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Unit Plan

Logistics Instructional Designer: Jessica McIlwain Grade: 5 Technology integrations: o Web Quests o Blogs (Journaling) o Performance Assessment (use of Movie Maker/ Photostory/Powerpoint etc.) o YouTube Videos/Websites to show students Considerations/Modification suggestions: (accommodations, differentiation, time of year, etc.) Unit Title: Hatchet – Novel Study Subject Areas: Language Arts Duration o 4-5 weeks o Average 2 LA classes per day o Based on 30 minutes class periods

+ This book is a bit of a difficult read, so we will likely read a lot of it together as a class, or in small reading groups + It may be effective to do this novel study in the Fall or Spring so students may go on a nature walk + If enough time for laptops exists – students could do online blogs instead of journals + A wide variety of activities are used in this novel study, so that different types of learners can benefit Creating objects/pictures related to the novel, and looking at pictures and videos (visual-spatial/kinesthetic), Cooperative learning (interpersonal), Journaling (intrapersonal/verbal linguistic), Pick a song activity (musical) + A lot of hands-on and discussion activities are used in this unit plan rather than pencil/paper tests + Students are provided choice for their final culminating task, so that they can choose something that interests them. If at risk students are having trouble meeting criteria – consider lessening it (ex. Students need to include ten major events, at risk student needs to include 6 major events) + When using cooperative learning strategies, try to break students into diverse groups, so that more advanced learners can help those struggling + Audio book for troubled readers + Summary sheets/outlines of important facts in chapters may be given to at-risk students + Students with writing difficulties may do a computer based journal + Use of peer teaching strategies

Resources: (media, technology, community, etc.) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Hatchet – Gary Paulsen - Novel The Glencoe Literature Library – Study Guide for Hatchet (graphic organizers): http://www.glencoe.com/sec/literature/litlibrary/pdf/hatchet.pdf Video – Walk through Cessna 406 Caravan II: http://oddballpilot.com/2012/03/aircraft-walkthrough-cessna-f406caravan-ii/ Web Quest ideas: http://teacher.kent.k12.wa.us/carriagecrest/beusebio/documents/download/HatchetWebquest+1.docx?id=183189. Cessna Web Quest website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reims-Cessna_F406 Black Bear Web Quest website: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/black-bear/ Tornado video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KDz6dGQ5RE Moose Picture: http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/stdprodconsume/groups/lr/@mnr/@fw/documents/images/stdprod_090668.jpg Kagan Cooperative Learning – Textbook Steps to building a fire: http://www.smokeybear.com/build-campfire.asp SOS ideas: http://www.wilderness-survival.net/chp19.php Modeling clay Recipe: http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistryactivities/a/modeling_clay_recipes.htm Optical Illusion Website: http://www.maniacworld.com/optical-illusions.html Blogs: http://www.blogger.com/home

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan

Learning Outcomes: 1.1 Discover and Explore Express ideas and develop understanding  use appropriate prior knowledge and experiences to make sense of new ideas and information  read, write, represent and talk to explore personal understandings of new ideas and information  use own experiences as a basis for exploring and expressing opinions and understanding

1.2 Clarify and extend

Extend understanding  search for further ideas and information from others and from oral, print and other media texts to extend understanding

2.1 Use strategies and cues Use comprehension strategies  comprehend new ideas and information by responding personally, taking notes and discussing ideas with others  use the meanings of familiar words to predict the meanings of unfamiliar words in context Use references  find words in dictionaries and glossaries to confirm the spellings or locate the meanings by using knowledge of phonics and structural analysis, alphabetical order and guide words

2.2 Respond to texts

Experience various text  write or represent the meaning of texts in different forms Construct meaning from texts  compare characters and situations portrayed in oral, print and other media texts to those encountered in the classroom and community  describe characters’ qualities based on what they say and do and how they are described in oral, print and other media texts  describe and discuss the influence of setting on the characters and events  support own interpretations of oral, print and other media texts, using evidence from personal experiences and the texts

2.3 Understand forms, elements and techniques Understand techniques and elements  support own interpretations of oral, print and other media texts, using evidence from personal experiences and the texts  identify examples of apt word choice and imagery that create particular effects

2.4 Create original text,

Structure texts  use structures encountered in texts to organize and present ideas in own oral, print and other media texts

3.1 Plan and focus Focus attention  summarize important ideas in oral, print and other media texts and express opinions about them

3.3 Organize, Record and Evaluate Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan Organize Information  organize ideas and information to emphasize key points for the audience

3.4 Share and Review

Share Ideas and Information  communicate ideas and information in a variety of oral, print and other media texts, such as illustrated reports, charts, graphic displays and travelogues

4.3 Present and Share Demonstrate Attentive viewing and Listening  show respect for the presenter’s opinions by listening politely and providing thoughtful feedback

5.1 Respect Others and Appreciate Diversity

Appreciate Diversity  compare own and others’ responses to ideas and experiences related to oral, print and other media texts

5.2 Work Within a Group Cooperate with Others  accept and take responsibility for fulfilling own role as a group member

Vocabulary Drone Slewed Stout gratitude turbulence cowling altimeter vague wallow

wrenching abated remnants hummocks wincing murky amphibious asset pulverized ruefully

Welled receded wuffling rivulets rectify corrosive pitch incessant chipper stymied

eeled Tinder tendrils smoldered flue convulse tapered hefted infuriating exulted

Essential Question: How is an individual able to overcome the mental and physical barriers in order to stay alive alone in the wilderness? Other questions: • How does the setting impact the storyline? • What is essential for (mental and physical) survival? • How does positive thinking help in problematic situations? • “Just takes learning. Like everything else.” Can you learn to do anything? • What is the overall theme of Hatchet? • What difficulties does Brian have/overcome throughout the time he is stranded? • Brian is only thirteen – as ten/eleven year olds – how do you think you would adapt to living in the wilderness? • In what ways can you relate to Brian? Assessment Evidence Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan Assessment - Students will hand in graphic organizers to be checked for completion (Formative) - Student journals will be taken in periodically to be checked for completion (Formative) as well some journal entries will be marked on creativity and ability to relate to Brian - Students will be put in cooperative learning groups, and they will do peer and selfevaluations/checklists to ensure participation - Students clay shelters, and drawings of the setting will be marked according to a rubric – creativity, ability to represent text in different forms, aesthetics Performance Task: -Students will demonstrate their understanding of the novel Hatchet by choosing one of the following performance assessment tasks: 1. You are a reporter – your task is to write an article or create a newscast describing Brian’s journey of survival Or. . . 2. You are a photographic journalist – your task is to create a photographic story with captions (either by taking pictures of re-enacted scenes or drawing pictures) describing Brian’s journey of survival Or. . . 3. You are a game-board designer – your task is to create a board game taking players through Brian’s journey Whichever task students choose to accept, they should include a minimum of ten events that Brian encountered or dealt with. Students will receive a rubric before they start working on their projects, so that they know what criteria they need to follow. Learning Plan Learning Activities:  Journal – throughout – students will be asked to journal on occasion – reflecting on reading, relating to their own experiences, writing from the main character (Brian’s) perspective  Web Quests – Using laptops to research information related to the novel  Cooperative Learning Strategies – used throughout the novel to engage students, test comprehension & develop communication skills  Drawing setting/Drawing cartoons/Creating Shelter – used to teach students to visualize what they read and represent it in various ways  Graphic organizers – Teaches students to organize information  Discussions/Questions – students will discuss, answer questions posed by the teacher in small groups or as a class throughout the novel  Word Wall – done throughout the novel, students will randomly be assigned to find a word that they don’t know the meaning of – add the word to the wall, with a definition and a sentence.  Comprehension checks will be done using cooperative learning strategies and written answers

Lesson #

Activity

# of Periods (based on 30

Materials Needed

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan Topic 1 – Introduction Introduction/If You Were Alone in the Wilderness

minutes classes) - Students bring one object that they think they would need in the wilderness – share with class

3

- Student objects - Hatchet novels - Paper for covers

From reading synopsis on back, and looking at cover, design a new cover for the front of your journal (can be completed in free time if not finished)

2 - Chapters 1,2,3

Video Walk-through Cessna 406

3

Video (Resource 3)

Cessna 406

Read Chapter 1

Laptops

Round Robin – What should Brian do?

Web Quest worksheet (Resources 4&5)

Read Chapters 2&3 Cessna 406 – Web Quest

3 - Chapter 4 Creating images with Descriptive Writing

Introduction – Describe a memory, write it down, Standup, hand-up, pair-up – Question – what memory does Brian recall?

3

Journals Paper

Read Chapter 4 Draw the setting (p. 39 – 42) – answer on back – what in this setting may help Brian? What may cause problems?

4 - Chapter 5 The Power of Positivity

Intro – “Positive Plates” (students writing positive traits on each other’s plates)

2-3

Paper plates Tape

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan Read Chapter 5

Journals

Journal – What are some of your positive traits? How would you stay positive if you were in Brian’s situation?

Quiz-Quiz Trade Question Cards (Some blank, so students may write their own questions?)

Comprehension on Chapters 1-5 – Quiz-Quiz Trade

5 - Chapter 6&7 Inquiry

Intro – Round Table – what might Brian find in the wilderness to eat?

2-3

Laptops Web Quest Worksheet (Resources 4&6)

Read Chapter 6 Bear Web Quest Bonus – Research what type of bird/berries do you think Brian finds in Chapter 6? (P.63)

6 - Chapter 8, 9, 10

What are the steps to building a fire? (Class activity)

Fire

Cartoon Strip/storyboard – how to make a fire, write 3 ways that fire can help Brian

3

Building a Fire (resource 10) 8 ½ by 14 paper for cartoon Question cards for Fan-NPick

Read Chapters 8,9,10 Comprehension Questions/activity for first half of book – Fan-N-Pick

7 - Chapter 11&12

What is an S.O.S – students make their own S.O.S

S.O.S

Read chapters 11&12 Journal Brian’s thoughts – How

2

S.O.S. Website (resource 11) Paper (if students decide to draw S.O.S), bright colored material, flashlight, mirrors

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan do you feel after the plane has come and gone without noticing you?

8 – Chapters 13&14 Learning from mistakes

Journals

Read Chapters 13&14

7

Mistakes – Stand-pair-share – tell about a mistake you have made –Rally Robin to discuss mistakes Brian has made

(*May use art class to make shelter)

Graphic Organizer Worksheet (Resource Modelling clay Branches/leaves

Graphic organizer comparing old and new Brian p.122 (pg. 21resource 2) – Students will build a model of Brian’s shelter using modelling clay and nature materials

9 – Chapter 15 Hunting – Finding a new way to see

Introduction – show Optical illusions

3

Pictures of optical illusions – Website (Resource 13)

Read Chapter 15

Journal

Briefly discuss descriptive wording – Journal - Describe the most delicious thing you’ve ever eaten.

Graphic Organizer (Clock – Resource 2)

Graphic Organizer – Clock – Describe 12 main events that have occurred in the story so far

10 – Chapter 16 Perseverance

Introduction – Think-pair-share – students describe one of their firsts (first sport class, first day of school etc.)

1-2

Video and Picture (Resources 7&8) Journal

Read Chapter 16 Watch tornado video/show Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan picture of moose Journal – moose/ tornado – not giving up. Relate to a time when you wouldn’t give up.

11 - Chapter 17 Building (Rebuilding)

Brian’s camp was destroyed – he’s back to just his hatchet – complete hatchet worksheet

2

Read Chapter 17

Bags of materials for each group to make something out of (sticks, paper, string etc.)

Creativity activity – in groups make something using only the type of material given to you – assign roles for students to ensure participation

12 - Chapter 18 Survival Kit

Introduction - What is something you couldn’t live without? – Journal

Hatchet worksheet (Brian’s uses and gains from the hatchet –Resource 2 pg.17)

2

Journal Paper (to draw survival kits)

Read Chapter 18 If you were Brian and found the survival kit what would you want to find in the survival kit? Draw your survival kit

13 – Chapters 19&Epilogue What will happen?

Activity – Brian misses music – think of a song that you think relates to Brian’s situation (what would he most want to hear/ a song that reminds you of him etc.) After students pick their song – listen to a song together as a class.

3

YouTube Students may use IPods today – remind them day before that they can bring them Student Whiteboards

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan This is the Last Chapter - Make a prediction what will happen? Cooperative Learning Strategy – Numbered Heads Together

Whiteboard markers “Brian’s Winter” novel to show students

Read Chapter 19 & epilogue Journal – How did you like the ending? Write an alternate ending (brief) Recommend further reading –“Brian’s winter” (Alternate Ending by Gary Paulsen) 17 Performance Assessment

18 Conclusion

Introduce final performance assessment : 1. You are a reporter – your task is to write an article/make a broadcast describing Brian’s journey of survival Or. . . 2. You are a photographer – your task is to create a photographic story describing Brian’s journey of survival Or. . . 3. You are a game-board designer – your task is to create a board game taking players through Brian’s journey Share projects with class

8

Laptops Video/digital cameras Large Paper

2

Student projects

Integration Activities Subject :

Outcomes:

Activities:

Relation to Hatchet:

Science

SLE 6: Measure at least four different kinds of weather phenomena. Either student constructed or standard

-Students could research tornados, and find out how tornados are measured.

These outcomes would relate to the tornado scene in Hatchet. By studying tornados students would have a

-Students could make tornados in a bottle to get a close up look at how

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan

Math

Social

instruments may be used.

a tornado looks

SLE 13: Appreciate how important it is to be able to forecast weather and to have suitable clothing or shelter to endure various types of weather. Design and construct different rectangles, given either perimeter or area, or both (whole numbers), and make generalizations.

-Students could find out the importance knowing when a tornado may occur. They could come up with/research what they should do in an emergency tornado situation.

Construct and interpret double bar graphs to draw conclusions.

-Students take a survey on the class, asking how many students think Brian will be saved from the wilderness or if he will be stranded forever. Students will then create a double bar graph comparing the class’s answers. (Other questions could be developed relating to the novel. Students could create their own questions relating to Hatchet – ex. Would you rather eat Gut Cherries or Turtle eggs?)

�Values and Attitudes Students will: 5.1.1 value Canada’s physical geography and natural environment: -appreciate how the land sustains communities and the diverse ways that people have of

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G.

-Students could design a shelter for Brian given a certain amount of materials. (ex. Make a shelter with the largest area, using 6 one meter long branches for the perimeter. Make a wall for the shelter so that it will cover an area of 4 meters. Etc.)

better understanding of what Brain went through during the tornado that struck his camp.

This would relate to Brian building a shelter for himself in the novel. He used branches to create a wall large enough to keep out intruders.

This relates to the plot/storyline of the novel, and would encourage students to make predictions about what will happen in the novel.

This would allow students to take a look at the geography of the Canadian wilderness where Brian is stranded and compare it with other regions of - Students look at the many ways Canada. They could that Brian uses the land to survive. even make predictions Students keep an ongoing list of on where Brian is ways that the land sustains his located by finding (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan living with the land (GC, LPP)

needs.

-appreciate the geographic vastness of Canada �Knowledge and Understanding Students will: 5.1.2 examine, critically, the physical geography of Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

similarities between where Brian is and other parts of Canada.

> Students compare the geography of the region of Canada where Brian is stranded to geographically diverse pictures of Canada.

How is the geographical region they live in different from other regions of Canada? (LPP)

Art

D. Sculpture

F. Photography and Technographic Arts

-Students make clay sculptures of Brian’s shelter.

-Students re-enact scenes from the novel and take pictures to create a photographic journal.

-This relates to the shelter that Brian makes himself. Students show visualization skills in creating their own versions.

-This looks at the storyline and plot of the novel and represent in pictorially. This

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan Take students on a nature walk, in which they take pictures of objects/nature that reminds them of Hatchet.

encourages students to visualize images that relate to the novel and be able to represent these images photographically.

Hatchet Synopsis The novel Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen follows the journey of a thirteen year old boy and his struggle to survive alone in the wilderness. The novel starts out with Brian in a plane going to visit his father in the Canadian wilderness. His parents had recently been divorced, and Brian struggles with knowing the secret to what caused their divorce (which turns out to be his mother having an affair). When the pilot of the plane has a heart attack, Brian is left in the plane alone. Trying to decide what to do, Brian continues to fly the plane on the course it is headed (which is off course, because the pilot jerked the steering wheel when he had his heart attack). When the pane eventually runs out of gas, Brian crash lands the plane into a body of water in the middle of nowhere. The only possessions that Brian has now are the clothes he is wearing and a hatchet that his mother gave him as a parting gift before he left. Bruised and confused, but not seriously injured, Brian must learn to survive in the wilderness on his own. At first he feels optimistic that someone will find him, and he is not overly motivated to do much. He drinks lake water, but doesn’t feel compelled to search for food yet, and he finds a rocky ledge with a bit of an overhang that he Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Unit Plan uses as a shelter. Soon his hunger takes over and he searches for berries, upon which finding berries that he scarfs down. That night he gets very sick from the berries, and decides to try finding something else. He finds raspberries, as well as a bear. The bear did not hurt him, but rather showed Brian that they can co-exist. After this Brian goes back to his shelter, and that night a porcupine sneaks up on him. Brian kicks out and throws his hatchet, scaring the porcupine, and getting quills in his leg. He begins to feel sorry for himself, and that night dreams of his best friend and his father, and in both dreams they seem to be telling him something about fire. When Brian awakes, he realizes that the Hatchet made sparks when he threw it against the wall. Brian spends the day trying to make fire, which he eventually succeeds in doing. The next day, he finds turtle eggs that he eats warily to begin with and then ended up eating six. After the eggs he realized how hungry he really was, and figured out that he could probably catch a fish. Brian made a spear, which didn’t work out very well, so he would try making a bow and arrow. While searching for wood to make his bow, he heard a plane. He ran to set his fire and try to catch the attention of the plane, but it did not work and the plane did not stop. The story advances, and Brian starts looking back on the days after the plane had come and gone. After the plane left, Brian became depressed, and he actually wanted to die. When he woke up the morning after he tried cutting himself, he felt changed and determined not to die. He began to think differently, and he was determined to learn from the mistakes he made – which happened a lot. He had made a bow with a tree branch and his shoelace, and he eventually was able to catch fish to eat with his bow. Brian continues to recall mistakes that he had made, including a skunk sneaking up on him in his shelter, and stealing Brian’s turtle eggs. When Brian tries to shoe it away, it sprays him. This teaches Brian to make a better shelter. Brian also talks about the “day of first meat,” when he was actually able to hunt and kill one of the “fool birds.” One day, just as Brian is feeling really good about himself, he gets attacked by a moose, and is nearly killed. Then to make the day worse a tornado rips through the area he is in – tearing apart his shelter and wrecking all that he has built. Brian remains determined, and he decides to rebuild. With only his Hatchet left, he decides to rebuild again, because that’s all he had in the first place. The tornado had also caused the plane to become partially out of the water. Brian builds a raft and swims out to the plane to find the survival pack. On this task he has his struggles, but eventually retrieves the survival pack. Brian compares the survival pack to Christmas. In the pack he finds things such as a lighter and a rifle, and doesn’t really like how these things make him feel. They take him out nature, and make things so easy. As well, there was a bunch of food in the survival pack. Just as Brian sits down to enjoy one of these easy meals, a plane flies overheard, and hears his emergency transmitter (also found in the survival pack, but Brian thought it was broken). Brian is found, and taken home.

Adapted from: McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Language Arts Novel Study  

This novel study was developed for a grade 5 classroom on the novel "Hatchet"

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