’s love for Shakespeare by Annette Spratte

November/December 2018

“How did it happen? Where most students ran from the classroom, screaming, I eagerly anticipated the next lesson. Where everyone sat groaning and tearing their hair, I learned verses by heart just for the fun of it.”

CHAPTER SEVEN

Ask Thelma & Louise

For me, one such part from Shakespeare’s sonnets is this:

The subject: Shakespeare

30 years ago we discussed Shakespeare in class. I was an English major and immediately fell in love with his writings. Not all of them - I distinctly remember the boredom while sitting through King Lear’s endless monologues in the theatre. But the comedies and most of all the sonnets took my fancy. While travelling England in my late teens, I visited Stratfordupon-Avon and Shakespeare’s birthplace and went to see “Much ado about nothing” performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company. I had a ball. It was so funny, I hung sideways in my seat with hysterics. Isn’t that amazing? Even after roughly 500 years, his humor still catches. His words carried through the centuries and haven’t lost their ability to touch.

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For the rest of my life, I won’t be able to look at a rose without the words from “Romeo and Juliet” playing through my mind: “What’s in a name? A rose, by any other name would smell as sweet ...”

Class was no place to get enthusiastic about poetry, though. I got into a row with my English teacher over the interpretation of a sonnet. While he said that there was no final interpretation, he at the same time would not let my interpretation stand next to his. I was so frustrated, I raved about it in my diary. Poetry is very special. There’s a whole lot of meaning condensed into a few words and there are no rules to say what that meaning is. There will be poems you read that mean absolutely nothing to you. There will be poems which are nice to read and evoke some emotion, no matter whether happy or sad, longing or melancholic. And then there are poems which will unlock a secret door in your soul and take up residence there, becoming a treasure you will carry with you forever.

“In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, for they in thee a thousand errors note. But it is my heart that loves what they despise.” Struggling with my looks for many years, this verse (or this sonnet, as the entire thing runs along the same lines) held a special meaning for me, because it focused on the soul, on personality and character rather than good looks. I still believe that loving a person for who they are rather than what they look like will get you a lot further in a relationship. Whether this idea was implemented by these lines or the words merely echoed what I already believed, I cannot say. In my late teens and early twenties poetry was my way of expressing my deepest feelings. And in the same way it happened with the poems I read, only a few of the poems I wrote found their way deep into my soul and I still know them by heart, remembering them and reciting them to myself over and over again. www.theracmagazine.com

Expert Advice from Wise Women with Witty Words


The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Ask Thelma & Louise Meet Thelma and Louise. They’ve been best friends since back in the day. Even though Thelma complains about Louise’s pink flamingo yard deco, they’ve lived next door to each other for enough years to see almost seventy birthdays together. They’ve had many disagreements and debates over the years but the one thing they do agree on is they both love a good book… and both have their own opinions. So much so that they’ve become their neighborhood’s gurus on all things books, reading, authors, fiction, nonfiction, you name it.

Here’s a question from a fellow book lover and fan, Jan Feickert:

Q: How can I get a good night’s sleep when I keep saying to myself, “Just one more chapter, just one more chapter?”

CHAPTER EIGHT

Puzzles & Games

Thelma: Jan, my advice: quit reciting sentences to yourself while in bed. Do what works: Close your eyes and think of the hunks you have met in all those books you’ve read in the last year… sister, you’ll be sleeping like a log in no time. Speaking of poetry, I recite poems too as I fall asleep. Here’s my latest one: Here I lay broken-hearted, Had a book but couldn’t start it. Closed by eyes and only….

Name this Poem

I always fall asleep after this line… can you finish it? :o) So, Jan, my final answer to you: Read only paperbacks in bed… when a Kindle hits your face after you fall asleep, it ruins your sleep rhythm… not to mention that black eye you’ll have to explain to everyone the next day…

Thelma is a talker and if you ask her a question, get comfy… grab some cookies and a blankie - the answer may take a while. Most in her neighborhood call her wise, but tend not to call too often, or they’ll most likely miss their favorite afternoon game show. Louise is the practical friend. She’ll always bring a hearty casserole to the monthly potluck (while Thelma usually brings at least two desserts, and doesn’t care who knows it), and balances her checkbook to the penny. She loves reciting book facts she finds online. She takes her new IPad with her everywhere she goes. Who’s the wisest between these two friends? You be the judge. Ask a question, any question to do with books, reading, authors, words, writing, book reviews, book covers, titles, etc., and you might just get an earful from both.

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Brain Teasers Word Search

Louise: According to the National Sleep Foundation, the best bedtime activity that can be done to unwind before going to sleep is reading. It is recommended that you read a paperback instead of an e-reader though, because the blue light can disrupt your internal clock and circadian rhythms. So Jan, make sure you are reading from a paperback, are comfy and snug as a bug in a rug, and enjoying a good story. When it’s a good book, we understand your dilemma and give you permission to stay up a little later every now and then to read until you’re snoring and drooling, your glasses are askew, and your finger is turning blue between pages 355 & 356. Do you have a question for Thelma & Louise? Send your inquiry to submittheracmag@gmail.com. Join in the fun at our FB group or our website:

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Cryptogram Fun Facts Do you know of a word puzzle, trivia, or game? Send your suggestions to theracreader@gmail.com

Expand your Vocab


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November/December 2018

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Poetry - How I Interpret it

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The RAC Magazine

Sweet and Low by Lord Tennyson

Help Father sail to his little one

November/December 2018

Sweet and low, sweet and low, Wind of the western sea, Low, low, breathe and blow, Wind of the western sea! Over the rolling waters go, Come from the dying moon, and blow, Blow him again to me; While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps. Sleep and rest, sleep and rest, Father will come to thee soon; Rest, rest, on mother’s breast, Father will come to thee soon; Father will come to his babe in the nest, Silver sails all out of the west Under the silver moon: Sleep, my little one, sleep, my pretty one, sleep.

CHAPTER NINE

Contributors & Sponsors

Thank You

Poem from The Cambridge Book of Poetry for Children via Project Gutenberg - http://www.gutenberg.org

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November/December 2018

Thank you, Sponsors!

CHAPTER TEN

Help Desk

Reading Apps

Thank you, Contributors! Jessica Baumgartner Nathan Bush Kay Castaneda Joanie Chevalier Cherry Christensen Revell Cornell Raton Ghosh 56

Jane Jago Julia Kaylock Harry Kelly Toni Kief Janet McDaniel John C. Morgan Nellie Neves

Sarah Northwood Michael Allen Scott Annette Spratte Ashley Vattimo Joseph Willson Kim Wolkens

www.theracmagazine.com

& Poetry Resources


The RAC Magazine

November/December 2018

Poetry - How I Interpret it

Q: I want to understand Even when poetry has a I can be upset by malice. Most and appreciate poetry meaning, as it usually has, it critics are very poor poets. may be inadvisable to draw it Poetry is a craft that takes a more. Any tips? out... Perfect understanding will sometimes almost you extinguish pleasure.

A: Yes, first off won’t appreciate every poem or poet out there. I once thought it was so nerdy and realised I’d been reading the wrong pieces for me. I also came to realise that it’s difficult to get in touch with someone else’s pov (point of view) and learned to enjoy those lines that touched my heart and soul.

Apps

Sarah Northwood

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Resources

&

The poem is a form of texting... it’s the original text. It’s a perfecting of a feeling in language - it’s a way of saying more with less, just as texting is.

www.theracmagazine.com

A. E. Housman

Sometimes understanding the art that went into the piece helps you to enjoy it even more. Sarah Northwood

Tips on Poetry Appreciation

In high school I was very much involved in poetry. You Carol Ann Duffy cannot read a poem quickly. There’s too much going on there. There are rhythms Poems are not read: they are and alliterations. You have reread. Reread the poem, to read poetry slow, slow, then read between the lines, slow to absorb it all. then look at it, then watch it, then peek at it: handle it Eugene H. Peterson like an object. Contemplate its shadows, angles and dimensions. To read a poem is to hear it with our eyes; to hear it is to Terrance Hayes see it with our ears. Most quotes found on: www.brainyquote.com submittheracmag@gmail.com

Octavio Paz

lot to appreciate, and there are some critics who have no ear for it. An irresponsible critic can do a lot of psychic damage, but eventually, they don’t affect your work. Derek Walcott

I think you have to read it and then read it out loud a few times too. Then you can digest what tools the poet has used to craft the piece. Sarah Northwood

Reading a good poem doesn’t give you something to talk about. It silences you. Reading a great poem pushes further. It prepares you for the silence that perplexes us all: death. Mark Yakich Nov 2, 2014 www.theatlantic.com

A poem, once it’s written, is meant to be read with the inner voice of the person who reads it. Tony Harrison

I was reading the dictionary. I thought it was a poem about everything. Steven Wright

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The RAC (Reader/Author Connection) Magazine  

Issue #2: Poetry... How I Interpret It

The RAC (Reader/Author Connection) Magazine  

Issue #2: Poetry... How I Interpret It