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MIRROR

FEBRUARY 22, 2012 | TONGANOXIEMIRROR.COM | TONGANOXIE, KANSAS

Full metal artwork

Shooting range draws concern BY SHAWN LINENBERGER SLINENBERGER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Nancy Hudson said she understands Leavenworth County Sheriff’s officials should be trained on how to use various weapons. That training, though, should not be in a rock quarry near Kansas Highway 16, she contends. Hudson, who lives in Fairway, owns land near the Hamm rock quarry. The land has been in the family since 1902. She and her three sisters own 80 acres near the quarry. At a Feb. 8 Leavenworth County Planning Commission meeting, the commission unanimously approved a special-use permit from the sheriff’s office for a shooting range, which if approved would be about 3.5 miles northwest of Tonganoxie. The Leavenworth County Commission will consider giving the range final approval at its Thursday meeting in Leavenworth. Hudson said she has concerns about the range’s proximity to K16 — the road runs just to the east of the quarry — as well as noise. She also has concerns about the possibility of stray bullets, recalling

Mechanic molds scraps into scenery BY SHAWN LINENBERGER SLINENBERGER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

S

crap metal is given a second life when Paul Lamb gets his hands on it. Lamb, who owns an automotive business southeast of Tonganoxie, has metal art dating back about 25 years. But recently, he’s created pieces ranging from 10-foot palm trees to miniature Christmas trees about a foot tall.

“I get more pleasure from giving something to people and seeing their eyes light up.” Paul Lamb Metal artist

For many of his creations, he uses old 30-gallon propane tanks that he’s acquired from landfills. Cut them in half and they become lady bugs. Intact, they are turned into jack-o’-lanterns and turkeys. The wheel of an all-terrain vehicle provides the base of a palm tree with scrap metal forming the trunk and leaves. Empty 1-gallon propane tanks are the “coconuts” for the palm trees. He has sold some of his artwork, but Lamb also has given metal art to others as gifts. “I get more pleasure from giving something to people and seeing their eyes light up,” Lamb said. Another of his creations, the miniature Christmas tree, is made of 3/16-inch metal piping. He estimated it took about 15 feet of the piping to form the tree. Cabela’s at Village West displayed one of his trees a few years ago in its fishing department. SEE WINDMILL, PAGE 9 FOR

T O D AY ’ S

75 CENTS

SEE COUNTY, PAGE 9

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INSIDE

SHAWN LINENBERGER/STAFF

Paul Lamb stands with one of his metal art creations, a 10-foot palm tree. Lamb takes scrap metal and transforms it into various art. FAMILIES

IN

TONGANOXIE,

SUBURBAN

LEAVENWORTH

COUNTY

Look inside for this week’s

NEW DEALS!

AND

THE

24-40

CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . SECTION B DEATHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OUR TOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 REMEMBER WHEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-21 VOICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 VOL. 126, NO. 30

C O R R I D O R


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T H E M I R R O R | F E B R U A RY 2 2 , 2 0 1 2

BY THE NUMBERS

15

A local business has been named to a state award.

POINT OF VIEW/PAGE 6

5questions

IN BRIEF Tonganoxie experiences Monday power outage

Number of feet of 3/16-inch metal piping Paul Lamb needs to make one of his foothigh miniature Christmas trees.

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This year is the first leap year since 2008. Timeanddate.com offers facts about leap years and how they became part of our modern calendar.

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Odds and ends about the calendar quirk This year is a leap year, making leap day Feb. 29. Below we turn to timeanddate.com for more information on leap years and why they occur. Q: What is a leap year? A: A leap year consists of 366 days, as opposed to a regular year, which has 365 days. During leap years, the extra day is added in February, creating a Feb. 29. Q: How often does a leap year occur? A: A leap year occurs about every four years. Q: What are the criteria used to determine when a leap year is happening? A: In our modern Gregorian calendar, some criteria must be met for a year to be a leap year: • The year must be evenly divisible by four. • The year cannot be evenly divided by 100 unless the year is also evenly divisible by 400. Then it is a leap year.

Q: Why do we need leap years? A: Leap years are necessary tools to keep our calendar in alignment with the Earth’s revolutions around the sun. It takes the Earth approximately 365.242199 days to circle once around the sun. So if we didn’t add an extra day, Feb. 29, about every four years, we would lose approximately six hours off our calendar every year. Q: When were leap years invented? A: One account is that Julius Caesar introduced leap years in the Roman Empire more than 2,000 years ago. Back then, however, the year only had to be divisible by four to be a leap year. This led to there being many more leap years than were necessary. The situation didn’t get corrected until the introduction of the Gregorian calendar more than 1,500 years later. Find more information about leap years at timeanddate.com/date/leapyear.html.

online at tonganoxiemirror.com POWER OUTAGE There was quite the discussion on our Facebook page during Monday’s power outage. Join the conversation: facebook.com/TonganoxieMirr or.

PHOTOS GALORE FROM TONGANOXIE HIGH REGIONAL WRESTLING

TWITTER Updates about all things Tonganoxie: twitter.com/tonganoxie.

Check for news updates 24/7 at tonganoxiemirror.com

Power gradually was restored to Westar Energy customers Monday in Tonganoxie, with some being without power for 3 1/2 hours. According to the Westar Energy power outage hotline, damaged power lines caused the outage. Westar Energy’s website showed that between 50 and 500 customers were without power at one point Monday night. The outage occurred about 7:30 p.m. and power was restored about 11 p.m. The outage also affected the traffic signal at U.S. 24-40 and Main, though other areas of town were not affected. The signal at U.S. 24-40 and Fourth Street was functioning during the outage.

Police station discussion on council’s plate Monday Discussions about the potential for a new police station likely will be the top item at Monday’s Tonganoxie City Council meeting. At it last meeting Feb. 13, the council heard proposals from the owners of the two finalists: Everlasting Specialties, owned by Steve LaForge and Jim Bennett, and the former Famous Stars video, owned by John and Jan Shoemaker. Everlasting Specialties, at 725 Laming Rd., is about 5,500 square feet with potential to add on and expand to 10,000 square feet. The former Famous Stars, 302 Shoemaker Way, is about 4,000 square feet with some room for expansion as well, though specific measurements were not mentioned at the meeting. Monday’s regular meeting is to start at 7 p.m. in council chambers, 321 Delaware.

Biggest Loser contest begins Monday; deadline is Friday Tonganoxie’s Biggest Loser will start next week. The event, which the Tonganoxie Recreation Commission is sponsoring, will start with the first weigh-in at 6 p.m. Monday at Tonganoxie Middle School. This year’s event will be a two-person competition, as any two people can form a team. Future weigh-ins will be Tuesdays March 13, April 10 and May 8 at TMS. The registration deadline is Friday at the recreation commission in downtown Tonganoxie. Fee is $40, but 70 percent of fees will be used for a cash grand prize. Smaller prizes will be given for each month’s weigh-in. Winners will be the participants who shed the highest percentage of their total weight. For additional information, contact the Tonganoxie Recreation Commission at (913) 845-3502.


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

COMMUNITY | 3

Leadership class collecting goods for needy BY MATT ERICKSON MERICKSON@THEWORLDCO.INFO

For one winter while she was growing up in Leavenworth, Sharon Tuttle’s family had no income while her father recovered from open-heart surgery. Only because of the kindness of others was her family able to continue eating while her father couldn’t work. So, you could say collecting goods to stock food pantries is a cause close to her heart. “If it wasn’t for a couple of the local charities in Leavenworth, we would have had a lot of trouble,” Tuttle said. Tuttle, an escrow closer for Kansas Secured Title in Tonganoxie, is one of 16 students in the 2011-12 Southern Leavenworth County Leadership Development class helping to organize a food drive during the month of February. The drive — which is also collecting sundry items such as paper towels, shampoo and shaving cream in addition to nonperishable food items — will benefit food pantries serving Tonganoxie, Basehor, Leavenworth and Lansing. The leadership class’s collections in Tonganoxie will go to the Good Shepherd Thrift Shop’s food pantry, and donations in Basehor will go to the Basehor-Linwood Assistance Ser vices pantry at Basehor United Methodist Church. Goods collected in Leavenworth and Lansing will go to LeavenSHAWN LINENBERGER/STAFF woth Assistance Center and Catholic Above: Members of this year’s Southern Leavenworth County Leadership Development Class stand with John Brown Hawk at the News Center in Charities in Leavenworth. Lawrence. Pictured are, from left, Andy Dedeke, Jeff Brandau, Sharon Tuttle, Allison Overby, Roger Vinzant, Diana Weaver, Leigh Farris, Brad Eccles, Brad Eccles, assistant director of the Tonganoxie Recreation Commission Skyler Barnes, Sydne Ericksen, Jonas Myers, Denise Johnson, Heather Van Dyke and Jennifer Bizzell. Not pictured are Timothy Dossey and Curt and another student in the 21st annu- Wright. Below: Class members also toured Free State Studios while in Lawrence. Jonas Myers and Brad Eccles check out the Knology Channel 6 al edition of the leadership class, said “Not So Late Show” set. the class members decided this time of in the class, said they hadn’t picked year would be ripe for a food and goods the rivalry matchup on accident. drive, as giving to charitable organiza“We knew we were going to have tions can hit a lull after the holiday high attendance,” Bizzell said. season ends. In Leavenworth and Lansing, where “After the first of Tuttle is helping the year, the givto lead the effort, ing drops off, so class members are we’re tr ying to DROP-OFF LOCATIONS collecting goods refill those places,” in person at DilEccles said. TONGANOXIE lons in Lansing Though class First State Bank and Trust, and Wal-Mart in members have set Tonganoxie Recreation Commission, Leavenworth. out collection Dollar General, Tonganoxie Public Tuttle asked for boxes at a number Library, U.S. Post Office, Masonic county residents of places around Temple, Leavenworth County annex to consider that a the county, office and Kansas Secured Title. host of things — they’ve also tried the loss of a job, BASEHOR to be more creative sickness or other in their mission, Basehor Community Library, First hardships — can Eccles said. For State Bank and Trust, Community leave families in National Bank, Dollar General, instance, he has need, and many Sarah's Studio of Dance and Kansas challenged fifthfamilies in the Secured Title. Class members will and sixth-graders county do need also collect donations Friday at the on 12 Tonganoxie help. It’s someBasehor-Linwood High School recreational basthing she knows home basketball games against ketball teams to from experience. Bonner Springs. compete to collect “It’s special for the most goods for LEAVENWORTH/LANSING: me,” Tuttle said. the drive. The winThe leadership Leavenworth County Courthouse ning team will get class was estab(south entrance), Lansing City Hall, a pizza party. lished as a joint Lansing Community Library, Eccles said he Lansing Activity Center, Armed venture between Trust us to treat you right! hoped the contest Forces Bank (all locations), the Tonganoxie would encourage Commerce Bank (all locations) and and Basehor CALL TALLMAN AUTO & BODY TODAY! the children to Country Club Bank (all locations), chambers of comthink about the Citizens Savings and Loan merce. Quality is not expensive– it’s PRICELESS! purpose of the (Leavenworth and Lansing locaStudents meet Serving Kansas City for 57 years drive. tions) and Kansas Secured Title monthly from (Leavenworth and Lansing loca“As long as the September to May, tions). Class members will also colkids kind of think Is your car or small truck pulling usually in Basehor lect donations from 2 to 5 p.m. about, ‘Hey, there to one side when driving? and hear from Saturday in front of Wal-Mart in are kids out there guest speakers on Time to get your front suspension Leavenworth. who don’t have various topics, & alignment checked. anything,’ ” Eccles such as education said. Call today for an appointment. and local governIn Basehor, class ment. Students $ * members will colalso tour the Leavenworth County Alignments lect goods at Basehor-Linwood High Courthouse and Justice Center, the state*Most cars and small trucks, parts extra. School on Friday as the basketball house in Topeka and the Lawrence Jourteams take on Bonner Springs. Jennifer nal-World. Bizzell, a Basehor resident taking part 13910 State Ave. • PH: 913-371-2881 • FX: 913-721-3132

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THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

TONGANOXIE

CALENDAR To submit a calendar item, send by online submission form at tonganoxiemirror.com, by e-mail to mirror@tonganoxiemirror.com, or by fax at (913) 845-9451. Deadline for calendar items is 5 p.m. Friday the week before publication. There is no charge for publication of calendar items.

2/22 WEDNESDAY • Tonganoxie Community Museum of History, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Historical Site, 201 W. Washington St., (913) 845-2477 • Adult Sexual Assault Support Group, 4 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4:30 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • Chess, 6-8 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 369-3011 • WOW! (The Word on Wednesdays) Program, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., Bonner Springs

2/23 THURSDAY • Taking Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meeting, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Christian Church, 204 Washington St. • Adolescent Sexual Assault Support Group, 3:30 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Pre-school Storytime, 5 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 8453281 • Basehor-Linwood Parents as Teachers nutrition class, 6-7 p.m., Basehor Elementary School, 15602 Leavenworth Road, Basehor

Utah Adventure of H.S. Adams,” 7 p.m., Tonganoxie Historical Site, 201 W. Washington St. •Kaw Valley Chorus rehearsals, 7 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., Bonner Springs, kawvalleycc@yahoo.com • Tonganoxie Community Historical Society, 7 p.m., Tonganoxie Historical Site, 201 W. Washington St., Tonganoxie, (913) 845-2477.

2/29 WEDNESDAY • Tonganoxie Community Museum of History, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Historical Site, 201 W. Washington St., (913) 845-2477 • Adult Sexual Assault Support Group, 4 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4:30 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • Chess, 6-8 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 369-3011 • WOW! (The Word on Wednesdays) Program, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., Bonner Springs

3/1 THURSDAY

• Tonganoxie Senior Quilters, 8:30 a.m., Florence Riford Senior Club, 530 S. Bury St., (913) 8452787 • Basehor-Linwood Parents as Teachers Fun and Fitness class, 9:30-10:40 a.m., Basehor Elementary School, 15602 Leavenworth Road, Basehor • Story Time for Preschoolers, 10:30 a.m., Linwood Community Library, 302 Main St., Linwood, (913) 723-3686 • Potluck and Game Day, 11 a.m., Heritage Center, 109 Delaware St., Leavenworth, (913) 682-2122 • Community Blood Center blood drive, 2-7 p.m., Tonganoxie VFW Hall, 910 E. First St. • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St.

• Taking Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meeting, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Christian Church, 204 Washington St. • Tonganoxie Chamber of Commerce luncheon, noon, Gambino’s Pizza, 1208 Front St. • Adolescent Sexual Assault Support Group, 3:30 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Pre-school Storytime, 5 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 8453281 • Basehor-Linwood Parents as Teachers nutrition class, 6-7 p.m., Basehor Elementary School, 15602 Leavenworth Road, Basehor • College planning session at Johnson County Community College, 6:30 p.m., Regnier Center on JCCC campus, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park •Tonganoxie Planning Commission, 7 p.m., Tonganoxie City Hall, 321 S. Delaware St., Tonganoxie, (913) 845-2620 • Henri Masonic Lodge meeting, 7:30 p.m., Henri Masonic Hall, 311 S. Delaware St., Tonganoxie. Contact Jim Denholm, (913) 369-2635 • Downtown First Thursday, businesses open until 8 p.m.

2/25 SATURDAY

3/2 FRIDAY

2/24 FRIDAY

• Tonganoxie Civic Club, 7 a.m., West End Cafe, 416 E. Fourth St. • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095

2/27 MONDAY • Leavenworth County Republican Women's Club luncheon meeting, 11:30 a.m., Riverfront Community Center, 123 S. Esplanade St., Leavenworth • Tonganoxie’s Biggest Loser, 6 p.m. Tonganoxie Middle School, 824 Washington St., Tonganoxie • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St. • Tonganoxie City Council meeting, 7 p.m., Tonganoxie City Hall, 321 S. Delaware Street, Tonganoxie • Basehor City Council meeting, 7 p.m., Basehor City Hall, 2620 N. 155th Street, Basehor, (913) 724-1370

2/28 TUESDAY • Tonganoxie Senior Quilters, 8:30 a.m., Florence Riford Senior Club, 530 S. Bury St., (913) 8452787 • Pre-school storytime, 10:30 a.m., children's area, Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 845-3281. • Senior Sing-A-Long — Test your voice with other senior citizens, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the Council on Aging, 109A Delaware St., Leavenworth • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group for people with severe and persistent mental health disabilities meetings, 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at 205 N. Fifth, Leavenworth. For more information contact Melinda Adams, executive director, at (913) 758-0095. • Adult Victims of Sexual Assault Support Group, sponsored by the Alliance Against Family Violence, will meet at 4 p.m. at the alliance offices, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth. For more information, call (913) 682-8979. • Tonganoxie Community Historical Society meeting and program: “Kansas Exploits and the 1957

• Tonganoxie Senior Quilters, 8:30 a.m., Florence Riford Senior Club, 530 S. Bury St., (913) 8452787 • Story Time for Preschoolers, 10:30 a.m., Linwood Community Library, 302 Main St., Linwood, (913) 723-3686 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St.

3/3 SATURDAY • Tonganoxie Civic Club, 7 a.m., West End Cafe, 416 E. Fourth St. • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095

3/5 MONDAY • Basehor City Council work session, 7 p.m., Basehor City Hall, 2620 N. 155th Street, Basehor • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St., Tonganoxie •McLouth Library Board meeting, 7 p.m., McLouth Public Library, 215 Union St., McLouth, (913)-796-2225

3/6 TUESDAY • Tonganoxie Senior Quilters, 8:30 a.m., Florence Riford Senior Club, 530 S. Bury St., (913) 8452787 • Pre-school storytime, 10:30 a.m., children's area, Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 845-3281. • Senior Sing-A-Long — Test your voice with other senior citizens from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the Council on Aging, 109A Delaware St., Leavenworth • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group for people with severe and persistent mental health disabilities meetings, 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at 205 N. Fifth, Leavenworth. For more information contact Melinda Adams, executive director, at (913) 758-0095.

• Adult Victims of Sexual Assault Support Group, sponsored by the Alliance Against Family Violence, will meet at 4 p.m. at the alliance offices, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth. For more information, call (913) 682-8979. • EMPOWER kidney disease classes, 5-7 p.m., Providence Medical Center, 8929 Parallel Parkway, Kansas City, Kan., (816) 842-0076 •Kaw Valley Chorus rehearsals, 7 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., Bonner Springs, kawvalleycc@yahoo.com • Linwood City Council, 7 p.m., Linwood City Hall, 306 Main St., Linwood, (913) 301-3024 • VFW Post 9271 Ladies Auxiliary, 7 p.m., Tonganoxie VFW Hall, 910 E. First St., Tonganoxie • McLouth City Council, 7 p.m., McLouth City Hall, 110 N. Union St., McLouth, (913) 796-6411

Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Pre-school Storytime, 5 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., Tonganoxie, (913) 8453281 • Frieda’s Friends Leavenworth Area Cancer Support Group, 7 p.m., St. John Hospital, 3500 S. Fourth St., Leavenworth • Tonganoxie Municipal Court, 7 to 9 p.m., 321 Delaware St. • Stranger Township Fire Department board meeting, 7 p.m., Stranger Township Fire Department, 19501 State Ave., (913) 369-9304 • Tonganoxie Tree Board, 7 p.m., Tonganoxie Public Library, 305 S. Bury St., (913) 845-3281

3/7 WEDNESDAY

• Tonganoxie Senior Quilters, 8:30 a.m., Florence Riford Senior Club, 530 S. Bury St., (913) 8452787 • Story Time for Preschoolers, 10:30 a.m., Linwood Community Library, 302 Main St., Linwood, (913) 723-3686 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St.

• Tonganoxie Community Museum of History, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Historical Site, 201 W. Washington St., (913) 845-2477 • Adult Sexual Assault Support Group, 4 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522 Kickapoo, Leavenworth, (913) 682-8979 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4:30 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095 • WOW! (The Word on Wednesdays) Program, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., Bonner Springs • Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 303 E. Fourth St.

3/8 THURSDAY • Taking Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meeting, 9 a.m., Tonganoxie Christian Church, 204 Washington St. • Adolescent Sexual Assault Support Group, 3:30 p.m., Alliance Against Family Violence, 522

3/9 FRIDAY

3/10 SATURDAY • Tonganoxie Civic Club, 7 a.m., West End Cafe, 416 E. Fourth St. • Leavenworth County Republican Presidential Caucus, 8:30 a.m., Leavenworth High School, 2012 10th Ave., Leavenworth • Manna from Heaven Food Pantry open, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 119 Sixth St., (913) 461-9224 • Clear Skies Mental Health Support Group, 4 p.m., Clear Skies, 205 N. Fifth St., Leavenworth, (913) 758-0095


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

| D E AT H S / F U N E R A L S | PATTY ANN LUX-BOWSER 1956-2012

Arrington, KS — Patty Ann Lux-Bowser, 55, of Arrington, KS passed away Wednesday, February 15, 2012 at her home. She was born July 29, 1956 in Lawrence, KS the daughter of William E. and Viva Elnora “Vi” Davis Lux. She graduated from Tonganoxie High School in 1974. Patty had lived in Oskaloosa for 15 years before moving to the Arrington community in 1992. She had worked for the State of Kansas in both the Department of Revenue and Ag Statistics. She had also worked in the K-Mart Distribution Center in Lawrence and owned Pat’s Pet Palace in Holton. Patty was currently working as a groomer for Banner Creek Animal Hospital in Holton. She was a member of the Larkinburg Christian Church and the Bulldog Club of America. Patty was married to John Robert Bowser on March 7, 1992 in Larkinburg,

KS. John and their daughter, Kristi Bowser, both survive of the home. Patty is also survived by her father, Bill Lux of Tonganoxie, KS; her brothers, Mike Lux (Pam) of Tonganoxie, KS, Tracy Lux (Mindi) of McLouth, KS and Todd Lux (Nicole) of Tonganoxie, KS; her sister, Christena Guthrie (Larry) of Tonganoxie, KS, her grandson, Ean Winsor and her many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her mother, Viva Elnora “Vi” Lux on October 30, 2011. Services were held at 11:00 a.m. Monday, February 20, 2012 at the Mercer Funeral Home in Holton, KS. She lied in state at the funeral home where family greeted friends from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. Sunday. Memorials may be given to Pat’s Rescue c/o Mercer Funeral Home, Box 270, Holton, KS 66436. To leave a special message for the family, visit mercerfuneralhomes.com. Please sign this guestbook at obituaries.ljworld.com.

CECILIA GLADYS MCDERMOTT Cecilia Gladys McDermott, 92, Shawnee, died February 15, 2012. Funeral was 10 a.m. February 21, 2012, with visitation one hour before at St.

Joseph Catholic Church, Shawnee. Burial in Holy Angels Cemetery, Basehor. Sign the guestbook at quisenberryfh.com.

| ENGAGEMENT | DeGraeve, Miles plan for July wedding at Holy Angels in Basehor Amber DeGraeve, Tonganoxie, and Brett Miles, Tonganoxie, announce their engagement. The future bride is the daughter of Brenda DeGraeve and the late Ronald DeGraeve, Tonganoxie. The future groom is the son of William Miles and the late Amy Miles, Tonganoxie. The future bride is a 2010 graduate of Kansas City Kansas Community College and a 2006 Tonganoxie High School graduate. She is employed as a labor and delivery registered nurse at Overland Park Regional Medical Center. The future groom is a 2010 Kansas State University graduate and a 2006 Basehor-Linwood High School graduate. He is employed as an electrical engineer with Henderson Engineers, Inc. The couple plans a July 14, 2012, at Holy Angels Catholic Church in Basehor.

COMMUNITY | 5

| NEWS IN BRIEF | PAST organization to offer historical performers event First City’s Performers and StoryTellers, or PAST, will have a historical performance workshop April 14 and 15 at Kelly Law Office, 512 E. Fourth St. in downtown Tonganoxie. The workshop will focus on learning how to create a first-person narrative of a historic figure or composite character. By participating in the workshop, participants agree to rehearse on a date to be decided by consensus of workshop participants and perform at a future designated engagement. Space is limited and registration is required in advance. The cost is $50, and the book “A Manual for Performers and Presenters of First-Person Narratives” by Joyce M. Thierer is recommended but not required. The workshop runs from 8:30 a.m.- 4 p.m. Saturday, April 14, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Lunch will be provided both days. For more information, contact Keyta Kelly at (913) 683-2979 or keyta@sunflower.com, or Laura Elkins at (913) 683-4334 or elmoose@juno.com.

Scholarships being offered The Kansas County Clerks and Election Officials Association is offering a $500 scholarship to high school seniors or college freshmen and sophomores. To be eligible, students must be majoring in journalism, political science or communications and have a current grade-point average of at least 3.0. The group will award 12 scholarships

around the state. Applications are available at the Leavenworth County Clerk's office at the county courthouse, 300 Walnut St. in Leavenworth, or from school counselors. Scholarship winners will be announced in May. For more information, contact Leavenworth County Clerk Janet Klasinski at (913) 684-0422.

USDA Farm Service Agency programs being offered Enrollment for two U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency programs has begun and will continue through June 1. Enrollment for the FSA's Direct and Counter-cyclical Program (DCP) and the Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program began Jan. 23. The FSA encourages producers to contact their local FSA offices to begin the enrollment process as soon as possible. For more information about either program, producers can contact the Oskaloosa FSA office at (785) 863-2221 or go online to fsa.usda.gov.

Caucus set for March 10 Leavenworth County Republicans can let their voices be heard in the presidential nomination process at the county's Republican Presidential Caucus next month. The caucus will begin at 10 a.m. March 10 at Leavenworth High School, 2012 10th Ave. in Leavenworth. Doors to the event will open at 8:30 a.m., and officials recommend that caucus-goers show up early.

| PUZZLE ANSWERS |

Brett Miles and Amber DeGraeve • Today’s puzzles can be found in the classified advertising section

| BIRTH | JACE DAVID LENTZ Zach Lentz and Kayla Sargent, McLouth, announce the birth of their son, Jace David Lentz. Jace was born at 12:51 a.m. Feb. 7 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces and was 20 inches long. Jace David Lentz Maternal grandparent is are Kim Cady, McLouth; paternal grandparents are Amber and David Lentz, McLouth.

Community Blood Center to have blood drive Friday at Tonganoxie VFW MIRROR STAFF REPORT Community Blood Center will have a blood drive next week in Tonganoxie. The drive will be from 2 to 7 p.m. Friday at the Tonganoxie VFW Post Home, 910 E. First St. To make an appointment online in advance, go to esavealivenow.org and use the sponsor code “tonganoxie.” People interested in donating can also call Dick Dean at (913) 845-2164. Community Blood Center must collect at least 580 pints of blood every day to meet the needs of the Kansas City area. One donation can help as many as two hospital patients.


VOICES

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

|6

QUOTEWORTHY “The groundwork of all happiness is health.”

Leigh Hunt

SUBMIT LETTERS TO EDITOR@TONGANOXIEMIRROR.COM

COMMENT

Proposals flowing fast BY JOHN SCHLAGECK

two-year drought permits. Without the opportunity to increase his water usage, he would have suffered extreme yield It’s decision-making time on farms declines or a complete crop failure in the across Kansas. In approximately two fields serviced by these three wells. months, the fields will be alive as farmWith the specter of another drought ers begin planting next fall’s crops. looming, the McPherson County irrigaIn preparation for this upcoming tor faces the prospects of another dry, hot planting season, grain farmers need to summer with not enough water for crops decide soon which crops they’ll plant, he must soon plant. fertility and herbicide programs, plant Sawyer believes the multi-year flex populations, plant varieties and, equally permits will let him better utilize his important, how much water they’ll have water resources should another year or available to irrigate specific two of drought persist on crops. It goes without say- his south-central Kansas Another wrench in this farm. production planning ing that Kansas crop “I will likely take advaninvolves insurance compa- producers have their tage of this multi-year flex nies who are hammering plates full trying to proposal on my three wells out how to implement their if it passes,” Sawyer told the make decisions irrigated versus dry-land House committee. “I will policies. At the same time, impacting their bot- need to know soon, because tom lines and their spring planting season is 60 the deadline for sign-ups is fast approaching. future livelihood in days away and I have cropIt goes without saying ping choices, fertilizing and the agricultural that Kansas crop producers herbicide applications, industry. Still, some plant population numbers have their plates full trying producers like to make decisions impactand plant varieties to decide ing their bottom lines and McPherson County on.” their future livelihood in All of these decisions will farmer/stockman the agricultural industry. dramatically affect Sawyer’s Derek Sawyer took Still, some producers like bottom line. A decrease in McPherson County time to travel to the production because of a lack farmer/stockman Derek of irrigation could decrease Statehouse to tell Sawyer took time to travel his production and have a this side of the to the Statehouse to tell this detrimental impact on his story. side of the story. Garnering operation. the full attention of the It appears the voices of House Agriculture & NatuKansas farmers are being ral Resources Committee, Sawyer told heard in Topeka. The Kansas Legislature these legislators just how important the is wasting little time in moving forward proposed multi-year flex account would with proposed changes in water policy. be for his family’s cropping operation. Let’s hope this important work gets done Sawyer who operates a fourth-genera- so this state’s crop producers can contintion dry-land and irrigated corn, wheat, ue with their plans and be ready to go this soybean and milo farm with his wife, spring when soil temperatures warm up Katie, told the legislators, “… it is time for and corn, soybean and milo planting seaKansas to look at new ways for producers son arrives. to more efficiently utilize the natural Stay tuned. resources it has available.” During 2011, because of the extreme- — John Schlageck is a commentator on agriculture and rural Kansas. He was born and raised on a ly dry conditions, Sawyer enrolled three diversified farm in northwestern Kansas. of his irrigation wells into emergency KANSAS FARM BUREAU

POINT OF VIEW Three local residents are our community voices for this three-month period. The three will comment on events local and national. And, at times, our local commentators may offer additional views online at tonganoxiemirror.com

Q:

Monday was Presidents Day. Which president or presidents do you admire most?

“Thomas Jefferson. Polymath, critical thinker, child of the Enlightenment, Renaissance Man, author of the Declaration of Independence. That's a pretty decent resume!”

“The two presidents I most admire are Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln.” Janet Stuke, Tonganoxie

Grant Ritchey, Tonganoxie

“There are a few presidents who I admire. George Washington for starting this country and Abraham Lincoln for our equality and freedom. I think our country could use another Ronald Reagan right now.” Aaron McIntyre, Tonganoxie

LETTERS POLICY The Mirror welcomes letters to the editor. Here are some guidelines to help you with writing letters: • Letters should be no more than 250 words. • They must be signed, have a return address and, where possible, a telephone number for purposes of confirming authorship. • Subject matter is limited only by good taste and lawful discussion. • We reserve the right to edit or shorten letters and to reject unacceptable material. • The deadline for letters to the editor is 5 p.m. on the Friday before publication.


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

COMMUNITY | 7

Wreath retailers win state small-business award BY SHAWN LINENBERGER SLINENBERGER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Everlasting Specialties started with sales of dried flowers out of the back end of a truck and eventually grew into its current business in Urban Hess Business Park where owners Steve LaForge and Jim Bennett now house the Wreath Depot, the Pest Depot and the Flower Depot. The company’s ability to always change has been important, according to Will Katz of the Kansas University Small Business Development Center in Lawrence. “It’s one thing to be an entrepreneur; it’s another thing to be a business person,” Katz said. The business recently was named 2011 Existing Business of the Year through the Kansas Small Business Development Center. Katz nominated the Wreath Depot for the award, which it will receive in March in Topeka. The business partners started selling dried flowers out of the back of a truck and eventually moved into a building — the former Union Pacific depot in downtown Tonganoxie. More than a decade ago, the business moved to the Urban Hess Business Center north of U.S. Highway 24-40. All part of Everlasting Specialties, its subsidaries sell dried flowers, wreaths and pest control products. LaForge and Bennett have worked for years with Katz and the KU Small Business Development Center. The company also has partnered with the KU business school for internships and other projects. In September 2001, the company launched the first color catalog for its wholesale company. It mailed out on Sept. 11. Though the catalog was not successful, the company evolved to emphasize online business, which has paid dividends.

SHAWN LINENBERGER/STAFF

Jim Bennett and Steve LaForge have been business partners for nearly 25 years. The colleagues recently were named business of the year through the Kansas Small Business Development Center.

The business has clients in all 50 states, with high concentrations in New York and California, LaForge said. LaForge pointed to population concentration as a possible reason for higher sales. “Those people are more web-oriented I think,” LaForge said. “When they go out searching, they go to Google. We’re really high on Google for wreaths and door wreaths on the Wreath Depot.”

Bennett said about 75 percent of Wreath Depot orders are shipped to a third party, normally a gift recipient. “Our flower business started because we started out growing flowers and had a love of gardening,” Bennett said. LaForge and Bennett said the award was quite the honor, as the business was selected from eight across the state. “And of course we couldn’t have done it without our employees and staff,” Ben-

Leavenworth optometrist Ashley Reddell speaks to Basehor Chamber of Commerce members Thursday at Reece & Nichols in Basehor. Reddell discussed various vision problems that can make schoolwork difficult for elementary-aged children.

Optometrist: Even kids with 20/20 eyesight can have vision problems BY MATT ERICKSON MERICKSON@THEWORLDCO.INFO

When it comes to children’s vision, optometrist Ashley Reddell says, it’s not all about those two numbers separated by a slash. Even if a child’s eyesight is 20/20, his or her performance in school might be hampered by vision problems, Reddell said at a Basehor Chamber of Commerce meeting Thursday. Children’s vision, not eyesight, is the specialty of Reddell, who works for the Vision Development Center in Leavenworth. What’s the difference? Vision has less to do with a person’s eyeballs and more to do with their connection with the brain, she said. “Vision is what the brain is doing with the information once it goes in,” said Reddell, who also gives presentations in schools, including in BasehorLinwood. Children with vision problems might have difficulty with keeping both eyes working together, changing focus from one object to another, following moving objects with their eyes or distinguishing between different letters with similar shapes, she said. Such problems can make typical classroom tasks — reading a book or copying words from a board at the front of the class — seem excruciating, Reddell said.

“They think, why would my friend want to read ‘Harry Potter’? That sounds like torture to me,” Reddell said. Vision difficulties often go unnoticed during regular eye screenings, and they can be tough for kids to recognize or describe, Reddell said. For instance, a child having problems with eye teaming — or the ability to use both eyes together — might experience double vision while reading. But a child may not understand what “seeing double” looks like. If an optometrist shows a child an animation of words on a page splitting into two, though, the child might be able to say that’s what it looks like when he tries to read, Reddell said. That difficulty in identifying the problem can sometimes cause parents to experience “mom guilt,” she said. “They’ll say, ‘Oh my gosh, I had no idea! They didn’t complain about it,’ ” Reddell said. Parents or teachers can sometimes see evidence of vision difficulties in children’s behavior, she said. A child struggling with eye teaming might often cover one eye while reading, and one having difficulty with eye focus might report that her vision is blurry even if she has 20/20 eyesight. A survey, often given to both parents and teachers, is the best way to determine if a child has vision difficulties that are interfering with learning, Reddell said. She handed out to chamber members a sample survey that asks how

nett said. “And the help of many others over the years.” LaForge said the company has been looking to move back to the downtown area. Its building has been discussed as a possible new home for the Tonganoxie police station if the city council approves such a move. “Full circle would be to move back to downtown,” LaForge said. “Jim and I both love the downtown.”

often certain behaviors occur, ranging from reading below grade level or taking too long with homework to experiencing headaches or itchy and watery eyes. Reddell said she often refers parents to the website covd.org, where they can find optometrists who can treat vision problems. In addition, the Vision Development Center at 2301 10th Ave. in Leavenworth, where she works, offers free parent workshops on the subject on the second Monday of each month. Parents can call (913) 682-3937 to reserve a spot. Reddell also told Chamber members that the optometrists in her office had considered opening a branch in Basehor someday, though that would likely occur some time from now.

Our “Children of the Inner Light” giftware conveys heartfelt, recipient driven messages of love, acceptance and gratitude. 760 Northstar Ct. • 913-369-2100 Tonganoxie, KS 66086 9-6 M-F 9-1 Sat.


8 | KANSAS LEGISLATURE

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Critics say bill could lead to discrimination BY SCOTT ROTHSCHILD SROTHSCHILD@THEWORLDCO.INFO

TOPEKA — A legislative committee on Monday approved a bill that supporters said would protect religious freedom, but opponents said the measure could be used to discriminate based on sexual orientation. “This is nothing more than legislative gay-bashing,” said Thomas Witt, president of the Kansas Equality Commission, after the House Judiciary Committee approved House Bill 2260, which is called the Kansas Preservation of Religious Freedom Act. During discussion on the bill, one of its main proponents, Rep. Jan Pauls, DHutchinson, referred to the city of Lawrence’s anti-discrimination ordinance, which includes protections based on sexual orientation. She said that ordinance could violate a businessperson’s religious beliefs if that person didn’t want to hire someone who was gay, transgender or cross-dressing. She used the example of a daycare business. “The situation in Lawrence, it then trumps the freedom of religion in our Constitution,” she said. “You cannot use your religion as a defense under that existing ordinance.” But opponents said the bill, if enacted, would open the door to discrimination. “This isn’t about freedom of religion. This is about freedom to discriminate against people who you don’t agree

with,” said Rep. Annie Kuether, D-Topeka. Rep. John Rubin, R-Shawnee, however, said the measure was needed especially now because of President Barack Obama’s decision to require birth control coverage, which has been protested by some Catholic officials. But Kuether said that was a smokescreen, noting the bill was first introduced last year right after the city of Manhattan approved an anti-discrimination ordinance covering sexual orientation. The measure would prohibit government from substantially burdening a person’s exercise of religion unless it furthered a compelling interest and was done in the least restrictive way possible. Discrimination would not be allowed against individuals covered by the Kansas Act Against Discrimination. This includes discrimination based on race, religion, color, sex, disability, national origin or ancestry. Lawrence officials testified against the bill, saying the local ordinance extended beyond the protections of the state law. But Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration weighed in in favor of it. Judiciary Chairman Lance Kinzer, ROlathe, said there was nothing in the bill that would invalidate a local ordinance. “There is not a single local ordinance on the books right now that will come off based on passing this,” Kinzer said. The measure, approved in committee on a voice vote, now goes to the full House for consideration.

Proposal would offer in-state tuition at regents universities to all veterans BY SCOTT ROTHSCHILD SROTHSCHILD@THEWORLDCO.INFO

TOPEKA — A House committee Monday heard from two Kansas University students, who are military veterans, and then recommended legislation that would allow all military veterans pay the lower in-state tuition rate to attend a regents university. "Service members who gave years of their young lives in the service of our beloved country deserve in-state tuition," said Bradley Boomsma, an Iraq war disabled veteran who is originally from Arkansas but came to KU to study military history. Boomsma and Sara Sneath, a Marine Corps veteran and Kansas native, said Kansas would benefit by attracting more veterans who are older, more likely married with families and who will settle down where they attend school. "With the current reduction in armed forces, more military veterans — with entitlement to federal benefits — are looking for a place to pursue their education goals, a place they will eventually call home," said Sneathm who is majoring in journalism, Spanish and sociology. "We believe that with House Bill 2652, military veterans will find that home in Kansas," she told the House Education Budget Committee. Under current law, military personnel, their spouses and their dependents are allowed to pay in-state rates at state universities, if they have been in the state for two years during their military service and established a residence in Kansas

within 30 days of their discharge, according to a fiscal note of the bill. In the last fiscal year, universities waived $4 million in out-of-state tuition. Under the proposal, the waiver program would be open to anyone who has served in the military. The cost of the program would increase, but no estimate has been given about how much because officials said it was impossible to predict how many would take advantage of the program. Mary Jane Stankiewicz, spokesperson for the Kansas Board of Regents, said that while it appears on paper that the waiver costs the state money, the schools are receiving tuition funds they otherwise wouldn't have gotten. Charles Yunker, adjutant of the American Legion Department of Kansas, said, "Some may argue if we as Kansas taxpayers can provide in-state tuition rates for the children of illegal immigrants, we should at a minimum provide the same consideration to those who have honorably served in the military." Sneath said that prior to August, the Department of Veterans Affairs paid about two thirds of the cost of out-ofstate tuition rates. But that has since been cut to less than half, which has increased the out-of-pocket costs for veterans, from roughly $2,759 per semester to $4,756 per semester, she said. The in-state tuition rate at KU is $253.70 per credit hour, while the out-of-state rate is $650 per credit hour.

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THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Windmill, grill among other creations FROM PAGE 1

Lamb decorated the tree with various fishing equipment. “I just love to weld,” Lamb said. “I love to fabricate and weld stuff.” His first piece of artwork was a decoration for his 1972 Chevrolet Nova SS he made in 1986. He fashioned the letters “SS” out of a coat hanger. More recent works use the same concept, but with the metal piping that is formed to spell names. Lamb’s creative mind hasn’t been limited to his artwork. He’s made a windmill with a old diesel semi fan blade and a tailgating

grill made from a 16-gallon 1958 Schlitz’s keg. A wrench serves as the handle for the grill. Lamb said he’s gotten more “serious” in the past two years with his metal art projects and finds that he does most of his work in between down times in his workday at the automotive shop. For instance, if he has to wait on a part for a vehicle, he’ll shift gears and work on his art in the meantime. “I ‘d say it’s a stress reliever,” Lamb said. “I’m not one to just lay on the couch. I do that enough. It’s a hobby, for sure.” Lamb’s business is at 17101 206th St. in rural Tonganoxie. He can be reached at (913)845-2377.

About 2,400 line up for free dental clinic in KCK BY CAROLINE BOYER

so bad that they were sent to the hospital. It was the 11th Mission of Mercy ClinDave Whitt was waiting Saturday to ic and the first in the Kansas City area lose the last of his teeth. since 2003, when a clinic took place at Having been laid off recently, the the Kansas Speedway. Over the course of Edwardsville resident jumped at the four days — including set-up on Thurschance to receive free dental help over day and take-down on Sunday — 1,590 the weekend at the Kansas Mission of volunteers lended a hand, with 173 denMercy clinic in Kansas City, Kan. It had tists and 152 hygienists donating their been about two years since he’d last seen time. a dentist, and Whitt said he knew he The clinic was open to anyone, no hadn’t taken good enough care of his questions asked. Most who attended the teeth, so he felt it would be better to get clinic were from the Kansas City area, a full extraction and move on to false but Yows said she had met some from teeth. much further away — one woman came “This was actually a blessing in dis- from Emporia with her daughters and guise because I had a tooth break off a three grandchildren. Another family couple of weeks ago,” he said. “… I’m came from the Kansas and Colorado really appreciative of something like border. this; it helps a lot of people.” "Some people make this their dental Whitt got to the former WalMart at care; they go from clinic to clinic," Yows State Avenue and 65th Street where the said. clinic was held at 4 a.m. Friday and was Dede Behrens, a dentist in Kansas given number 700. But a family emer- City, Kan., has participated in three pregency called him away before his num- vious clinics outside of Kansas City, so ber was called, so he was back early Sat- she said taking part in a clinic where she urday morning, this time lives was especially number 952. important to her. She “This is where I live, “It’s worth it to me, brought along her staff anyway, because my and these are my peo- and got her mother, husteeth right now are at the ple. And if we’re going band and son to work as point where they’re causvolunteers. to take care of their ing me pain,” he said. “This is where I live, “And I don’t have any problems, I’m going to and these are my peodental insurance or any- be taking care of them ple,” she said. “And if thing like that, so it came we’re going to take care of too.” along at the right time.” their problems, I’m going Dede Behrens About 2,400 people to be taking care of them, Kansas City, Kan., dentist who like Whitt came to the too.” helped with free clinic clinic Friday and SaturBehrens went to area day, which was sponpreschools to prescreen sored by the Kansas Den250 children for the clintal Charitable Foundation. People ic. Of those, she set up clinic appointbegan lining up at 8 p.m. the night prior ments for 64 children; about half of to each day of the clinic, staying those showed up. She said she hoped the overnight to receive cleanings, fillings clinic helped many see how important and extractions. dental care is. After their number is called, patients “I think sometimes their problems are were put through triage to ensure they so overwhelming that they’re afraid to had no major medical issues and to start,” she said. “And so hopefully this, check their general dental health. They because they do education first, hopewere then separated into groups accord- fully with this, if they’re afraid, it lets ing to their needs: cleanings, extrac- them (get over that). I had two people tions, fillings and even some oral sur- today that it was their first fillings ever, gery. and they were afraid. But by the time we “We have to decide what is the most were done, they were like, ‘OK, so that urgent treatment they need,” Heather wasn’t so bad.’ We talked about followYows, spokesperson for the event, said. ing through and taking care of things. “So many need lots of treatment that we Maybe that does give them an introduchave to limit it in order to treat as many tion that they haven’t had before.” people as possible.” She said hoped the clinic taught the There were many stories like Whitt’s families who attended that dental of those who had not taken care of their health was important and easily mainteeth and were in desperate need of tained through daily brushing. treatment. Yows said one hygienist told “We just have to teach people that her on Saturday morning, in the pedi- teeth are part of your overall health,” atric area of the clinic, that a 2 year old Behrens said. “You have to value those had needed six fillings and two crowns, and take care of them, and put them as while two other children had problems part of your priority system.” CBOYER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

COMMUNITY | 9

County commission to consider shooting range at rock quarry FROM PAGE 1

a rural Linwood girl being struck in the head by a stray bullet while playing outside her home in 2008. “Bullets are bullets and they go where science takes them,” Hudson said. The proposed site in the quarry would be on county-owned property that the public works department already uses. Jeff Joseph, planning and zoning director for Leavenworth County, said the proposed range would face northwest. Sandusky Road, to the south, is about 1,500 feet from the point of fire, while Kansas Highway 16, to the east, is about 1,800 feet. The point of fire to the property line is about 3,000 feet to the west and 2,000 feet to the north, Joseph said. As for the depth of the depression, Joseph said there was not a definite number, but it was estimated at 20 feet. In the special-use request to the planning commission, Lt. Mike Swisshelm wrote that hours of operation would vary at the range, but it would be used two to three days per month, with the majority of training taking place during a normal business day. There would be nighttime shooting range as mandated by the state, but Swisshelm wrote that shooting likely wouldn’t take place after 10 p.m. Swisshelm anticipated a maximum of 35 officers using the range and spread out over a two-day training period, though other agencies could use the range. The planning commission added to the proposal the stipulation that only lawenforcement agencies within Leaven-

worth County could use the range. A wood frame structure measuring 20 by 40 feet also is planned under the proposal, to be used as a classroom and shelter from the elements when needed. Swisshelm said his “rough guess” of cost for the shelter would range between $10,000 and $15,000, which Undersheriff Ron Cranor said has been budgeted for if approved. Officers also would be allowed to use the range when off duty and would be required to notify dispatch of when they planned to use the range. Capt. Andy Dedeke said the sheriff’s office currently uses a range at the Lansing Correctional Facility. Dedeke said the range would allow for more flexibility in training. “It’s available to us when we need it as opposed to being on a list,” Dedeke said. “There are several agencies on the list, as well as LCF. It’s not always available.” Chad Krull, who lives south of the quarry, said his biggest concern is the potential noise. And, he thinks the range would be unnecessary. “I don’t think they really need it,” Krull said. Asked about safety concerns, Cranor said there is more chance of someone being struck by an hunter’s errant bullet than from the range. “If a round would get out of there, it would almost be a miracle to get out,” Cranor said. The county commission will consider the permit at 9:30 a.m. Thursday at the Leavenworth County Courthouse.


10 | KANSAS LEGISLATURE

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

A busy ‘turnaround’ week at the Kansas Statehouse BY STATE REP. MELANIE MEIER D-LEAVENWORTH

EXCITEMENT IN THE STATEHOUSE This past week was very busy and full of excitement. This coming week is “turnaround,” so our committees were working late to get bills passed out on time so that they can be voted on and sent to the Senate. Turnaround is what the legislature calls the day when bills passed by the House are sent over to the Senate for consideration, and vice versa. Over 100 additional bills were introduced in the House last week to meet the introduction deadline! We had a bit of excitement around the Capitol this week as two unrelated security incidents kept Capitol Police very busy on Wednesday and hearings in committees were drowned out by protesters chanting and cheering in the Capitol. In the first case, two explosive devices were discovered in an unattended pickup truck across the street from the Capitol. The Topeka Police Department’s bomb squad was summoned and the vehicle owner was apprehended in the tunnel between the Statehouse and the Docking State Office Building. In the second incident, a man was arrested after issuing several threats in a telephone call to Gov. Sam Brownback’s office. The man was located via caller ID, questioned, then arrested. Then that same day, protesters came inside after gathering on the grounds for most of the day to deliver thousands of letters to the Governor. Capitol Police did an excellent job of managing these situations. I am grateful for their service. Three shadows and six pages assisted me this week. I enjoyed having them in committee with me and showing them around the Capitol, and I hope each one felt their day was worthwhile. Sunday

night I enjoyed attending the 4H Citizenship in Action banquet before the 4H-ers headed over to the Capitol to hold a mock session. They had three bills to debate and vote on.

HOUSE REPUBLICANS’ TAX PLAN This week, the House Republican tax plan was published in writing. In order to pay for their tax plan, the House GOP proposes to adjust the percentage of general sales taxes that are sent to the Department of Transportation. This adjustment would result in a cut of $300 million from the Highway Fund over the next two years (and perhaps more money over a longer period of time). The Highway Fund is the revenue source for the comprehensive transportation plan that was signed into law in 2010, also known as TWorks. T-Works is projected to create 175,000 new jobs and generate $6.4 billion for our state’s economy over the next 10 years.

REDISTRICTING Even though the House seemed to have passed its new map of Kansas House Districts out easily, the redistricting discussion has started to heat up. There has been some contention with proposed Senate districts, especially with a map that would separate candidates from the districts in which they have already filed. There is also contention with the many versions of the Congressional map that have been introduced in the House. One proposal introduced by the speaker of the House is very similar to the “salamander map” that was being shown across Kansas last summer in the traveling redistricting committee. It would put Leavenworth and Wyandotte Counties in the same district as counties that border Colorado. There are at least two other proposals that have a district that stretches across the top of Kansas, from Colorado to Missouri, and includes Leav-

enworth County. You can see the proposals at redistrictingks.com.

VETERANS AFFAIRS HB2480 was passed out of the House Taxation Committee and placed on the consent calendar. This bill would make the federal and military retirees' “Thrift Savings Program” distributions taxable in Kansas. Currently, all public retiree plans are exempt. As the governor and House Republicans’ goals are supposed to be lowering income taxes, this does not make sense to start taxing retirees. I objected to this bill being on the consent calendar, and it was taken off. I do not know if it will be brought to the floor for debate in the next few days, but be sure to let your voices be heard. Because it is from the Taxation Committee, it is exempt from the normal deadline for “turnaround.” Information on how to contact the taxation committee and all legislators is found at kslegislature.org. Monday, there are a couple of hearings related to veterans. In the House Education Budget Committee there will be a hearing on HB 2652, which is a bill to grant in-state tuition to any veteran who served his or her country honorably for at least three years. In the Social Services Budget Committee there will be a hearing on HB2696, which is a proposal to develop a central database of information on Kansas resources supporting veterans. In other words, it would be a “one-stop shop” for veterans to find services.

CORRECTIONS & JUVENILE JUSTICE AND JUDICIARY COMMITTEES We were very busy in both committees again. We passed out two bills that were introduced last week in response to tragic events in the national news: “Caylee’s Law” and the “Penn State Law.” I carried the bill on electronic cigarettes that the

Leavenworth County Attorney and the Leavenworth City Police Department introduced. It passed the House 112 to 6 and is on its way to the Senate. We tabled a couple of bills: one about tracking information on anyone selling to a second-hand store and another on further definition of support when determining severance of parental rights in adoption cases.

COMING UP THIS WEEK As of Friday morning, we had more than 65 bills waiting to be voted on in the House. There were many more added Friday afternoon and will be still more on Monday. Starting Tuesday and the rest of the week, we should be in the House Chambers most of the day to debate and vote on bills. I will have pages again on Wednesday. They should stay busy!

KEEP IN TOUCH You can track my activities on my website, meier4kansas.com, my Facebook page, facebook.com/Meier4Kansas, and on Twitter at twitter.com/melaniemeier. I am privileged and honored to be your voice in the Kansas Capitol. If I can ever be of assistance to you, please feel free to contact me at home or in Topeka. My office is still in the Docking State Office Building on the seventh Floor, Room 722. Mail can be sent to my office address: Kansas State Capitol, Topeka, KS 66612. You can also reach me at (785) 296-7668 or call the legislative hotline at 1-800-432-3924 to leave a message for me. Additionally, you can e-mail me at melanie.meier@house.ks.gov. You can also follow the legislative session online at kslegislature.org. If you need to directly contact a particular agency in state government, you can find useful telephone numbers online at da.state.ks.us/phonebook.

New group rallies against policies of Brownback, Kobach BY SCOTT ROTHSCHILD SROTHSCHILD@THEWORLDCO.INFO

TOPEKA — Tamara Werth, one of the co-founders of a grass-roots organization that has arisen in opposition to the agenda of Gov. Sam Brownback and Secretary of State Kris Kobach, said many Kansans are upset with the political direction of the state. “What people do seem to fall back on is the quality of life — that Kansas has such a strong history of education, social services, trust-building and neighbor helping neighbor, and that is being diminished and marginalized as a consequence of decisions being made in Topeka,” Werth said. Werth and Crystal McComas, also of Lawrence, have formed Kansans United in Voice and Spirit, which helped put together a rally last week that drew several hundred people to protest outside Kobach’s office and then Brownback’s office in the Statehouse. It was the group’s second rally in Topeka. The first one in September drew a similar-sized crowd and was directed mostly at Brownback, concerning his cuts to school funding and administration of the social services agency. But the list of grievances has expanded since then. At last week’s rally, people spoke against Brownback’s proposals to overhaul the tax code, school finance formula and public pension system, and fur-

ther changes to social services. And protesters have also turned their attention to Kobach. The group criticized Kobach for his work nationally on cracking down on illegal immigrants and in Kansas for pushing through a law that requires photo ID to vote and proof of citizenship for new voter registrations. “We want a secretary of state that works for us,” said Sulma Arias, executive director of the Wichita-based Sunflower Community Action. Kobach’s critics say the voting requirements will create obstacles to voting, while Kobach says the measures will prevent fraud at the ballot box. On illegal immigration, Kobach says his enforcement measures are causing undocumented workers to “self-deport.” But immigration advocates say Kobach’s proposals are causing hardships and tearing families apart.

Another focus of Kansans United in Voice and Spirit, Werth said, is the influence that the Washington, D.C.-based American Legislative Exchange Council has on the Kansas Legislature. ALEC is a corporate-funded group that describes its mission as promoting free markets, limited government, federalism and individual freedom. Each year, bills based on ALEC “model legislation” are introduced and passed by legislatures across the nation, including in Kansas. Art Laffer, who as a $75,000 paid consultant helped craft Brownback’s proposed tax overhaul, serves as a member of ALEC’s Board of Scholars. ALEC has also pushed for the Health Care Freedom Act, which is aimed at blocking federal health reform and was signed into law by Brownback.“ALEC’s agenda seems to be the backdrop for a number of changes we are seeing in Kansas,” Werth said.

Brownback adviser to speak in Leavenworth Landon Fulmer, policy director for Gov. Sam Brownback, is scheduled to speak and take questions on state education reform policy next month. Fulmer is the author of the Governor’s proposal to overhaul state education policy in the areas of funding, teacher evaluation and technical education.

The event is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 8, in the Jahn Meeting Room at the Leavenworth Public Library, 417 Spruce St. in Leavenworth. The public is invited to attend. For more information, contact State Rep. Jana Goodman, R-Leavenworth, at (913) 547-0565.

Werth said the main goal of Kansans United is to organize concerned citizens to support valuable state services and programs. At this point, the nonpartisan group doesn’t have a future event scheduled, but she said it will continue working with one of its goals being to increase voter turnout. “We are about mobilizing the people and giving people a voice,” she said.

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FOOD

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

| 11

ON DECK: NEW MAC ‘N’ CHEESE On next week’s Food page, this go-to comfort food gets an adult twist, with orange powder-free recipes. Find the story now in the ‘Living’ section at tonganoxiemirror.com.

M E A LT I M E I D E A S A N D R E C I P E S F O R Y O U A N D Y O U R FA M I LY

| RECIPES | WHITE CHOCOLATE COVERED BROWNIES

ISTOCK PHOTO

White chocolate isn’t technically chocolate, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t perfect for the Valentine’s Day season.

Winter white Not officially chocolate, but equally delicious BY SARAH HENNING SHENNING@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Chocolate gets top billing in the pantheon of sweets every year around Valentine’s Day. It seems it’s impossible to go anywhere without seeing ribbon-wrapped truffle boxes, sculpted edible roses or someone balling up a foil wrapper, cocoa scent on his or her breath. But what of the dark stuff’s albino cousin? White chocolate barely gets a mention, unless your valentine prefers it over milk or dark. In fact, it gets so little love that the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t even classify it as chocolate. Yes, despite its name, white chocolate doesn’t contain any cocoa liquor, which the FDA has determined must be present for an item to be labeled solely “choco-

late.” Rather, white chocolate is simply cocoa butter combined with milkderived ingredients and sweetener. Now, cocoa butter does come from the cacao bean — cocoa butter is created in the process that extracts and refines cocoa liquor. White chocolate’s FDA “identity” has been established since 2002, but didn’t come with a name change, despite the classification. Identity and names aside, now is as good a time as any to give white chocolate some love. The confection’s creamy sweet flavor is mild enough to be enjoyed in several combinations, but it pairs especially well with berries and, of course, its attention-loving cousins milk and dark. ONLINE: For more white chocolate recipes, find this story in the ‘Living’ section at tonganoxiemirror.com.

Makes 24 brownies. 1 cup butter or margarine (2 sticks) 2 cups sugar 4 large eggs, slightly beaten 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips 1 (12-ounce) bag white chocolate chips for melting Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9x13x2inch baking pan. Set aside. Place butter in a small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high for 30 seconds, or until melted but not hot. Pour melted butter into a large mixing bowl; blend in sugar, eggs and vanilla. Add remaining ingredients, except for white chocolate chips; stir until combined. Spread batter into prepared pan. Bake 30 to 35 minutes, or until brownies pull away from sides of pan. Remove from oven, and cool completely before cutting. Place cut brownies in freezer for a minimum of 30 minutes. Place white chocolate chips in microwave-safe bowl; microwave 25 to 30 seconds, stir. Microwave for an additional 15 seconds, stir again. Repeat this process until white chocolate is melted. Dip frozen brownie so it is completely covered in white chocolate. Set on parchment paper to dry. Store brownies in an airtight container for up to one week refrigerated, or in the freezer for one month. Tip: For best results, freeze brownies approximately 2 hours before dipping into white chocolate. This will help prevent crumbs from falling into the melted chocolate. (Recipe from chsugar.com)

MINI WHITE CHOCOLATE BLUEBERRY TARTLETS Makes 42 to 48 tartlets. 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 1/4 cup heavy cream, room temperature 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup white chocolate chips, melted 1 cup powdered sugar 1 recipe sweet tart pastry crust (below) Fresh blueberries Make one recipe of the sweet tart pastry crust. While tartlets are cooling, make filling. In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth. Slowly add in powdered sugar, heavy cream and vanilla. In a microwave-safe bowl, melt chocolate on high for 30 seconds, then 15 seconds at a time, stirring in between, until melted, for a total of approximately 90 seconds. Add melted white chocolate to cream cheese mixture, blending quickly to avoid clumps. Spoon a rounded teaspoon of filling into each tartlet and top with fresh blueberries. Keep filling and baked tartlet shells refrigerated in separate airtight containers for up to one week. Filled tartlets can be kept refrigerated for 2 to 3 days before serving. Sweet tart pastry: 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt

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WHITE CHOCOLATE-APRICOT BISCOTTI 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine 1-1/2 cups sugar 2 eggs 3 squares white chocolate, melted 1/4 cup orange juice 1 teaspoon almond extract 3 1/4 cups flour 2 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup coarsely chopped toasted almonds 3/4 cup coarsely chopped dried apricots Heat oven to 350 degrees. Beat butter and sugar in large bowl with mixer until light and fluffy. Blend in eggs, chocolate, juice and extract. Add flour, baking powder and salt; mix well. Stir in remaining ingredients. Shape 1/2 of dough into 15x2-inch log on center of each of two greased and lightly floured baking sheets. Bake 30 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven; cool 10 minutes on wire racks. Place on cutting board. Cut each log into 16 slices; place, cut-sides down, on baking sheets. Bake an additional 20 minutes, turning over after 15 minutes. Remove to wire racks; cool completely. (Recipe from kraftrecipes.com)

PINEAPPLE WHITE CHOCOLATE CHUNK MACAROONS 5 egg whites, at room temperature 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut 1 cup finely chopped sweetened dried pineapple 1 cup white chocolate chunks 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, beat egg whites and salt with an electric mixer on medium speed until stiff peaks form, about 2 minutes. Gently fold in coconut, pineapple, white chocolate and vanilla. Drop mixture in 2-tablespoon portions onto a large, parchment paper-lined baking sheet about 1 inch apart. Bake until set and golden brown on the bottom, about 15 minutes. Loosen by running a knife under each, and then serve warm or at room temperature. If you want to make ahead, cool and store in an airtight container for 3 to 5 days. (Recipe from wholefoodsmarket.com)

Call John Barnes 200 West Street Tonganoxie, KS

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1 cup cold, unsalted butter or margarine cut into small pieces (2 sticks) 2 eggs, large In a medium mixing bowl, stir together flour, sugar and salt. Using a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, a pastry blender or your hands, add in butter and combine; dough will appear very crumbly at this stage. Add eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition, until dough forms. Shape dough into a disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate 3 to 4 hours or overnight. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease tart pan with cooking spray or line the bottom with parchment paper. Roll dough out on lightly floured surface to 1/4 inch thickness. Fit into tart pan. Place in the center of your oven and bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until the crust is lightly golden brown and the center of the tart looks dry. Cool completely and fill with your favorite filling and fresh fruit. (Recipe from chsugar.com)

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10 ACRE RAISED RANCH ON ASPHALT ROAD IN TONGANOXIE! 3 Bdrm. 2 bath with Great Room, WBFP, 2 car att. garage. All steel constructed 30X60 detached garage/workshop (a mechanics dream) insulated, heated, A/C, bath, with 14’ tall doors for large machines, 12x14 storage shop with concrete floor and electric. Freshly painted interior throughout. MLS #1742074

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THIS IS OUR TOWN! TONGANOXIE UPDATED BUNGALOW HOME AT A VERY AFFORDABLE PRICE! Mid $90’s. 2 blocks from Grade School. Recent updates, wiring, sheetrock insulation, windows, high efficiency furnace and A/C, and siding. Special features 2 car detached garage/workshop, (26x31) with 220 electric and gas to the shop and plenty of parking area MLS #1743256

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(211th Donahoo St., Tonganoxie) Deer Ridge Ranch Subdivision. Bring your builder!!! Only 2 tracts left, approximately 5 acres each with water meter included. (Stillwell Rd., Linwood) $65,000 Huge Price Reduction!!! 6.47 acres. Excellent building tract close to new interchange on Cty. Rd. 1.

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$159,000 12361 Merion Dr.

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Tonganoxie Schools

$459,000

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223 S Delaware St.

$129,950 2929 N. 153rd Terr.

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25 Santa Fe St.

$82,900

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$119,000 %FIPò3E 

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9424 Goddard St.

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$172,500 20076 219th St.

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$179,000 25330 Conely Rd.

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$203,500 23501 152nd St.

$279,950 Lot 8 N. 159th Terr.

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201 E. Lucy St.

$83,500

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$156,800 27711 207th St.

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15015 Lake Side Dr.

-POHXPPE"WF  2719 E. Sycamore St.

x*UHDWEHGURRPUHPRGHOHGUDQFKKRPH x$OOQHZNLWFKHQZLWKFDELQHWV IORRULQJ x$OOQHZFDUSHWWKURXJKRXWKRPH x1HZWLOHLQEDWKURRPIRUPDOGLQLQJURRP x/DUJHIDPLO\URRP IRUPDOOLYLQJURRP ,$,4DIPPMT

Tonganoxie Schools

$159,950 7531 Anderson St.

$374,950 521 Birch St.

x5HYHUVHVWRU\RYHUORRNLQJSULYDWHODNH x*UHDWEHGURRPEDWKRSHQIORRUSODQ x*UDQLWHFRXQWHUVNLWFKHQLVODQG x+HDUWKURRPZLWKVHHWKURXJKILUH3O x/X[XULRXVPDVWHUVXLWHRQWKHPDLQOHYHO x )LQLVKHG EDVHPHQW LQFOXGHV JUHDW IDPLO\ URRPZILUH3O Basehor Schools

x6QD]]\EHGURRPEDWKUDQFKKRPH x2SHQNLWFKHQOLYLQJDQGGLQLQJURRP x*RUJHRXVKDUGZRRGVDQGJUHDWVSDFH x&XVWRPFDELQHWV WLOHIOULQ%DWK ODXQGU\ x)XOOEDVHPHQWEHJJLQJWREHILQLVKHG

Eudora Schools

$193,000

x$EVROXWHO\IDEXORXVFDUJDUDJHVSOLWHQWU\ x)DPLO\URRPDQGWKEHGURRPLQEDVHPHQW x0DLQIORRUODXQGU\ZLWKRSHQIORRUSODQ x/DUJHPDVWHUVXLWHZLWKZDONLQFORVHW 3LFWXUHLVZKDWKRPHZLOOORRNOLNHZKHQILQLVKHG

$155,000

x$IIRUGDEOHWRZQKRXVHZLWKRYHUVTIW x0DVWHUZODUJHZDONLQFORVHWDQGMHWWHGWXE x*UHDWRSHQIORRUSODQZYDXOWHGFHLOLQJV x-DFNQ-LOOEDWKZGRXEOHYDQLWLHVDQGQLFH VL]HEHGURRPVLQ),1,6+('EDVHPHQW Basehor Schools

20511 Golden Rd.

$299,950

19220 252nd St.

$209,000 "MCSJHIU%S 

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRPKRPHZWRQVRIH[WUDV x2YHUDFUHVZLWKDOOSDYHG5GV x+XJHNLWFKHQZSDQWU\DQGJUDQLWHFRXQWHUV x'RXEOHVLGHGVWDLUVOHDGLQJXSVWDLUV x)RUPDOGLQLQJURRP+8*(PDVWHUVXLWH x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQW Basehor Schools

x&RXQWU\KHDYHQRQEHDXWLIXOWUHHGUROOLQJDFUHV x$ZHVRPHIURQWSRUFK ODUJHGHFNRIIWKHNLWFKHQ x/DUJHEHGURRPVZLWKZDONLQFORVHWV x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQWZIXOOEDWK PXUSK\EHG xu[uVODELVUHDG\IRUWKHVKRSRI\RXUGUHDPV

18151 Donahoo Rd.

17400 174th St.

$319,950

x8QLTXHDQGPDJQLILFHQWEHGEDWKKRPH xDFUHVZVSHFWDFXODUKLOOWRSYLHZV x6HSDUDWHOLYLQJTXDUWHUVZSULYDWHHQWUDQFHV x0DLQWIUHHH[WHULRUZILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x3HUIHFWIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJODUJHVSDFLRXVURRPV Basehor Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

x%HDXWLIXOEUEDWK6WRU\ x2YHU64)WRIOLYLQJVSDFH x+XJHPDVWHUVXLWHZOX[XU\EDWK x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x3ULYDWHDQGVHFOXGHGDFUHV

McLouth Schools

$219,950 19750 Stranger Rd.

x6XSHUEHGURRPWUXHUDQFKZLWKIDQWDVWLFYLHZV x3URSHUW\IHQFHGZvKRUVHJXDUGwHOHFWULFIHQFH x[ORDILQJVKHGDQGDVWRFNHGSRQG x/DUJHOLYLQJURRPWRQVRIFDELQHWVLQWKHNLWFKHQ x3OHQW\RIURRPIRUWKHKRUVHVEDFNIURQWSDVWXUH

Tonganoxie Schools

$239,950

x*UHDWEHGURRPUDQFKRQDFUHV x1LFHIORRUSODQZYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP x/DUJHNLWFKHQZLWKWRQVRIFDELQHWVWRUDJH x3DUWLDOO\ILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW

Tonganoxie Schools

MUST SEE!!

3VCZ8BZ 

xEHGURRPUDQFKZIXOOILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW x:RQGHUIXOPDVWHUVXLWHZOX[XULRXVEDWK x&XVWRPNLWFKHQZKDUGZRRGIORRUV SDQWU\ x)RUPDOGLQLQJURRPFRYHUHGGHFN x%DVHPHQWILQLVKHGZKXJHZHWEDUSHUIHFWIRU HQWHUWDLQLQJ Basehor Schools

(SBOE"WF  502 E. Cynthia St.

x*UHDWQHZFRQVWUXFWLRQEHGURRPUDQFK x:RQGHUIXODUHDZHDV\DFFHVVWRHYHU\WKLQJ x2SHQIORRUSODQZYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJUP x)LUH3OODUJHNLWFKHQ JUHDWPDVWHUVXLWH x1RZLVWKHWLPHWREHDEOHWRSLFNDOO\RXUFRORUV DQGIORRULQJ -FBWFOXPSUI4DIPPMT

$139,950

x*UHDWEHGURRPUDQFKRQKXJHORW x*X\VZLOOORYHWKHu[uVKRS x6KRSIHDWXUHVFRQFUHWHIORRUVZRRGVWRYH  EDWKURRP x/DUJHNLWFKHQZSDQWU\IRUPDOGLQLQJDQGKXJH OLYLQJURRP McLouth Schools

18336 Butternut St.

$189,950

xEUEDVSOLWHQWU\ZVSDFLRXVEDFN\DUG x+DUGZRRGIORRUV SDQWU\LQNLWFKHQ x0DLQOHYHOODXQGU\ILQLVKHGORZHUOHYHO x0DVWHUVXLWHZMHWWHGWXEVHSDUDWHVKRZHU x+XJHFDUJDUDJHZLWKWDOOGRRU

Gardner Schools

14300 W. 55th St.

$199,950

3ULFH5HGXFHG0DNHRIIHU x5DUHROGZRUOGFKDUPLQWKHKHDUWRI6KDZQHH x$OOVWRQHKRPHRQEHDXWLIXOWUHHGDFUHV x/DUJHXSGDWHGNLWFKHQZLWKSDQWU\ xEHGURRPV VWRQHEDUUHOFHLOLQJLQWKHFHOODUy SHUIHFWIRUDZLQHFHOODU Shawnee Schools

20476 147th St.

$299,000

x  *UHDW  EHGURRP UDQFK ZLWK  DFUHV DQG ODUJHSRQG x[EDUQZLWK[OHDQWR x/DUJHXQILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW x%($87,)8/VWRQHILUHSODFHLQOLYLQJURRP

Basehor Schools

16701 Parallel Rd.

$139,500

/RWVRISRWHQWLDO x7UXHUDQFKMXVWRYHUDQDFUHRIFRXQWU\YLHZV x/DUJHHDWLQNLWFKHQZLWKGHFN x+XJHOLYLQJURRPZLWKEHDXWLIXOVWRQHILUHSODFH x'HWDFKHGJDUDJHZLWKZRUNEHQFK

Basehor Schools

LOTS and LAND RESIDENTIAL

UIFMPUTBSF[POFEBTEVQMFYFT 

Piper Landing. – Lots starting at $50,950. SE4Uo1SJTUJOFWJFXT HPSHFPVTWBMMFZ  Perfect location in Piper’s newest community! BCVOEBOUXJMEMJGF  "VCVSO)JMMTo#FBVUJGVMXBMLPVUMPUTPOQBWF- -PU OE4Uo-BSHFCVJMEJOHMPUJO ment! Lots starting at $49,950. 8BMOVU3JEHFTVCEJWJTJPO  Prairie Gardens. – 2 cul-de-sac lots to choose from each just $36,500. Stone Creek. – Come and see what Stone $SFFLIBTUPPòFS"òPSEBCMFMPUTTUBSUJOH at $33,000. 5IF&TUBUFTPG$FEBS-BLFo(SFBUMPUTBWBJMBCMFXJUIQSJNFMBLFGSPOUBOEMBLFWJFXT starting at $49,950. 8PPETPO.VODJFo4VQFS-PDBUJPO"òPSEBCMFMPUTTUBSUJOHBUKVTU  Woods of Wellington oGBOUBTUJD-FBWFOXPSUICVJMEJOHMPUTGSPN  McGee Meadows – 37 multi-family lots. First DPVMECF[POFEBTGPVSQMFYFT5IFSFTUPG

Lot 1 or 3 George Rd. – Great 3 acre m/l lots! (SFBUMPDBUJPOKVTUPòQBWFNFOU  each. PRICE REDUCTION!! 5SBDUPS&WBOT3EoBDSFUSBDUTPG perfect ground. $240,000 each. Chieftain Rd. – Wonderful 20 acres m/l with MFWFMPQFOTQBDF  -PU4UBUF"WFo(SFBUQSJDFPOUIJTBDSF CVJMEJOHMPU  Lot 3 Tonganoxie Dr. - AFFORDABLE LOT IN A GREAT LOCATION! $49,950.

Lot 11, 160th St. – Wonderful 2.57 acre m/l estate lot in Saddle Creek Estates $79,950. Lot 1 Parallel Rd. – Building site on hard surface Rds. $59,950. Lot 5, 169th St. – Great corner lot location! -PUJT[POFEGPSEVQMFYMPU  /,)XZo"DSFTPGCFBVUJGVMHSPVOE  including a pond! $189,950. (PMEFO3Eo1SPQFSUZIBTCFFOQMBUUFEPVU into 15 residential lots w/city water & sewer. $199,950. Lot 2 or 3 5th St. - Great walkout lot at a fantastic price! $19,950 Lot 3 187th St. - Beautiful .5 acre m/l tract of MBOE-PDBUFEKVTUPòQBWFE3ET 

Lot 5 or 6 147th St. - Great access to all major Lot 1 Tonganoxie Dr. - 13.6 acres just North of highways! 2 and 2.3 acres $79,500 5POHBOPYJFPOQBWFE3ET1SPQFSUZJODMVEFT UI4U 0TLBMPPTB'BCVMPVTBDSFTNM  2 tracts. $139,950. MPDBUFEKVTUPòQBWFE3ET 

COMMERCIAL 153rd St . – Great commercial corner location in the city of Basehor! $49,950. /8FTU4Uo"DSFTNMWBDBOUMBOESJHIUPò)XZ $449,000. 4UBUF"WFo#FTUMPDBUJPOJO5POHBOPYJF"DSFTNM  HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!! Honey Creek Farms. – Fantastic commercial lots ranging from $86,650 to $969,350. #BZTJEF%S(SFBUBDSFQJFDFPGMBOE[POFEGPSDPNNFSDJBMVTF UIBUGSPOUTPO4UBUF"WF   .D(FF.FBEPXTNVMUJGBNJMZMPUT'JSTUDPVMECF[POFEBT GPVSQMFYFT5IFSFTUPGUIFMPUTBSF[POFEBTEVQMFYFT 4UPOF$SFFLQSJNFEFWFMPQNFOUMPDBUJPOTQFSGFDUGPSIJHI USBóDCVTJOFTTTUBSUJOHBU  -PU UI4U0OFPGUIFCFTUMPDBUJPOTMFGUJO#BTFIPSBDSFT m/l $189,950. .PSFUPTFFPOPVSXFCTJUFXXXMZODISFTJEFOUJBMDPN

19750 Stranger Rd.

$239,950

x*UHDWEHGURRPUDQFKRQDFUHV x%HDXWLIXOVHFOXGHGZRRGHGORW x1LFHIORRUSODQZLWKODUJHNLWFKHQ x9DXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP x3DUWLDOO\ILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW

Tonganoxie Schools

-FBWFOXPSUI3E  x/RRNLQJIRUWKDWKLGGHQMHP"7KLVLVIRU\RX xEHGURRPEDWKUDQFKKRPHRQDFUHV x$ORWRISRWHQWLDOZLWKDOLWWOHHOERZJUHDVH x3URSHUW\LVMXVWRXWVLGH%DVHKRURQSDYHG5GV x,QFOXGHVDQLFH[PHWDOEDUQ Basehor Schools


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

WWW.LYNCHRESIDENTIAL.COM OPEN HOUSES OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00 18336 Butternut Street (BSEOFS ,4 $189,950 OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00 5BNBSJTL%SJWF -FBWFOXPSUI ,4 $179,500 OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00 (SBOE"WFOVF -FBWFOXPSUI ,4 $198,500

NEW HOME SUBDIVISIONS t)*%%&/3*%(& JUST NORTH OF 24-40 ON 166TH, BASEHOR www.hiddenridgelifestyle.com t450/&$3&&, JUST NORTH OF 24-40 IN TONGANOXIE www.stonecreektonganoxie.com t"VCVSO)JMMT,UI4U#BTFIPS t.FU[HFS.FBEPXT-FBWFOXPSUI3EUI Basehor — Great starter community. t8JMMPX1PJOUF0ò5POHBOPYJF $UZ3E PO4ZDBmore - Tonganoxie. — Great starter homes.

t+"$,40/)&*()54 OFF PARALLEL & TONGANOXIE RD., IN TONGANOXIE. GREAT STARTER COMMUNITY. www.jacksonheightstonganoxie.com t1*1&3-"/%*/( LOCATED JUST NORTH OF PARALLEL OFF OF 115TH ST. www.piperlandingkck.com t8JMMJT1BSL%FMBXBSF4UJO5POHBOPYJF Great starter community. t'BMM$SFFL7JMMBT4PVUIPG4UBUF"WFPO4PVUI1BSL Tonganoxie. — Retirement community 55 and older. t$SPXO&TUBUFT4PVUIPG4QSVDF4UPOUI -FBWFOXPSUI

1518 S 15th St. ..........................................................................4

Beds/

1 ..........Baths.....................................$9,900

213 S Bluegrass Dr.................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$169,950

2906 S 24th St. ..........................................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$49,950

211 E Riley St...............................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$169,950

-POHXPPE"WF........................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$69,950

2210 Rock Creek Dr..............................................................3

,JOESFE"WF......................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$69,950

236 S Melrose Ln.....................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$169,950

309W Lake St ...........................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$69,950

623 Green St...............................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$174,950

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$169,950

4IFJEMFZ"WF...................................................................2

Beds/ 1.1 ..........Baths..................................$74,500

0SJFOU"WF.......................................................................3

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$178,500

412 Main St .................................................................................4

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..................................$75,000

23501 152nd St........................................................................4

Beds/

1207 Atchison St. ...................................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$79,950

613 High Prairie Pl .................................................................3

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$179,000

741 Chestnut St.......................................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$82,000

16907 Juniper Dr ...................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$189,950

2925 N 74th St .........................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..................................$84,000

839 E Chestnut Dr .................................................................4

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$191,950

2055 Brook Ridge Ct ...........................................................2

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..................................$87,500

Lot 23 Sycamore St ..............................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$193,500

2524 N 54th St..........................................................................3

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..................................$89,950

24967 Dehoff Rd ....................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$199,950

119 Gould St ..............................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..................................$89,950

15907 Cedar St.........................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$199,950

2080 Joles Dr .............................................................................2

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..................................$99,950

19220 252nd St........................................................................3

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$209,000

24130 Golden Rd ..................................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..............................$110,000

20021 Douglas Rd ................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$214,500

13421W 102nd St.................................................................4

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$114,900

18730 207th St ........................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$214,950

521 Pleasant St.........................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..............................$114,950

2829 N 114th St ......................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$219,950

1601 Fall Creek Dri ................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..............................$119,950

17400 174th St ........................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$219,950

7601 E 132ndTerr ..................................................................3

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$124,000

27711 207th St ........................................................................3

1621 Fall Creek Dr...................................................................2

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$125,000

237 S Melrose Ln.....................................................................4

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$222,500

19162 Cantrell Rd ..................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$129,000

2434 Sycamore St. ................................................................4

Beds/

502 E 5th Str................................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$129,950

19750 Stranger Rd. ..............................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$239,950

1003West St ..............................................................................3

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$129,950

15810 Christie Dr. ...................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$249,000

2015 Brookridge Ct .............................................................3

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$129,950

-FBWFOXPSUI3E..................................................4

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$254,950

223 S Delaware St..................................................................4

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$129,950

18151 Hollingsworth Rd. ................................................5

Beds/

8FTUWJFX%S....................................................................4

Beds/ 1.1 ..........Baths..............................$134,500

6640 Lind Rd. ............................................................................4

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$263,500

1920 Jackson Dr .....................................................................3

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$134,500

25025 Stillwell Rd. .................................................................5

Beds/

501 S 17th Str.............................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$134,950

17218 Feather Ln. .................................................................3

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$279,950

8BSOFS"WF.......................................................................3

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$134,950

20476 147th St. .......................................................................3

,BSFO-O.............................................................................3

Beds/ 1.2 ..........Baths..............................$139,950

20511 Golden Rd. .................................................................4

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$299,950

191Willis Dr ................................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$144,950

17851 Hollingsworth Rd. ................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$299,950

207W 2nd St..............................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$144,950

22934 George Rd. .................................................................5

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$299,950

3121 S 65th Str..........................................................................3

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..............................$149,950

16834 258th St. .......................................................................3

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$305,000

22010 219th St.........................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$149,950

18151 Donahoo Rd. ...........................................................5

Beds/

22922 148th St.........................................................................3

Beds/ 1.1 ..........Baths..............................$152,500

4MPBO"WFOVF..........................................................5

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$334,500

1030 Bury St ...............................................................................4

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$154,900

"MCSJHIU%S.................................................................4

19261 254th St.........................................................................3

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$156,800

20703 Brandt Rd. ...................................................................5

Beds/ 4.1 ..........Baths..............................$529,950

13505 184 St...............................................................................5

Beds/ 2.1 ..........Baths..............................$159,950

#FMSJWF$JSDMF..............................................................4

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$599,500

1212 Delaware Dr .................................................................4

Beds/

2 ..........Baths..............................$159,950

20618 Mitchell Rd. ................................................................2

Beds/

17651 190th St.........................................................................2

Beds/

1 ..........Baths..............................$164,950

Beds/

Beds/

3 ..........Baths..............................$178,950

2 ..........Baths..............................$219,950 3 ..........Baths..............................$229,950

3 ..........Baths..............................$259,950 3 ..........Baths..............................$274,950 2 ..........Baths..............................$299,000

4 ..........Baths..............................$319,950

Beds/ 3.1 ..........Baths..............................$399,950

2 ..........Baths..............................$599,950

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

1601 Commerce Dr. 5POHBOPYJF ,4 $200,000

0MJWF4U .D-PVUI ,4 $105,500

| REMEMBER WHEN | BY BILLIE AYE

10 YEARS AGO: FEB. 6, 2002 Deaths: Rodney Allen "Hot Rod" Boettcher, 35, Edwardsville, died Jan. 31, 2002, from injuries received on his job; Garrett Thomas Daily, eight months and 21 days old, Tonganoxie, died from complications of leukemia on Jan. 30, 2002; Nellie K. Fischer, Lawrence, age 90, died Feb. 3, 2002; Retired USN John H. Snowden, Tonganoxie, age 76, died Feb. 1, 2002; Clarence F. Zacharias, 86, Tonganoxie, died Jan. 28, 2002. Annette Evans, Tonganoxie, has been named to the Dean's list for outstanding academic work during the fall 2001 semester at the University of Evansville, Evansville, Ind. Katrina Korb has been named to the dean's list at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, for outstanding work during the 2001 fall semester. County digs out from icy storm: (Caption under picture.) Downtown strollers walked carefully last Wednesday on icecoated sidewalks. Pictured were Michelle Conroy, followed by her mother, Pat Conroy. To the left is P. J. Conroy, 7. Army 2nd Lt. Aaron M. Cornett has graduated from the transportation officer basic course at Fort Eustis, Newport News, Va. Cornett is the son of Terry L. and Rebecca J. Cornett, Lansing.

25 YEARS AGO: FEB. 4, 1987

HOMES NOT PICTURED

1701 Commerce Dr. 5POHBOPYJF ,4 $629,000

14612 Parallel Ln. #BTFIPS ,4 $204,900

COMMUNITY | 13

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Caenen will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Feb. 9, 1987. Jarbalo Jottings: George and Margaret Stiglmire attended the open house for Walter Knapp's 94th birthday Saturday afternoon in Leavenworth. Death: George Portwood, 81, Linwood, died Jan. 30, 1987. Birth: Madison Christine Weller was welcomed home Jan. 25, 1987, by her parents Chris and Marilyn Weller of Tonganoxie and her 3-year-old sister, Ashley. Madison was born Dec. 3, 1986. She weighed 3 lbs., 5 oz. Springdale News: Funeral services were held for Elizabeth Murr at the Tonganoxie Friends Church Jan. 27 at 2 p.m. On Feb. 8 Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Rawlings will be observing their 65th wedding anniversary. Several individuals have inquired what was on the plaque received by us (Helen Schilling) at the Chamber of Commerce banquet. So here is the wording: Chamber of Commerce, Tonganoxie, Kansas, Historical Mural. In recognition of their devotion to Tonganoxie and the pride they have helped create in this community, an anonymous donor has commissioned the first mural in honor of Grace and Helen Schilling. (This mural hangs in the Tonganoxie Library.)

50 YEARS AGO: FEB. 22, 1962 Mrs. Lillian Clark, McLouth, who was 86 years old Feb. 14th, was honor guest at a birthday dinner Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Howard in Lawrence. Births: Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kramer Jr., Rt. 1, announce the birth of a son, Frank Edward, on Feb. 15, 1962; Mr. and Mrs. Trent Flory, Kansas City, Kan., announce the birth of their daughter, Diana Lynn, Jan. 6, 1962; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Siegrist of Towanda, N.Y., announce the birth of a daughter, Kelly Ann, Nov. 19, 1961. Basehor Weekly Notes: Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Hoch celebrated their twentyfifth wedding anniversary Sunday with an open house to their relatives and friends. Linwood News: Mr. and Mrs. Gary Holmes announce the birth of a son Feb. 14, 1962. Up Fairmount Way: Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Farquhar, RR 1, Basehor,

announce the birth of their daughter, Natalie Janet, Feb. 14, 1962.

75 YEARS AGO: JAN. 28, 1937 The Weekly News Reel: M. J. Bigham, a dairyman near White Church, calls his cows by radio — and finds it works like a top. When milking time arrives, he lures the cows in with seductive music, and Bowser, the family dog, who claimed that chore, is now on the unemployed list. Science is even taking jobs away from dogs. Mrs. Nellie Wright of Linwood has been appointed the new Postmistress in Linwood and began her duties in the office Monday morning. Deaths: Linwood: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Harris received word Saturday of the death of Mr. Harris' sister, Mrs. Mary Alice Scoville, age 73 years, in Pittsburgh, Pa.; Funeral services for Milton M. Lafferty, age 78, who died in Topeka Wednesday, will be held Friday at 2:00; Mrs. L. W. McGinnis, 68, died this morning. From "It Happened in Kansas" by F. A. Cooper: A miraculous pool on the top of a hill ‌ Waconda Springs in Mitchell Co. A bottomless pool on the top of a hill, unaffected by drought. The Indians could not understand this so they offered gifts before bathing in the health-giving waters. The white men thought it was connected with the ocean because its salty waters rose and fell with the ocean tides. BUT, it is not a spring and it not connected with the ocean. It is a geyser, the only one in the central prairie states ‌ And this fact: A black horse belonging to Melfred Kesinger of Leavenworth County has a perfect "S" on its forehead. "Grandma" Barber, Mrs. Etta L. Barber, celebrated her 90th birthday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Angell. Despite her years, Grandma is still quite active.

100 YEARS AGO: FEB. 8, 1912 Mrs. Ladora Shrimplin, a resident of this township for 32 years, died at the home of her youngest son, John Shrimplin, near Lebo, Osage County, last Sunday in the 76th year of her life. Grandma Burkle passed away from old age and acute bronchitis at her home near Hoge, at the age of 81 years, 9 months and 17 days. Josephine Siedle was born in Baden, Germany April 9, 1831, and in 1847 came to America with five sisters and three brothers. She married Gerson Burkle in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, and they came to Kansas in 1873. A shadow box social will be given in Stanwood school house a week from tomorrow evening. The school will present "A Perplexing Situation." The admission will be free. Wright Brown, the old soldier who lived here some years until he went to the Dodge City soldiers home, died at that home Jan. 6. The deceased was a member of Company K, 14th Vermont Volunteer Infantry, during the war of the rebellion. After a long struggle to regain his health, Firman Sechrest died at Santa Fe, New Mexico, of tuberculosis, last Sunday. His wife and children were with him when he died, and the family had lived there quite a while in the hope that the father would get better. Linwood: Mrs. Lenora Miles, daughter of Enos Thompson, died at her home in Lawrence Monday at the age of 24 years. She had been married to Oscar Miles but a few months. Work on rebuilding the court house at Leavenworth will begin soon. The occasional rumor that the Faultless plant has been sold and is about to start up is again in circulation. This story gets started every few months. Perhaps some day the story will be true. Basehor organized a brass band several months ago and it has 21 pieces. They will give a concert in their home town Monday evening, Feb. 19.


Making Medicare Make Sense

Answers To Some of The Most Commonly Asked Medicare Questions

Q A

How Can I Cut the Cost of the Prescription Drugs that I Need to Stay Healthy?

There are several ways to cut the cost of your medicines, without compromising your health. For starters, talk to your doctor, and see if there are other, less-expensive medicines available. These can be generic formulations, lower-priced brand name medications, or even over-the-counter drugs. Switching can save you a lot of money. If you can’t switch, consider using a mail-order pharmacy, particularly for medicines you will be taking for a long time. Most of the time, you will pay less by ordering this way, and renewing your order is as simple as a phone call. Be sure to check with your doctor about getting a prescription that can be renewed. If you’re not already part of a Medicare prescription drug plan, which is Medicare Part D, joining one can help, too, especially if you have multiple prescriptions, or must take expensive brand-name drugs. In most cases, you can only join a plan during the open enrollment period in the fall, but there are some exceptions. One exception is for people who qualify for Medicare’s Extra Help in paying for prescriptions. If you meet the limited income and resource qualifications for this program, the cost you pay for your prescriptions drops sharply, and in many

cases, you won’t have to pay a monthly premium for the plan at all. And, if you qualify, you can enroll in a prescription drug plan immediately, without waiting for the open enrollment period, to start cutting costs as quickly as possible. To apply for Extra Help, contact Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800325-0778), or you can apply online at www.socialsecurity.gov.

Q A

Are There Other Prescription Drug Savings Options if I Don’t Qualify for Medicare’s Extra Help Program?

based programs that may offer assistance, such as the National Patient Advocate Foundation, or the National Organization for Rare Disorders. Information on these assistance programs can be found on the BenefitsCheckUp website, www. benefitscheckup.org. Finally, to get help finding these resources, you can call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). You can get free, knowledgeable, unbiased, and personalized counseling. The SHIP phone number for your state is on the back page

of your Medicare & You handbook, or you can get their number by calling Medicare’s toll-free helpline, below. If you have a question about Medicare, call 1-800-MEDICARE, which is, 1-800633-4227. Medicare’s national toll-free helpline is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, or visit www.medicare.gov or log onto www.healthcare.gov to read more about the Affordable Care Act. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Yes, there are. In some locations, a State Pharmaceutical Assistance Program (SPAP) can help. These programs are available in 23 states, and help people with Medicare pay for the premiums of their Medicare Part D drug plans, and/or help cover the out-ofpocket costs for medicine you have to pay at the pharmacy. To find out if your state has such a program, visit www.medicare. gov/spap.asp. There are also programs run by drug manufacturers that can reduce the cost of medications they manufacture. Many, but not all, manufacturer programs can be used by Medicare beneficiaries. To find out if there is a program offered by the manufacturers of the drugs you take, and whether you qualify, visit www.medicare. gov/pap/index.asp. There are also national and community-

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14 | THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Mature Living


| 15

Mature Living

FEBRUARY 22, 2012 | THE MIRROR

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ighting can be your eyes‘ best friend as you age. All of us experience changes in our eyesight as we age. For many, the eye changes mean buying glasses to read a menu, newspaper, or other small print. Changing the lighting in your surroundings can also go a long way to enhance reading ability and increase comfort. Often, the first thing people notice as they get older is their loss of ability to see distance, notes Terry McGowan, director of engineering and technology for the American Lighting Association. That happens around age 45, and is called presbyopia. By 60, most people have a fixed focus‘ optical system and need glasses. After age 60, eye and visual system changes accelerate, so less light reaches the eye. Therefore, people need more light to see details as they age. Basically, the following changes are occurring: • Reduced visual acuity (inability to see small details); • Reduced contrast sensitivity (harder to see differences between light and dark objects and surfaces); • Reduced color discrimination; • A longer time required to adapt to large and sudden differences in brightness; and • Increased sensitivity to glare.

Paul Eusterbrock, a lighting manufacturer who has championed lighting developments and products to help aging eyes, agrees. The main issue is the quality of light, he says. Research shows that a 60-year-old needs twice as much light as a 30-year-old. Most of the commonly found lighting guidelines are written with the 30-year-old user in mind. Eye fatigue during the day is another side effect. Because the eye loses the ability to accommodate, the muscles of the eye have to work harder, McGowan says. Eyes get tired faster, especially when performing difficult visual tasks such as driving at night or reading fine print. The solution is to make seeing easier. That means large-print books, reducing glare, setting up special lighting for task areas, and having regular eye exams to catch problems promptly. According to McGowan, having a few table lamps turned on while watching TV can help reduce the contrast that occurs between the bright screen and the surrounding darkness of the room. He recommends a torchiere that provides an upward-directed light as well downward illumination for versatility. This could be accomplished with a style that has a separate task light attached or by a torchiere with a glass bowl at the top that will bring some light downward. Continued on page 16.


Funding Solutions for Senior Living

Individual vision varies Continued from page 15.

It is one of the cheapest and best ways to light a room for someone with aging eyes, McGowan adds. Is there a magic lightbulb that will work for everyone? McGowan and Eusterbrock say no. Individual vision varies so much— especially as people age—that it‘s difficult to develop lighting recipes that are one-size-fits-all, McGowan says. It is indeed a matter of preference, agrees Eusterbrock. There are fluorescents, halogens, and even LED bulbs bright enough for reading tasks, he says. What‘s most important is to have light that you can direct, such as a pivoting or adjustable head on a task lamp. Designs with a reflector inside the head are even more effective for focusing the light where you need it. McGowan recommends that older homeowners provide for light-level adjustments through use of dimmers, so they can match the lighting levels to the tasks at hand. Dimmers are ideal in the bathroom to add a bit of illumination to navigate during the night, and to make it easier to get up on dark mornings without blinding glare. A dimmed incandescent bulb does not emit blue wavelengths of light that can upset circadian rhythms, which is another healthy lighting‘ consideration,

If you have some questions on where the money will come from in your later years … we might be able to provide you a couple answers. McGowan says. The basic rules of good lighting: Have sufficient illumination, with little or no glare, and use diffused lighting to minimize shadows. If energy savings is a concern, select compact fluorescent lights and LED bulbs with warm tones (look for 2,700–3,000K on the box) and a color-rendering index of 90 or more. McGowan and Eusterbrock advise consulting with a professional who can tailor a lighting selection to meet your specific needs. That‘s most easily done in a lighting showroom run by an American Lighting Association member. To find a store near you, visit www. americanlightingassoc.com.

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16 | THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Mature Living


SPORTS

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

| 17

SENIOR SENDOFFS This week marks the regular season finales for the Chieftain basketball and powerlifting teams. Check next week’s edition for feature stories on the seniors involved with both sports.

G O T O T O N G A N O X I E M I R R O R . C O M F O R S P O R T S U P D AT E S

THS wrestlers finish third at regional meet

Pair of Chieftain head coach spots opened to public BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

SPRING HILL — From a team standpoint, the 2011-12 wrestling season came to an end last Saturday. However, a select group of THS grapplers aren’t quite finished on the mat this year. Eight Chieftains guaranteed their season will last another week, as they finished in the top four of their respective weight classes Saturday at the Class 4A regional meet in Spring Hill. “There’s always a time where it’s going to end,” coach Jeremy Goebel said. “That’s one of the hardest parts about this weekend, but we’re sending eight kids to the state tournament.” Sophomore Clayton Himpel (120), senior Caleb Himpel (126), sophomore Joe Wolf (132), freshman Asher Huseman (138) and senior Matt Soetaert (152) guaranteed themselves a spot at the Class 4A state meet when they wres-

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

Freshman Asher Huseman was Tonganoxie’s only individual champion, but eight Chieftains qualified for state at last week’s regional in Spring Hill.

tled their way to the regional finals on Friday. Other THS state qualifiers include freshman Dalton Tavis (113), junior Julius Coats (182) and junior Thomas Miller (195), who each advanced to their respective third-place matches Saturday.

Tavis and Miller each won one more time and took home bronze medals. “We had a great round (Friday),” Goebel said. “Overall, we ended the day 20-7, which is pretty darn good. (Saturday), we had five kids in what you call SEE STATE, PAGE 20

A pair of Tonganoxie High coaches won’t be on the sideline again next fall, but it’s currently unclear who will fill their spots. Head volleyball coach Brandon Parker and interim head football coach Matt Bond have resigned from their respective positions. Both resignations were accepted at the Feb. 13 board meeting. Parker, who co-coached the Chieftain volleyball with his wife, Tiffany Parker, for 11 years, said it’s yet to be determined who will take the reins of the program. THS went 30-11 last season, advancing to the sub-state semifinals. Bond, who stepped in following the resignation of former head coach Mark Elston before the 2011 season, said he won’t return as head coach. The Chieftains went 1-8 last season. Brandon Parker said Tuesday that both coaching jobs have been opened to the public.

Bulldogs win OT thriller at IHS BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

Senior Gavin Swearngin scored 12 points, including a pair of go-ahead free throws in McLouth’s overtime win at Immaculata.

LEAVENWORTH — All but two of Gavin Swearngin’s points came after halftime, but arguably none were bigger than the two he scored after regulation. Swearngin scored 12 points, including a pair of go-ahead free throws with 2:54 remaining, and the McLouth boys snapped a four-game losing streak with a 53-51 overtime victory Friday at Immaculata. “It’s nice. Three of the four (losses) were on the road, but that’s no excuse,” coach Jason Schroeder said. “We knew we should have gotten some of those wins, but we came (Friday) and finally put it back together.” The Bulldogs (10-8) battled the Raiders to a 49-49 stalemate in regulation, setting the stage

for a high-octane extra period. The teams traded punches in overtime and remained deadlocked until Swearngin drew a foul with 2:54 remaining He sunk both shots from the free throw line, ultimately putting MHS in front for good. Junior Carter Gish, who scored a team-high 13 points, gave the Bulldogs a two-possession lead when he drained a layup with 1:28 left. IHS got back within two on the next possession and had a chance to win on the final shot, but Corey Leintz’s desperation 3-point attempt clanked off the rim as the final buzzer sounded. Leintz led all scorers with 18 points, while Adam Sewell added 17. Sewell, who scored six points in the fourth quarter alone, fouled out with 3:28 left in overtime. “That hurt them big time,”

Schroeder said. “They were running plays for him almost every single possession.” MHS led, 22-20, at halftime and seemingly took control when it opened the third quarter on a 7-2 run. But that prompted an IHS timeout, which the Raiders followed with an 8-0 scoring burst to briefly take the lead. However, the Bulldogs regained their composure and didn’t allow IHS to extend its advantage any further. “Our team has mental toughness,” Swearngin said. “It could have gotten really bad really quick, but we kept it together.” Swearngin and company battled back and took a 38-37 lead into the fourth quarter. Neither team led by more than two points in the period. SEE SENIOR NIGHT, PAGE 20

Tonganoxie lifters near end of season BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

For those not interested in basketball or wrestling, winter can be a dull time when it comes to sports. However, in the halls of Tonganoxie High, the options don’t stop at the mat or the hardwood. A select group of Chieftain athletes have been hard at work in 2012, but rather than the gym or the wrestling room, they’ve been in the weight room. The THS powerlifters opened their season Jan. 7 at the Basehor-Linwood Bobcat Invitational, and they’ve never looked back. Now, as the winter sports season draws to a close, the Chieftains have their sights set on a strong showing at the Horton Invitational on Saturday. “We’ve got a motto we always talk

about, and that’s ‘go beat somebody,’” coach Matt Bond said. “They’ve been to a couple meets now and they know the kids they’re going to be competing against for the most part. I want to make it a goal for them to move up the list. “The meets themselves are a great platform to show off all the time and energy they put in in the weight room.” Though not sanctioned by the Kansas State High School Activities Association, powerlifting has found its way into several Kansas high schools in recent years. THS didn’t host a meet this season, but travelled to Basehor-Linwood, Royal Valley, Wamego and Horton this season for competitions. The team wrapped up its regular season last Saturday at the Horton Invitational. SEE ABILENE, PAGE 19

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

Senior Tyler Stockman and the THS powerlifting team will wrap up their 2012 regular season Saturday at the Horton Invitational.


18 | SPORTS

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Chieftain rally comes up short at Bonner Springs BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

For three quarters, the Tonganoxie High girls played toe-to-toe with one of the top teams in the state. But when the final buzzer sounded, those extra eight minutes made all the difference. Three players reached double figures and the Chieftains gave No. 4 Bonner Springs a scare, but dropped a 60-55 decision last Friday. Neither team could establish control in the early going, as the Braves clung to an 18-16 lead after the opening period. But THS (12-6) allowed its opponent to gain some momentum in the second. The Chieftains scored just five points in the period, and BSHS gradually pulled away. The scoring put coach Randy Kraft’s group on the wrong side of a 33-21 halftime score.

“For the most part, we were either even or beat them in every other quarter,” Kraft said. “That second quarter, we didn’t play very well defensively. I think they got a little bit up on us and we got rattled. “It took a little bit of a talking-to to get their heads right, then we played real well in the second half.” The Chieftains weren’t able to cut into the deficit right away, as the teams each scored 11 in the third quarter, but Emma Stilgenbauer provided a spark that made things interesting in the final period. Stilgenbauer, who scored a game-high 18 points, racked up nine in the final eight minutes to help THS slowly chip away at the lead. The Chieftains got within five and had two chances to make it a one-possession game, but missed the mark on a pair of 3-point attempts in the final minutes. “Emma was huge for us in the second half,” Kraft said of the sophomore for-

ward. “In the first half, our post men weren’t mixing it up down low. We really started emphasizing getting the ball in to her, and that was a huge difference.” Stilgenbauer just missed a double-double, as she pulled down a team-high nine rebounds. She was joined in double digit scoring by senior Amanda Holroyd and junior Jenny Whitledge, who had 13 and 12 points, respectively. The Bonner Springs duo of Yessinia Hernandez and Anna Deegan gave the THS defense problems all night. They combined for 39 points. THS was back in action Tuesday when it hosted Piper on senior night. The Chieftains will travel Friday to Turner for the final game of the regular season. Substate competition will begin next week. Before Tuesday’s game, the standings indicated the Chieftains would see Jeff West in the quarterfinals.

FILE PHOTO

Sophomore Emma Stilgenbauer scored 18 points and pulled down nine rebounds last Friday at No. 4 Bonner Springs.

Erickson drops 33, but THS boys fall to Braves on road BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

As he’s done so many times this season, Tonganoxie High senior Dane Erickson put on a show in the paint. The Chieftain senior gave Bonner Springs fits last Friday, racking up a seasonhigh 33 points. However, when it was all said and done, the Braves were in front on the scoreboard. THS couldn’t overcome a 24-point night by Stevie Williams and

dropped a 76-53 decision on the road. “We struggled defensively with keeping them out of the paint early,” coach Shawn Phillips said. “When you can’t keep them out of the paint and you give them second or third chances, that leads to some easy scores.” Despite his big night, Erickson saw limited time early on. He picked up two fouls in the first quarter and spent the remainder of the period on the

bench. BSHS took advantage and jumped out to a 19-8 lead. The Chieftains (8-10) got their top scorer back in the second, and it showed on the stat sheet. They outscored the Braves by a 21-19 margin to cut the lead to single digits at halftime. Erickson stayed hot after the break, including a nine-point effort in the fourth quarter alone. “That’s one of many great nights he’s had throughout his career,” Phillips said of Erickson.

“It’s not like he did it against a slouch team. To put up 33 on a quality team like that, it’s a testament to how good of a player Dane really is.” THS continued to score points down the stretch, but did nothing to slow down the BSHS offense. Erickson was the only Chieftain to reach double figures. Senior Brady Waldeier each added six points. B.J. Watson and J.J. Jackson each added 10 for the Braves.

The loss was the second straight for Phillips’ squad, which suffered a 61-43 setback Feb. 14 at Lansing. THS returned to its own gym Tuesday for senior night action against Piper. It will wrap up the regular season Friday at Turner. Following the regular season finale, the Chieftains will begin sub-state competition. Before Tuesday’s game, they were tentatively schedule to face Jeff West in the quarterfinals.

TONGANOXIE AREA

The following businesses busi nesses encourage you to attend the church of your choice.

CHURCH DIRECTORY Basehor Baptist Church First Baptist Church Pastor Joe Martin of McLouth Worship Services 11:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Basehor Church of Christ

Worship Services 11:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Basehor United Methodist Church

First Congregational Church of Tonganoxie

Pastors Craig and Phyllis Laurion Worship Service 11:00 a.m.

CNB Temple Church 119 E. Sixth Street, Tonganoxie Rev. Alonzo Davis Sunday Service 11 a.m.

St. Martin’s Lutheran Church of Basehor – Missouri Synod

Rev. Joel Oster 16979 Chieftain Rd. Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.

High Prairie Bible Church

Pastor Larry Grove Worship Service 9:00 a.m.

15395 Briar Road

First Baptist Church of Basehor

Holy Angels Church of Basehor

5th and Pleasant Tonganoxie

913-845-2680

Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Tonganoxie

Tonganoxie Nazarene Church

Pastor Morgan Smith Worship Service 11:00 a.m.

Rev. J. Vernon Welkner Worship Services 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Himpel Lumber and Building Supply

McLouth

Methodist Church

Fairmount United Methodist Church

Pastor Duane McCracken Worship Services 8:30 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Children’s Church for preschool thru 2nd grade at the 10:45 a.m. Nursery provided for both services Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Evening Service 6:30 p.m. Worship center is handicap accessible

Pastor Carlester Childs Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.

Rev. Mark Goldasich Sunday Masses 8:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Saturday Mass 4:00 p.m.

TONGANOXIE (913) 369-8710 BASEHOR (913) 724-4244

Worship Service 9:30 a.m.

First Baptist Church of Tonganoxie

Reverend Michael D. Murray Church of the Nazarene Pastor John Wright 303 East 4th Street Worship Service 10:30 Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Sunday Evening Service First Presbyterian 6:00p.m.

Rev. Claudia Bakely Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Church of Oskaloosa Children’s Church for Pastor Jeff Light preschool through 1st grade Worship Service 11:00 a.m. during 10:30 worship service. Nursery available. McLouth United

Community of Christ Church

1204 Hwy. 24-40

Rev. Scott Berry Worship Services 10:45 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.

Sunday Masses 7:30, 9:00 & 11:15 a.m.

Jarbalo United Methodist Church

Pastor Larry Grove Worship Service 10:30 a.m.

Linwood United Methodist Church Rev. Ji-Seok Ju

Worship Service 10:00 a.m.

Stanwood Friends Church

6197 259th Street, Tonganoxie Pastor Tom Decker 10 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship 785-220-9480

Cornerstone Family Worship

Rev. Ron Swaim Worship Services 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 7 p.m.

Tonganoxie Christian Church

Minister Dirk Scates Worship Services 8:00 a.m., 9:15 a.m., 10:40 a.m.

Tonganoxie Friends Church

402 Shawnee, Tonganoxie Pastor Clyde W. Ham, Jr. 913-669-4997 or email: revcham@att.net Sunday MorningWorship 10:30 a.m. Spiritual Direction in the Quaker tradition offered, please contact Pastor Clyde for information

Tonganoxie United Methodist Church

Chapel 8:30 a.m. Sundays Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sanctuary Service 10:30 a.m. Rev. Jeff Clinger

Trinity Lutheran Church of Basehor/Tonganoxie Rev. Jim Jobst, Pastor Traditional Worship 8 a.m.

Sunday School & Adult B.C. 9:15 a.m.

Contemporary Worship & Children’s Church 10:30 a.m.

913-845-2222 www.tonganoxiemirror.com

Victory Baptist Church, Independent

Pastor Dr. Jim Melrose, Worship Services 11:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.

West Haven Baptist Church of Tonganoxie

Pastor Mike Bronson Worship Services 10:30 a.m.

Wallula Christian Church

Minister Steve Slack Worship Services 8:15 a.m.Classic 9:30 a.m.-Contemporary 11:15 a.m.-Contemporary

Additional information on area churches can be found on The Mirrors website: www.tonganoxiemirror.com.

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THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

SPORTS | 19

MHS girls lead early, but can’t hold on vs. Raiders BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

THS senior Shyanne Gergick will continue her soccer career at the University of St. Mary.

Gergick signs LOI, will play soccer at St. Mary BY JUSTIN NUTTER JNUTTER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Since she was 7 years old, Tonganoxie High’s Shyanne Gergick has been no stranger to the soccer fields in Leavenworth. That’s where the Chieftain senior first played competitive soccer and where she remained for the next decade. As it turns out, it’s also where she’ll spend her time as a college athlete. Gergick has signed a national letter of intent to continue her career at the University of Saint Mary. She did so Feb. 14 in front of friends, family, coaches and teammates in the THS Chieftain Room. “I’m going to be honest; it’s amazing to get it done and know what I’m doing,” Gergick said. “Now I can focus on the season. I feel like I just kind of signed my life away, but I’m OK with that.” A three-year starter for the Chieftains, Gergick has seen playing time at numerous positions during her time in a red and white uniform. She began her THS career as a midfielder, but moved to the defensive end of the field as an upperclassman. However, according to coach Justin Seever, her eye for the ball will likely lead to another change this spring. “We’re probably going to move her into a midfield spot to try to utilize her skill more,” Seever said. “She tends to be a center-minded player, so we’re going to try to keep her in the middle. We have big expectations for her this year.” Following her junior season, Gergick was named an All-Area honorable mention by the Lawrence Journal-World. Gergick first stepped onto the pitch at age 4 when she played in a recreational

league. Three years later, she made the switch to competitive soccer and remained in the Leavenworth club system until 2011. She spent last season with a club team in Olathe. She had other collegiate options, including schools in Missouri and North Carolina, but admitted she’s grateful for the opportunity to stay close to home. “I know people there and I can come home whenever I want,” she said. “It’s great because if I went somewhere far away, (my family) couldn’t come to my games. My parents have been there through everything, so it’s nice that they get to come and support me.” In addition to the school’s proximity to her hometown, Gergick found her familiarity with coaching staff appealing. Seever, who enters his sixth year in the Chieftain program, just finished his fourth as USM’s top assistant. “This is obviously a good signing,” Seever said. “We want to keep the local talent local, and this definitely does it.” Gergick’s position with the Spires is currently undetermined. She joins a team that went 6-10-2 a year ago and made its first appearance in the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference postseason tournament since 2007. The Chieftains will open their 2012 campaign March 26 at Bonner Springs. With her future plans now set in stone, Gergick has her sights set on a deep run in the postseason. “My goal for this season is to go 11-4 and hopefully move further up in regionals,” she said. “I’d like to at least go to the third round. That’s a tough goal, but state is always in mind. We’ll see when we get there.”

State meet is March 3 in Abilene FROM PAGE 17

The Chieftains adopted their current powerlifting program in 2008 when the current seniors were freshmen. Makayla Sample and Tyler Stockman are two of four seniors on the 2012 roster and the only two who have been in the program since it was started four years ago. “Tyler and Makayla, they’ve been involved since they were freshmen,” Bond said. “They’ve kind of taken a lot of self-leadership. It’s kind of an identity for them, and they’ve had great success.” Other seniors include Derek Lingo and Parker Osborne, who have each been in the program for one year. Stockman has broken several personal records this season and Sample is unde-

feated entering Saturday’s regular season finale. She is one of three Chieftains with at least three overall championships. Others include sophomores Jessica Rubio and Cole Holloway, who each earned gold medals at the first three meets. The season will come to a close at the Class 4A state meet March 3 in Abilene. As THS continues to gear up for the home stretch, Bond is optimistic several lifters will end the season on a high note and bring home some hardware in the process. “A lot of them have great shots to place,” he said. “If you get in the top six, you place at state. It’s not a sanctioned sport by the state, but it’s still all-state honors. We’ve got several that are kind of pushing for that.”

LEAVENWORTH — McLouth girls coach Gina Durkes saw several flashes of potential from her Bulldog squad. Unfortunately, though, the flicker was gone by halftime. MHS couldn’t overcome two big second half runs by Immaculata and dropped a 45-33 decision to the Raiders on Friday. “I could blame it on us always playing slow in the second half,” Durkes said. “We always come out lackadaisical in the third and fourth quarters.” The Bulldogs (3-15) entered the second half with the score deadlocked at 16 apiece, but the Raiders quickly took control after intermission. IHS opened the third quarter on a 12-2 run to take a 28-18 advantage, and the damage was done. MHS got back within seven by the end of the period and trimmed the gap to five midway through the fourth, but an 11-2 Raider scoring burst extinguished the comeback attempt in the game’s final minutes. Defense was the theme of the first half, as the teams combined for just 32 points before the break. The Bulldogs held IHS off the scoreboard for the first 4:02 and led 10-6 after one quarter. The Raiders were able to even the score by halftime, but the MHS defense never allowed its opponent to get into an offensive rhythm before the break.

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

Junior Kaitlyn Hullinger led McLouth with nine points, but the Bulldogs lost to Immaculata last Friday.

“That was the basketball team I know we can be,” Durkes said of the Bulldogs’ first-half performance. “If we come out and play the next two games like we played that first half, we should have a positive end to the season.” Junior Kaitlyn Hullinger led MHS with nine points, while senior Morgan Drinnon added eight. Liz Todd and Brittany Simek paced the Raiders with 17 SEE LOSING STREAK, PAGE 20


20 | SPORTS

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

State finals begin Friday at Salina Bicentennial Center FROM PAGE 17

a bubble match. If you win, you get in. We won three of the five. As a coach, you’re always finding opportunities for your kids to add a few more points.” The eight state qualifiers break the previous school record of six set in 2002 and tied in 2008. The No. 10 Chieftains struggled in the championship round, going a combined 1-4. Huseman claimed the team’s only gold medal when he defeated Atchison’s Tyler Harris, 8-3. THS came up short in its quest for a team championship, finishing third in the final standings. Entering the consolation round, the Chieftains were just 1.5 points out of first place, but No. 6 St. James Academy made a late charge to clinch the team title. Complete team results can be found below. The team title was still up for grabs when the final round began, as THS sat just 1.5 points behind Bonner Springs. The state meet will take place Friday and Saturday at the Salina Bicentennial Center. “As a high school athlete, you’re able to go showcase your talent and represent your high school,” Goebel said. “It’s going to be a great weekend for our kids to do what they‘ve done all year.” State pairings have been released by the Kansas State High School Activities Association and can be found at tonganoxiemirror.com.

THS WRESTLING NOTES ! Of the eight Chieftains to qualify for state, five will face a lower seeded opponent in the first round. Soetaert enters as a No. 2 seed and will face No. 15 Kyle Ryan (Smoky Valley). Clayton Himpel is a No. 4 seed and will start off against No. 13 Ty Kolterman (Clay Center). Huseman comes in at No. 7 and will take on No. 10 Davey Parker (Cheney). Wolf and Caleb Himpel are each seeded at No. 8. Wolf will wrestle against No. 9 Seth Gunter (Mulvane), while Caleb Himpel will face No. 9 Seth Strauss (Abilene). ! The remaining three wrestlers will be considered underdogs in their first matches. Tavis is a No. 13 seed and will take on fourth-seeded Jeremiah Jones (Pittsburg). Coats is No. 14 and will see No. 3 Jake Bradley (Prairie View). Miller enters at No. 15 and will face No. 2 Skyler Hittle (Concordia). ! Clayton Himpel and Caleb Himpel are THS’ only returning state qualifiers. Clayton placed at last year’s state meet, taking fourth in the 112-pound class. Caleb participated, but did not place in 2011. ! After regionals, Clayton Himpel sports a 39-5 season record. He is two wins shy of the school-record 41 wins set by Ross Starcher in 2003-04.

JUSTIN NUTTER/STAFF

Senior Matt Soetaert guaranteed himself a spot at state by finishing second in the 152-pound class at regionals. Photos of the Chieftains’ remaining state qualifiers can be found on Page 21.

Starcher can also claim the highest state finish in school history. He took second in the 171pound class in 2005. ! Four Chieftains have eclipsed the 30-win mark this season. That list includes Clayton Himpel (39), Huseman (36), Soetaert (33) and Tavis (31). Together, that group is a combined 139-36 this season. As a team, THS went 469-270 in 2011-12.

MHS senior night set for Friday FROM PAGE 17

The game was a back-and-forth affair from the start, as MHS clung to a 13-12 lead after the opening period. It looked as though the Raiders would take a 20-18 lead into the locker room at halftime, but freshman Jack Courtney drained a layup and drew a foul with 1.1 seconds left in the second quarter. Courtney missed the ensuing free throw, but junior Dakota Cop grabbed the loose ball and hit a reverse layup as time expired. Gish was the team’s most consistent threat in the early going, as he scored 10 points before intermission. MHS played host Tuesday to Maur Hill Academy and will be at home again Fri-

day for senior night action against Valley Falls. Winter sport seniors will be honored in a ceremony following the girls game.

MCLOUTH 53, IHS 51 (OT) SCORE BY QUARTER McLouth 13 9 16 11 4 — 53 Immaculata 12 8 17 12 2 — 51

INDIVIDUAL SCORING MCLOUTH — Carter Gish 6-10 1-2 13, Gavin Swearngin 5-12 2-2 12, Dakota Cop 4-7 0-0 8, Drew Cerny 3-5 0-2 8, Jack Courtney 2-4 2-3 6, Nick McAferty 1-2 1-2 4, Shawn Dailey 1-3 0-0 2. IMMACULATA — Corey Leintz 8-18 0-1 18, Adam Sewell 7-17 2-3 17, Sean Murray 2-3 0-0 5, Connor Schmidling 2-4 0-0 4, Josh Boeppler 2-6 0-0 4, Dan Boisson 1-5 0-0 3, Eric Haynes 0-1 0-0 0, Jarret McCall 0-1 0-1 0.

Losing streak reaches six games FROM PAGE 19

IHS 45, MCLOUTH 33

and 14 points, respectively. The loss is the sixth straight for Durkes’ squad. It returned to the hardwood Tuesday when it played host to Maur Hill Academy. The Bulldogs will close out the regular season Friday when Valley Falls comes to town for senior night. Seniors involved in winter sports will be honored in a ceremony immediately following the game. Tipoff is set for 5 p.m.

THE

SCORE BY QUARTERS McLouth 10 6 7 10 — 33 Immaculata 6 10 14 15 — 45

INDIVIDUAL SCORING MCLOUTH — Kaitlyn Hullinger 4-7 1-4 9, Morgan Drinnon 2-9 4-4 8, Kayla Steffey 3-5 0-0 6, Terri Stewart 1-8 3-6 6, Konner Patterson 2-6 0-0 4, Kami Wisdom 0-0 0-1 0. IMMACULATA — Liz Todd 4-12 5-6 17, Brittany Simek 4-16 6-10 14, Lainey Bell 3-12 2-2 9, Mary Kate Metivier 1-1 0-2 2, Grace Parker 0-4 2-2 2, Ellie Wolk 0-3 1-2 1, Danielle Sachse 0-1 0-0 0.

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REGIONAL TEAM RESULTS

THS INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

St. James Academy — 194 Bonner Springs — 180.5 Tonganoxie — 170 Baldwin — 134.5 De Soto — 128 Spring Hill — 115 Piper — 63 Jeff West — 58.5 Atchison — 51 Sumner Academy — 40 Basehor-Linwood — 39 Hiawatha — 33 Perry-Lecompton — 21 Eudora — 12 Bishop Ward — 7

Name, tourney record (tourney finish) 113 — Dalton Tavis, 3-1 (Third)* 120 — Clayton Himpel, 2-1 (Second)* 126 — Caleb Himpel, 3-1 (Second)* 132 — Joe Wolf, 2-1 (Second)* 138 — Asher Huseman, 4-0 (First)* 145 — Adam Thomas, 1-2 (N/A) 152 — Matt Soetaert, 3-1 (Second)* 160 — Luke Carey, 2-2 (N/A) 170 — Ryan Lynch, 2-2 (N/A) 182 — Julius Coats, 2-2 (Fourth)* 195 — Thomas Miller, 3-1 (Third)* 220 — Zeke Kissinger, 2-2 (N/A) 285 — Ty Barton, 1-2 (N/A) *Denotes state qualifier


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

SPORTS | 21

SEE YOU IN SALINA Eight Chieftain wrestlers are headed to the Class 4A state meet, which begins Friday in Salina. Pictured in the left column, from top, are Dalton Tavis, Thomas Miller, Caleb Himpel and Clayton Himpel. Right column, from top, are Julius Coats and Joe Wolf. Asher Huseman (Page 17) and Matt Soetaert (Page 20) will also be in action.

Photos by Justin Nutter


22 | COMMUNITY

THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

K-STATE EXTENSION: KNOWLEDGE FOR LIFE

With emergency savings, start small but think big Having an emergency savings fund • Save a portion of your tax return. may be the most important difference • Bring soda from home rather than between those who manage to stay afloat purchasing from a vending machine. and those who sink financially. • Buy one less ‘fancy’ coffee per week. That’s because an emergency savings • Pack your lunch instead of eating fund allows you to meet unexpected out. financial challenges such as car repairs, • Switch to basic cable. traveling to see a sick relative, paying for • Borrow books, CDs and movies from a speeding ticket, or repairing a broken the library rather than renting or buying. appliance. The emergency • Cut back on phone feafund allows you to cover tures. these expenses, and it gives Building an emergency you peace of mind that you fund may be easier if you can afford these types of involve your whole family in financial emergencies. meeting this challenge. After Each year, those without you’ve explained the imporemergency funds borrow $2 tance of emergency savings billion from payday lenders to your spouse or children, who charge 300-500 percent they may even help build interest. Many experts sugthe account and help find gest that the size of an emerways to save. gency fund should equal 3Another way to accumu6 months of your salary so late emergency savings is to that you could continue to ask your bank or credit DENISE meet your monthly expensunion to automatically es if you lost your job. This S U L L I VA N transfer a set amount of K-State Research and is an excellent long-term money from checking to savings goal, but it can seem Extension savings monthly. Automatic like an overwhelming task if savings is the easiest savings. you are just starting to build What you don’t ever see, you your fund. Start with a goal of $500 and may never miss. once you’ve reached that goal, keep savFor more practical savings tips, join ing until you reach that bigger goal. the America Saves program. This free An emergency fund should be easy to educational campaign is coordinated by access in case of an emergency, but not the Consumer Federation of America so easy that you’ll be tempted to dip into (CFA) and is dedicated to helping indiit for non-emergencies. A viduals save money, savings account offers easreduce debt and build ier access to your money There are many ways wealth. The program will than a certificate of to find money to save help you identify and deposit, U.S. Savings mark progress toward — we just need the Bond, or mutual fund. financial goals that you Emergency funds kept in a willpower and encour- set. When you join, you checking account or cash will receive an America agement to put our hidden at home may be money toward a sav- Saves campaign flier, a free tempting to use for nonsubscription to the quarings goal rather than emergencies, and won’t terly American Saver some other purchase. earn interest like a saving newsletter, and free account will. Consider these strate- monthly e-mail newsletYou may need at least gies for finding money ters with savings advice $100 to open the savings from national experts. You to start your emeraccount and a $200 miniwill also receive access to gency savings fund. mum balance to avoid the members-only “Savers monthly fees. However, Tracking Tool” to help you there are financial institureach your goals. tions with lower miniFor more information mums. Be sure to keep your cash in a or to enroll, visit the America Saves websecure location until you’ve saved up site at americasaves.org/join. enough to open a savings account. Once — K-State Research and Extension is a short name you’ve opened the account, keep making for the Kansas State University Agricultural regular deposits until you’ve reached Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension your savings goal. Service, a program designed to generate and There are many ways to find money to distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and save — we just need the willpower and private funds, the program has county Extension encouragement to put our money toward a savings goal rather than some offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its other purchase. Consider these strategies headquarters is on the K-State campus in for finding money to start your emerManhattan. For more information, visit the Leavenworth County Extension Office at 613 gency savings fund. Holiday Plaza in Lansing, call the office at (913) • Collect loose change. Work as a fam364-5700, or visit its website at ily on a ‘feed the piggy bank’ challenge. leavenworth.ksu.edu.

| SPRINGDALE NEWS | BY ANABEL KNAPP Peggy Gillaspie was visiting her mother, Evelyn Schwinn, Wednesday, Feb. 8. Florence Haling was visiting Evelyn Schwinn Thursday, Feb. 9. The celebration of Baptism for Blayke Roggerkamp was at Saint Mary’s on Sunday Feb. 12. He is the little son of Jennifer and David Roggerkamp. He has a brother, Brayden. Attending the celebration were grandparents, aunts and uncles and

cousins. A luncheon followed at the Roggerkamp home. Jennifer is the daughter of Johnny and Jackie Schwinn. The adult Sunday school class of the First United Methodist Church in McLouth will have a chili and soup supper on Saturday, Feb. 25, at the church from 5 to 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome! Wayne and Anabel Knapp went to Meriden to babysit their grandson Austin, who has been sick with the flu.

| MCLOUTH HAPPENINGS | BY BEVERLY MUZZY The McLouth United Methodist Church will sponsor a fundraiser for baby Raiden Harnden to assist with expenses not covered by insurance. Raiden was born in September 2011 with a myelomeningocele, the most severe type of spina bifida. It is a neural tube defect in which the bones of the spine do not completely form, resulting in an incomplete spinal canal. This causes the spinal cord and meninges (the tissues covering the spinal cord) to stick out of the child's back. Surgical closure is required shortly after birth. Raiden also has hydrocephalus and has a ventricular peritoneal shunt to remove excess fluid from around his brain. These conditions require lifelong treatment for problems that result from damage to the spinal cord and spinal nerves. A baked potato bar with dessert and drink will be offered during the McLouth High School home basketball game with Valley Falls on Feb. 24. The event will take place in the Home Economics room at MHS before and during the game. Volunteer coordinator for this event is Sue Hollingsworth: (913) 7966556.

Please keep Baby Raiden and his family in your prayers. • The adult Sunday school class is sponsoring a soup and chili supper from 5 to 6:30 p.m.. Saturday at McLouth United Methodist Church. They will serve vegetable soup, chili and dessert. Free will offerings are appreciated. • McLouth United Methodist Church will have a book study on the book "Heaven Is For Real" during the Sundays of Lent, from 4 to 5 p.m., Feb. 26 through April 1. • McLouth Public Library's book discussion group will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday. For more information, please call (913) 796-2225. • All are welcome to join in a new comprehensive Bible study, titled "The Bible's Big Ideas," beginning at 7 p.m., Sunday, March 4, at First Baptist Church of McLouth. This will be a continuous study of the entire Bible, which will run until November 2012 (with breaks between 5 sections), providing a wonderful opportunity to learn together. • McLouth's Patriots Day parade and events will be Saturday, April 21. — Please submit McLouth Community information, announcements and upcoming events to Beverly Muzzy: mcclouthhappenings@gmail.com or (913) 796-6935.

| JARBALO JOTTINGS | BY THAMAR BARNETT Phil and Betty Clark and Rhett spent the weekend with Jeff and Rachel, Ryan and Nathan of Park City. They all celebrated Nathan’s first birthday on Sunday.

Steve and Gail Fitzwater of Shawnee visited Thamar Barnett on Friday. Visiting her Saturday were Kathy Stimac and Terry Drennon of Emporia and David and Jane Turner.


THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

AREA | 23

Two killed in Shawnee apartment fire Friday BY SARA SHEPHERD SSHEPHERD@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Food left in a pan on the stove caused a fire that killed a young man and woman inside their Shawnee apartment Friday morning. The victims, identified as 23-year-old JaMaur Smith and 21-year-old Jay’d Griffin, died of smoke inhalation, Shawnee Fire Chief John Mattox said at a press conference Friday evening. Mattox said there was a smoke detector in the apartment but that the battery had been removed. One victim’s body was found on the bedroom floor, the other on the living room floor, Mattox said, indicating they probably tried to escape but were overcome by toxic smoke — which doesn’t take long. “The first thing to go to sleep on you is your olfactory system, you quit smelling things,” Mattox said. “And then one of the last things to wake up on you is your olfactory system, as well. That’s why it’s so important to have early detection.” Firefighters arrived at the Carlyle Apartment Homes, 11601 W. 75th Terrace, shortly after 5:30 a.m. and encountered light smoke in the hallway but no visible flames, Mattox said. He said crews began checking apartments and encountered thick smoke in one of the first units they forced their way into. Firefighters discovered the victims while searching the first-floor apartment, brought them outside and performed CPR. Both victims were pronounced dead at the scene. No other residents were hurt, and no other apartment units were damaged, Mattox said. Neighbors were back in the building Friday afternoon. Johnson County Crime Lab technicians and Shawnee Police Officers assisted with Friday’s investigation. Mattox said an automatic alarm in the circa-1970s apartment building alerted the fire department Friday morning. It wasn’t immediately clear whether a hallway smoke detector or a manual switch triggered that alarm. Mattox said investigators checked complex records and that the alarm system worked fine during its annual test in May. He said the complex checked and replaced smoke alarm batteries in individual units in April and October. “We can’t emphasize enough to maintain your smoke detector,” he said. “Have a working smoke detector in your house, in your apartment.”

SARA SHEPHERD/STAFF

Shawnee Fire Chief John Mattox takes questions from reporters outside the apartment building where an early-morning fire killed two residents. Food left on the stove caused the fire, which started about 5:30 a.m. Friday at the Carlyle Apartment Homes, 11601 W. 75th Terrace, and accounted for Shawnee’s first citizen fatalities from a fire in more than 10 years, Mattox said.

SARA SHEPHERD/STAFF

A Shawnee firefighter enters an apartment building at 11601 W. 75th Terrace, the Carlyle Apartment Homes, where an earlymorning fire killed two people. Fire officials said Friday's fire only damaged one unit, and little fire damage was visible from outside the building.

| AUNT NORIE’S SEWING ROOM | BY ELEANOR MCKEE Sr. Joyce Rupp, O.S.M., titles this little jewel "Taming of the Tongue.” I read a wise adage urging, when about to speak out about another, ask yourself three questions: is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? Only if the answer is yes to all three should you continue. This took me back — way back — to my dad, who got into our minds, even when we were ever so small, always teaching us to think, to listen (oh how he dwelt on that one). He would often say "God even now knows what that mind of yours is doing right now" He would often say "before you spout off, spell it out, write it down, think it over. That piece of paper you can tear up, erase or burn, but once you utter those words, it’s too late. It’s gone, it’s on the wind, to just keep on keepin' on hurting someone, making someone feel so sad." He would always say "If you can't say something good about someone, then don't say anything at all" I often think about dad and his "on the

wind" ideas, as we know today so much more about those airwaves and what carriers they really are. Yes, he taught us to listen well, and how important it is to remember, and to remember well. "You just never know how you may someday help someone," he'd then usually chuckle. “Why, you might even solve a mystery for someone." That was, of course, right down the alley of my brother, Larry. I received a very nice email from Arizona recently. “My home town" means so much to so many, our roots, that anchor. A former resident of the Jarbalo area, she reads The Mirror every week, reads it "online, for many years now.” Moved to Arizona in 1965, “but I often think about those days and the people I grew up with." Thanks much, It was so nice hearing from you, Take good care of today now. Yesterday is gone and tomorrow is far away. God Bless, and be happy. — Aunt Norie, P.O. Box 265, Tonganoxie, KS 66086; auntnorie@att.net

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THE MIRROR | FEBRUARY 22, 2012

| 24

SUBMIT PHOTOS OF TONGANOXIE LIFE AT TONGANOXIEMIRROR.COM

LOCAL SCENE

YOUTHS SHOW OFF TALENTS The Bonner Springs Branch NAACP Education Committee presented its 2012 Youth Extravaganza Saturday at the Bonner Springs Community Center. TJ Kimbrough -Smith performs in a "Who Am I?" skit. He and his mother, Nina KimbroughSmith, portrayed several historicallysignificant African Americans, sharing biographical information and asking the audience to name the person they were portraying.

Above: Akiko Capalla plays her violin. Right: Dr. Jesse Milan accepts the Louisa Fletcher "Excellence in Education" award. Milan was the first black teacher in the Lawrence school district following integration. This was the second year the branch has given out “Excellence in Education” awards.

Quadra Jarrett, a member of the "Unspoken Truth" dance troupe, performs.

PHOTOS BY CAROLINE BOYER/STAFF

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Feb. 22