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CHRONICLES February 15, 2013

Now Showing in the Osborne Family Gallery

Future, Beware!

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From the Dean’s Desk We’re Number One (Hundred) On March 1st, Criss Library will become the 100th installation of WorldShare Management Services (WMS) from OCLC. Many of our readers will know that OCLC is the largest consortium of libraries in the world, with over 25,000 member libraries. One hundred installations is a significant milestone for OCLC – an indication that their efforts to create an entirely new model for library automation have been successful.

CRISS CHRONICLES Spring 2013 Volume 3 Issue 2

Contributors Dean: Stephen Shorb Managing Editor: Joyce Neujahr jneujahr@unomaha.edu (402) 554-3607 Art Director: M. Iftikhar Husain Associate Editors: Karl Johnson II Emily McIllece M. Iftikhar Husain Contributing Authors: Lindsey Bailie Emily Rokisky Les Valentine Mark Walters

We are pleased to be a part of WMS for a number of important reasons. First and foremost, the cooperative approach between OCLC members will replace the traditional for-profit library systems currently in use. Libraries will now be working together as a “.org” instead of paying rapidly escalating prices to a “.com” provider. Plus, the entirely web-based nature of WMS means that the library will not need to purchase or lease its own server hardware. Upgrades and enhancements will be shared between libraries in a cost-effective manner. As a system “of, by and for” libraries WMS reflects years of library management expertise by greatly simplifying workflows for our staff and librarians. All these efficiencies result in reduced costs that can be applied to new resources for teaching and research. A direct result of the savings for UNO is that we will be adding (also on March 1st) nearly 300,000 new electronic books from leading academic publishers. What you will notice on March 1st. Most users search the library catalog from the window on our homepage. There are currently tabs for “Books & More” and “WorldCat”. The tab for “WorldCat” will no longer be available, and the “Books & More” selection will search both our local catalog and the entire WorldCat database. This is good news for researchers, because the worldwide searching capability will reveal many more resources, including books in other libraries, journal articles and other items – all in a single search. Sound perfect? Well, it’s very good but not yet perfect. Expert researchers will notice some differences in the operation of the new search engine and in the way that results are displayed. Over time, the system should improve continuously and offer more features for productive, scholarly use. Using WMS will position Criss Library to take advantage of the rapidly evolving network computing landscape – including cloud-based systems, more apps for mobile devices, and the exciting developments in linked data. Hundreds of other libraries have already committed to the new system. We’ll be working together with those libraries on the important issues of making scholarly information more readily available, more comprehensive, and better organized than ever before. It’s an exciting time, and the start of a different future for library services. -Stephen Shorb

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Table of Contents Focus on Resources............................................................................ 4 Cover Story - Osborne Family Gallery presents Future, Beware!.... 6 A Conversation With Emily Rokisky................................................. 7 Spaces............................................................................................... 8 - 9 New Equipment Available................................................................. 10 From the Archives............................................................................... 11 Copyright Corner............................................................................... 12 Kaneko-UNO Library........................................................................ 13 Events Calendar.............................................................................. 14 - 15

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F cus on Resources It’s March Madness at Criss Library: New Catalog, New eBooks! March roars like the proverbial lion with the launch of a new integrated library system (WorldShare Management Services) and adoption of more than 300,000 ebooks. WMS will replace Discover in the Books & More tab on the homepage and allow patrons to search the catalog, ebooks, and databases. Those who used WorldCat to search for items in other libraries will be familiar with the interface, but librarians will be on hand to introduce users to the new interface. A few reasons for switching:

• Primary source for cataloging and ILL

• Download to laptop or e-reader

• Single, consistent communication between databases

• Access for multiple users

• Cloud/apps model • Money saved = more for materials • Integration of ebooks • Streamlined processing = better service for you

On March 1, Criss will also launch its EBL ebook collection. EBL:

To get ebooks from EBL or EBSCO, you need: • Adobe ID (free) • Adobe Digital Editions (if downloading to computer) • DRM-supporting ereader app like Bluefire (tablets, smartphones) eBooks are currently available for download through EBSCO. More details on ebooks can be found in our libguide.

• Adds 300,000 ebooks

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- Emily McIllece


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Digital Commons Comes to UNO Open access is defined by the Budapest Open Access Initiative as “…immediate, free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software or use them for any other lawful purpose…” UNO has joined the open access movement, embracing it in the form of DigitalCommons@UNO. Digital Commons is an institutional repository (IR) with the goal of collecting, preserving, and making visible the intellectual output of our university. Currently, DC@UNO contains faculty publications and presentations from a wide variety of disciplines, one journal and one newsletter. In the future we hope to expand DC@UNO to hold electronic theses and dissertations, digital images and streaming video, faculty monograph publications, student-run journals, and materials from conferences held on campus. The benefits of an institutional repository are widespread. The university is able to showcase the work of its teachers and students, aiding in student and faculty recruitment as well as funding efforts. In addition, an IR can serve as a digital archive for the university. The local community also benefits. For example, UNL has found that the annual beef cattle reports it posts are being downloaded in great numbers from rural areas in Nebraska as well as around the world. For the individual student or faculty member, IRs are an opportunity to publish work (in final or alternate versions) in a medium that allows the widest possible dissemination, increasing the potential to impact their field of study.

On a global scale, works posted in IRs are available to any researcher or stakeholder with internet access, allowing those previously restricted by the high costs of academic journals to access relevant research. You can tap into this growing wealth of knowledge at www.digitalcommons.unomaha.edu. While there, search for works by collection, discipline, or author. If you’re just browsing, we recommend checking out the Top 10 Downloads of all time, the 20 most recent additions, or the paper of the day. Clicking on the interactive color wheel on the home page will link to the Digital Commons Network, a collection of over 600,000 works from 265 institutions around the world, to date. Recently, works from UNO faculty have ranked among the most popular within this massive global network in disciplines from Scandinavian Studies to Aquaculture and Fisheries. How’s that for global impact? John Willinsky, member of the Stanford University faculty, argues that “a commitment to the value and quality of research carries with it a responsibility to extend the circulation of such work as far as possible and ideally to all who are interested in it and all who might profit by it.” We would like to invite faculty authors to submit works to be added to DC@UNO in order to expand this resource by emailing a publication list to UNODigitalCommons@unomaha.edu. We’ll do the rest! If you have any questions about DigitalCommons@UNO, please contact Emily Rokisky, erokisky@unomaha.edu or (402) 5542382. - Emily Rokisky

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Osborne Family Gallery Presents

Future, Beware! Photography by Ophir Palmon Jan. 7 - Feb. 22, 2013 Ophir Palmon challenges the viewer to consider the roles and choices made by Perpetrator, Victim and Bystander during times of conflict. The exhibit depicts American youths visiting concentration and extermination camps in Poland, and asks viewers to examine not only the impact of war atrocities, but also to reflect on the moments and occurrences which all of us will face at some time in our lives.

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A Conversation With Emily Rokisky

surprised to find out about you? I’ve jumped out of a perfectly good airplane at 13,000 ft. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would that be and why? I would love to go to Egypt – the food, culture, and architecture are unlike anywhere I have ever been before. There is so much history there and seeing the pyramids are on my bucket list.

Where are you from and what are you doing here? I’m originally from Richmond, VA but most recently moved from Arlington, VA. My husband and I are enjoying living in the Midwest and exploring what Omaha has to offer.

visit friends and family scattered all over the country.

What do you like most about Criss Library? I really enjoy the people I work with and of course, the café on the second floor!

What is your Favorite Quote? “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.” - Antoine de Saint-Exupery, “The Little Prince”

What is the last book you read? “The Duchess” by Amanda Foreman If you were a super hero, what would your super power be, and why? Teleportation – so I could easily

What are your hobbies? Reading, cooking, traveling, yoga, and watching Hokie football.

If you could have dinner with anybody, past or present, who would it be and why? My father’s father. I never met him but I’ve heard so many interesting stories about him. What would people be the most

If you could change your job title (or if you could pick any job title in the world, what would it be?), what would you change it to? I’m not sure what the title would be, but one that allowed me to travel and see as much of the world as possible.

I’ve jumped out of a perfectly good airplane at 13,000 ft. Where is your favorite place to eat? M’s Pub in the Old Market. I love the atmosphere! What is your favorite color? Green

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Step into virtual

UNO senior Patricia Sobetski

Spaces Media Lab 118 Edit videos files with Adobe Premiere Add video effects and computer generated graphics (CGI) with Adobe After Effects Create audio files with Adobe Audition

See Sobetski “Walk like an Egyptian� on the footsteps of the Pyramids of Giza.

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enters her own virtual paradise on the sunny beaches of Hawaii.

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It’s one small step for man and one giant leap for Sobetski as she walks on the moon.

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New Equipment Available Epson scanner - Scan documents, books, magazines, etc. into digital formats. Sony HDV tape injestor - convert miniDV cassettes into digital formats.

Whisper Room - Create audio recordings in the sound-proof recording booth.

Apple MAC Pro desktops - utilize graphic, sound and video software.

REI Bluray player and Toshiba VHS/ DVD players convert any VHS into Bluray or DVD.

Green Screen shoot videos anywhere your mind can imagine in front of this professional quality green screen.

Photos and descriptions courtesy of UNO student Eric Anderson.

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From the Archives UNO was founded in 1908 as the University of Omaha with the assistance of the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Omaha. The Board of Trustees of another Presbyterian institution, the old Bellevue College founded in 1880 twenty miles south of Omaha, originally supported the founding of OU. Very soon it became obvious that the new university posed a severe threat to the survival of the Bellevue institution. By the fall of 1910 Bellevue College officials seemed to regret their role in establishing OU and began to support calls for a merger of the two colleges. Although the University of Omaha was then only a couple years old, its students had already grown quite attached to their university and most signed this petition against the proposed merger with Bellevue—including the first UNO alum, Claudia V. Galloway who graduated by herself in 1911. Proposals for an OU merger with Bellevue led to nothing and the old Bellevue College closed its doors permanently in 1919.

- Les Valentine

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O R N E R

with Mark Walters

In December 2010, Ambrose Video Publishing, an educational video producer, and the Association for Information and Media Equipment, a non-profit trade association, filed a lawsuit against UCLA for copying and streaming DVDs for professors as a part of their coursework. The videos in question were Shakespeare plays produced by AVP, and AIME claimed that AVP’s business, and the business of their members, would suffer if UCLA and other academic libraries continued to stream the videos. UCLA claimed fair use allowed them to make copies of the DVDs. In November of last year, Judge Consuelo Marshall issued an order dismissing the complaint, but not for the reason you would expect: she claimed the plaintiffs lacked standing. As for UCLA’s claim of

fair use? Judge Marshall declared ambiguity. After balancing the four factors of fair use, discussed last time, Judge Marshall concluded: “there is, at a minimum, ambiguity as to whether Defendants’ streaming constitutes fair use. . .  Notably, no Court has considered whether streaming videos only to students enrolled in a class constitutes fair use, which reinforces the ambiguity of the law in this area.”

One way forward is to follow a code of best practices

Although the case was dismissed, legal scholars agree: the UCLA case did not decide if streamed digital video was fair use.

This puts librarians and academics alike in a tricky place. What to do when there is no established rule or regulation? One way forward is to follow a code of best practices, like the one offered by the Association of Research Libraries, entitled: Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries. The Code is available here: http://www.arl.org/ pp/ppcopyright/codefairuse/code/index.shtml As you can see from the UCLA case, fair use can be ambiguous. Library professionals and academics who exercise the guidelines listed in the ARL document are in a far better position to defend their fair use policies. And yes, the guidelines include a fair use exception for streaming videos.

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Despite the cold, it’s been a lovely winter at KANEKO! Coffee and tea have been consumed at amazing rates, mostly by patrons hunkered down with immense tomes of poetry and archival research materials.

stops for a brief moment to consider the rack of tiles set out in front of a Scrabble board. He played every day this week and wants to see what other patrons have contributed to the game. Finding a spot to play “THORNY” on a double-word score spot, he continues on to his table and removes his winter gear. Unpacking the laptop and papers he needs for the day consumes only a moment and then, he’s ready for the hot coffee with two sugars and a glass of water. Ah, perfect. The next six hours are spent refilling the cups and typing away, occasionally stopping to chat with other familiar faces that have filtered in throughout the day.

I’ve found that despite interest in the library, very few know what goes on here in the wilds of downtown Omaha, so let me give you a glimpse of the KANEKO-UNO Library: As a patron enters the library, he shuffles the snow and sand from their feet while greeting the staff. En route to his favorite spot, he

More and more, our patrons are turning into regulars here at KANEKO-UNO Library. They have favorite tables and sofas or drinks. They ask the staff for help with formatting documents and where to find books on textile design. They build elaborate Lego homes for a plastic alligator named Sylvester. They pull the Scrabble board between a group of three or four and play a quick round as a

study break. Overall, we couldn’t be happier and more excited about the future of this creative space that UNO and KANEKO have created. Well, perhaps we’d be more excited to see you there too. Some of our current excitement stems from a new endeavor- a book club. Titled “The Curiosity Review,” this book club focuses on books that encourage creativity and assuage curiosity. Rather than concentrating on a certain type of book- fiction or non-fiction- we aim to survey a wide variety of titles and disciplines. The first book is The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling. Future plans involve non-fiction books relating neuroscience and art, fiction books about future worlds, and even a graphic novel! If you’re interested in joining the book club, it’s not too late! Simply pick up a copy of The Casual Vacancy, read it, and meet up with us Wednesday, March 13th at 6pm at KANEKO-UNO Library. Wine and snacks will be provided if you come with questions and thoughts about the little British village of Pagford. - Lindsey Bailie

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Events Calendar February

February 2013 Jan. 7 - Feb. 22: Osborne Family Gallery presents “Future, Beware!” an exhibit featuring the photography of Ophir Palmon. Feb. 13 - At the KANEKO-UNO Library, “The Curiosity Review,” this ongoing book club will focus on a variety of books, including fiction, non-fiction, contemporary, historical, and maybe even some weird books! An inquisitive mind and an appetite for good food and conversation are all you need to join!

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March 2013 Feb. 26 - Mar. 29: In the Osborne Family Gallery, “Women of Accomplishment”

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Apr. 7 - May 4: Osborne Family Gallery presents “UNO Bachelor of Arts Student Show.” Apr. 7: BASA Student Exhibit Reception in the Library (hosted by the UNO Art Gallery). Apr. 9 - 10: Scholastic Book Fair (9AM - 6PM) Apr. 18 - 2nd Annual Open Mic Night Apr. 22 25: Dead Weak Apr. 28 - May 1: Finals Week

May 2013 May - June: In the Osborne Family Gallery, Chris Knudtson showing. May 4: Graduation May 9: Summer Sessions Begin Summer Hours: Sun. 12PM - 9PM Mon. - Thu. 7AM - 9PM Fri. 7AM - 5PM Sat. 12PM - 5PM

Compiled by - M. Iftikhar Husain

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6001 Dodge St. Omaha, NE 68182 (402) 554-3206 AVAILABLE 24/7 @ library.unomaha.edu

LIBRARY HOURS Monday - Thursday: 7:00 AM - 12:00 AM Friday: 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday: 12:00 PM - 12:00 AM Consult website for holiday hours


Criss Chronicles Vol. 3, Issue 2