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PROJECT BRIDGE TO ACHIEVEMENT

The Chalkboard International Center of Indianapolis According to the International Center of Indianapolis, 30,000 immigrants came to Indianapolis between 1990 and 2000. The opening of the Mexican Consulate and the establishment of diverse neighborhoods throughout the Indianapolis metro area mean that this trend has and will continue. The International Center of Indianapolis (ICI) provides much needed international resources to this population. According to their Web site, ICI “helps the greater Indianapolis community to welcome and connect people of all cultures. Programs and services reflect our values: to understand, promote and celebrate cultural diversity, to demonstrate uncompromising readiness to assist people facing cultural challenges, to create a community that embraces and values people from diverse cultural backgrounds and improve our community by enabling individuals we serve to contribute proactively and productively.” ICI has served the Indianapolis area for four decades. ICI provides programs that help Indianapolis’ citizens understand diverse cultures, promote communication, and “provide opportunities for citizen diplomacy and international exchange.” ICI’s mission is focused on citizen action: “At the In-

ternational Center, we know Indiana can change the world. We see it happen every year through the work of more than 300 citizen diplomats. For a brief time, they welcome emerging leaders from other countries into their lives and homes offering them Hoosier Hospitality to exemplify the reality of U.S. life and values. We also know that the world can change Indiana. It is changing Indiana. Immigrants are coming here in numbers not rivaled since the early years of the state. And more and more international companies are establishing a presence here. The International Center's mission is to enhance globalization in Indiana.” ICI works to achieve this mission by “enhancing Indiana's global image, providing information and knowledge that connect people of all cultures, and meeting the growing needs of our international community.” ICI was developed during Senator Richard Lugar’s tenure as Mayor of Indianapolis in order to provide interpreters and translators when Indianapolis hosted the 1972 NATO Conference of Mayors. ICI became a permanent organization because there was a strong belief that Indianapolis needed to serve

the needs of international visitors and promote appreciation of our diverse international population. ICI was permanently established in 1973, hosting international activities and meetings, as well as providing foreign language training for adults and children. According to ICI, “one hundred and twenty -nine foreign languages other than English are spoken in the homes of Indianapolis Public School students. The foreign born population has increased almost 100% since 1990, with the greatest increase in the Hispanic community, followed by Asians, Africans and representation from throughout the world. Schools, hospitals, public safety departments, businesses and neighborhoods need access to language and cultural resources, information and referral services and training to address the multicultural mix of population that is our present and future. Throughout ICI’s history, it has distinguished itself as THE point of information reference for multi-cultural services.” (All information for this article taken from the International Center of Indianapolis’ web site, http://www.icenterindy.org/ index.asp)

AUGUST 2008 V OLUME 6 , ISSUE 1

Teacher Tips: From NEA: Works4Me, found at http://www.nea.org

D I G I T A L S E AT I N G C H AR T "I use a digital camera to create a modern seating chart. I take each student's picture, laminate the pictures and cut them apart. Then, I stick Velcro dots on to the backs of the pictures and onto a laminated poster board. This way, I can easily change their seats around during the year. My substitutes love me for this! I also have a library of student photos for future use and awards." From Mary Patterson, a sixth grade science teacher at Hamilton Middle School in Cypress, Texas

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: August

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Calendar Summer Fun

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In Indiana Visualize This

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Culture

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Corner It’s Time for

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the Indiana State Fair! Intern Profile

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A U GUST 20 08

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Schedule of Events

August 2008 Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Welcome back to the classroom!

Fri 1

Sat 2

Vacation

ü August 1 — Total solar eclipse

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With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

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With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

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Class at Marian

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

Class at Marian

Class at Marian

8am-4pm

8am-noon

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ü August 4— National Friendship Day ü August 6— Independence Day, Jamaica

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ü August 9— International Art Appreciation Day ü August 11— Independence Day, Chad

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ü August 13— International Left-Hander’s Day ü August 15— Independence Day, India

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ü August 21— State Day, Hungary

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Class at Marian

With Mentor Teacher

With Mentor Teacher

Class at Marian

Class at Marian

ü August 24— Ukrainian Independence Day

8am-4pm

8am-noon

ü August 26— Liberia became an independent republic, 1847

8am-4pm

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ü August 31— Maria Montessori, teacher, born 1870

Have Some Fun Before Summer’s Gone! Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo: See over 1,500 animals at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, rated one of the top ten zoos in the country by Child Magazine. For more information, go to http:// www.kidszoo.org/. Bluespring Caverns: Bedford, IN is home to Bluespring Caverns, the world’s largest underground river. For more information, go to http://www.bluespringcaverns.com/. Fair Oaks Farms: Winner of the World Dairy Expo Championship, Fair Oaks Farms would like to teach you about the “art of dairy.” For more information, go to http://www.fofarms.com/. Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore: Experience the shore in Indiana! Sandy beaches, butterflies, hiking, wildflowers and more are available for summer fun in Chesterton, IN. For more information, go to http://www.nps.gov/indu/.


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Visualize This…Crash! Click! Snap! Pop! By Jamie Bender

Hmmmm…how many times do we stop and think out loud with this popular phrase? How many American students know to be good when they hear their teacher’s heeled shoes going click click on terrazzo floors, signaling she is returning to the classroom? Most children who speak English as their first language know the song Old MacDonald Had a Farm. They know that the sheep goes baa and the cow goes moo. But, these sounds, while the same internationally, are not written the same way or interpreted the same way across cultures. Onomatopoeia exists across the globe. While the sounds things make are universal, the way we describe them is not. As teachers, we must understand this when we are reading with our students. Onomatopoeia is when a word is used to describe a sound heard. One would not think that this would make reading difficult for English Language Learners, but it can. Good readers visualize, or make mind movies when they are reading. Imagine how difficult it would be to visualize that a car drove by and went VRRROOM, if cars did not make this sound in your native country. Part of American culture is how we hear sounds and the names we give them. Not all cultures name the same sounds. In China, people name the sounds for rope breaking, string snapping, and water flowing. In Japan, they would know onomatopoeia for murmuring, splashing water, and moving rapidly. How would Americans describe moving rapidly? Some sounds have similarities in different cultures. A cat’s meow begins with the /m/ sound in many languages. A chick goes cheep cheep in English, but in Greek it goes ko ko ko. Students need to be taught what these sounds are in English, so that they can visualize animals making sounds and objects creating sounds. This will help them become better readers and writers. Next time you come across onomatopoeia while reading, understand that knowing how something sounds is part of your culture.

Culture Corner: Tanabata By David Ledman

The Japanese holiday of Tanabata, or the Japanese Star Festival, is a celebration based on a Chinese legend called Kikkoden. Tanabata is not a national holiday but rather a traditional holiday. The Tanabata celebration takes place on either August or July 7th each year. The month depends on the region of Japan you are in. Some regions celebrate the holiday in August because it was the 7th month in the old Japanese lunar calendar and some in July because it is the 7th month in the current calendar. The Kikkoden legend states that there was a princess named Orihime who was a weaver, and a cow herder named Hikoboshi. Once they met they spent all their time together and neglected their responsibilities and jobs. The king, who was the princesse’s father and the em-

peror of heaven, was angry and separated them to opposite sides of the Amanogawa River (the milky way galaxy). The two lovers were allowed to meet only once per year according to the king, and that was on the 7th day of the 7th month. People pray for good weather on this day because it is said that Orihime and Hikoboshi cannot meet if it is raining. The tradition on this day is to write your wishes on a special colorful paper, called tanzaku, and hang them on bamboo branches There are many colorful decoration throughout towns and cities. The most common decoration is colorful streamers, which are said to symbolize the threads that Orihime used to weave. Other decorations are fishing nets, to bring good luck to farming and fishing, and a small kinchaku, or handbag, used to bring wealth. Some people even light lanterns and float them across the river. This sym-

bolizes the stars of Orihime and Hikoboshi on the Amanogawa River. Many cities hold festivals to celebrate the holiday. Millions of people attend these festivals to celebrate each year. You can find good information about the Tanabata festival at the following websites that I used: http:// gojapan.about.com/cs/ japanesefestivals/a/ tanabata.htm and http:// www.tokyowithkids.com/ entertainment/ tanabata_myth.html The second website is very good for children who are curious to learn about other cultures. This is a kid friendly and more easily read and understood version of the story. Each of these websites also contain links to other sites of interest about the Tanabata holiday.


It’s State Fair Time! Ever Teaching, Ever Learning, Ever Changing

Project Bridge To Achievement Marian College School of Education 3200 Cold Spring Road Indianapolis, IN 46222 Fax: (317) 955-6448

Newsletter Contact List Cheryl Hertzer Program Director 317-955-6087 chertzer@marian.edu Patricia Stewart EDU Administrative Assistant 317-955-6089 pstewart@marian.edu Jenny M. Witcher Project Bridge Assistant 317-955-6095 jmwitcher@marian.edu

Readers, this is your newsletter. We welcome any contributions you wish to make. If you have a news item, a suggestion or a correction, please contact Jenny M. Witcher by phone or email. If you are a mentor or student and would like to volunteer to be profiled in subsequent issues, or if you would like to contribute a “Teacher Tip,” please contact Jenny, Patricia Stewart or Cheryl Hertzer. Thank you for your interest and participation!

This year’s Indiana State Fair theme is “Year of Indiana Trees.” Educational programming and events will highlight Indiana’s trees and their agricultural impact on our state. The Indiana State Fair Covered Bridge is being constructed of Indiana Hardwoods on the fair’s campus, and is modeled after the famous covered bridges in Parke County, IN. In addition to many exciting concerts, Garrison Keillor will return with “A Prairie Home Companion.” And, as always, there will be agricultural exhibits, home economics, animals, midway rides and games, and food, food, food to please every taste bud. For more information, go to http://www.in.gov/statefair/fair/index.html. See you at the fair!

Intern Profile: Jennifer E. Plumley Jennifer Plumley, a cohort 7 intern, graduated from Indiana University with a Bachelors of Journalism degree in 1994. Her professional career began in Florida where she taught scuba diving for four years.; she then moved back to Indiana and became a manager for a wine distributor. She has also worked in the real estate and mortgage industries and mentored for The Leukemia Society Team . Jennifer decided to pursue classroom teaching because guiding others was the aspect of her professional experiences that she most enjoyed: “When I began substitute teaching I had an epiphany: the component that I enjoyed most about all of my jobs was teaching. As I started substitute teaching I felt that all of the pieces of the puzzle were in place. I have always enjoyed the inquisitive nature of young minds and the joy they express when they figure something out. At the end of the day in a classroom teaching young children, there is a tre-

mendous feeling of satisfaction that I have never felt in my previous positions. “ When asked why she chose Marian as the place to earn her teaching degree, Jennifer said, “I want to make a difference in the lives of children. I want to be a part of their success and help them overcome and learn from their mistakes. I enjoyed meeting with both Cheryl and Karen and learning about the program’s focus on multiculturalism and ESL learners. After the interview, I felt Marian’s program was a perfect fit for me. “ Jennifer is already enjoying the program and her experience as a graduate student: “ I am looking forward to furthering my education and gaining more experience in the classroom. I have enjoyed the three professors I have had in class so far and have benefited from their educational insight “ Jennifer’s philosophy of teaching is focused on the individual, but with an holistic approach: “Teaching is about educating the indi-

vidual. Students should receive respect and encouragement in the classroom. I will foster an environment that allows each child to feel as welcome as if they were in a second home. Children should be encouraged to excel in their talents and receive assistance for their struggles. Teaching should be directed to the whole child: social, intellectual, emotional and physical. Students should be encouraged to try ideas outside of their comfort zone and reflect on the knowledge they have gained. All children from diverse cultures should be welcomed and all children should be celebrated. Students should have fun while they are learning so they will have the desire to continue. I will try to instill ownership and responsibility of one’s actions, and create a peaceful environment that allows children to feel safe and welcome.” We are delighted that Jennifer joined cohort 7, and we wish her the best in her education and in her future career in the classroom!


August 2008 Chalkboard