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BI-MONTHLY MAGAZINE OF CHANDIGARH MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION Issue 2

March 2010

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16 Years of Excellence Education with Employment


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Contents

S.No.

SUBJECTS

Page No.

1

Foreword by Col. Karamjeet Singh

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2

Futuristic Need More Important Than 'Heritage' Status By Lt Col S K Suri, (Retd)

2-3

3

Death Traps on Roads, By Col (Retd) KK Sharma

4-5

4

Countering Maoism with Sagacity and Statesmanship, By Dr P K Vasudeva

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5

Human Rights Commission Need More Teeth , By CA Manmohan K Garg and Sangeet Growar,

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6

Violations of Human Rights in India, By Monika Aggarwal

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7

Concept of Community-Based Tourism, By Dr N K Sharma

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8

Rural Industrialisation and its Attendant Issues, By Dinesh K Kapila

11-12

9

Out of Box Thinking, By Balwant Gurunay

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10

Is “Affordable Housing” Somewhat Misleading?, By R.Rajan

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11

Managing People For The Businesses, By Dr. Gulshan Sharma,

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12

Why Learn Management Skills?, By Col. D S Cheema

16-17

13

The Rise, Fall And Re-Rise of The Modern Manager, By Prof. Gursharan & Prof. Raman

18-19

14

Six Steps for Realizing Your Dreams, By Navdeep Kaur Chauhan

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15

The Magic of Aloe Vera, By Alakshita Pasricha

21

16

Issues Of Lack Of Skills In Garment Industry, By J.N.Vohra

22-23

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Events 2010

24-25

CO-SPONSORS

Allahabad Bank


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Foreword Col Karamjeet Singh President-CMA Director- Continental Group of Institutes

Dear Members, The maiden issue of CMA's eMag was highly applauded by all who have had the opportunity to glance through it. Members almost instantaneously & overwhelmingly responded by giving their feedback & also taking on the onerous task of subscribing their thought provoking articles, views, stories & snippets etc for the following issue- a very encouraging indicator for the CMA fraternity. The articles/views subscribed by the members in this issue cover significant dimensions including surveys & research findings of contemporary interests, comments and view points on the emerging vis-Ă -vis desired stature of Chandigarh, human rights, tourism, rural industrialisation, management , motivation & other issues. I urge the members to generously & proactively participate by not only contributing but also giving their valuable suggestions & feedback so as to enable us to affect improvements & make eMag a resounding success. Let us all make CMA platform - A happening place! Col. Karamjeet Singh President

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Lt Col S K Suri, (Retd) MD, PSC, MSc, MBA, DTM, Research Associate R.I.P.H.C., Life Member 'VANARAI'

Futuristic Need More Important Than 'Heritage' Status

Tags: Chandigarh, Administration, Flyovers, International City, Heritage Status, Roach Garden Chandigarh Administration is fighting for the title of “Heritage City” for decades! Why this should bring antagonism about new age requirements and symbols of progress, i.e. Information Technology hub, Multiplex cum Shopping Plazas, Cosmopolitan City, Metro Rails, International Airport, Tourist hub, to name a few? Can we go back to 'Guru Kul & Putri Pathshala culture' & Bullock Cart Age if we have opted for 'Modernity in Totality'? We cannot have the cake & eat it too. I dare say it is a sheer hypocrisy. Change with time & progress is inevitable; we must accept it. In the overall interests & progress of Chandigarh, to attain the International City status, we must go for much needed 'Flyovers' (rather than harping/bothering about the future sky line interference of our 'Heritage City' concept. Forget 'Heritage Status'

Our sewerage system is as good as non existent. We have not been able to avoid flooding of our 52 rotaries, & low lying southern sector streets for 2

the last five decades! It is a fallacy that we will be able to manage the on coming & approved nine undercarriage-ways & the underground section of our Metro. Mumbai Govt. had shelved 26 such under carriageways, in 2008, despite old tech & feasibility reports & tender approvals (as suddenly they realized that disruption & reconstruction of utilities cost escalations were four times more visas-vie the fly-over)! Let us not forget how the New Delhi traffic was paralyzed due to odd heavy showers in 2009! In view of the forgoing, despite our rulers' view, I beg to defer with RITES & our engineering departments' tech studies of our 'monsoonal subsoil/underground water levels'. We must, therefore, forget 'Heritage Status' & opt for 'fly over' & ground level Metro, whose cost will be one fifth, disruption minimal, & maintenance much cheaper! New Delhi flyovers & above the ground metro section are a living example. In the mean time we must bid for Heritage Status for our 'Rock Garden' & a few other selected monuments. I am sure we will get them. Paper Tigers Why are we slow, indecisive, & lethargic? The Central Advisory Committee, Road Safety & Traffic Mgmt. (of which I was/am a member), had demanded & recommended an M.R.T.P.S. & Fly Overs in 1995! Our now Hon'ble Minister, Mr. Pawan

Bansal was also present. We are still debating/awaiting approval/rejection of our plans, leave aside funds. Our dream projects lie more on paper / gaseous form than becoming ground realities. Why? Because, we are not a “State/ State Capital”; we are only a “Union Territory”. If we had a Chief Minister, & Statehood, our MRTPS would have been functional in/by 2005! We are still groping in the dark on paper. We will appoint a committee, which will be over ruled by a Central sub committee, two years later. Let us not be paper tigers. Three Kings and One Palace! Pundit Nehru had dreamt of a Palace. Le Corbusier had conceived & designed this palace for one king & his kingdom. Today it is housing three kingdoms with their kings, armies & migrating population! What is more, their emperor, with all the financial controls, resides at New Delhi. I am sure he must be turning in their ashes/grave. Thanks to our worthy rulers, politicians & babus, we have many pluses but also the menace of second highest population density & highest vehicle density in India.


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It is but natural that the City Beautiful, which is bursting at the seams, is & will be unmanageable unless drastic steps & root-level corrective measures are taken. For this the 'Genesis of the Problem' must be clearly understood rationally, & acted upon on a war footing, non-politically. In a nut shell: We cannot & must not house three kings in one palace; we cannot & must not sheath two, leave aside three swords in a single scabbard! Our VIP Culture further compounds this issue. They need front seats & full force police/ black cats' protection on all roads & even at Tagore Theatre! (Our autocrats & police have become our pre independence 'Gora Sahibs'; for fear of terrorists, all, including senior generals & citizens, must park outside the compound). Please

leave us alone. We were happier in 1956-66. Reduce Population Stress No MRTPS, Metro, under carriage ways. Flyovers are going to solve our grass root problem & our quality of life. Nearly one lac vehicles move to & fro to Chandigarh, daily, besides its integral nine lac vehicles. Psychologically, once a person owns a car or a two-wheeler, which majority of Chandigarians possess, he or she is used to a certain level of ease/comfort/luxury. It cannot be replaced with any MRTPS service, which is not a 'door to door service'. Therefore, gradual reduction of population stress on Chandigarh', (by shifting Punjab & Haryana kingdoms, lock-stock & barrel), have become 'the need of the hour'. Once this is clearly understood, a truly independent “Statehood for the

City Beautiful�, which was long overdue, has now become an inescapable necessity / compulsion. For all we know, this understanding & prompt decision of our grass root problem, may yet enable us to discard the on coming nine undercarriage ways, many fly overs & may be an under ground metro, thus saving thousands of crores of rupees! I dare recommend the capital of Haryana to be shifted to Gurgaon, & Punjab to Mohali!

Awarded Col. Karamjeet Singh being awarded by S. Sukhbir Singh Badal, Dy. C.M. Punjab on the occasion of Punjabi Parvasi Divas held on 23rd January at Mount View Hotel in Chandigarh

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Death Traps on Roads Col (Retd) K.K. Sharma CH Adam Smith Institute of Management

Tags : Chandigarh Roads, Vehicle Accidents, Road Deaths, Traffic, Civic Sense I have been travelling on Chandigarh roads in the last 25 years intermittently and for the past four years almost daily. Unfortunately, there is a palpable degradation in our collective sense of road safety and concern for fellow travellers. Condition in other tier II and III cities in North India is even worse. On all India

level, as per World Road Statistics, presented in the Rajya Sabha, 94,985 people were killed in road accidents in the country in 2005, next only to China where 98,738 people were killed in the same year. The number of deaths in road accidents in Delhi alone was 2,169 in 2005. Some of the press reports reveal that India had nearly 3,00,000 accidents with over 1,10,000 deaths in 2009. All these accidents and fatalities are avoidable if we, as responsible citizens take notice to this and start a massive voluntary education cum awareness campaign. But our apathy to human life is evident when we compare this to 4

the reactions to terrorist and insurgents’ related attacks. In 2008, India lost approximately 2,600 personnel to such incidents. Media and civil society debates this form of death day in and day out, which it should and attempt to stop; but can we ignore 50 times higher death toll on the national roads? As per World health Organization (WHO) data, every 30 seconds someone dies on the world’s roads. Annually, over 1.3 million people die and over 20 to 30 million are injured or permanently disabled from road traffic injuries. The Global Burden of Disease Report, published by the WHO, predicts that road traffic accidents will move from ninth place to third place on the list for worldwide death and disability. Chandigarh Roads – No Better In Chandigarh itself, as per Chandigarh Traffic Police web site, a total of 728 calls were made to the PCRs regarding road accidents in 2009. 14 fatal and 20 injury cases were reported in these accidents. Besides this, 240 minor cases were reported regarding vehicle accidents. While the averages are far below the other metros like Delhi, we can not draw comfort as every life lost in vehicle accident is unnatural and preventable. What are the major reasons of these accidents and fatalities? Chandigarh roads are barely able to sustain the traffic pressure, especially during peak morning and evening hours. Multiple vehicles in families

have become a necessity in the absence of a viable public transport sy s t e m . N o t w i t h s ta n d i n g t h e infrastructure constraints, we have accidents primarily due to poor road sense. How often have we sat through a traffic light and seen the usual game theory application in blatant disregard to even the presence of a traffic policeman? Non-stopping before the zebra crossing, not waiting till clock ticks zero, creeping forward at 6 to 8 seconds, not stopping in a lane or simply ignoring a blazing red light and whizzing past; are all part of our skewed traffic sense and defect behaviour. Startling Survey Last year MBA students of Adam Smith Institute of Management (formerly Icfai National College) carried out an interesting survey. The students were located at eight traffic lights and recorded their observation of vehicle drivers – in the presence of a traffic policeman and in his absence. The s t a t i st i c s w e re s t a r t l i n g a n d demolished our misplaced concept of Chandigarh being more disciplined in road sense than other metros. A total of over 2,600 vehicle recordings were made in the busy intersections of Dakshin Marg and three internal roads of Sector 37-38, 34-35 and 28-29 by 46 students. In the presence of a traffic cop, it was observed that 92% of the vehicles stopped, but less than 10% adhered to their lane or zebra crossing. Balance 8% of the vehicles – mainly the auto rickshaws and two


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wheelers slipped past the red traffic light before it turned green. The condition in the absence of a traffic cop was alarming. Nearly 45% of the vehicles did not stop and continued their journey in the most hazardous condition. Same is actually true for Panchkula traffic in the presence of a traffic cop – if that can be any solace to us. This is one of the most conspicuous differences between countries like US and India. One of the most obvious reasons is population. The other is that we have never realized that we need a traffic sense. It is not an issue driving in a haphazard, zigzag manner. It becomes a problem when we do it at the expense of the other driver’s peace of mind. Everyone, be it the person riding the two-wheeler or the person driving the auto or the fourwheeler, wants to be the first one reaching their respective destinations. So, we drive rashly without the slightest thought about the others on the road. Driving with a carefor others on the road will make the ride a peaceful & safe one for yourself and as well as others. We are not signal-abiding citizens but constable-abiding citizens. Even when the signal is RED, we see if the traffic constable is present. If not, we proceed to go ahead. We don’t even realize that we are breaking rules. The whole idea of a traffic signal is to prevent traffic. We are ready to break the law just because we hate to wait for a minute, sometimes even less. Similarly, when we are driving towards the signal and we see it in YELLOW, we accelerate to cross the signal before it turns RED. This is sure to cause many

accidents but we do not care. In US, I was travelling back to my hotel in a cab at 11.30 pm in Irving, TX. On reaching a crossroad, the cab driver waited for the signal to turn green even though there was no vehicle in sight in any of the other three directions. Can you even imagine that happening in India? Do we have any idea what is the maximum allowed speed on a road? Rather, have we ever seen speed limits on the road? There are speed limits for every road and there are signs indicating this somewhere (because no one knows where) on the side of the road. We need to make sure that we are aware of these things and it’s the responsibility of the government to make sure that this is properly communicated to the people. What can I do : Always stop, when you see RED. Slow down, when you see YELLOW. Drive only, when it’s GREEN. Though we have read this in our elementary classes, somewhere during our growing up years, we have forgotten it. Try to look for speed limits and try to follow them as much as possible. Speed thrill but kills . Try to cross the roads considering the drivers coming at high speed for your own safety and to avoid accidents. Try to follow the lane and think 10 times before crossing from one lane to another. How many times one comes across a BMW or Merc driven by a well heeled, jumping the traffic light? Bigger the vehicle, more is the need of speed seems to the mantra in the city. One wonders, why is such impertinence allowed or tolerated? Looking at many incidences of infringement, one feels that Chandigarh Traffic Police appear to be too intimidated by the luxury on wheels. Similarly, it allows two wheelers to go as they oblige them too willingly. I heard a former well admired administrator-bureaucrat lamenting the “connection” culture of the city. Any time a traffic cop stops a luxury car, the driver pulls out his cell phone and asks the cop “to talk to someone high in the administration”! No doubt the traffic policemen are wary of such calls.

Civic Sense Deficiency Speed thrill is yet another bane in the city. Young boys without helmets and three atop a motorcycle meandering their way through the traffic is a usual sight on the inner roads including ‘geri’ routes. The WHO report on traffic injury prevention documents that compulsory helmet use by motorized two wheeler riders can reduce deaths by 30%-50%. There is no scientific evidence available that use of helmets makes motorcyclists more vulnerable because of reduction in sight or hearing. Unfortunately, in Chandigarh, helmets are used to avoid being penalised by the traffic cops and not to save own heads. Speed is not the exclusive domain of young men. I have seen a young executive driving her Maruti Alto at over 80 km speed on a busy road almost on daily basis. Many ladies after dropping their kids in popular convent schools in Sector 26, speed up to over 80 to get back home as fast as possible. Another major reason of road rage and traffic accidents is, total disregard to the value of using indicator lights. In Chandigarh, hardly anyone uses indicators on the vehicles. It can avoid major mishaps and provide a better sense of direction to other drivers on the road. Similarly, use of lane is another area that Chandigarh road users need to learn about. Non adherence to lanes creates daily confusion on Madhya and Dakshin Mark intersections with the laterals coming from various sectors. However, in the final analysis, a lot depends on self discipline and law enforcer – the traffic cop. We have all the traffic laws to maintain order on the roads, but their enforcement is lackadaisical due to rampant corruption and lethargic fatalism. Indian roads provide us a hallucinatory potion of screeching, honking, yelling and carelessness to one’s own life. Safer roads can become a reality only if there is unanimity amongst all roadusers on the need to build disciplined road sense and for that civil society has to stand together like they did for Arushi, Jessica, Ruchika or Cricket. 5


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Dr. P. K. Vasudeva Former senior professor ICFAI Business School, Chandigarh E-mail : vasu022@gmail.com

Countering Maoism With Sagacity And Statesmanship

Tags : Naxalite, Maoist, Democracy, Tribals, Revolution

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According to the Prime Minster of India, Dr Manmohan Singh, the Maoist and Naxalite menaces are the biggest threat to Indian democracy. This is a far more serious and complex threat than from extremist religious groups. The Maoist and Nexalite movements have got mixed up with some genuine grievances of the tribal people whose cause appeals to a lot of well-meaning people especially those who are living in shabby and neglected conditions. The Genesis Unlike the earlier Maoist/Naxalite movements, now it is much more integrated, spanning the interconnected forest areas running from the borders of Nepal all the way to Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, West B e n ga l , A n d h ra P ra d es h a n d Maharashtra. The radical groups have got control of sophisticated arms procured from our adversaries (neighbouring countries) and are involved in murders, of rival political party members, local government officials and policemen (all considered enemies of the people), looting of banks, commercial establishments and destruction of public property disastrous for the democracy. They are of the opinion that the tribals have not had their share of the benefits of development. Most of them do not have any legal rights to land they have been cultivating or living on for centuries. They do not have access to schools, medical services, fair price shops or even safe drinking water. Many still live on ga th e red fo rest p ro d u c e a n d firewood. Their deprivation gets magnified when the government to big

industrialists is leasing out rich mineral resources in the tribal areas.

Some fear that industrialisation on these lands and forests (even with reasonable compensation) will deprive the tribals their customary way of life, making them slaves of an industrial society. Their culture and living styles are curbed and to some extent destroyed by the intruders in their society. Joan Robinson, the noted “Marxist” British economist (who was even sympathetic to Maoist Cultural Revolution at one stage), said: “There is one thing worse than being exploited by capitalists that is not being exploited at all.” Intellectuals as scapegoats Intellectuals are the first to come under fire from the political or governing class whenever it finds itself in a critical predicament and desperately needs scapegoats. This inevitably gets him into trouble from both sides of an issue or an argument. Whatever stand he espouses after objectively weighing the pros and cons, he is invariably accused by each side for favouring the other. Such was the lot of intellectuals in Britain and the US during India's freedom struggle, the Vietnam War, the fight for civil rights for the blacks or the invasion of Iraq.

Intellectuals are variously seen as spoilers, gadflies, thorns in the flesh, and even sympathisers of agitations, when they stand up for human rights and tolerance of dissent. Hardly has there has been a political or governing dispensation which has taken them as holding a mirror to itself. Want of trust The situation today is compounded by the want of trust in the Government or representative institutions. Even the judiciary has shaken the people's faith. In olden days, all this would have resulted in French or Russian revolution accompanied by a horrendous bloodbath. The manifestation of Maoism is perhaps India's own version of a revolution advancing from district to district. It cannot be countered by shooting Maoists at sight. The Government should spare no efforts to provide a just, fair, sensitive, effective, honest governance, deal sternly and summarily with the corrupt and the venal, rid legislatures and cabinets of scoundrels and criminals and force officials to behave with humility and in a spirit of service. As Mr Chidambaram himself used to say, Maoists/Naxalites are not enemies but our own people. Although their methods are abhorrent, they have at least turned the spotlight on the untold hardships and excruciating sufferings of the poor and the vulnerable. T h e G o ve r n m e nt s h o u l d n o t , therefore, stand on prestige but respond to the Maoist offer of talks by displaying sagacity and statesmanship.


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eMag Research

Human Rights Commission Need More Teeth

Mr. Manmohan K Garg, CEO Gurukul Vidyapeeth

Tags : Human Rights, Extra Judicial, Killings, Nandigram, Gujarat Riots, Nazi germany, Punjab

Ms. Sangeet Growar, Director (R&D) Gurukul Vidyapeeth

Though India has been given an overall clean chit on its human rights record, but it still faces numerous serious problems including extra-judicial killings, disappearances, and torture and rape by security forces as well as by terrorists. The State Department's 2007 Human Rights Practices report states; the Indian government “generally respected the rights of its citizens; however, numerous serious problems remained.” The report, which makes critical, references to the state of affairs in India's neighbourhood - Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka, said, in India “serious internal conflicts affected the state of Jammu and Kashmir, as well as several states in the north and east”. The report noted that in West Bengal, violence in Nandigram led to accusations of state government failure to control ruling Communist Party of India - Marxist (CPI-M) party cadres, which were accused by human

rights groups of killing more than 30 villagers and intimidating them through violence and rape. There was also, it said, concerns about the failure of the Gujarat government to arrest and convict those responsible for the 2002 violence following the train burning in Godhra in which 59 men, women and children were killed. Enforcement is inadequate Although the country has numerous laws protecting human rights, enforcement is inadequate and convictions rare. It is because, unlike Consumer forum committees where its members have the right to take the decisions, HRC members can only file complaints with the courts and the police but can't take any actions related to the violation. The report also adds that poor prison conditions, lengthy pre-trial detention without charge and prolonged detention while undergoing trial remain significant problems. The rising corruption at all levels within the government and police, and attempts to combat the problem are u n s u c c es s f u l, t h e report said, and added that the government continues to apply restrictions to the

travel and activities of visiting experts and scholars. Significant restrictions on the funding and activities of NGOs also continue, according to the report. Human Right Cases on the Rise We have also noted that After Independence, the number of Governments formed till now must have claimed a lot on Human Rights but the true face of this is totally different. Though the problem of Human Rights is global but the intensity of this problem is more in India especially in the regions of Punjab and Haryana. Punjab State Human Rights Commission is especially set up to give an ear to the existing violations and other new violations cropping up. But the following figures clearly represent that the situation is totally out of control. This chart shows us the cases instituted by Punjab State Human Rights Commission.

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Let's not go very far. Our neighbour state, Haryana is facing the problem of honour killings. The social activists call these honour killings totally against the Human Rights Act. History of Human Rights Let's go back into history and see how this whole thought and concept of Human Rights originated. Though the belief that everyone, by virtue of her or his humanity, is entitled to certain human rights is fairly new, its roots, however, lie in earlier tradition and documents of many cultures. It took the catalyst of World War II to propel human rights onto the global stage and into the global conscience. Throughout much of history, people acquired rights and responsibilities through their membership in a group a family, indigenous nation, religion, class, community, or state. Most societies have had traditions similar to the "golden rule" of "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." The Hindu Vedas, the

Babylonian Code of Hammurabi, the Bible, the Quran (Koran), and the Analects of Confucius are five of the oldest written sources which address questions of people's duties, rights, and responsibilities. Documents asserting individual rights, such the Magna Carta (1215), the English Bill of Rights (1689), the French Declaration on the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789), and the US Constitution and Bill of Rights (1791) are the written precursors to many of today's human rights documents. Yet many of these documents, when originally translated into policy, excluded women, people of colour, and members of certain social, religious, economic, and political groups. The idea of human rights emerged stronger after World War II. The extermination by Nazi Germany of over six million Jews, Sinti and Romani (gypsies), homosexuals, and persons with disabilities horrified the world. Trials were held in Nuremberg and Tokyo after World

War II, and officials from the defeated countries were punished for committing war crimes, "crimes against peace," and "crimes against humanity." Governments then committed themselves to establishing the United Nations, with the primary goal of bolstering international peace and preventing conflict. People wanted to ensure that never again would anyone be unjustly denied life, freedom, food, shelter, and nationality. The essence of these emerging human rights principles was captured in President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 1941 State of the Union Address when he spoke of a world founded on four essential freedoms: Freedom of speech, Freedom of religion, Freedom from want, and Freedom from fear But the scenario today has changed. In an atmosphere where the war against terror has gained primacy, human rights concerns have taken a backseat.

Book Release Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development Ideal for Indian Economy Edited By B. B. Tandon and P. K. Vasudeva. On Jan 2010 was released by H.E. Mr. Gudmundur Eiriksson, Ambassador of Iceland to India

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Ms. Monika Aggarwal Asstt. Professor-Govt. College, Panchkula

Violations of Human Rights in India

Tags : Human Rights, Violations, POTA, AFSPA, Child Abuse, Human trafficking, Anti Sikh Riots Human rights are "basic rights and Forces and the armed militants freedoms to which all humans are operating in Jammu and Kashmir. A entitled". Charter of the United 2005 study conducted by Medecins Nations, which has been signed by Sans Frontieres found that Kashmiri virtually all sovereign states, women are among the worst sufferers recognises the existence of human of sexual violence in the world, with rights and calls for their promotion 11.6% of respondents reporting that and respect. The situation of human they had been victims of sexual abuse. rights in India is a complex one, as a The Armed Forces Special Powers Act result of the country's large size and (AFSPA) grants the military wide tremendous diversity, its status as a powers of arrest, the right to shoot to developing country and a sovereign, kill, and to occupy or destroy property secular, democratic republic and its in counterinsurgency operations. history as a former colonial territory. Indian officials claim that troops need such powers because the army is only According to the estimates of deployed when national security is at Reporters without Borders, India serious risk from armed combatants. ranks 105th worldwide in press women and children are trafficked Such circumstances, they say, call for freedom index (press freedom index f rom Bangladesh. Babubhai extraordinary measures." Human for India is 29.33 for 2009). Laws such Khimabhai Katara was a Member of rights organizations have also asked as the Official Secret Act and Parliament when arrested for Indian government to repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA) smuggling a child to Canada. Public Safety Act, since "a detainee have been used to limit press The 1984 Anti-Sikh riots was a fourmay be held in administrative freedom. Under POTA, person could day period during which members of detention for a maximum of two years be detained for up to six months the secular-centrist Congress Party of without a court order." before the police were required to I n d i a m a s s a c red S i k h s ; s o m e bring charges on allegations for Medley of Human Rights estimates state that more than 2,000 terrorism-related offenses. POTA was Homosexuality is criminalised in India were killed. Recently in Taliban, two repealed in 2004, but was replaced by by interpretations of the ambiguous Sikhs were beheaded because they amendments to UAPA. The Official Section 377 of the 150-year-old Indian refused to convert into Islam. Secrets Act 1923 remains in effect. Penal Code (IPC). The punishment Conclusion The Violations ranges from ten years to lifelong It is a matter of grave concern that the imprisonment. The law has been used Despite state prohibitions against violations against Human Rights are to harass HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, torture and custodial misconduct by increasing day by day despite the as well as sex workers, men who have the police, torture is widespread in formulations of Human Rights sex with men and other groups at risk police custody, which is a major reason Commissions at the Centre and State of the disease. On June 2 2009, the behind deaths in custody. The police levels. This only shows that the Delhi High Court decriminalised often torture innocent people until a commissions are not efficient, as their consensual private sexual acts 'confession' is obtained to save work needs to be monitored. This also between adults saying "We declare influential and wealthy offenders. G.P. shows the poor governance system, that Section 377 IPC, in so far it Joshi, the programme coordinator of the leaking delivery mechanism and criminalises consensual sexual acts of the Indian branch of the giant gaping holes in the social adults in private, is violative of Articles Commonwealth Human Rights security net. For human development, 21, 14 and 15 of the Constitution. Initiative in New Delhi comments that provision of basic human rights is the main issue at hand concerning Human trafficking is $8 million illegal ultimate without these all economic police violence is a lack of business in India. Around 10,000 growth is meaningless, as it will result accountability of the police. Nepali women are brought to India in wide disparity between the haves annually for commercial sexual Claims of human rights abuses have and have-nots and the dream of exploitation. Each year 20,000-25,000 been made against the Indian Armed inclusive growth cannot be achieved.

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Concept of Community Based Tourism

Prof. N.K. Sharma, ITFT College, Chandigarh

Tags : Tourism, Community Participation, Economic Life, Klong Khwang Tourism is becoming one of the most important social and economic activities of today's world. The number of domestic and international travellers is steadily increasing and many countries in the world are seeking to develop tourism for their varied benefits. Tourism helps a community become more attractive and prosperous more attractive, b e c au s e c o mm u n i t y m u st b e appealing to draw and satisfy visitors, more prosperous, because these visitors spend money. The Economic Effect Dr Maynard Keynes, the English economist (1883-1946) was the first to expound on the “multiplier” and “rippling” effect of additional inputs of money into a community. This phenomenon also occurs with tourist spending. The higher the multiplier, the more beneficial is the economic effect on the community. Tourism as compared to manufacturing and other industries has a higher multiplier effect both in terms of income g e n e ra t i o n a n d e m p l o y m e n t generation. Sharing similar views, Union Tourism Minister, Selja, says that “Tourism should be all inclusive and bring in visible changes in the livelihood of local community which should also elevate their economic status. Stakeholders should explore all possible ways for poverty alleviation through tourism” Benefit from tourism doesn't just happen. Investment of talent, time, c a p ita l a n d o p e ra ti n g f u n d s , community spirit and determination are required to make tourism a significant part of the community's economic life. Probably the single 10

b i g g est d e te r re n t to t o u r i s m development is lack of appreciation and enthusiasm from civic and business leaders. When tourism is not understood and its benefits remain unclear, proper planning and implementation of measures to improve the industry are often poorly attempted. The approach to tourism by a community should be that the development and involvement is for the community rather than just in the community. Example of Klong Khwang Here, we consider the example of Klong Khwang, a small village with 100 households in the Nakorn Ratchasima province of Thailand where tourism development is being actively planned, developed and managed with a strong emphasis on community involvement. Three main attractions in Klong Khwang are a reclining Buddha, the Stone Wheel of Thamma and an archaeological site. Klong Khwang community was provided with technical assistance and support but encouraged to express their ideas on what kind of tourism activities they wanted in the future, why they wanted tourism and how many tourists they would be able to accommodate in their community. The community would also be taking into account the principles of sustainability with cultural preservation and environmental protection. The village headmen, a women's group and a village community were encouraged to define tourism products and the direction of tourism development for their village.

Through the planning process, the community chose to design the tourism model that would initially be for a modest numbers of visitors. This level of development would position tourism as a seasonal activity not disruptive to the existing agricultural activity of the community. Klong Khwang has been recognized by the APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation) as a good example of community-based tourism in the AsiaPacific Region. It is high time that tourism mandarins in the northern Indian states prepare plans, which focus on tourism and tourists in a community and consider the fundamental questions of the costs of tourism to the community and how the community will capture potential benefits in this regard. The local bodies such as municipal corporations, panchayats, NGO's exservicemen associations, women bodies and others should help and participate in being a part of the

tourism industry in community. Similar efforts with schools can be useful, particularly in forming good attitude among the youth. They should also take the help of the print and electronic media in spreading the concept of community-based tourism.


CMA

eMag Economic

Dinesh K Kapila Assistant General Manager in NABARD

Rural Industrialization and its Attendant Issues

Tags : Rural, Agriculture, Agro Bussiness, Farm Sector, China, Economic Success Agricultural expansion is not enough to conquer poverty; this is the most important issue while discussing the rural non farm sector, of which Rural Industries are an integral part. The World Bank has also observed in its communications that the rural farm and non farm growth is widely shared, with a privately held and competitive agriculture & a vibrant agro business being vital engines of economic growth. Moreover, family farms and non farm enterprises provide ample remunerative opportunities and employment to men and women. For any nation to succeed economically, Wealth creation is at least as important as or more important than wealth redistribution. A competitive economy produces high productivity, efficiency, innovation & higher investments in human resources. The Japanese economic miracle in spite of the hiccups witnessed is based on brutal domestic competition. The Indian Rural Sector, specially its Non Farm component, is yet to undergo this transformation whi le its urban counterpart modernizes fiercely and restructures itself. . Indian Social Attitudes and Systems Gunnar Myrdal stated in the sixties that India's social attitudes and systems were responsible for low industrialization, low productivity, a primitive production technology, low levels of living due to poor work discipline and contempt for manual

work, low aptitude for cooperation etc. A debilitating land tenure system, low standards of efficiency and integrity in public administration, low peoples participation and rigid social structures were other negative factors. This is even now applicable in parts to the rural non farm sector in spite of various initiatives by the g ove r n m e nt a n d i n st i t u t i o n s . Economists do state cultural traits are not that important, that in South East Asia success was mainly due to efficient employment of resources, exports by labour intensive industries, vigorous literacy and a proactive g o v e r n m e n t ro l e i n b u i l d i n g competitiveness and correcting distortions. However, the Indian Rural Non Farm Sector needs corrective measures, cultural and governmental. The over 50 % share of services in India's GDP indicates that we as a nation are still culturally attuned to being comfortable with a white collar approach to work. The impact is only deeper in the Rural Non Farm Sector with innovation being low key, sporadic, without committed financial

support from multiple players and innovation. Learn from China We can learn from China. The Chinese economic success owes a lot to the immense revitalization of its Rural Industries. The Rural Industrialization process was to a great extent led by local government initiatives with incentive oriented schemes in place for officials. The schemes envisaged incentives related to the number of

people employed in units, taxes paid to the federal government, FDI arranged for etc. At the core of China's economic miracle; the reduction of poverty to less than 4 % of the population, was that by 1987 the output of rural industries surpassed that of agriculture that is in terms of a source of total rural income. We in India still need to take this process to the countryside, especially 11


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in terms of Food Processing etc. The h i g h s av i n g s rate a n d h eav y investment in infrastructure and labour reforms are additional facilitative factors. The stress of Government of India & its institutions on the Rural Non Farm Sector to promote rural industrialization & services so as to reduce the pressure on agriculture can be understood in this context. In North West India, Agro processing and food processing industries could be the focus to start with coupled with small manufacturing of agricultural implements. Need for Sound Projects Appraisal My own personal observations based on interactions with progressive micro / small industrialists / businessmen in two to three districts over a period of time were that the growth rate of

RNFS in the district remained low in spite of the policy push. The gray areas (though there are several positive features ) was the absence of systems at times for sound appraisal for projects specific to rural areas in financial institutions, inability to follow up intimately with vigour the

p ro j e c t s e t c . A m o n g s t o t h e r contributory factors as per feedback, were delays in release of assured subsidy, governmental agencies at times not updating project profiles, 70 % to 75 % loans (a rough estimate admittedly) going for expansion of existing business / units, the cost & quality of power etc. I must conclude here by recalling that Japan did not experience the scientific revolution as also the reforms (also applicable to Asia ), but after the Meiji reforms of the 17 century, it took off industrially as the country as such decided to adopt this path. India and China did not. China has broken through now but we need to focus more effectively to catch up. * This article contains his personal views only and it does not reflect in any manner the views or policies of his employer.

Dr. Anshu Katartia, Chairman Aryans Business School receiving AACSB certificate of Membership from Ms. Alleen Peacock, Vice President and Chief Officer (Asia) of US based best Accreditation Body

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eMag Motivational

Out of Box Thinking Balwant Gurunay MBA, PG (PR), Corporate Motivator, Attitudinal Coach and Management Trainer.

Tags : Linear Thinking, Attitudinal Problems, Illussion, What do we mean when we use the term 'out of box'? Out of box thinking is a phrase that explains our mind's work, when we look at a problem, from a new perspective, without preconceptions. Psychologically the “BOX", refers to virtual experience within the premises of linear time and emotion. “Out of the Box Thinking" means viewing reality beyond our limited beliefs, values and perception. When you learn to think outside the box your consciousness moves beyond the boundaries of linear thinking. This is also referred to as lateral thinking. In the corporate world it is quite a fad to use it, but to put it in simpler of words; it is nothing but another name for creative thinking. Limited Mind For the purpose of Psycho-reorientlogy and attitudinal correction, It is nothing more than turning your acceptance of the unknown possibilities. In the world of metaphysics and spirituality it is referred to as the sphere or the 'mandla' where healing and balancing of your emotional needs can take place. You and everything else around you is nothing but an illusion (Maya). We operate within the frame work of our mind limited by our beliefs and values, formed over a period of time through our limited exposure to different situations and people. "Thinking outside the box" means

being over and out stepped with out of the box answers. Q. How can you drop a raw egg onto a concrete floor without cracking it? Ans. Concrete floors are very hard to crack! Q. If you had three apples and four oranges in one hand and four apples and three oranges in the other hand, what would you have? Ans. Very large hands awareness beyond your known self. This state of mind can be safely termed as 'limited mind' or “The Box”. Dissolving Yourself Moving your core conscious out of the box and dissolving yourself in to the vastness around you, freeing yourself from all the limitations set around you by your beliefs and values is what stepping out of the box is. This is it, when it comes to truly understanding this otherwise complex concept. Never forget that anything substantial can be achieved or realized, only and only when, one looks beyond the limited concepts and theories in science, management or even when discovering your true self in spirituality. Chew the bubblegum of life Here are some examples of out of box thinking. See how the barriers of conventional thinking and logic are

Q. How can you lift an elephant with one hand? Ans. It is not a problem, since you will never find an elephant with one hand. Q. How a man can go eight days without sleep? Ans. No Problems, He sleeps at night. Q. What can you never eat for breakfast? Ans. Dinner. And so on…… So, do not pack yourself in the box of your own limiting perceptions and offer yourself as a pre-packaged product to be unfolded by others. Be a player in this world. After all you are not a bubble gum to be chewed by others. You are born to chew the bubblegum of life. Learn to do it and never forget that you are your only limitation and stepping out of your self-limiting beliefs is the only key. 13


CMA

eMag View Point

Is “Affordable housing” somewhat misleading?

R. RAJAN Strategist & Facilitator

Tags : Affordable Housing, Real Estate, Construction The current trend in the real estate market is one of optimism and upswing. As much as I hate to put a dampener on this mood of joy, I feel that someone has to look at the picture from a more realistic standpoint. How it is that real estate is improving but the developers responsible for the market are not? For starters, there are many things to cheer about in the real estate market. Buyers can take advantage of a slight reduction in prices of built-up projects and established developers are launching new projects targeting the middleclass buyer. Infrastructure, too, is improving in far-flung areas and previously neglected regions. Gurgaon is the biggest example of this infrastructural development. The media, too, is casting a favorable light on the real estate sector. These news reports in the Indian Brand Equity Foundation and The Economic

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Times are just an indication of such optimism. On the economic and corporate fronts, organizations have started hiring thus signaling an end to the gloom of recession. These factors, collectively, boost the morale of the property buyer and give him newfound hope in the real estate market. Unfortunately, when he does go to buy that apartment or invest in the real estate market, he returns disappointed. Why? Here are the reasons. Dream Apartments One just looks at the sale promotions. These are mainly offers that are of little or no use to the middle-class end user. After all, does a buyer really want a car with the flat? Secondly, there are umpteen numbers of projects by builders that are hanging in the air with no clarity on their completion. People have lost faith in investing their hard-earned money in projects that have a completion timeline of two to three years. The overall reputation of so-called reputed builders has also been hit dramatically by last year's recession. Builders and developers have not been able to live up to their commitments to the customer, thereby eroding their name and reputation considerably. Moreover, the recent launch of “affordable housing” by several developers is somewhat misleading. After all, what is “affordable” for one

may not be so for another? Moreover, the affordable tag often does not include additional and hidden costs that make it difficult for a buyer with a budget of Rs. 20-25 lacs to buy an apartment. Factors such as these make it difficult for the average, middle-class buyer to realize his dream of buying an apartment. The real estate market may surely be maturing and improving but I really can't say the same for many developers. They really need to start looking at the average Indian buyer with renewed respect and go that extra mile to earn his trust and loyalty once more. Offer prices and projects that are realistic. Commit and deliver. Clarify affordability. Avoid hidden costs. These are just a few. Am sure you, the consumer, can come up with many more.


CMA

eMag Business

Managing People for the Businesses

Dr. Gulshan Sharma Ph.D (Service Industry) ACTE (WTO) Spain, WT (USA)

Secretary General- IPCSI Director ITFT College-Chandigarh Tags : Manager, Business Goals, Productivity, Team Building, Efficiency Well, if not everyone, but definitely a major chunk of your employees are important people for your business! Concealed potential is there in everybody in good measure; it's just how you bring it on. This is where the real challenge and calibre-testing of a manager comes into play. A manager should be polished enough to unleash the hidden store of creativity, innovative bent, and productivity of his subordinates and apply those to realize the business goals. Why is it that some managers manage to become a heart throb and others a Hitler? Well, it's all about how you display your managerial slice of the p e r s o n a l i t y. Yo u r s k i l l s a n d management of people would determine the success of your business and projects. Here is how to become a favourite among your people: Train your mind to lead than to manage. If you are a leader, your power would never be confined to promotions. Keep the humour membrane alive and kicking in your system. Embrace people, it's better than enforcing, believe us; it's more effective as well. People would fall for you religiously. Have your strategies clear in mind. Since you are the zenith for your subordinates, you should exhibit a

character that is confident and clear of objectives. Yo u s h o u l d h ave a p o we r f u l communication skill. Talk about your expectations and counsel your people the various productive ways to achieve those. Flexibility, consistent behaviour, and decision making should be obvious traits of a manager in the flesh of a leader! Leading a team isn't any cinch and it takes a lot to sustain that optimum level of synergy among team members. The better the sync, the more will be the productivity and performance. But, what are those parameters that a leader should practice and maintain in order to bring camaraderie among his/her team companions? What is it that motivates team members the most? Here are therefore some mantras to comply with in order to lead a happy and an all time efficient team. Here you go: Purpose is basic Every team member should work towards one goal and share a common purpose. In this way they will work in collaboration and understand the significance of working in a group. Every team mate should be clear in his/her mind what they are focusing at and believe in

what they are putting their efforts in. Sense of ownership is pivotal and every body's consents are equally significant during decision processes. In this way, not only can confidence be generated in them, but also a sheer sense of responsibility will surface as well. Utmost efficiency in crisis Challenges can be really triggering for a team to prove its performance and attain accomplishments. The real ingenuity and courage gets tested in times of professional upheavals. And in order to handle challenges or crisis in the right spirit with the right attitude, unison among team members is pivotal. Significance of the team lead A good leader is like the captain of the ship and is responsible for the entire outcome that a team renders. In order to maintain a well managed team, and high motivation levels among team members, choosing a thorough professional is a requisite who is bestowed with exceptional attributes to lead a team. Hence motivation is something that d e t e r m i n e s t h e p e r fo r m a n c e probabilities of a team. Complying with these parameters can effectively motivate team members to render the best they can and have. 15


CMA

eMag Learning

Why learn Management Skills?

Col. D S Cheema, Vice President (HR), FTP

Tags : Management, Managers, Human Resource, Skills, Learning Everyone in the world thinks that studying management is a wise investment of time and energy. Let us know how management makes any one, working in any field of activity, a better professional and perhaps, a better human being. It is in our interest that we possess fundamental knowledge of essential skills of the vast field of management. Why is it necessary for every one to acquire certain management skills? The very existence of organizations, demands their 'management' i.e there have to be people who run these organizations. When we think of a college, we think of a Principal and his staff, when we talk of a business entity, we want to know about its CEO or MD. Whether we are discussing a state or central government, administration of services provided by a private builder, profitability of a business house or public distribution system for people below poverty line, our attention usually centers on those individuals who run these organizations, in other words, the managers and organizations go together hand in hand, we can't have one without the other. Valuable Human Resources We have seen if organizations are not managed, they would not live, they 16

would die. Managers infuse life in organizations. Managers are very important and valuable resources because organizations with effective managers are likely to be more successful as compared to those who have poor or ineffective managers. Managers, i.e. good and effective managers are also crucial from national point of views. If we think of India as a huge organizations (any country may be thought of as a big open system part of the only closed system a universe, and a Prime Minister as the CEO who runs the country) the individual who occupies the PM's position becomes a manager. Imagine the state of the nation with an ineffective Prime Minister. There are many classic examples of failure of nations which can be directly attributed to the lack of vision and skills of heads of states, ministries, corporation etc. Need for achievement among managers and entrepreneurs is crucial to any nation's economic development. Hence, the skills and motivation (and hence performance) are directly tied to the economic growth and overall development. It is of particular significance to a secular, sovereign democratic nation like our. Effective Managers are in Demand

It is common observation that whenever any organization fails, be it the falling of a government or poor financial results of a corporate house, it is the managers who are blamed for the failure. Good organizations are known because of their management. People often have more faith in a company which has men of caliber and reputation as effective managers. We often hear statements like' “Tatas will never fail you” or “Go for this mutual fund, its fund manager is very good”. Because managers have such major influence on organizational success, they are much in demand. They are also paid well because of their ability to manage. The pay packages of CEOs, presidents and vice-presidents, general- managers etc. are much higher than those of many doctors, engineers etc who do not have management background and may not be seen as good managers. The average salary of a manager with required skills is generally much higher than other employees in any organization. Acquiring Management Skills It is hoped that you agree with the above reasons and arguments that managers and management are important. If that be so, your next obvious questions would be' “How to


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eMag Learning

learn management?” “Is it plane simple common-sense?” “Why can't one learn management skills while performing on the job?” There is no doubt that some of the greatest managers of the world had never read a management book. One can manage without learning management and using the experience gained from

“University of Hard Knocks”. But, at what cost? Many legendary managers of our c o u n t r y l i ke Gujar Mal Modi, Mohan Singh Oberai (Oberai hotels) Azim Premji (Wipro) and the likes of Dhirubhai Ambani ( of Reliance fame ) did not study management, but had extraordinary decision- making ability, vision, perseverance and so on, which made them what they were. There are two points to be noted, one there must have been large number among few named here, who tried and failed

and whose names we don't know. Second, had they studied management and learnt many others skills, may be they would have done far well than what they did. Any one wanting to learn management skills must first and foremost kick the phobia that he or she doesn't need them. Second, one must adopt the right approach and mindset that any one with basic commonsense can easily learn and develops the necessary skills. Third, you don't have to study BBA/ MBA in a college/ university to understand and practice these skills. Such skills can be developed sitting at home. Fourth, don't force- fit the skills and techniques in every situation, after you have acquired them.

Awarded

Master of Ceremony

CMA being awarded by the Chandigarh Tourism Club

Dr. Gulshan Sharma, Secretary General Chandigarh Tourism Club, V.President, Chandigarh Management Association and Director ITFT College carried the event commendably with his flawless elocution, wits and narrations of personalities and won appreciations from one and all on the Chandigarh Tourism Club event held at Kalagram. Present on the occasion were Mr. Guddu Dhanoa, Film Director, and actors; Pooja Tandon, Dilijit Singh, Vivek Shauk, Deep Dhillon, of the film “The Lion of Punjab”. Dr. Mamta Joshi, a Sufi Singer from Chandigarh kept the audience spell bound with her Gazals, Quwalis and Sufiana Kalams. Sh. M.P.Singh, IAS, Secretary to the Governor of Punjab was the chief guest and Sh D.K.Tiwari, Director CITCO and Senior Patron, Chandigarh Tourism Club was the Guest of Honour.

on the occasion of welcoming the Cine Stars from Bollywwod on their complation of the film shooting “The Lion of Punjab” held in and around Chandigarh. Seen in theb picture are Mr. Charanjit Singh,Past t President, Mr. A.K.Gandhi, Chairman (Membership Development) and Mr. J.N.Vohra, Secretary General of CMA.

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CMA

eMag Research

Prof. Gursharan Business school, IBS Chandigarh

The Rise, fall and Re-Rise of the Modern Manager Tags : Modern Managers, Shakespeare, Credit Default, Enron, Toyota, Satyam, uS Economy

Prof. Raman Business school, IBS Chandigarh

William Shakespeare, the great Elizabethan dramatist, wrote that it was the “tragic flaws” of hubris, greed, lust and unbridled ambition in the human nature that bring the downfall of the powerful and the mighty in this world and, the forces of “fate” and “chance” hasten that fall. But, the modern manager dismissed that with the sleight of his hand. For him, the greed was good. Ambition drove him. And, hubris intoxicated him. He learnt to outwit and defy fate with his ingenuity and skill. Rising from “Rags to Riches” on the shoulders of Free Market in the corporate theatre of the absurd, he projected a façade of an innocent, honest, hardworking, kind-hearted and generous man while hiding his incompetence, if any. The Rise Weaving innovative complexity in “a c c o u nt i n g p ro c ed u res ” a n d designing derivatives like “Credit

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Default Swaps”, he spread his risks far and wide. He scaled himself up rapidly to become “Too big to fail”. He became the “rain-maker” and the “gamechanger”. A halo of excessive pride and hubris surrounded him and he eventually became invincible. But, alas, that was not to be! It was really heart rending to see Mr. Akio Toyoda, the proud, 53 years old CEO of Toyota- the company synonymous with the “Quality” testifying in front of US Congressional Committee, with bowed head losing his face. The Committee is investigating into the c o m p l a i nt s a b o u t t h e fa u l t y accelerators, floor mats and breaking systems in Toyota vehicles. The company has recalled eight million vehicles in the recent past. The company had lost its way and sense of priorities in its rapid rise to the top. He said, “I fear the pace at which we have grown may have been too quick.” “We pursued growth over the speed at which we were able to develop our people and organizations, and we should sincerely be mindful of that.” Toyota raised its capacity to 10 million units during the last decade overtaking General Motors as the World's largest car maker. “Hubris from success” that the company that could do anything and “undisciplined pursuit of more” in the words of Jim Collins, took the toll at Toyota and the core values were

thrown out of the window. The fall In “How the Mighty Fall”, Jim Collins w r i t es , “ Ev e r y i n s t i t u t i o n i s vulnerable, no matter how great. No matter how much you've achieved, no matter how far you've gone, no matter how much power you've garnered, you are vulnerable to decline…….. Anyone can fall and most eventually do”. Decline sets in like an insidious disease, “harder to detect but easier to cure in the early stages, easier to detect but harder to cure in the later stages.” The last decade began with the collapse of revolutionary trail blazers like Enron into bankruptcy. Its disgraceful and scandalous fall was led by none other than its own founder Kenneth Lay, the blue eyed Kenney Boy- of the US President Bush. The company acquired the financial power


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eMag Research

surreptitiously through “Accounting manipulations” and “Deceit”. Mr. Lay remained the corporate cheerleader, assuring employees and investors that everything was fine dousing the smoke of suspicion whenever it bellowed out of the company. When “Denial of Risk and Peril” becomes the part of day-to-day operations, the company dies. So Enron died. Back home, baby faced Ramalinga Raju, former Chairman of Satyam, led Satyam to similar fate following similar modus operandi. As Enron was dying, the modern managers/bankers were busy building up “housing bubble” on the back of “irrational exuberance” with the underpinning of Shakespearean tragic flaws unmindful of the pains of Enron. The fate waited in the wings to strike. And it struck at the very root of US

economy in early 2008 bringing it to the brink of a precipitous fall. Three of the five mighty and the powerful gold standard Investment Banks fell like a pack of cards. If in March 2008, the 85 years old bank Bear Stearns fell, in September 2008, the 158 years old Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy and 84 years old Merrill Lynch put it itself on the block. US Treasury rescued AIG, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the biggest bailout known in the history of mankind. Shakespeare was vindicated. The Re-Rise But, then the modern manager was not to be outdone. He is rising again, dusting off the mud, to be the “knight in the shining armour”. This time ethics and values give him the wings. The International Finance Reporting Standards provide him with the divine

protection. There are no headwindsthe recession is over. As advised by the latest February issue of Harvard Business Review, he will regain his resilience by adopting “ReposeOriented Thinking” What features of the situation can he potentially improve”- What sort of positive impact can he personally have on what happens next”- “How can he contain the negatives of the situation and generate currently unseen positives”- “What can he do to begin addressing the problem now? - while providing the corporate governance. And while flying high' if any one of them falls, he shall remember the poem of John Donne, “Send not to know for whom the bell tolls, It tolls for thee.”

Amritsar Management Association - Launched

Amritsar Management Association (AMA) was launched on 28th February at Hotel Mohan International in the holy city of Amritsar. The meeting was short, crisp and meaningful. Members were enthusiastic and were looking forward for some good events being planned by the association Chandigarh Management Association had assisted the AMA to formulate its constitution to enable them register with the Registrar of the Societies. Dr. Gulshan harma, Vice President CMA and Mr. J.N.Vohra, General Secretary CMA were present on the occasion and addressed the pioneered members of AMA and explained them the finer points of operations of the associations for smooth functioning. Members clarified many questions in their mind about the operation of the association. Present on the occasion were, Mr. Ashok Sethi, prominent journalists and a businessman, Mr. C.L.Maheshawari, Dy. General Manager, OCM, Mr. Gurjeet S. Sekhon, Diretor, NIIT, Amritsar Center, Dr. Rakesh Joshi, Chairman, Swami Satyanand College of Management and Technology, Prof. Dr. Suresh Seth, Principal, SSCMT, CA. Sanjeev Gupta and CA. Sanjeev Sud of Sud Gupta Associates and some more. 19


CMA

eMag Motivational

Navdeep Kaur Chauhan, Principal CIIS-IST, Mohali, Member of Executive Council, CMA

Six Steps for Realizing Your Dreams Tags : Targets, Goals, Mind, Attitudes, Path Plan

“It is in my mind & heart. I can see it.. Nothing can stop me as I determined to attain it. I shall not stop till I achieve it� Without goals we are like a rudderless ship in the middle of a sea, just drifting away with no sense of direction. It just goes with the waves and if it ever gets anywhere it is just by mere accident. Don't let your goals and resolutions fa l l b y t h e way s i d e . T h e s i x conspicuous steps to achieve goals in life are: You need to deeply desire the goal or resolution: According to Napoleon "The starting point of all achievement is desire. Keep this constantly in mind. Weak desires bring weak results, just as a small amount of fire produces a small amount of heat." So, the first step in goal setting and achieving dreams is that you've got to really, really want to achieve the goal. Visualize yourself achieving the goal: "The greatest discovery of any generation is that human beings can 20

alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind." What will your achievement feel like? How will your life unfold differently as a result? If the goal is a thing, some gurus of goal setting recommend that you keep a picture of the item where you see and are reminded of it every day. If you can't picture yourself achieving the goal, chances are you won't. Make a plan for the path you need to follow to accomplish the goal: Create action steps to follow. Identify a critical path. The critical path defines the key accomplishments along the way, the most important steps that must happen for the goal to become a reality. Stephen Covey said, "All things are created twice. There's a mental or first creation, and a physical or second creation of all things. You have to make sure that the blueprint, the first creation, is really what you want, that you've thought everything through. Then you put it into bricks and mortar. Each day you go to the construction shed and pull out the blueprint to get marching orders for the day. You begin with the end in mind." Commit to achieve the goal by writing down the goal: "The discipline of writing something down is the first step toward making it happen." Write down the plan, the action steps and the critical path. Somehow, writing

down the goal, the plan and a timeline sets events in motion that may not have happened otherwise. In our life, it is as if we are making a deeper commitment to goal accomplishment. We can't fool ourselves later. The written objective really was the goal. Establish times for checking your progress in your calendar system, whatever it is: a day planner, a PDA, a PDA phone or a hand written list. If you're not making progress or feel stymied, don't let your optimism keep you from accomplishing your goals. No matter how positively you are thinking, you need to assess your lack of progress. Take a look at all of the factors that are keeping you from accomplishing your goal and develop a plan to overcome them. Add these plan steps to your calendar system as part of your goal achievement plan. Review your overall progress regularly: Make sure you are making progress. If you are not making progress, hire a coach, tap into the support of loved ones, analyze why the goal is not being met. Don't allow the goal to just fade away. This six step goal setting and achieving system seems simple, but it is the most powerful system you will ever find for achieving your goals and living your resolutions. You just need to do it. Best wishes and good luck.


CMA

eMag Case Study

Alakshita Pasricha Student P.G.Diploma, Regional Institute of Co-operative Management

The Magic of Aloe Vera

Tags : Aloe vera, Herb, Innovation, ashwaganda Aloe Vera is a well known healing herb being used in various medicines and widely used in different varieties of cosmetics . These facts are the known facts. However, Aloe Vera can make a rickshaw puller till a few years ago , an exporter , is something not very commonly known. Rickshaw Puller turned Farmer Shri Dharamveer was a rickshaw puller till some years ago in Old Delhi area of Fatehpuri and Chandni Chowk, though he belonged to a farmer's family . He returned back to village and rejoined the farming. He was keen watcher of herbal plants and Aloe Vera attracted

him. He fell in love with Aloe Vera. From a small farmer of Aloe Vera, now he has become a prosperous entrepreneur while continuing to be a farmer also. He has won many awards a n d re p o r t ed l y h e h a s b e e n recommended for President's Award. Dharamveer started with Aloe Vera farming some years ago with a total land of 2 acres. In one acre he cultivated various medicinal herbs like

Ashvaganda, Stivia etc and in another one acre he planted Aloe Vera. Later on Kisan Dharamveer invented a machine known as Multipurpose Unit. Its multi -purpose utility is proved by the fact that it is used as grinder, boiler, cooker, mixer etc. From this machine one gets extracts of vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. It acts as a grinder and is capable to grind many spices. With this machine itself Dharamveer is producing Aloe Vera gel, Aloe Vera juice etc on a very large scale. The Innovator As told by Dharamveer, the cost of this machine is Rs. 1.,35 Lakh and is made in Jagadhri, a small town in Haryana (India). Due to its versatile nature, it has been bought by Rajasthan and Haryana Governments. This, nowfamous machine is not confined to our country's geography as he has exported one unit to Kenya also and is expecting more orders from other countries also. Although this machine is multipurpose he is concentrating on Aloe Vera gel and Aloe Vera juice preparation. Along with this he also prepares amla juice, dry amla powder etc and also cultivates medicinal plants like ashwaganda, stivia, asparagus. He said that this Multi Purpose Machine has been patented by him. The unique feature of this machine is that the stony core of amla comes out as a whole and these stones can be converted into synthetic coal which is further used in mehendi. The products of Dharamveer, as told

by him, are supplied in Indian cities, like Delhi, Muradabad, Kankhal (Haridwar). Some of the beauty salons from various cities make direct purchases from him. There is continuous flow of visitors to his place in Damla village (District Yamunanagar, Haryana.) and with a open heart not only he welcomes everybody also shares all his activities with everyone. Even her daughter Pooja is fully involved with her father and is simultaneously pursuing her M.B.A. studies. Aloe Vera has proved a God sent plant of prosperity at least for Dharamveer 's family. Shri DHARAMVEER is a very optimistic that Aloe Vera has high potential as it requires a little care, perennial plant with less water requirement, moderate inputs and long shelf life. All parts of this plant are used in one way or the other especially in restoration of human health. According to him its potential has been uncovered and in future it is bound to be on really big scale 21


CMA

eMag Research

J.N.Vohra B.Text, M.Tech, F.I.E, C. Eng. (I), M.I.M.A Co-ordinator-NITMA

Issue of Lack of Skills in Garment Industry

Tags : Skills Govt. Industries Workman Apperel Textile industry shows a very classical case of side by side existence of small, medium and large enterprises spread in different clusters, which have organically grown. Complete value chain of textiles manufacturing exists in these clusters; spinning, weaving, knitting, dyeing and finishing, garmenting along with auxiliary industries such as embroidery and printing. Labour intensive industry Since 1960s/70s the labour intensive clothing industry, a downstream industry of textiles has been shifting its businesses from western countries to Asian countries, mainly to China and India. The product requirements of the EU and USA are quality of International Standards, timely deliveries, and competitive prices. To meet these global requirement, there is need to adopt advanced technology and improvement in work culture that calls for up gradation of human

resource skills. After having work closely for long and interacting with the texti le entrepreneurs, I would say that today exporters face not only commercial challenges, but in this highly competitive global market, they are also confronted with technical, logistical, environmental and social challenges. Most importantly, there is skill gap to meet global requirements. The improvements, which are required to acquire competitive stand in the International markets are operative skills to handle computerized machines, understanding of the products handled and in addition working skill for Apparel Designing, Merchandising and Marketing to handle foreign buyers. However, most of the manufacturing units are short of skilled staff; both supervisory and shopfloor, with the result they are overstaffed with unskilled or inadequately skilled workmen. Skills Requirement For example, there is usually lack of shopfloor management skills for garment assembly lines, the correct handling methods for achieving the quality and productivity levels at appropriate stages in the progressive chain. Simultaneously technical skills to work out the timelines to meet the export schedules in a factory working

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with multi-styles and multi-customers is inadequate. The worse part is that Garment industry is mostly dependant on piece rate workers at the shop floor level and the management is not concerned or aware of the requirements of the operational skills and remains in the dilemma as to how to employ, retain and motivate the skilled workmen and supervisory staff. At the most factories are concerned with supervising the operative productivity level, whereas, it is essential that a workmen should have adequate technical skill to mange machines for achieving the finish quality and work knowledge about the products being handled for coping up with the quality standards and for effecting timely dispatches. The training programme in the garment industry should seek to address these critical skill gaps. Coping Up with Skill Gaps With the pace of technological


CMA

eMag Research

changes and requirements to cope it up, the skill gaps will widen if steps are not taken now. Future is bright if skilled workmen are available. Based on projected growth of about 8% in Indian textile industry, the Punjab textile industry may almost double in

next 5-6 years with an additional investment of about Rs.18000 crores and can create additional employment for 8 Lakh people in the State for the appropriately skilled workmen. Govt. needs to recognise the

importance of skill development for the garment industry's success. The steps, which need to be taken, should be to set up a Skill Development Board u n d e r Te c h n i c a l & S c i e n c e Department who may be entrusted with the task of preparing a paper on skills gaps with the help of experts working in the industry. Based upon the findings, the training contents of I n d u st r i a l Tra i n i n g I n st i t u tes , polytechnics and fashion institutes may be revised to meet the modern day needs of the garment industry with increased participation of the stake holders.

Awarded

Mr. J.N.Vohra, General Secretary being awarded by the Hon'ble NRI Minister of Punjab S. Sewa Singh Sekhwan for his presentation on “Skills Development in Punjab� 23


CMA

eMag Events 2010 rd

CMA Celebrated it’s 43 Foundation Day at Red Bishop, Panchkula

C h a n d i ga r h M a n a ge m e nt Association (CMA) celebrated its 43rd Foundation Day at Red Bishop, Panchkula on January 23, 2010. The day was celebrated as an occasion to present CMA annual Excellence Awards for entrepreneurship. Mr. H.S.Malik, the senior most past president of CMA presided over the event. On this occasion all the past presidents of CMA were also honored. Mr. Manmohan Singh, a film producer and director of Punjabi and Hindi Films was also present, besides large number of CMA members and NRIs from Singapore and Thailand. CMA Excellence Award –year 20 0 9 fo r “ P ro fes s i o n a l l y Managed Best Company” was

given to M/S Groz Beckert Asia Limited, Chandigarh. Dr. Anton Rein Felder, Managing director of M/S Groz Beckert received the award S. Indereshwar Singh Paul, MD, Drish Shoes Ltd., Panchkula was awarded for “Distinguished First Generation Entrepreneur” and S Pushvinder Jit Singh, CEO of M/S. Tynor Orthotics (P) Ltd. M o h a l i wa s a wa rd ed a s “Innovative Entrepreneur” Starting the program, Col. Karamjeet Singh welcomed the guests and the past presidents. He underlined the achievements of CMA in the year 2009 with the current executive and also highlighted the assistance and guidance provided for launching of Amritsar Management

Association (AMA). He congratulated the award winners and thanked the Past presidents for their continuous support to raise the standard of CMA activities. He informed that CMA is now spreading its activities to satellite township of Mohali and Panchkula also. Dr. Gulshan Sharma, V ice President CMA made a lively presentation on the Haryana Tourism Scenario with an interesting interactive session. A copy of the CMA eMag was also released by the Chief Guest. Earlier J.N.Vohra, General Secretary of CMA made a presentation on the activities organised so far by the incumbent executive for the year 2009

CMAeMag Released First Issue of CMAeMag was released on the Foundation Day by the Chief Guest Sh. Hardip Singh Malik. Other in the pictures are Col Karamjeet Singh, President CMA and Mr. Karan Singh Thakral, Industrialist from Singapore.

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CMA

eMag Events 2010

AIMA Celebrates Foundation Day

All India Management Association (AIMA), celebrated its 54th Foundation Day and the Management Day in Hotel Le Meridian, New Delhi on February 22, 2010. Mr. P Chidambaram, the Hon’ble Union Minister of Home was the Chief Guest. The Foundation Day was limited to conferring of AIMA Excellence Awards. CMA was represented by Dr. Niraj Pasricha, Mr. A.K.Gandhi and Mr. J.N.Vohra. About 400 delegates attended the event, including large number of students. Mr. R C Bhargava. Chairman, Maruti Suzuki India was awarded the Life T ime Achievement Award for excellence in Management. The AIMA – JRD Tata Corporate Leadership Award was given to Mr. O P Bhatt, Chairman, State Bank of India and Mr. M Damodaran, Former Chairman, Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI). Mr. D R Mehta, Founder and Chief Patron, Bhagwan Mahavir Viklang

Sahayta Samiti (known for its ‘Jaipur Foot’ innovation), Jaipur received the Public Service Excellence Award. Ms Sayantani Kar and Ms Byravee Iyer received the AIMA – Dr. Ram Tarneja Award for best Article in Indian Management. AIMA – Dr. J S Juneja Award for Creativity & Innovation for Small & Medium Enterprises was delivered to Transasia Bio-Medical Ltd. Earlier, Mr. Sanjiv Goenka, President, AIMA gave his welcome speech and said that, AIMA awards are in r e c o g n i t i o n o f e xc e l l e n c e i n management. AIMA’s Management Day After the tea break, the Management Day started. The theme for the day was ‘Managing India: Turning a Dream into Reality.' The main speakers for Management Day included, Mr. T.K.A.Nair, Principal Secretary to Prime Minister, Mr. Arun Maira, Member Planning Commission, Mr. Andrew Harrison, Chief Operating Officer of Delhi International Airport, Mr. Tarun Das,

Former Chief Mentor CII, and Mr. O.P.Bhatt, Chairman, SBI. The main emphasis of all speakers, other than Mr. Andrew Harrison, was on ensuring that the development fruits must reach to the poorest, if we want to build India of our dreams. The development of MSMS Industries is important for employment generation, development of skills for making youth employable, and making corporate accountable towards social issues such as women empowerment and global warming, besides giving greater responsibilities to younger generation for building India of dreams. Mr. Andrew Harrison, Chief Operating Officer made a powerful presentation on future development of Delhi International Airport. The Airport is being developed by a joint venture consortium of GMR Group, Airports Authority of India and Fraport & Eraman Malaysia

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Edited by : JN Vohra, Secretary General, CMA Plot No. 5, C/o Bhartiya Vidya Bhavan, Sector 27, Chandigarh Mobile : 9814556072 E-mail : cma.chd@gmail.com


CMA_eMag (March 2010)