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PROJECT BRIDGE TO ACHIEVEMENT

The Chalkboard Nationalities Council of Indiana: “Welcome to the World in Indiana!”

JANUARY 2009 V OLUME 6 , ISSUE 6

Teacher Tips:

Did you attend the Indianapolis International Festival? Have you attended any of the international events highlighted in the weekly MAT Update? Thanks to the Nationalities Council of Indiana (NCI), we are able to provide our readers with information and opportunities to attend a multitude of diverse, international happenings in the area. According to the NCI web site, at http:// nationalitiescouncil.org/, “The Nationalities Council is a non-profit, all-volunteer educational foundation comprised of more than 50 ethnic or national affinity organizations plus other groups, corporations and individuals interested in celebrating Indy's diversity. For more than 30 years, the Council has worked to increase the visibility of and partici-

view the newsletter, visit the web site. You may also sign up to receive the newsletter each month by e-mail. Maybe the best part of the site is its blog. This interesting gem provides discussions about international NCI Logo events and news items — everything pation by ethnic from film to business, groups in the commu- science and technolnity life of central ogy to education. Indiana.” Visitors to Visitors can learn so the NCI web site will much about our mulfind links to hundreds ticultural community, of multicultural and its offerings, influinternational organiences, and its impact zations across the on Indiana and the state. Also available world. is the state’s only We encourage comprehensive direcyou to use the Natory of ethnic restautionalities Council of rants and markets. Indiana as a reThe NCI prosource to connect duces a monthly you to the diversity newsletter called The around you. You Ethnic Hoosier. The may contact the NCI newsletter provides by e-mailing information on a vari- info@nationalitiescou ety of international ncil.org, or by calling topics, local events, Allen Galloway, NCI and news from the president, at 317-709 Indianapolis interna-5135. tional community. To

From NEA: Works for me, http://www.nea.org GOOD NEWS C AL L S "When my students get a 100% on their spelling tests or any other great accomplishment, I let the student call home to share the good news. The phone call usually takes only 2-3 minutes, but it is a rewarding few minutes. I can almost always hear the parent praise from across the room. Students look forward to calling so they try extra hard on their assignments." From Michelle Oleske, a special education teacher at ZJ Williams Memorial School in Napaskiak, Alaska

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: January

2

Calendar Inauguration

2

Day! Chinese New Year

3

Spectacular Culture

3

Corner Indianapolis

4

Civic Theatre Intern Profile

4


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January 2009 Sun

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Schedule of Events Happy New Year!

Sat 3 ü January 1 — Betsy Ross’ birthday, 1752

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School with Cooperating

School with Cooperating

School with Cooperating

School with Cooperating

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Teacher

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School with Cooperating

School with Cooperating

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MLK, Jr.

School with Cooperating

School with Cooperating

Classes at Marian

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College Closed

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8 — noon

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Classes at Marian

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Classes at Marian

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ü January 2 — Forefathers Day, Haiti ü January 8 — Stephen Hawking’s birthday, 1942 ü January 10 — League of Nations formed, 1920

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ü January 15 — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. birthday ü January 17 — Benjamin Franklin’s birthday, 1706

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ü January 23 — National Handwriting Day ü January 26 — Australia Day ü January 27 — Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart born, 1756

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ü January 30 — Franklin D. Roosevelt’s birthday, 1882 ü January 31 — Franz Schubertborn, 1797

Inauguration Day! The nation is preparing to celebrate its 56th presidential inauguration on Tuesday, January 20. Here are some historical inauguration facts you may not know:

• • • • • • •

George Washington’s inauguration was held in New York City on April 30, 1789. Inauguration Day was changed to January 20, from March 4, in 1933 by the passage of the Twentieth Amendment to the US Constitution. Bill Clinton’s January 20, 1997 inauguration was the first to be broadcast live over the Internet. George Washington gave the shortest inaugural address in history (135 words). In 1865, Abraham Lincoln was the first president to include African-Americans in his inaugural parade. In 1917, Woodrow Wilson was the first president to include women in his inaugural parade. When January 20 is on a Sunday, the president-elect usually takes the oath of office privately and then repeats the ceremony in public on Monday.


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Divine Performing Arts: Chinese New Year Spectacular in Indianapolis “Inspired by the spirit of an ancient culture, Divine Performing Arts brings to life classical Chinese dance and music in a gloriously colorful and exhilarating show. With an elite company of dancers, singers, and musicians, the New York-based Divine Performing Arts comes to Indianapolis this January. The company’s masterful choreography and graceful routines range from grand classical processions to ethnic and folk dances, with gorgeously costumed dancers moving in stunning synchronized patterns. Its themes are drawn from the pages of history as well as our world today. State-of-the-art backdrops conjure celestial palaces and pastoral vistas, while groundbreaking music combines the best of Chinese and Western composition. Taking inspiration from ancient heroic legends and modern courageous tales, the breathtaking beauty of Divine Performing Arts is not to be missed.” Showing on January 31, 2009 at 2:00 PM and 7:30 PM at the Murat Theatre at 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Tickets are available from Ticketmaster.com, Livenation.com, by calling 317-239-1000, or by visiting the Murat Theatre box office. Group tickets are available.

Culture Corner: Chinese New Year This month’s Culture Corner was contributed by Becky Smith, a cohort 7 intern.

Chinese New Year this year will fall on January 26th 2009. This year will be the year of the Ox. Every year there is a new animal that represents that year. There are 12 different animals: dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, pig, rat, ox, tiger, and rabbit. Similar to the astrological signs that we are familiar with in the United States, each animal for the year you are born in is supposed to relate to the type of personality that you have and the compatibility or lack thereof with other people. Grandparents, parents, and other adult relatives traditionally celebrate Chinese New

Year by giving red envelopes to the younger generation. These envelopes contain money and encouraging sayings for the coming year, and they are often decorated with lucky symbols. The envelopes are red because red is a lucky color in Chinese culture. Another tradition is flying a Dragon Kite during the New Year celebration to symbolize wisdom, strength, benevolence, and good fortune. You can bring Chinese New Year into the classroom by talking about traditions that are done in America for New Year (Times Square ball drop, resolutions) and comparing them to Chinese New Year. Have the children go to http:// www.chinese.new-year.co.uk/ calendar.htm to find out what animal the year of their birth represents and what it means. Another way to get the children involved with celebrating the Chinese New year is to get them involved with another class in the school. Match up a younger class (1st-2nd grade) with an older grade (4th – 5th grade).

The older grade can make a red envelope and fill it with advice they would give the younger students. It can be about anything from life to school. This website shows you how your student can hand make the envelope. http:// www.enchantedlearning.com /crafts/cards/envelope/. Younger children can make the Dragon Kites and read A Time of Golden Dragons, by Song Nan Zhang to learn about the tradition of the dragon. They can then report to the older class about what they have learned and show them the Dragon Kites that they made by using the template found at http:// www2.scholastic.com/ browse/article.jsp?id=3705 .


Now Showing at Ever Teaching, Ever Learning, Ever Changing

Indianapolis Civic Theatre:

Project Bridge To Achievement Marian College School of Education 3200 Cold Spring Road Indianapolis, IN 46222 Fax: (317) 955-6448

Newsletter Contact List Cheryl Hertzer Chair, MAT Programs 317-955-6087 chertzer@marian.edu Patricia Stewart EDU Administrative Assistant 317-955-6089 pstewart@marian.edu Jenny M. Witcher Assistant to the MAT Chair 317-955-6095 jmwitcher@marian.edu

Readers, this is your newsletter. We welcome any contributions you wish to make. If you have a news item, a suggestion or a correction, please contact Jenny M. Witcher by phone or email. If you are a mentor or student and would like to volunteer to be profiled in subsequent issues, or if you would like to contribute a “Teacher Tip,” please contact Jenny, Patricia Stewart or Cheryl Hertzer. Thank you for your interest and participation!

Through January 4. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 923-4597 or visit the web site at http://www.civictheatre.org/. Indianapolis Civic Theatre is located on the Marian College campus at 3200 Cold Spring Road.

Intern Profile: Shira Behar Shira Behar, a cohort 7 intern, earned her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Indiana University. After graduating, Shira lived in Manhattan for three years, where she worked for a nonprofit organization that raised money for a science research center in Israel. When she moved back to Indianapolis, she worked for an IT recruitment company, then substituted for a year at The Orchard School. Shira chose to pursue a degree in teaching because of the satisfaction she feels from being in the classroom: “I love working with children; it brings me so much joy. I have never felt so accomplished at the end of the day than after a day of teaching. I learn something new

every day from the students. I feel that I was born to be a teacher.” Shira chose Marian’s MAT program because of its size and its intensity: “I felt that after attending IU I wanted a more personal experience. I love the fact that Marian is an environment of caring. Also, I was up to the challenge of an accelerated program.” Regarding Marian’s Franciscan focus, Shira added, “I really enjoy being in a school that promotes the benefits of a religious background, but is also so welcoming to people of other faiths.” When asked what she was looking forward to in returning to being a student, Shira said that she was excited to make new friends and to developing relationships with professors

as she learns more about her chosen field. Shira’s philosophy of teaching is focused on discovering each child’s individual needs and addressing them: “I believe in searching for the root of difficulties in every child and teaching to his or her strengths and challenges. I believe in staying positive at all times. I think it is crucial to make social and emotional growth part of the curriculum. I believe in teaching to the whole child.” We are glad Shira became a part of the MAT program, and wish her the best!


January 2009 Chalkboard