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JULIET N. DOMINE DESIGN PORTFOLIO


JULIET N. DOMINE Syracuse University jndomine@syr.edu (207) 590-9085


CONTENTS 01

LIVE LEARN GROW Syracuse, NY

02

EERIE BOULEVARD

03

WORK LIVE COMPLEX

04

CANAL PROMENADE

05

TO THE VICTORS GO THE SPOILS

06

SIDEWALK STITCHING

07

SHIFTED SPACES

Syracuse, NY

Syracuse, NY

New York City

Florence, Italy

New York City

Chelsea, NY


01 LIVE LEARN GROW Syracuse, New York Collaboration with Megan Baker Mixed Use Complex

This high rise mass timber complex promotes the skills of the food industry while simutaneously housing students from Syracuse University and providing new educational space for the Food Studies program at the Falk School. A third of the building serves as residential apartment units for university students (live), another third serving as academic facilities (learn), and the middle third allows the live and learn to mix in intermediate growing spaces (grow). These grow areas provide a market, greenhouse, and community indoor gardening while formally connecting the apartment units and university sides. This acts under a model of sustainability and timber construction, which compliments the natural desire of growth in the food studies program. The complex is both a model of high rise mass timber construction, and food incubation promotion. The formal strategy for the design is driven foremost from the programmatic divisions. Each program is comprised of a different module type. The live areas, where the student housing resides, are composed of the smallest module units, the learn being the middle size and accommodating the academic programs, and the grow areas being the largest to house the green proggrams and provide a more open atmosphere. The live occupies the left corner of the site and the learn the right with the grow in between to connect the two together. Both the live area and learn have their own cores which run vertically to service the building programs independently. Modules are rotated at 45 degree angles not only to better accommodate the regular 20’x20’ grid, but also to provide large areas of green roof as well as access to more scenic views over the neighboring church and the Northeast cityscape. The over 90,000 square foot building complex is a test of high-rise mass timber construction, and a proposal for a stronger connection between the neighboring Syracuse University and the Downtown area built off of the concept of food of the earth, building of the earth.


CORE Elevators Stairs Other CORE TOTAL

4,000 SF 4,000 SF 2,000 SF 10,000 SF

LIVE Lobby Student Housing Co-Op Space Amenities

700 SF 20,000 SF 1,300 SF 3,000 SF

LIVE TOTAL

25,000 SF

LEARN Classrooms Kitchens/Labs Auditorium Administration Lounge LEARN TOTAL

8,000 SF 4,000 SF 12,000 SF 4,200 SF 7,800 SF 36,0000 SF

GROW Greenhouse Market/Grocery Terraces Community Garden

01 LIVE LEARN GROW

5,600 SF 8,400 SF 500 SF 5,500 SF

GROW TOTAL

20,000 SF

BUILDING TOTAL

91,000 SF


FLOOR FIFTEEN

FLOOR NINE

S. WARREN ST.

FLOOR ONE SCALE: 1'-0" = 1/8" 0'

5'

10'

20'

LIVE LEARN GROW 01


01 LIVE LEARN GROW


LIVE LEARN GROW 01


VRF ROOF UNITS

TER WIN

Each unit is 2ft by 2ft and placed on the green roof/porch of each unit.

SUN

ER

MM

SU

95 F

85 F

N

SU

75 F

65 F

55 F

45 F

RADIANT ZONING

H

UT

The building is divided into zones, which allows the zones to be maintained at 66 degrees, 72 degrees, and 70 degrees depending on program.

SO

WE

ST

INSULATED POLYCARBONATE WITH OPERABLE SHADES Insulated polycarbonate is weather and UV resistant and has a high R-value. The operable shades help retain heat during the night and in the winter months.

Horizontal Cross-Section

Vertical Cross-Section

OPERABLE WINDOWS

Operable windows create ventilation during the hot months and create opportunities for cross breezes.

EA

ST

GREEN ROOF / GREY WATER COLLECTION

CORE + FOUNDATION

SLABS + WALLS

BEAMS + COLUMNS

Green roofs provide rainwater collection which can be stored and recirculate throughout the building. The recycled water can be used to heat radiant flooring and the grey water circulate into the greenhouses for plant irrigation.

01 LIVE LEARN GROW

H RT NO


A VERTICAL CLT PANEL PRE-CUT WINDOW OPENING

PLASTERBOARD

TIMBER FLOORING SCREED INSULATION HORIZONTAL CLT PANEL AIR CAVITY SERVICE VOID

A

DROP CEILING INSULATED POLYCARBONATE

A

B

STEEL PLATE CONNECTION

CLT FLOORING AIR GAP

DROP CEILING

CLT BEAM

INSULATED POLYCARBONATE CEILING

SILL GASKET

A

BOLTED STEEL PLATES

B

B

B

CONCRETE SLAB

SILL GASKET

RIGID INSULATION

C C

VEGETATION GROWING MEDIUM FILLER FLEECE SEPERATION LAYER ROOT BARRIER DECKING WATERPROOF MEMBRANE

D

D

STEEL PLATE CONNECTION

C

CLT BEAM SILL GASKET

REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

VAPOUR BARRIER PROTECTIVE LAYER

D

EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE RIGID INSULATION

CONCRETE SLAB SILL GASKET PROTECTIVE MEMBRANE

RIGID INSULATION AS BOND BREAK MATERIAL GRANULAR CAPILLARY BREAK AND DRAINAGE PAD

E E

W

C

E PROTECTIVE COATING RIGID INSULATION WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL FILTER FABRIC

C

CONCRETE SLAB VAPOR BARRIER GRANULAR FILL

PERFORATED DRAINAGE PIPE WATERPROOF CORNER FLASHING STRIP FOOTING CAPILLARY BREAK

LIVE LEARN GROW 01


01 LIVE LEARN GROW


LIVE LEARN GROW 01


02 EERIE BOULEVARD Syracuse, New York The Entrance to the NY State Fair

The project is a three step series of binaries beginning with the study of an item from the New York State Fair: a toffee apple. This study focused on the first of the three binaries: the real vs. ideal, which derived from Miralasis’s Creasaunt. The real vs. the ideal is the actual object vs. the idealized object. The second binary of the project is the baily-crate vs. the cratey-bail, based off of the toffee apple and a wheelbarrow from the fair. Bail refers to the way in which hay is carried and crate refers to the way in which apples are carried. This binary reverses the tectonics of the bail and crate to experiment with stack and pile typologies. In culmination, at the New York State Fair there is a gradient of strange. This gradient is emphasized through extreme sensations. The extreme sensations (the binary of extreme circumstances) ranges from the unintentionally eerie to the intentionally eerie. The unintentionally eerie is defined as the extreme sense of Americana (clowns, bright colors, plushies, etc.), which can be overwhelming and oppressive. The intentionally eerie is abjection; the public display of the animals, what they live in, and the uncanny conditions of agriculture and animal cruelty. In looking at Aux Abattoir De La Villette from Battaille, the question arose, “how can one not appreciate the extent of horror’s fascination (intentional and unintentional), and that it alone is sufficient to shatter everything that stifles us?” The fair in itself is a “boulevard of eerie experiences,” hence the creation of an Eerie Boulevard. Though it may seem counter intuitive to create an entrance that scares people away, operating with the preceding logic of Battaille, people are attracted to the fascination of horror.


5 inches

8 Inches

Two layers of the wrapper. The inside is the area covered in caramel. The outside is the 3 inches area that remains clean

Lines give an idea of the varying circumferience sizes of the apple shape

1 inch

Key

Juliet Domine

“Axonometric” Apple Skin

Relationship between wrapper covered in caramel and clean wrapper. The hash marks indicate where the caramel has accumulated and the white indicates where the wrapper has remained clean

4 inches

Wooden Stick

Juliet Domine

“Exploded Dimetric”

North

[2:1]

Real

8 inches

The Real

Section A

Inside of app further most of a straight g of the interio grain

Plan

Elevation

Section B

A

3 inches The idealized apple is created through placement within a square 5 inches

Following the lines of cross section creates a way to symmetrically define the apple

B

The idealized app are arranged on t apple. When they they form a star.

In the idealized apple the skin 3 inches and the caramel thickness thickness are uniform all around

ized Apple

The Idealized Apple

C 3 inches

B C

A

Section

Plan Idealized Apple Horizontal Sections Section

Elevation

Ke Key

Juliet Domine

Juliet Domine

“Real vs. Ideal Section and Elevation”

Section Cut

“Real vs. Ideal Plan and Section”

Wooden Stick

Binary One: The Real vs. The Ideal The study of the existing conditions of an object with imperfections vs. the idealized, which can be perfectly graphed and diagrammed.

02 EEIE BOULEVARD

North

[1:1]

[1


BARNYARD ICONS Juliet Domine and Christina Rubino

4’6”

4’

4’

4’ 3’

4’

2’8”

3’

3’

3’

2’8” 2’4” 2’5”

2’4” 2’4” 2’

2’

2’

1’10”

1’10”

0

1’10”

0

2’

2’

1’10”

1’6”

1’6”

0

1’6”

0

0

1’

0

5’

5’

10’ 10’

40’

80’

0’

6’

12’

18’

Juliet Domine and Christna Rubino

“BINARIAL MATERIALITY”

Binary Two: Baily-Crate vs. Cratey Bail The study of the tectonics of a crate and a bail of hay, leading to the exploration of stacking and piling typologies. These ideas are portrayed through abstract representations indended to portray the atmosphere of the New York State Fair.

EERIE BOULEVARD 02


1

2

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5

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7

8

9

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

Oblique Roof Plan

02 EEIE BOULEVARD

5’ N

10’

Scale: 1”=8’-0”


State Fair Blvd

a

b

c

8

d

9

7 5

e 1 6

4 3

2

f

g

h

Program Key 1 12

Dining room Dinging Room

3

Restaurant back of house

4

Storage

5 Administrative Offices

1

i

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Tonawanda St.

6

Public Circulation

9

7

Double heighted space

8

Administrative Circulation

9

Public Bathrooms

a

Floor Plan 20+

10’

20’

Scale: 1”=16’-0”

N

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

Key Deepest Ground with water Secondary water area Primary water zone Concrete Detailing

i

Underground rocks Unconstructed ground Riparian Environment vegetation

Subterranean Plan

N

10’

20’

Scale: 1”=16’-0”

EERIE BOULEVARD 02


1

2

3

4

5

3

2

2

1

E

D

Sec 02 EEIE BOULEVARD


6

7

8

9

4

5

6

A

C

ction

B

5’

10’

Scale: 1”=8’-0”

EERIE BOULEVARD 02


Perspective

02 EEIE BOULEVARD


EERIE BOULEVARD 02


03 WORK LIVE COMPLEX Syracuse, New York Mixed Use Complex

An exploration of layering in an urban environment in the south side of Syracuse. The existing suburban layers are defined as the zones from houses, to trees, to sidewalk, to street. In the project, this existing system was expanded upon to create a finer grain of layering by mirroring behind the existing houses. As a result this created the “inner block” condition. The inner block condition becomes the heart of the project, acting as the connection point between the complex’s commercial buildings to the residential in the multi age mixed use complex. Programatically the project is based on the idea of creating a complex that can accomodate people of all ages with a residential emphasis on designing for the elderly. Key components of the complex include a child care center, theater, library, athletic facilities, community dining areas, lounges, and extensive residential ammenities. By creating the inner block there becomes a unique duality to the project. The semi commercial buildings aline with the street, while the residential and residence amentities align with the creek. The commercial buildings follow the same strict rhythm of the houses across the street, while the residential mass follows the more organic form of the river. This creates the relationship of: commercial is to the street as residential is to the creek.


Auditorium

Housing Nursery

Athletic Facilities

Resident Amenities

Library

03 WORK LIVE COMPLEX


Section A 1” = 15’

Site Section 1” = 40’

WORK LIVE COMPLEX 03


03 WORK LIVE COMPLEX


WORK LIVE COMPLEX 03


04 CANAL ST. PROMENADE New York, New York Urban Landscape Intervention

The project creates a connection from the Hudson River into the heart of lower Manhattan through Canal St. which in turn, transforms Canal St. into a grand entrance to the city. In creating this connection, the two end points were defined as the existing Canal Park and Seward Park. The forms of the exiting parks were exaggerated and expanded upon to emphasize the gesture of a two way connective corridor. The connection between the parks was created by inserting a promenade into the middle of Canal St., replacing the wasted automobile lanes. This move redefined the street space and the interaction between the facade, the sidewalk, the pedestrians, the road, and the automobiles, creating a new experience and revitalizing Canal St. Inserting this additional walking space would ideally help with Canal St.’s pedestrian congestion. To emphasize the connection, a unifying factor of a paving pattern was applied to the parks and the promenade. There is a creation of primary and secondary roads, which is defined by the density of trees. The primary street is Canal St. with the addition of the promenade. The secondary streets are the interjecting. However, these interjecting streets are important to split the promenade into smaller islands to avoid the feeling of a never ending corridor and allow for programatic variation on the promenade.


9A

We

Wa

st St.

ton shing

St.

nw Gree

ich

St.

on Huds

St.

k St.

Greene St.

Wooster St.

. 6th Ave

Thompson St.

W. Broadway

Varic

Broadway

Mercer St.

04 CANAL ST. PROMENADE


Essex St.

Ludlow St.

St.

St.

Allen St.

Orchard

St.

Chrystie

St.

Baxter St.

Elizabeth St.

Mott St.

Mulberry St.

dg

e Bri ttan

Eldridge

Forsyth

Bowery

Cantre St.

Lafayette St.

ha an M

250’

CANAL ST. PROMENADE 04


04 CANAL ST. PROMENADE


125’

CANAL ST. PROMENADE 04


05 TO THE VICTORS GO THE SPOILS Florence, Italy In Collaboration with Virginia Paulk A Theoretical Dialogue Old Architecture can make New Architecture An interest in collaging developed through spolia, defined as elements of architecture from varying eras combined into one. The desire to place a project into an existing architectural dialog stemmed from Andrew Holder who studied the work of HH Richardson, Greg Lynn, Aranda/ Laschi, and Mos and the architectural commentary they had been creating. Holder fit his own work into this architectural commentary of piling and stacking by defining a new way of combining objects. In a similar way, this project is placed in the architectural dialogue of collaging. Andrew Kovacs used collage to combine entire buildings into one larger project, retaining their entire architectural value. Anastasia Savinova used a similar strategy of collaging entire buildings, disregarding scale. Fitting the project within this dialog, a kit of parts was developed consisting entirely of elements from Florentine architecture, used to collage together into one building. All objects remained at their original scale and used “puzzling� as a collage technique. Meaning, all objects were fit around each other to create a whole, rather than colliding, mashing, or interjecting together. Placing the project within the Florentine context, the project takes advantage of the existing towerhouse typology. This engaged the project with Florentine architectural history and allowed vertical expansion, ideal for collaging. The site is an existing towerhouse on the Vasari Corridor, which because of it’s connection to the Corridor, is inherently a collage in itself. Through using Florentine architectural elements as a kit of parts with collage, and specifically puzzling, we were able to create vertical growth of the historic tower house by using old architecture to create a newfound architecture and place ourselves into the existing architectural dialog of collage.


Kit of Parts - Florentine architecture components

05 TO THE VICTORS

Puzzling Techinque


TO THE VICTORS 05


05 TO THE VICTORS


TO THE VICTORS 05


Massing Breakdown The project started with three main units that were divided through the two sidewalks that cut through the site. At each level, the sidewalk path is rotated, which changes the shape of the individual masses.


06 SIDEWALK STITCHING New York, New York New York Public Library & WeWork

In New York City the sidewalks are the social gathering spaces that stitch the city together. The sidewalks are the paths in between destinations where interactions of every kind are likely to occur. The site of this project is the existing New York Public Library. The site is cut by two central axis, which define the three masses of the building and act as interior sidewalks. Elevated sidewalks carry up through the buildings on each floor to stitch these masses together. The complex houses a public library, WeWork, and commercial spaces, which alternate by floor in all three of the masses. The creation of interiorized-exterior sidewalk spaces and the integration of programs provides the same opportunity of chance interactions as the sidewalks of New York City.


iting and entrance taurant

m

d hostess stand ance

7

1

5 6

3

4

2 9 10 8

06 SIDEWALK STITCHING


5

Second Floor 1. WeWork Open Office 2.Third Periodicals Floor 3. Restaurant outside bar 4.1.Reading and study area Adult Collection 5.2.Computer area Offices WeWork Open Fourth Floor 6.3. Reading study area WeWorkand Conference rooms 1. Adult Collection con4. WeWork Lounge tinued 5. 2. WeWork WeWork Conference Open Offices rooms 3. Young Adult Collection

Second Floor 1. WeWork Open Office Floor 2.Third Periodicals 3.1.Restaurant outside bar Adult Collection 4.2.Reading study area WeWorkand Open Offices 5.3.Computer area WeWork Conference 6.rooms Reading and study area 4. WeWork Lounge 5. WeWork Conference rooms

3

2

6

2

3

2

6

2

and Reading space

1

2

5

1

1

4

5

4

3 1

4

5 1

4

3

5

Second Floor

3

Third Floor

1. WeWork Open Office 2. Periodicals 3.Third Restaurant outside bar Floor 4. Reading and study area Adult Collection 5.1.Computer area WeWork Open Offices 6.2. Reading and study area Fourth Floor 3. WeWork Conference 1. Adult Collection conrooms tinued 4. WeWork Lounge 2. WeWork Conference Open Offices 5. 3. Young Adult Collection rooms and Reading space

1. Adult Collection 2. WeWork Open Offices 3. WeWorkFloor Conference Fourth rooms 1. WeWork Adult Collection 4. Lounge continued 5. WeWork Conference 2. WeWork rooms Fifth FloorOpen Offices 3. Young Adult Collection 1. and WeWork Open Office Reading space 2. Rare Book Collection 3. Reading and Study Space 4. Children’s collection and reading area 1

3

2

6

2

2

2

1 2

3

2

1

5 1

4

4

3

5 1 4

3

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3

1

3

4

Third Floor

Fourth Floor

1. Adult Collection 2. WeWork Open Offices 3. WeWork Conference rooms Fourth Floor 4. WeWork Lounge 1. WeWork Adult Collection con5. Conference tinued rooms Fifth FloorOpen Offices 2. WeWork 3. Young Adult Collection 1. WeWork Open Office and Reading space 2. Rare Book Collection 3. Reading and Study Space 4. Children’s collection and reading area

1. Adult Collection continued 2. WeWork Open Offices Fifth Floor 3. Young Adult Collection Reading space 1. and WeWork Open Office 2. Rare Book Collection 3. Reading and Study Space Sixth Floor 4. Children’s collection and 1 1. WeWork reading areaSleeping Room 2. Kitchen and Pantry 3. Dining Area 4. Lecture Stage 5. 200 Seat Auditorium 6. Book Storage 7. Staff Offices

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5 3

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Fourth Floor Fifth Floor

1. Adult Collection continued 2. WeWork Open Offices 3. Young Adult Collection Fifth Floor and Reading space 1. WeWork Open Office 2. Rare Book Collection Sixth Floor 3. Reading and Study Space 4. collection and 1. Children’s WeWork Sleeping Room reading areaand Pantry 2. Kitchen 3. Dining Area 4. Lecture Stage 5. 200 Seat Auditorium 6. Book Storage 7. Staff Offices

1. WeWork Open Office 2. Rare Book Collection 3. Reading and Study Space Sixth Floorcollection and 4. Children’s reading areaSleeping Room 1. WeWork 2. Kitchen and Pantry Seventh Floor 3. Dining Area 1. 4. Auditorium Lecture Stagestage 2. auditorium 5. 400 200 person Seat Auditorium 3. Storage and 6. Backstage Book Storage dressing rooms 7. Staff Offices 4. Outside Patio

2

3

2 4

1

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2

1 4 1

1 5 1

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5 1

3 2

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3 4

6

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3

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Fifth Floor 1. WeWork Open Office 2. Rare Book Collection 3. Reading and Study Space 4. Children’s collection and Sixth Floor reading area 1. WeWork Sleeping Room 2. Kitchen and Pantry Seventh Floor 3. Dining Area 1. Auditorium stage 4. Lecture Stage 2. 400 person auditorium 5. 200 Seat Auditorium 3. Backstage Storage and 6. Book Storage dressing rooms 7. Staff Offices 4. Outside Patio

Sixth Floor

3

2

5

4

1. WeWork Sleeping Room 2. Kitchen and Pantry Seventh Floor 3. Dining Area 4. Stagestage 1. Lecture Auditorium 5. 400 200 person Seat Auditorium 2. auditorium Avenue Section 6. Backstage Book Storage 3. Storage and 7. Staff Offices dressing rooms

1

4 1 1 5

4. Outside Patio

2 5 1 2 1

4

2

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Sixth Floor 1. WeWork Sleeping Room 2. Kitchen and Pantry 3. Dining Area Seventh Floor 4. Lecture Stage

SIDEWALK STITCHING 06

Seventh Floor 1. Auditorium stage 4

2. 400 person auditorium 5 Avenue Section 3. Backstage Storage and

1

Adult Collection


06 SIDEWALK STITCHING


SIDEWALK STITCHING 06


07 SHIFTED VOLUMES Chelsea, New York Gallery and Living

Placed within the dense urban context of Chelsea, New York the project is composed of shifted volumes to optimize the opportunities for privacy by creating offset points of vision from the surrounding context. The building is vertically split into three masses; the center mass programmed as utilities and the outer two masses housing the gallery and art exhibits spaces on the lower levels, and apartments on the upper levels. The outside masses on each floor are shifted to create public and private spaces. The public/private program of these volumes is defined on the exterior by an apertures of varying size. These apertures are offset from those of the existing building across the street, creating a more private environment within the crowded New York context.


Site Plan 1’=1/32”

N

Site Plan 1’=1/32”

N

7

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3 7

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12 13

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4

1. Event Space 2. Gallery 3. Bathroom First Floor Plan Plans 1’ =1/8” 1. Event Space 2. Gallery 3. Bathroom

Second Floor Plan A

Third Floor Plan 12. Living Room 13. Kitchen 14. Bedroom 15. Bedroom Third Floor Plan 16. Bathroom

4. Library 5-8. Offices 9. Conference Room 10. Open Studio Second Floor Plan 11. Bathroom A

Plans 1’ =1/8”

12. Living Room 13. Kitchen 14. Bedroom 15. Bedroom 16. Bathroom

4. Library 5-8. Offices 9. Conference Room 10. Open Studio 11. Bathroom

Section A

Section A

Street Elevation

Section B

Elevation 1’=1/8”

Sections 1’=1/8”

Street Elevation

Section B

Elevation 1’=1/8”

Sections 1’=1/8”

06 SIDEWALK STITCHING

15 16

B

First Floor Plan

13

14

4 1

16

15


SIDEWALK STITCHING 06

Architecture Portfolio 2018  
Architecture Portfolio 2018  
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