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CONCERTS n HIP-HOP n COLLEGE SPORTS n COMIC BOOKS n LOVE AND SEX ADVICE n EVENTS CALENDAR n FINE ARTS n EXHIBITS n FILM n FOOD

MARCH 10, 2010

Green day Lucky us! FOX Toledo’s Ashley Johncola leads our tour of the hottest St. Patty’s Day parties this side of the River Shannon.

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TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR n CONCERTS n HIP-HOP n COLLEGE SPORTS n LOVE AND SEX ADVICE n CALENDAR n FINE ARTS n FILM n WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 2010

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SEX & CANDY: It’s not a video game button

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EVENTS CALENDAR: The Pulse of Toledo

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OUTDOORS/METROPARKS: Gone fishin’

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BRAIN GAIN: Raquel Wilson

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THE WORD I HEARD: lilD on Dre P.

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POP GOES THE CULTURE: My man Ebert

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Kyle Gass • Dre P. • X-Men/Avengers • NICK Vitucci • OnceOver • Roger Ebert • Gene Cross • CALENDAR STARTS ON PAGE 10 MARCH 10, 2010 • Episode 1 Chapter 1 • Toledo Free Press Star, Toledo, OH: “The Academy screwed ‘Avatar.’”

‘‘

The voice which spoke with such fire may now be silent, but its owner still speaks louder than ever ... “ McGINNIS ON EBERT page 30

Is sex addiction real or just b.s.? page 7

Hey, young readers: You’re on your own. page 9

Gene Cross on the future of UT hoops. page 28

“The work you see happening with the families is amazing.” page 22

Kiss us, we’re Irish. Honest! A ‘pub crawl’ tour of the region’s hottest St. Patrick’s Day pots of gold.

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ot to make you green with envy, but we took full advantage of the debut issue of Toledo Free Press Star hitting the stands so close to St. Patrick’s Day. We searched high and low for the area’s best St. Patty parties. Since no one likes to pub crawl all by their lonesome, we invited the Face of FOX Toledo, Ashley Johncola, along for the

ride. In addition to being the sexiest woman on FOX since Marge Simpson, Ashley is a smart, funny, personable woman who is spending her first Green Day in Toledo. As her friend, we owed it to her to give her the tour of the leprechaun haunts and hidden pots o’ gold that dot the Toledo landscape. Ashley repaid the favor by bringing along the former Face of FOX

Toledo, Julia Johnston, and we don’t mind admitting we still have a thing for her. We started at our favorite bar, The Blarney Irish Pub, and many hours later, ended at one of Ashley’s favorite hangouts, Mulvaney’s Bunker. In between, we inspired a lot of early Irish cheer. Thanks, Ashley. You are a true Irish rose. O


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Blue Hook, Trainwreck, OnceOver lead must-see concerts Band at Woodchuck’s on March 12. By Colleen Kennedy Toledo Free Press STAR Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

For local musical trio The Blue Hook, having coffee with the devil is a common occurrence. Its debut album titled “Motor Oil & Whiskey” dropped Feb. 5. The 13-track album features a blues-rock-funk blend and includes titles such as “Loose Lips Magoo,” “Flow Like Your Mama Says” and “Having Coffee with the Devil in a Waffle House on the way to Memphis.” Lead vocalist AJ Szozda, who also produced the album, said he started the project as a solo album but decided to add additional artists because he could hear the sound going “in that direction.” Aside from Blue Hook drummer Keith Roach and bassist Pete Mann, the album features 10 additional musicians. “Being around the music scene for awhile,” Szozda said, “I got a lot of talented music friends and it made sense to get as many of those guys on the record as possible.” Guitarists Pat Lewandowski of the Chris

Shutters Band and Bobby May of Dry Bones Revival were two of the featured musicians Blue Hook members said they felt most privileged to record with. “For about two solid years, every Tuesday night, me and AJ would go to see those guys at Frankie’s,” Roach said. “It was definitely an honor to play with them.” Though the album includes many additional players, Szozda said what ties it together and defines its signature Blue Hook sound is Roach and Mann’s rhythmic foundation. To ensure its core sound, “Motor Oil & Whiskey” includes several tracks the trio has been playing since its formation five years ago. One song, “Clown,” began as a musical collaboration between then roommates Mann and Szozda. “We used to play that a lot around the house,” Szozda said. “And four years later it ended up on a record.” Others were developed and refined — sometimes accidentally — during the recording process. “It was the first time I’d ever played ‘American Dream,’ ” Roach said. “At some point in the middle, I thought I’d screwed it up so I just started tapping on the rims. When I started doing that, I saw AJ stand up in the sound booth; he’s pointing like, ‘Yeah, that’s awesome!’ And that ended up being the take that’s on the record.” The final product took nearly 50 recording

OnceOver finishing new CD, “9.”

The Blue Hook’s latest CD, “Motor Oil & Whiskey,” dropped Feb. 5. STAR PHOTO BY CHARLIE LONGTON

sessions and three years to complete. Most of that time was spent at Zeta Recording Studio in

Holland, where owner and musician Chris Stoll also contributed to the album. O

Kyle Gass brings alter ego to Frankie’s Inner City.

By Mighty Wyte Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

What if Mr. T and Chuck Norris had a baby or Slipknot, Meshuggah and System of A Down made an album together? The former would be extremely hideous and would most likely rule the world with his/her fists, while the latter would be an extremely talented collective of musicians known as OnceOver. Grinding guitars, brutal drums and vocals that rival those of Corey Taylor and Brandon ONCE OVER Boyd blend flawlessly. The music, written, produced and performed by Toledo-based OnceOver, brilliantly transitions from beautifully melodic and expertly crafted stanzas into bone-crushing, riff-driven mayhem. OnceOver has rocked Toledo since 2001 and has undergone several changes in musical direction and membership. The newest incarnation, with Steve Dwyer ripping vocals, Colin De Saint Victor and Paul Dwyer abusing guitars, Bruce Stelter hammering the drums and Nick Archer laying groundpounding bass is easily the most aggressive and appealing so far. OnceOver posted new music on its myspace page (myspace.com/onceovertoledo) and I have to admit that when I first listened to the new songs, I peed a little. OnceOver has produced tracks that put them in a national league. The new tracks, which compel the audience to feel frustration, discontent and raw emotion, are set to appear on the album “9,” dropping later this year. As OnceOver finishes “9,” it will play in our fair city and surrounding areas. When asked what people can expect at a OnceOver show, vocalist Dwyer said, “You will hear somewhat of a diverse catalog of our songs. Emotional songs, angry songs and ‘pump you up’ songs. If know the words and you’re in the front row, the mic will be undoubtedly get aimed your way to sing for a sec.” Frankie’s Inner City will host OnceOver on March 13. Go to the show, buy the album and crank that shit this summer while you’re driving around town. O Mighty Wyte (Matt Feher) is a Toledo-based producer who has worked with the Beat Bullies, Onyx and had tracks featured in “The Blind Side.”

By Jeff McGinnis Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

“Check, check, one, two, three ...” Kyle Gass joked after the audio recorder was turned on. Force of habit, apparently.
Gass is a musician, comedian, actor, a member of two comedy rock bands — Tenacious D, which features Jack Black, and his own group, Trainwreck, which features many of the same members. Gass and Trainwreck will appear at Frankie’s Inner City on March 12. “At first, you go, ‘Oh my God, I’ve seen a lot of bands before, but I’ve never seen a band like this,’” he said. “And then you start questioning yourself, going, ‘Why am I so entertained by these guys? Why can’t I take my eyes off the stage?’ It’s because it’s like a Trainwreck ... It’s like a cartoon has come to life. A brilliant, musical cartoon. And then, you’re just won over by our charm and amazing talent.” Although this will be Trainwreck’s first gig in Toledo, the band has several ties to the Buckeye State — Gass and Reed met up with fellow musicians John Konesky and Nate Rothacker (whose Trainwreck name is Dallas St. Bernard) in Columbus, which led to the formation of the band. “I think it’s like a basketball team,” Gass said, discussing the nature of the group. “It’s a highly tuned machine.” While Trainwreck and Tenacious D focus

TRAINWRECK on the comic side of rock, Gass insisted there are many differences between the two groups. “With the D, I just wear whatever I’m wearing that day onstage,” he stated. “For Trainwreck, I have to be well coiffed, and in character. And I have to make sure to wear my wig.” Fans who can’t wait to see the wig in person can listen to Trainwreck’s first studio album, “The Wreckoning.” As for Toledo, Gass said — with his usual comic level of modesty — fans who come on March 12 will get a show for the ages. “It has to be seen to be believed. I think we’re coming into the peak of our powers. In fact, I encourage everyone — see Trainwreck now. Don’t wait. If they don’t see us now, I think they’re missing an opportunity,” Gass said. To be there at a moment of music history? “At the height of our powers. My powers could start eroding at any time.” O


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Touchy subject Handling a delicate matter, and the truth about Tiger.

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o, are you up for my big origin story or do you want to get right to the fun and dirty stuff? I thought so. Maybe I’ll just reveal a little about myself each time out. You know, like in a real relationship. I have been soliciting on Twitter (not that kind of soliciting, honey, dream on) for questions and comments on life, love and sex in Toledo. What qualifies me to answer your questions? First, I have experience. With men and women. Second, I have friends with experience. Third, I have a ringer for the tough questions; when you need answers I can’t provide, I’ll run them by Lori Hollander, a dual-master’s deCandY gree holder who serves as a couples and sex therapist at the Center for Real Intimacy in Ann Arbor, where they know a thing or two about scoring. Or at least, they used to, back when the Wolverines could beat the Rockets. Lori will help me stay on track and not let me lead you astray. Let’s dive in. This comes from Katie in Rossford, who says her boyfriend of a year is “good to me and is mostly generous in bed” but who handles her most sensitive area a little roughly: “We’ve talked and I’ve tried to explain how incredibly sensitive my clitoris is; it can hurt if not touched carefully. Any ideas on converting him to a more gentle touch?” Well, Katie, it amazes me that so many men can dance their Lincoln Log fingers over a micro-mini BlackBerry keyboard like 10 little Anna Pavlovas, but when it comes to touching the clitoris, they act like they’re mashing buttons on an Xbox video game controller. (Not a lot of nicknames or euphemisms for that precious little area of real estate; one of my girlfriends calls it her “pleasure nut,” but that doesn’t seem likely to catch on. Feel free to send me your pet names or nicknames; that would be a column that writes itself.) The best course of action, to avoid ego damage, is to show him. Lay back and let him watch you do what you know feels good. Takes his hand and show him just the right places and pressures. Even the least nimble-fingered fella will catch on with practice. Remember, you know better than anyone what

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STRANAHAN

THEATER MAY 19TH 8PM

Is it real or ...

Tickets are available at the Stranahan Box Office, all Ticketmaster outlets, online at Ticketmaster.com, or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000.

Adams

SEX& CANDY

Eye candy

Looking to hook up with someone you saw in public but didn’t have the balls to approach? Send me the details (and your responses) at star@toledofreepress.com and I’ll try to help you find them. No stalkers, please. O Saw you at Chuck’s on Monroe Street Saturday March 6 and can’t stop thinking about you. You: red hair, long black coat, at the bar with two girl friends. Me: short dark hair, tan collared shirt. I caught your eye when I took my drink and you smiled but left before I could man up to talk to you. O We were in line at Target on Monroe Street two Fridays ago. We laughed at the covers of the celebrity magazines and you made that funny joke about Brangelina. I got caught at the register and you got away. I’d love to see you again! O E-mail Candy at star@toledofreepress.com, follow her on Twitter @SexandCandyStar or friend her on Facebook.

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ON SALE NOW!

feels good to you. He’ll enjoy the show, you’ll enjoy the show and hopefully he’ll learn the (velvet) ropes. Repeat as necessary. You’re welcome. :) Our other question this week comes from a number of my girlfriends who are watching their men watch the Tiger Woods coverage and are asking, “Is there really such a thing as a sex addiction or is that b.s.?” I asked Lori this question, and she said, “Many people say that sexual addiction is merely a fancy explanation for promiscuity, but there are very important differences. “Rather than simply being distracted by sexual thoughts, sexual addicts are absolutely consumed night and day. Add to that the loss of control that leads them to risk everything they deeply cherish. As one client put it, ‘I don’t want to come completely unglued every time a woman walks into the room, as if I were an adolescent.’ “Tremendous feelings of loneliness, despair and shame are the subconscious triggers for the overpowering urge and meeting the urge is just a maladaptive way to reduce that pain, for the moment, anyway. At the core, sexual addiction is really not about sex at all.” Not sure that explanation will make Elin feel any better (not sure anything will at this point), but there you go.

LOVE AND SEX ADVICE

NEW LOCATION

Special occasion coming up?

Schedule a GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT PARTY

419.654.3262 www.dancetoledo.com 4853 Monroe Street

(adjacent to Westfield Franklin Park)

Pole Dance Fitness • Ballroom Wedding Dance Prep • Salsa • Tango

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 2010

Exciting things are happening in “your” Downtown! FREE Parking

in more than 5,000 spaces after 5:00 on weekdays.

Calendar of Upcoming Events March 11 March 11 March 12 March 12-14 March 12-14 March 13 March 15 March 17 March 19 March 20 March 21 March 22 March 25-27 March 28 March 29

DTID hosts networking social 5:00-6:30 EPIC hosts social event at The Blarney Blarney O’Papalis 8:00-1:00 am Home & Garden Show at Seagate Monster Jam at Lucas County Arena Blarney O’Papalis 9:00-1:00 am Toledo Public Library Film Festival St. Patty’s Day- The Blarney opens at 8:00 am Toledo Walleye at home Bill Gaither at Lucas County Arena Toby Mac concert at Lucas County Arena Toledo Public Library Film Festival Zenobia Shrine Circus at Seagate Toledo Walleye at home Toledo Public Library Film Festival

To contact DTID, please call 419-249-5494, or visit our website : www.downtowntoledo.org

SIDELINES AT THE ARENA

2010 St. Patty’s Day Party

after work cocktails relaxed urban atmosphere toledo’s best jazz and blues music, thursday to sunday

relaxed urban atmosphere

toledo’s best jazz and blues music, thursday to sunday

Wednesday, March 17th M a n h a t t a n s • Drink Specials

is the perfect place to kick back and relax. Join us for Green Beer lunch or end your day•with the perfect cocktail. Try our scrumptious appetizers•orGuinness stay for dinner. Bring your friends. Beer Meet some new ones. You are sure to have a good time. • Live Music

Impressions are Everything

lunch dinner cocktails

Impressions Colors

with 1516 adams st., toledo U 419.243.6675 U free parking U www.manhattanstoledo.com from the Libbey Factory Outlet

A Touch of Glass

Come Join Us

for St.Patty’s Day and Every Wednesday,

for Food & Drink Specials Including Open Mic Nights Green Beer ALL DAY!

OPEN MONDAY–FRIDAY AT 11 AM

419-244-5151

233 N. Huron St. Toledo, OH

20% off

any purchase with coupon Take 20% off your total purchase of regular and sale priced merchandise at the Libbey Factory Outlet Store.

15% Off

Disclaimer: One coupon per purchase. Coupon must be any purchase with coupon presented at time of purchase. Cannot be combined Take 15% off your total purchase of regular with any other offer. Quantities and sale priced merchandiselimited at the to stock on hand. Store Libbey has right to limit quantities. Factory Outlet Store. No cash value. Disclaimer: One coupon per purchase. Coupon must be presented at time of Does not include prior purchases. Expires 12/31/08. purchase. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Quantities limited to stock on hand. Store has right to limit quantities. No cash value. Does not include prior purchases. Expires 3/30/10. TFP

TCP

205 S. Erie St. 205 • Toledo, OH 43604 S. Erie St.

Toledo, OH 43604 (419) 254-5000

(419) 254-5000

Mon-Fri 9:30am-5:30am, Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 10am-5pm Mon-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm • Sat 8am-5pm • Sun 10am-5pm


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Impetus for investing Rely on yourself to take care of your retirement.

M

any people, especially young people, don’t often give serious consideration to saving or investing for retirement. All too often they expect their financial future to be taken care of by either their employers (if they have a career) or the government. Unfortunately, as the last few years have made quite apparent, these assumptions can be very dangerous. First regarding employers, let’s face facts: Since 2008 the job market is shaky at best. Jobs can disappear at any time, as can 401(k) matching programs (this happened in many companies during 2008 and 2009), as employers continue to look for ways to cut costs.

Many companies want to help their employees save for retirement, but they do expect their employees to have additional savings aside from employer-sponsored plans. When it comes to relying on the government to secure a person’s financial future, the idea is almost laughable. Put bluntly, our generation will be lucky to ever see a thin dime back from Social Security. As books, TV personalities and many political activists have shown in detail, our government has shown itself totally incompetent of handling finances, be it fiscal deficits or funding DOCK DAVID government programs. What this means to young investors: We need to be prepared to fend for ourselves. We need to write off Social Security as a lost cause and look at 401(k) programs for what they are: a small piece of the pie. Some readers would undoubtedly argue that their parents take care

TREECE

DOLLARS & CENTS HE

of their finances, and they will make sure everything is structured properly. Young investors can rest assured that, after 2008, their parents are in hot water themselves, and are probably worried enough about their own retirement, which was just pushed out four or more years, that they don’t have time to worry about their kids. Young readers need to understand that your parents raised you, fed you, clothed you, maybe even put you through college. You’re on your own now, and need to take care of yourself. If anything, you need to be preparing yourself to take care of your parents, should they ever need your support. Unfortunately, the statistics tell a very different story. In fact, the savings rate in the United States is among the lowest of all industrialized nations. Here’s a sad fact: More low-income families think that they are more likely to accumulate money for retirement by winning the lottery than by saving and investing over time. Something that few investors understand is the power of compound interest. For a startling example, let’s assume that young investors decided to put themselves on a strict saving plan for the next 50 years, so they could accumulate enough money to retire. These young investors would probably just be starting their career, but they think they can watch

Starting Tuesday, March 16th 4-7 p.m. Wednesday March 17th (St. Patrick’s Day) 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursday March 18th 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

St. patrick’S day

rOck tHE BLOck party Saturday, March 13th 5-Midnight

The Shoppes at River Plaza/Walt Churchill’s Perrysburg on Rt. 25 & Eckel Junction Rd. There will be a Beer Tent, Music and Dancing. Hosted by the Shoppes at River Place. Sponsored by Brown Automotive Group. Presented by Sounds of Music, American Rent-All, JJ’s Pub, Star 105.5 FM and K100. Admission is $5 and tickets are available at the gate.

• Jigg’s Dinner- Steamship Round of Corned Beef, Cabbage, Potatoes, Carrots, Honey Mustard & Soda Bread……$7.99 Dinner • Only Corned Beef Carved from Steamship Round ……$8.99/ lb. • Cream of Potato & Spinach Soup or Irish Lamb Stew ……$7.99/ qt. • Baked Cod in Cream & Bay over Saffron Rice with Sautéed Leeks, Asparagus & Red Pepper ……$8.99 ea.

www.waltchurchillsmarket.com 26625 N. Dixie Hwy., Perrysburg Follow us on twitter @ waltchurchills

419.872.6900

Hours: Mon-Sun 7 a.m.– 11 p.m.

3320 Briarfield Blvd., Maumee

419.794.4000

Hours: Mon-Sat 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sun 8 a.m. – 9 p.m.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. | No sales to vendors. | Not responsible for pictorial or typographical errors.

their spending enough that they can consistently put away $100 every month for the next 50 years. They plan to invest the money they save with a good financial adviser who can average returns of 10 percent per year [after fees] on their hardearned money. Now, a quick calculator reference will reveal that over the course of this 50-year program, this investor has saved away $60,000, certainly not enough to live on through retirement. However, taking into account the interest they’ve been earning year after year, by the time they retire, their account will be worth well over a million dollars, or $1,331,511 to be precise. Saving and investing are surprisingly small tasks for those who can start early. They require a well-thought plan and plenty of discipline. Our future is not something we can leave in the hands of our employers or politicians; it’s up to us to take charge and play an active role. O Dock David Treece is a stockbroker licensed with FINRA. He works for Treece Financial Services Corp. and also serves as editor of the financial news site Green Faucet www.GreenFaucet.com and as a business commentator for Toledo Free Press. The above information is the express opinion of Dock David Treece and should not be construed as investment advice or used without outside verification.

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at Both Locations!


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 2010

Walleye fever

Spring spectacle set to begin on Maumee. By Scott Carpenter Special to Toledo Free Press Star

star@toledofreepress.com

Just as the Toledo Walleye hockey team is ending its first season of regular league play, the Lake Erie walleye are beginning an annual tradition as old as the Maumee River. This time every year, up to 500,000 of the fish make their way up the largest river flowing into the Great Lakes for the “spring run.” The reproductive ritual is responsible in part for Lake Erie’s claim to fame as the Walleye Capital of the World. This time of year, the Maumee is the Walleye Capital. Walleye run, or spawn, in other tributaries of the Great Lakes, including the Sandusky River in Fremont, but the Maumee River

Catching walleye on the Maumee River is all about timing. PHOTO COURTESY METROPARKS

run is the largest and best known. Thousands of fishermen from throughout the region and beyond begin arriving in Maumee and Perrysburg shortly after the ice is gone to wade into the river after the coveted game fish. “It’s a spectacle to watch, but it’s not new,” said Mark Plessner, who grew up on the river and has led nature walks for the Metroparks since the early 1990s. “Native Americans harvested fish in

mexico

BRINGING THE FLAVORS OF

to northwest ohio

experience the

Northwest Ohioans have always enjoyed the hot flavors of Mexico, and our warm hospitality. Come to one of our restaurants and experience a delicious dining adventure tonight!

Loma-Linda’s

“BIEN VENIDOS AMIGOS”

Specializing in Mexican Food since 1955

419-865-5455

10400 Airport Hwy.(1.2 Mi. East of the Aiport) Lunch & Dinner, 11 a.m. to Midnight Closed Sundays & Holidays

BARRON’S CAFE

Everything Mexican From Tacos to Enchiladas to Delicious Burritos

419-825-3474

13625 Airport Hwy., Swanton (across from Valleywood Country Club) Mon. - Thurs. 11-11 p.m. Fri. - Sat. 11-12 a.m. Closed Sundays and Holidays

• 20TH ANNIVERSARY •

THE ORIGINAL MEXICAN RESTAURANTE & CANTINA IN TOLEDO

419-841-7523

7742 W. Bancroft (1 Mi. West of McCord) Mon. - Sat. from 11 a.m. Closed Sundays & Holidays

ARTURO’S

FRITZ & ALFREDO’S Original Recipes from Both Mexico and Germany

419-729-9775

3025 N. Summit Street (near Point Place) Mon. - Thurs. 11-10 p.m. Fri. - Sat. 11-11 p.m., Sun. 3-9 p.m. Closed Holidays

Casual Dining • ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

the same spots. The fishery has been here as long as the river has.” Side Cut Metropark in Maumee is one of the most popular spring run fishing destinations. The park provides easy access from West Broadway Street to the prime spawning grounds just below the Jerome Road Rapids. That’s where the female walleye broadcast thousands of eggs each over the cobblestone on the bottom of the river. The stones provide cover for the eggs so they don’t get washed away before the males arrive to fertilize them. Catching walleye is all about timing. “The fish are sensitive to the photo (daylight) period and they actually move into the river when the water reaches 45 degrees,” Plessner said. “So more than anything else you need a thermometer to tell whether or not you’re going to be successful.” Most fishermen wade just far enough out from shore to get past the brush that can snag their fishing line, or cross a narrow channel to Blue Grass Island, where they can gain access to the larger channel on the island’s south side. Others fish from small boats or from shore. “The angler, of all the sportsmen, is the most optimistic,” said Plessner. “He’s got on a $100 pair of waders, a $100 stick with a reel on it that probably cost $40-50 and maybe a $50 landing net. He’s just certain he’s going to catch fish.” In 2009, many of them did just that. Maumee River fishermen reeled in an estimated 57,000 walleye during the run, the most since 1990 and the third most since 1975, according to the ODNR-Division of Wildlife, Sandusky Fish Research Station. The vast majority of the fish were males hatched six years earlier, according to Travis Hartman, a biologist at the research station. That’s a lot of fish, especially considering that the regulations then, as now, allow each fisherman to keep just four walleye per day in March and April. Regulations also limit the size of fish, legal fishing times and types of lures that can be used. In addition to water temperature and fishing

regulations, anglers also have to contend with the delicate balance of water levels, said Clarence Labiche, of Toledo, who has sold his own brand of fishing lures at Side Cut during the spring run for more than two decades. “You have to play it by ear,” Labiche said, adding that snowmelt and rain in Indiana can affect river levels more than precipitation here in Toledo. The height of the river is critical because the water needs to be high enough at the right time to allow the fish to swim upstream, but low enough at other times for fishermen to wade into the river. Last year, Labiche recalled, spring floods swelled the river over its banks and across the road, putting the fishing season on hold until the water receded. Higher water is needed again after the hatch to wash the young fish, called fry, out into the Maumee Bay because there isn’t enough food in the river to sustain them for more than a few days, Plessner said. Plessner, a veteran observer of the spring run, offers a few tips to fishermen, from his perspective: O Be careful, not only on the water, but also along busy West Broadway Street. Heed the warnings of signs that indicate when the water is too high to safely cross to the island. O Don’t leave fishing line and lures behind. Plessner has photographs of wildlife, including a Canada goose and great blue heron, entangled in discarded fishing line. O Mind legal fishing hours, sunrise to sunset, and note that the time changes March 14. O Finally, enjoy the fishing, but also take a moment to enjoy the view. The Maumee is a state scenic river and attracts a wide array of birds and other wildlife. You might even see a bald eagle. The Metroparks maintains a walleye hot line to keep fishermen posted about current conditions, including river height and water temperature. Call (419) 407-9731 (select option 1). O Scott Carpenter is public relations director for Metroparks. Contact him at scott.carpenter@metroparkstoledo.com. Contact Metroparks at (419) 407-9700.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 2010

MARCH 10-17, 2010

What’s what, where and when in NW Ohio

Compiled by Whitney Meschke Events are subject to change.

MUSIC MUSIC

The Blarney Irish Pub:

Catch local acts and the pub’s modern Irish and American fare. 601 Monroe St. (419) 4182339 or www.theblarneyirishpub.com. O Jeff Stewart: March 11. O Astra (Resonant Soul acoustic): March 18. O 2 Dudes & A Chick: March 19. O Cluster Folk: March 20.

Bronze Boar:

Be sure to check out this Warehouse District tavern’s namesake, overhead near the entrance. 20 S. Huron St. (419) 244-2627 or www.bronzeboar.com. O Brandon Duke: Wednesdays. O Joe Woods Band: March 11. O Ravens: March 12. O Distinct Cousins: March 13. O Rivers Edge: March 18. O Mike Whitty Group: March 19. O Crucial 420: March 20.

Brooklyn’s Daily Grind:

Coffee and music, what more can one want? If a snack is the answer, this is your spot. 723 Airport Hwy., Holland. (419) 724-1433 or www.brooklynscafe.com. O Troy Moore & Joe Howe: 8-11 p.m. March 12. O Decent Folk: March 19.

Caesars Windsor:

If you have your passport, consider hopping the Detroit River for this casino’s entertainment offerings. Ticket prices are approximate because of fluctuating currency exchanges; attendees must be 19 or older. Caesars Windsor Colosseum, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor, Ontario. (800) 991-7777 or www.caesarswindsor.com. O Air Supply: 9 p.m. March 13, $20. O Whoopi Goldberg: 9 p.m. March 20, $34.

Degage Jazz Cafe:

Signature drinks, plus live local jazz performers. 301 River Road, Maumee. $5 Tuesdays-Thursdays. (419) 794-8456 (information) 794-8205 (reservations) or www.degagejazzcafe.com. O Gene Parker: Wednesdays and March 19-20. O Jerry Powell: March 12-13. O Eric Johanson: March 17. O Tim Whalen: March 18. O Steve Richko: March 25-27.

Distillery’s St. Patrick’s Day:

4311 Heatherdowns Blvd., (419) 382-1444 or www.thedistilleryonline.com. O Dave Carpenter: March 10. O Noisey Neighbors: March 11. O Jeff Stewart & the 25s: March 12-13. O Tony & Lyle (5-8 p.m.) and Bridges March 17. O The Bridges: March 18-20. O Steve Mullan: March 24. O Gunslinger: March 25. O Earregulars: March 26-27. O Tony & Lyle: March 31.

Manhattan’s:

This “slice of the Big Apple” in the Glass City provides entertainment most weekends. 1516 Adams St. (419) 243-6675 or www. manhattanstoledo.com. O John Jelinger Trio: 6 p.m. March 11. O Joe Woods Band: March 12. O Tom Turner & Slowburn: March 13. O Cynthia Kaay Bennett: 6 p.m. March 15. O Quick Trio: 6 p.m. March 18. O Sarah Cohen: March 19. O John Barile: March 20.

Mickey Finn’s:

A variety of genres. Open mic nights (no cover), 8 p.m. Wednesdays. 9 p.m., 602 Lagrange St. $5-$7 cover. (419) 246-3466 or www.mickeyfinnspub. com. O Fangs Out: March 11. O Tobacco, Teammate, Go Lab: March 12. O The Hard Lessons, Mindflash: March 13. O Highland: March 18. O The Lux, the Tides: March 19. O Champions of Breakfast: March 20.

Fat Fish Blue:

Serving blues and similar sounds, as well as bayou-style grub. Levis Commons, 6140 Levis Commons Blvd., Perrysburg. (419) 9313474 or www.fatfishfunnybonetoledo.com. O Hepcat Revival: 9:30 p.m. March 12-13, $7. O East River Drive: 9:30 p.m. March 19-20, $7.

Frankie’s Inner City:

Tickets vary between $5 and $14, unless otherwise noted. 308 Main St. (419) 6935300 or www.FrankiesInnerCity.com. O Trainwreck: 9 p.m. March 12. O Once Over, Measure the Redshift, Curse Icon, Harrowsfield: 9 p.m. March 13. O Driver Side Impact, Victory in Numbers, Zenadare, All Dreams Arrest: 5 p.m. March 18. O ShamROCK benefit concert featuring Ashes, Man Down, Poetic Republic: 9 p.m. March 18. O After Midnight Project, Ashes of Soma: 9 p.m. March 19. O All Hope Abandon, Soldierside: 9 p.m. March 20. O A Place to Bury Strangers: 8 p.m. March 21.

Ground Level Coffeehouse:

Mix your beans with some music for an eclectic brew. Open mic on Monday nights. 2636 W. Central Ave. (419) 671-6272 or www.groundleveltoledo.com. O Village Voice Soultry Cafe: March 11. O Steve Guerrero Showcase: March 13. O Jazz Jam Session: March 17. O Steve Masternak and friends: March 19. O Watson St. Loft: March 20.

Headliners:

All ages, all genres are welcome. 4500 N. Detroit Ave. Ticket prices vary between $5 and $15, unless noted otherwise. (419) 693-5300 or www.headlinerstoledo.com. O Jonny Craig, Tides of March, Eye Alaska, Romance of a Rocketship, the Kaleidoscope Brighter: 6 p.m. March 13. O Ekoostik Hookah, Polka Floyd: 8 p.m. March 20.

The Grascals to bring bluegrass to Perrysburg Pickin’, pluckin’, three-part harmonizin’ and lovin’ — that’s The Grascals. “The main thing ... is that there’s six people that’s playing together that love each other and love the music that we create,” singer and guitarist Terry Eldredge said. “And we don’t forget our roots; we remember where we came from.” Whether the bluegrass band is covering a country classic, playing a gospel song, or scorching a barn with an original instrumental, The Grascals have fun. That’s a lesson the Grammy-nominated group learned from a legend. After forming in Nashville in 2004, The Grascals toured one year with Dolly Parton. “Dolly always said before we’d go onstage, she’d say, ‘Have fun with it because if not, it’s work and that’s a four-letter word,’ ” Eldredge said during a phone call from Nashville. The Grascals — Eldredge, singer and guitarist Jamie Johnson, singer and upright bass player Terry Smith, banjoist Kristin Scott Benson, mandolin player Danny Roberts and fiddler Jeremy Abshire — will bring that good-time attitude to the Center for Fine and Performing Arts at Owens Community College in Perrysburg for an 8 p.m. show March 19. Tickets are $26 and $22. They’ll be excited, too, as “The Famous Lefty Flynn’s” will be released March 30. “[Lefty Flynn’s] a fictional character that Jamie Johnson came up with ... and [Flynn’s] an outlaw. He robbed all the banks out West and hid

a bunch of money all different places,” Eldredge said. “And then, of course, well, me because I’m the one singing it, me and Lefty end up breaking out of jail and go and get the money and build this bar called the Famous Lefty Flynn’s. I ain’t going to tell you the sad part of it, though, but you can probably figure that out.” The new CD will feature a cover of The Monkees’ “Last Train to Clarksville.” Hank Williams Jr. is a guest vocalist on the new disc; he sings “I’m Blue, I’m Lonesome.” “It’s a song that his daddy, Hank Sr., and Bill Monroe wrote backstage at the Ryman Auditorium at the Grand Ole Opry,” Eldredge said. “We combined Hank Sr.’s sound and Bill Monroe’s sound together because we’ve got twin fiddles and, of course, the mandolin and guitar and banjo, and then we also put steel on it like Don Helms would have played on Hank Sr.’s albums, and it turned out really, really cool.” Eldredge was matter-of-fact when asked about his reverence and passion for bluegrass. “It’s a real, rural, American music and it talks about home, growing up and living and dying and dreaming, you know, it’s just a real true music that anybody can relate to,” he said. “Bill Monroe said it best. One time when we asked him about what [makes bluegrass special], he said, ‘It’s my heart talking to your heart.’ ” O — Vicki L. Kroll


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Murphy’s Place:

Jazz played here. 151 Water St. (419) 2417732 or www.murphysplacejazz.com. O Ellie Martin: 9 p.m. March 12, $6. O Calvin Hughes: March 14; call for tickets. O Clifford Murphy and Claude Black: 8 p.m. March 15-16, $4. O Glenda McFarlin: 9 p.m. March 19, $6. O Christian Howes: 9 and 11 p.m. March 20.

Omni:

This Toledo club is a venue for music (and music lovers) of all types. 2567 W. Bancroft St. (419) 535-6664 or omnimidwest.com. O Appetite for Destruction: 7:30 p.m. March 12. O Motley Crue tribute; Poison tribute: 7:30 p.m. March 19, $7.

Ottawa Tavern:

Casual meals. 1815 Adams St. (419) 7255483 or www.otavern.com. O Falling Spikes: March 13. O Peregrine: March 19. O Full Scale Panic, Iron Minds: March 20.

The Village Idiot:

Tunes combined with pizza and booze, some would say it’s a perfect combination. 309 Conant St., Maumee. (419) 893-7281 or www.villageidiotmaumee.com. O The Werks: March 12. O Reese Daily Band: March13. O Steve Mulland Band: March 18. O The Nutones: March 19. O 4 Finger 5: March 20.

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Yeeha’s St. Patrick’s Day Party:

Big Ticket will perform, and DJ Heat will spin tunes. March 17. 3150 Navarre Ave., Oregon. (419) 691-8880 or www.yeehas.com. O Double Shot: March 12-13. O Big Ticket: March 19. O Websters: March 20.

Morehouse College Glee Club:

7 p.m. March 10, Third Baptist Church, 402 Pinewood Ave. $10. (419) 248-4623 or www. tbctoledo.org.

Skeleton Crue:

This band will be joined in performance by guests Sleeper Cell, Stryk 9 and Sunz of Sam. 8 p.m. March 13, Toledo Mainstreet Bar and Grill, 141 Main St. $5-$8. (419) 697-6297.

Hats Off to Jazz:

This event, featuring music from the Murphy’s band, will benefit Beta Phi Chapter of Gamma Phi Delta sorority’s scholarship fund. 6:30 p.m.-midnight March 13, Murphy’s Place, 151 Water St. $30-$35. (419) 241-7732 or www.murphysplacejazz.com.

Living, Hope, Passion, Wisdom:

The Masterworks Chorale, with help from the Toledo School for the Arts senior chorus, will perform works by Byrd, Brahms, Rutter and Bernstein. 8 p.m. March 13, First Presbyterian Church, 200 E. Broadway St., Maumee. $12-$25. (419) 246-8000 or visit the Web site www.masterworkschorale.us.

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Ann Arbor Palestine Film Festival returns A sampling of contemporary Palestinian cinema will return with the premiere of Najwa Najjar’s feature film “Pomegranates and Myrrh” at 7:30 p.m. March 10 at the Michigan Theater. The festival, which was founded in 2008, is organized by a core group of University of Michigan students and recent graduates, with the help and guidance of a carefully selected advisory board. “Films are very accessible, so I wanted to start a Palestine film festival as a means to educate people on Palestine, by showing films that are made by Palestinians, so that we would be providing a venue for Palestinians to have their voices heard, and by showing films made by nonPalestinians in solidarity with Palestine,” said festival founder Hena Ashraf. In addition to Ashraf, this year’s main festival organizers include Bana Sakr, Ryah Aqel, Lauren Thams and Reid Allison. “We really aim to offer films that humanize the Palestinian people. Some of the films we select are submitted and some are invited, one of the main things with look at

is the production value. I think the festival offers films that very few people know much about, and I think that those that attend will be touched and entertained,” Allison said. Other screenings will include Cherien Dabis’ award winning “Amreeka” at 7:30 p.m. March 11, also at the Michigan Theater, followed by a series of short films at 8 p.m. March 12 at the Michigan Union Ballroom, including Georgina Asfour’s “Neighbors,” Paulina Tervo’s “Thorns and Silk” and Cherien Dabis’ “Make a Wish.” Screenings on March 13 at the Hutchins Hall Law School will feature a 2 p.m. showing of Yaelle Kayam’s short “Diploma,” followed by Ismail Habbash, Raed al-Helou, and Najwa Najjar’s “Gaza Winter” and Terje Carlsson’s “Welcome to Hebron.” Closing the festival that evening at 7 p.m. At the UM Museum of Art (UMMA) will be Yaron Shani and Scandar Copti’s “Ajami,” which premiered at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival. For more information, visit the Web site www.a2palestinefilmfest.org. O — John Dorsey

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‘Casablanca’ at Maumee Indoor Theatre The Lyric Photoplay Society will present “Casablanca” at the Maumee Indoor Theateron March 14. “Individuals can enjoy how great movies use to be,” said Evan Chase, chairman of Lyric Photoplay Society. The 1940s classic stars

TMA Faculty Artist Series:

Instructors and professors from area colleges will perform. 3 p.m. Sundays, Great Gallery, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org. O UT faculty vocalist Carol Dusdieker, March 14. O Winners of BGSU’s fourth annual Chamber Music Competition, March 21.

Kate Jordan and Soul Venture:

These Christian performers will sing. 10:45 a.m. March 14, Eastminster Presbyterian Church, 725 Navarre Ave. (419) 691-4867.

The Blue Pacific Grill

is a tropical themed restaurant that offers a unique dining experience, where you create your own Asian stir-fry that includes the finest choice of proteins, seasonings, veggies and mixes. Then choose one of our 12 sauces and hand your creation over to one of the trained grill masters as they magically cook your signature dish to perfection on a flat-top grill — ready to enjoy in just minutes! Large Selecti on of Imp orted & Dome stic Be ers!

Scholars of a Different Note:

This concert series features BGSU vocal and instrumental music students. 7:30 p.m. March 16, 23 and 30, Wildwood Preserve Metropark Manor House, 5100 W. Central Ave. (419) 419-407-9700.

The Expedition Show:

Formerly known as Williams & Clark Expedition, this bluegrass band will be joined by some surprise guests. 7 p.m. March 17, Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. $15. (419) 250-1096 or www. glasscityopry.com.

Heart & Soul:

Dueling Pianos will perform, with special appearances by Notre Dame Academy students, in this fundraiser for the school’s scholarship fund. 6:30 p.m. March 20, NDA gymnasium, 3535 W. Sylvania Ave. $50. Reservations: (419) 475-9628 or visit the Web site www.nda.org.

“The Y Chromosome”:

Full Bar and Daily Drink Specials Hours: Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm • Fri-Sat 11am-10pm

4150 Levis Commons Blvd. • Perrysburg, OH 43551 (419) 873-9466 www.TheBluePacificGrill.com

A musical and spoken word celebration of Women’s History Month featuring performances and DJs. 9 p.m. March 20, Collingwood Arts Center, 2413 Collingwood Blvd. $5. (419) 244-2787 or www.collingwood artscenter.org.

Gaither Homecoming Tour:

Christian music fans can get their gospel on. Performers include Michael Eng-

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. Before the movie will be old newsreels and old previews to create a sense of how movies used to be, Chase said. The 1942 film won the Academy Award for Best Picture and featured the classic song, “As Time Goes By.” Shows will begin at 2:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Admission is $5. Maumee Indoor Theater is located at 601 Conant St. For more information, visit www. greateasterntheatres.com. The Lyric Photoplay Society shows classic films around town. — Kristen Rapin

lish, Mark Lowry, David Phelps and Wes Hampton. 4 p.m. March 20, Lucas County Arena, 500 Jefferson Ave. $29.50-$39.50. (419) 321-5007 or visit the Web site www. lucascountyarena.com.

Rhapsody in Blue:

Pianist Kirill Gerstein will play works by Rachmaninoff and Gershwin with the Toledo Symphony. 8 p.m. March 20, TMA’s Peristyle, 2445 Monroe St. $20-$50. (419) 246-8000, (800) 348-1253 or www.toledosymphony.com.

Engelbert Humperdinck:

Beloved by fans, this romantic icon is touring in support of his new “Legacy of Love” CD. 7:30 p.m. March 20, Ritz Theatre, 20 S. Washington St., Tiffin. $35-$90. (419) 4488544 or www.ritztheatre.org.

Toledo School for the Arts recital:

Budding young musicians will take center stage. 1:30 p.m. March 21, Trinity Episcopal Church, 1 Trinity Plaza. $12-$15. (419) 2468732 or www.trinitytoledo.org.

Jimmy Cook tribute:

The Toledo Jazz Orchestra will pay homage to this Toledo-area jazz legend, a trumpet player. Proceeds will fund a memorial scholarship. 3-6 p.m. March 21, Southbriar Restaurant, 5147 Main St., Sylvania. $10. (419) 654-0775 or (419) 517-1111.

TobyMac & Skillet:

These two top Christian acts are joining forces for their Awake Tonight Tour. 7 p.m. March 21, Lucas County Arena, 500 Jefferson Ave. $27-$24. (419) 321-5007 or www.lucascountyarena.com.

High School Honors Band Concert:

High schools from Northwest Ohio and southeastern Michigan send their best musicians to perform. 3 p.m. March 21, UT’s Doermann Theater, University Hall, 2801 W. Bancroft St. Visit the Web site www.utoledo.edu/as/music or the Webb site www.utoledo.edu/bands.


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Border Crossings:

Baroque Music of Northern and Southern Europe. Musica Antigua de Toledo, a community ensemble, works to re-create pre-1800 styles and sounds with as much historical accuracy as possible, using combinations of voices and period instruments. 3:30 p.m. March 21, UT’s Center for Performing Arts recital hall, Tower View Boulevard and West Campus Drive. $8$10. www.musicaantiguatoledo.org.

Warren Mailley-Smith:

This U.K. pianist is called “one of the country’s leading solo pianists of his generation.” 2 p.m. March 21, Ritz Theatre, 20 S. Washington St., Tiffin. $10-$20. (419) 448-8544 or www.ritztheatre.org.

F.C.ETC. Understanding Digital Camera Basics workshop:

PRIZM Creative Community will sponsor these classes to help photographers understand how new cameras differ from traditional formats and help them transfer photos from camera to computer for editing. 1-3 p.m. March 10 or 13, Way Public Library computer laboratory, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. $10. www.myprizm. com. Registration: (419) 874-9422.

The 2445:

The Art of Funk. The socially minded can boogie to funkadelic music, try groove-worthy food and sip unusual drinks, then check out the “funkier” side of the TMA collection. 7-10 p.m. March 11, Glass Pavilion’s GlasSalon, 2445 Monroe St. $30. (419) 254-5771, ext. 7432.

Monster Jam:

Revving engines, tires as tall as a basketball player and a rumble that resonates through your entire body … yes, it’s monster truck time. These behemoths will tackle a customdesigned track full of obstacles. 7:30 p.m. March 12, 2 and 7:30 p.m. March 13 and 2 p.m. March 14, Lucas County Arena, 500 Jefferson Ave. $25-$30. (419) 321-5007, (419) 474-1333 or www.lucascountyarena.com.

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“Murders at Little Wotting”:

A group of actors takes over an experimental theater piece and turns it into a “traditional British village mystery.” But someone is stalking the proceedings. 8 p.m. March 12-13, 19-20 and 26-27, Oliver House South Wing, 27 Broadway St. $5-$10. www.northcoasttheatre. org. Reservations: (419) 255-0416.

Cigar tasting:

Anyone appreciative of a good torpedo can check out this event, featuring some of the area’s best cigars. Noon-8 March 13, Cigar Merchant, 1415 W. Sylvania Ave. (419) 478-6747.

Steppin’ Out:

Funky shoes will be admired at this fifth annual Toledo School for the Arts fundraiser, featuring live and silent auctions with guest auctioneer Jerry Anderson of WTOL. Lots will include student and professional art, trips, home furnishings, music and more. 6 p.m. March 13, Toledo Club, 235 14th St. www.ts4arts.org. Dinner: $45. Reservations: (419) 246-8732, ext. 256.

Square and Contra Dancing:

Beginning and experienced dancers can twirl to old-time music from the Cottonwood Jam String Band with Marlin Whitaker calling. Partners aren’t necessary. 7:30-10:30 p.m. March 13, Rossford United Methodist Church, 270 Dixie Highway, Rossford. $3-$6. (419) 8748831, (419) 691-5389 or www.notmad.org.

Manor of Weddings bridal fair:

Brides-to-be can stroll through the mansion and get information about their special days. Two fashion shows, appetizers and live music are planned, too. 5 p.m. March 19, Manor House, Wildwood Preserve Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave. $7-$10. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations. metroparkstoledo.com.

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“Shaft”:

Learn why Shaft was a 1971 breakthrough film directed by Gordon Parks, then sit back and enjoy viewing it. 7-10 p.m. March 19, TMA Glass Pavilion GlasSalon, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org.

Elton John, Barenaked Ladies, Moody Blues Elton John will perform his “Rocket Man — the Greatest Hits Live” concert at 8 p.m. April 25 at the Lucas County Arena on April 25. “Your Song,” “Daniel,” “Rocket Man” and “Bennie and the Jets” are among the songs John plays on the tour. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. March 13 for $139, $89 and $39 and will be available through all Ticketmaster outlets, online at www.ticket master.com, the Lucas County Arena Box Office and by phone at (800) 745-3000.

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Zoo concerts

On March 9, the concert news service Pollstar reported that Barenaked Ladies and the Moody Blues are booked to play the Toledo Zoo. Pollstar said Barenaked Ladies would appear May 14; Moody Blues are scheduled for July 2. At presstime, the Zoo had not confirmed the performers or dates. — Staff Reports

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Irish eyes turn to local festivities FOX Toledo’s Ashley Johncola shamROCKS!

by Kristen Rapin

TOLEDO FREE PRESS SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR krapin@toledofreepress.com

Decked out in green, the Face of FOX Toledo Ashley Johncola and I hit the bars for a pre- St. Patrick’s Day pub crawl. The quest to see what Toledo had to offer for the Irish holiday. Joined by former “Face” Julia Johnston

and fellow Toledoans, we drank in the festivities, enjoying live music, dancing, food and fun at local bars. On March 17, Toledo will embrace Irish traditions and paint the town green because on St. Patrick’s Day everyone is Irish. Below is a list of St. Paddy’s parties and drink specials to point Toledoans to locations where they may enjoy their inner Irish. Erin go Bragh! O

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With Sasha Waldon, Kelly Nemetz, Kayla Jay at The Bunker. Mickey Finn’s Pub Julia Johnston, lef

t, Tracy Turner with

The Blarney Irish Pub

The show at Lourdes will be an acoustic performance. Screaming Orphans will perform at 8:30 p.m. in the Ebeid Student Center. Tickets for the show are $10, or free with a Lourdes College student ID. To purchase tickets visit the box office at the Franciscan Center or call Binkowski at (419) 517-8870. For more information about the Screaming Orphans, visit www.screamingorphans.com. O — Kristen Rapin

EVENTS CALENDAR

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ith Ashley w Hall e n n a z Su Finn’s. at Mickey

Will Cole, left, with Jake Bell and Ash

Screaming Orphans, an Irish rock band, will perform March 19 at Lourdes College. “Our audience loves them. They are a lot of fun and put on a good show,” said Lisa Binkowski, director of campus and residential life programs at Lourdes College. The band is returning to the college for its fourth performance. The Screaming Orphans is composed of four sisters, Joan, Angela, Gráinne and Marie Thérèse Diver, from Ireland. The women draw musical inspiration from Simon and Garfunkel, R.E.M. and traditional Irish music. “They were really awesome. My friends and I were jumping and dancing around; it was a good time,” said Ben Jakeway, a third year Lourdes student who saw the Screaming Orphans in 2009.

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Screaming Orphans at Lourdes

MOVIES

With Steve Mulla

On the felt with Phil Dockum.

STAR PHOTOS BY CHARLIE LON GTON

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601 Monroe St. (419) 418-2339 O Open: 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. O Drinks: Limited beer selection and full liquor, Guinness, Killian’s, Irish Great Lakes, Harp, Smithwick O Bands: Johnny Rocker and Hitmen featuring Kyle White: 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. O $5 suggested donation to American Red Cross of Greater Toledo

Four Horsemen

4452 Lewis Ave. (419) 476-3900 O Open: 10 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. O Food: $ 8.50 Jiggs Dinner Dine in or carry out available O Drinks: O $1 Green Demon shot *Best Jiggs Dinner

Ashley at The Four

Horsemen.

Pre-St. Patrick’s Day festivities: “Blarney O’Papalis”:

“IRISH Kickoff to St. Paddy’s Day” O Open: March 12 from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. O Bands: Toast and Jam: 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Bloody Tinth: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. O Open: March 13 from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. O Bands: The Bloody Tinth 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. O $5 suggested donation with proceeds donated to United Way and Boys & Girls Clubs of Toledo * Covers benefit local charities

Delaney’s Lounge

309 West Alexis Road (419) 476-2883 O Open: 10 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. O Food: Corn beef sandwiches O Drink Specials: Jello shots, Green beer, Killian’s O DJ Mark Sheppard with Glass City Sounds starts at 3 p.m. Free leis and beads while supplies last *Leprechaun making appearances throughout the day

602 Lagrange St. (419) 246-3466 O Open: 11 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. O Food: $10 Jiggs Dinner O Drinks: $5 Guinness, $5 pitchers O Bands: Paddy Murphy: 4 p.m. Bobby May and the Dry Bones Revival: 7 p.m. Boogie Matrix Mechanism: 10:30 p.m. O $5 cover *Best live music

Mulvaney’s Bunker Irish Pub

4945 Dorr St. (419) 534-9830 O Open: 9 am to 2 a.m. O Food: $6.95 all you can eat breakfast at 9 a.m. $8.50 Jiggs Dinner O Drink Specials: Green beer on tap, $2 shots O Bands: Kyle White: noon to 4 p.m. City Limit Sundown: 5p.m. to 9p.m. DJ Smoke: 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. O $5 cover charge starting at noon *heated tents over patio

6648 Lewis Ave. (734) 847-7222 O Open: 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. O Food: $10 Jiggs Dinner $7 Cornbeef sandwiches To-go orders welcome until 7 p.m. Kitchen closes at 2 a.m. Drinks: $4 Irish margaritas, Harp, Smithwick, Irish shots $6 20 oz. Guinness $3.50 Killian’s $6.50 Irish Car Bomb O In house D.J. all day * Variety of drink specials

Village Inn

4984 N. Holland Sylvania Road (419) 882-0338 O Open: 7 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. O Food: Jiggs Dinner: $7.99 O Drink specials: $2.50 Killian’s, $3.50 Guinness Featured shots: Mini Guinie, Irish Car Bombs O Bands: Mt. Fuji and the Eruption: 6:30 p.m. * No cover charge with live band

Claddagh Irish Pub Shawn’s Irish Tavern

4400 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-1281  and 105 S. 3rd St. (419) 441-1081 O Open: 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. O Food: $8 Jiggs Dinner O Drinks: $2.50 green beers O Bands: Johnny Rodriquez: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. (Toledo) 8p.m. to midnight (Waterville) $2 cover at 3 p.m. *Free beer cozy and beads with cover

5001 Monroe St. (419) 472-1414 O Open: 6 a.m. to 2:30 am O Food: Kegs and Eggs starting at 6 a.m. O Drink Specials: $5 pitchers of green beer, $2.50 Irish lemon drop shots, $3 draft after 10 p.m., $1 Bud lights from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. O Bands: Extra Stout: noon to 3 p.m. The Bridges : 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Rays: 9 p.m. to midnight O $5 cover starts at 3 p.m. *$20 VIP passes- no cover, no waiting in lines, entrance to a special VIP lounge and free buffet at 5 p.m.

Black & White Transportation offers app to get you home By Kristen Rapin

TOLEDO FREE PRESS SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR krapin@toledofreepress.com

Black & White Transportation offers an iPhone application that can help Toledoans arrive home safely after St. Patrick’s Day festivities. “When you’re having a good time, it can be very easy to over-celebrate. But, you still have to make the right choices, and the B4UDRIVE app can help with that,” said Scott Potter, owner of Black & White Transportation, in a press release. The company developed B4UDRIVE, an application that can calculate an individual’s blood alcohol content (BAC) by taking into account gender, weight and number for drinks consumed. If the application finds that the user should have someone else driving, an icon on the screen will identify if they are within Black & White Transportation’s service area and connect to the 24-hour dispatch center. If someone is not within the service area, the number for the nearest cab company will be provided. If concerned about leaving a vehicle behind, an individual may specify Black &White Home and two drivers will arrive, one to drive the cab and the other to transport the remaining car. The company also has a reservation system that can be accessed by any Web capable phone, www. bwcab.com. For more information, visit the company’s Web site at www.blackandwhitecab.com. O


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While many may think March 17 has progressed into even more of a drinking day, bar owner Jeff Hobbie said St. Patrick’s Day in Bowling Green has pretty much stayed the same. “St. Patrick’s Day is a drinking holiday and always has been,” Hobbie said. “You just have to know how to control it.” This year, two of the more popular bars in town have been Hobbie’s City Tap and The Attic, each of which will open their doors to their first St. Patrick’s Day next week. City Tap, located on North Main Street in downtown Bowling Green opened in September while The Attic, located right above City Tap, opened a few months earlier during the summer. Together, the two bars have enjoyed much success in their first year of business and have become hot spots of Bowling Green night life. Hobbie, an alumnus of BGSU, has been on the BG bar scene for more than 30 years and knows what to expect on St. Patrick’s Day. “It’s probably the second-busiest day of the year for the bars outside Homecoming,” he said. In addition to co-owning City Tap and The Attic, Hobbie is also the owner of Uptown/ Downtown Sports Bar and Deli just down the street, a business he started back in 1979. “It’s been great so far and hopefully the success we’ve had at Uptown/Downtown will to carry over to City Tap and The Attic,” Hobbie said. One person who would definitely agree with Hobbie is co-owner Eric Pelham. Also a BGSU graduate, Pelham has worked as general manager of Uptown/Downtown since 2001. Partnering with Hobbie, the two went into business together, opening City Tap and The Attic. Being a graduate of the University, Pelham

understands how people and students in town celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. “It’s the one day of the year that everyone seems to be in a good mood and lots of people are out, especially in BG,” Pelham said. Pelham agreed that St. Patrick’s Day hasn’t really changed in recent years, but that people’s perceptions of the day seem to change with time. “Growing up, you know you have to wear green or someone’s going to pinch you,” he said. “I think for most people, it’s not until you get to college that you realize how big of a party day it is.” City Tap will open on St. Patrick’s Day at 9 a.m. and The Attic will open up a few hours later at 12 p.m. One of the things Hobbie and Pelham are excited about is opening up The Attic’s outside patio area for the first time this year. The patio, which overlooks the four corners of downtown Bowling Green at the intersection of East Wooster and North Main Street is one of the things the two were most excited about when opening the bar. “The patio gives the bar more space and I think lots of people come to The Attic to hang out there, especially if it’s a nice day,” Pelham said. On St. Patrick’s Day, City Tap and The Attic will be serving up specials on Bud Light drafts, Irish drinks and shots. Uptown, which will open at 8 p.m., will be having a “power hour” upon opening and will feature $1 beers and shots. Downtown will open earlier at 10 a.m. and will have $2 green Bud Light drafts among other specials. All four bars also will have free giveaways such as T-shirts. But Pelham’s and Hobbie’s bars won’t be the only ones hosting a St. Patrick’s Day bash next week. Almost every other bar in town will feature drink specials and will be opening their doors earlier than most people would even think about drinking if it was any other day. Nate and Wally’s Fishbowl will host live bands all day along with $3.50 Guinness drafts, $4 green beer pitchers and free giveaways. Ziggy Zoomba’s Bar and Grill will be also have live music all day with green beer specials. O


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ART & FAMILY

Imagination Station

Children’s science museum. Visitors can take part in the Big Draw, which allows them to contribute to a 4-by-8-foot community artwork by drawing their favorite cartoons. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays and noon-5 Sundays, Summit and Adams streets. $6.50-$8.50. (419) 2442674 or imaginationstationtoledo.org. Upcoming and ongoing programming O “Animation”: Some of the Cartoon Network’s favorite characters will give visitors a peek inside the world of animation. Through May 2. O Science Story Times: Trained team members will read an interactive story to children in the Little KIDSPACE Science Studio and help them make a related project to take home. Upcoming topics: Clucking cups: “The Cow Who Clucked” by Denise Fleming, through March 14; rolling art: “The Spider Weaver” by Margaret Musggrove, March 16-21. O Mr. Etch-a-Sketch: Tim George uses the classic toy as his canvas and will challenge kids try it, too, as he demonstrates his talent.10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 20, Science Studio.

Toledo Museum of Art

O 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fridays and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org.

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Frogtown Froggy Museum

O “Paris: City of Art.” UT art history students selected work from TMA’s collection depicting the City of Light and creations of the city’s artists. Through March 14, Hitchcock and Stevens galleries. O “Bare Witness: Photographs by Gordon Parks.” Parks’ lens work will be highlighted, offering a “cross section of the human experience.” Through April 25, Canaday Gallery. O “Whistler: Influences, Friends and the Not-So-Friendly.” The work of James Abbott McNeill Whistler will be exhibited within the context of his contemporaries, influences, friends and enemies. Through May 30, Works on Paper galleries. O TMA High School Art Council: The work of 30 students from 15 schools will be represented. March 12-April 25, Community Galleries. O “Mexico’s Toledo”: The works of Francisco Toledo, a contemporary Latino printmaker, “are records of things and beings in dreamlike scenarios, both menacing and playful, full of pattern and movement.” March 12-May 9, Gallery 18.

Players 12 and younger of any skill level can practice basic moves and learn some advanced strategy. 9-11 a.m. through May 29, children’s library, Toledo Lucas County Main Library, 325 Michigan St. (419) 259-5207.

TMA Family Center

Advanced Bird Study

Hands-on art activities for children. Story time tours are offered so young visitors and their adult partners can see art related to the week’s theme (2 p.m. Sundays). Noon-5:30 p.m. Sundays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 2558000 or www.toledomuseum.org. O The Bead Goes On: March 11. O Outside Art: March 21, 23 and 25.

More than 300 amphibians are on display, as well as a “ribbit-ticklin’” activity room. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. Sundays, 136 N. Summit St., Suite 1A. Donations. (419) 944-8806 or www.frogtownfroggymuseum.webs.com.

Wildwood Manor House tours

Built in the 1930s in the Georgian Colonial style, the Manor House was the estate of the Stranahans, the patriarch of which co-founded the Champion Spark Plug Co. Tours at quarter after and quarter till the hour noon-5 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays through March, Wildwood Preserve Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave. (419) 419407-9700.

Saturday Chess Players

Visitors can learn more about different bird species seen in the parks or backyard. 7 p.m. March 11, Secor Room, Secor Metropark, 10000 W. Central Ave., Berkey. $3. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations.metroparkstoledo.com.

Top Chef competition

Attendees/competitors will offer their best

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appetizers and desserts for judging. Notre Dame Academy’s speech team will perform, and proceeds will support the team’s efforts. 5:30 or 7 p.m. March 13, NDA Performing Arts Center and dining hall, 3535 W. Sylvania Ave. $8-$10. www.ndaarts.org.

Celebrating Seuss

The Toledo-Lucas County Public Library will host a number of events marking the birthday of the father of “The Cat in the Hat,” the Grinch and Horton. www.toledo library.org. O Dr. Seuss Favorites: Participants will vote for their favorite Seuss book, do some crafts and eat some snacks. 2-2:45 p.m. March 13, Oregon Branch Library, 3340 Dustin Road, Oregon. Registration: (419) 259-5250 or www.toledolibrary.org.

Toledo Train & Toy Show

More than 250 dealers from across the country will offer their stock, and free appraisals and repairs and “Thomas” rides for kids will be available. Exhibits will include Tiedtke’s department store’s American Flyer train display. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. March 14, Gladieux Meadows, 4480 Heatherdowns Blvd. $6-$8. (419) 215-4181.

Southview Garage Sale

A variety of furniture, clothing, entertainment and more will be offered. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. March 20, Southview High School, 7225 Sylvania Ave., Sylvania. (419) 824-8580.

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New CD releases at Ramalama Records O Home Acres (from BG) “Aloha”

O Daughters “Daughters [2]”

O Hendrix, Jimi “Valleys of Neptune”

O Untouchable “Before Their Eyes”

O The World Is a Thorn “Demon Hunter”

O Immolation “Majesty and Decay”

O Heat Fetish “Bled”

O Eluveitie “Everything Remains”

O Leo, Ted “The Brutalist Bricks”

O “Collett, Jason” Rat a Tat Tat

O Frightened Rabbit “The Winter of Mixed Drinks”

O Liars “Sisterworld”

O We Are the Void “Dark Tranquillity”

O Harper, Ben “Live from Montreal”

O “Elect the Dead Symphony” Tankian, Serj

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his larger-than-life puppy, Blue, leaving a series of hints to help him find “the most spectacular place.” 7 p.m. March 19-20 and 2 p.m. March 21, Croswell Opera House, 129 E. Maumee St., Adrian, Mich. $6-$10. (517) 264-7469 or www.croswell.org.

Eco Hikers: Young nature lovers (ages 6-12) will learn about the ecological and his-

torical importance of the metroparks through games, activities and hands-on exploration. 1 p.m. March 20, Metz Visitor Center, Wildwood Preserve Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations.metroparkstoledo.com.

Helping Hands: Welcome spring by helping the Metroparks maintain their habitat. 2 p.m. March 20, Swan Creek Preserve Metropark, Airport Highway between Byrne and Reynolds Roads. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations.metroparkstoledo.com. First Night of Spring: Spring seekers can celebrate the season’s first signs with a night hike, bonfire, s’mores, hot chocolate and stories. 5:30-7:30 p.m. March 20, Buehner Center porch, Oak Openings Preserve Metropark, 4139 Girdham Road off Route 2, Swanton. $5. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations.metroparkstoledo.com.

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Jump Into Journaling: Artists and others can learn about keeping a creative log for motivation and inspiration. 10 a.m.-noon March 20, 577 Foundation, 577 E. Front St., Perrysburg. $15.Registration: (419) 874-4174 or www.577foundation.org. Spring Festival of Crafts: The Toledo Craftsman’s Guild will showcase its members and their work. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 20 and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. March 21, Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-8851 or www.stranahantheater.com. Teddy Bear Care Fair: Youngsters can bring their favorite stuffed animals for a free check-up from a veterinarian, take part in activities and learn about animals. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. March 20-21, Toledo Zoo, 2700 Broadway. $8-$11. (419) 385-4040 or toledozoo.org. All Saints Chicken Paprikas Dinner: This spiced dish will be served until they run out. Carryouts will be available. Noon-4 March 21, All Saints Catholic Church, 628 Lime City Road, Rossford. $7-$9. (419) 666-1393 or www.allsaintsrossford.org. Rep Ed Theatre Classes: Kids ages 6-16 can learn acting, voice, dance, design and technical skills in an eight-week session with the theme “Wicked Awesome.” 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays, March 13-27 and April 17-May 15, Madison School for the Arts, 1511 Madison Ave. $100. Registration: (419) 243-9277 or www.toledorep.org.

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TSO taking ‘Stairway to Heaven’ in 2010 The music of Beethoven, Led Zeppelin and famed New York composers is on tap for the 2010-11 season, the Toledo Symphony has announced. The upcoming season, which begins in September, promises a variety of concerts intended to appeal to a wide audience, said spokesperson Ashley Mirakian. The Toledo Symphony is heading to New York City in May 2011 for its Carnegie Hall debut during the Spring for Music concert festival. To gear up for the event, the Symphony will host a Carnegie Hall Kickoff concert on Jan. 7 at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle. The concert will feature renowned jazz pianist and Toledo native Stanley Cowell as well as Mayor Mike Bell, who will narrate Aaron Copland’s “Lincoln Portrait.” Works that premiered at Carnegie Hall as well as music by New York City composers will be performed. On April 29-30, attendees will have an opportunity to hear the Symphony’s Carnegie Hall performance in its entirety during the Classics Series finale concert. The Symphony will reveal the program in early 2011. “The concerts are meant to celebrate that we’re taking Toledo to the world stage,” Mira-

kian said. “We really wanted to celebrate with the whole community.” On tap for February is Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, which Mirakian described as “hugely celebratory, happy and uplifting,” while in March the KeyBank Pop Series will offer the music of Led Zeppelin for those who enjoy classic rock with symphonic flair. “The Music of Led Zeppelin is one of the best orchestral rock concerts out there,” Mirakian said. “It’s a Zeppelin cover band that has arranged Zeppelin’s music for full orchestra. They perform all the hits.” Also performing as part of the Pops Series are Doc Severinsen on Oct. 9 and Jim Brickman on Nov. 27. Returning next season is the popular Family Series, but with a new twist, Mirakian said. The Symphony will partner with a different nonprofit organization for each performance, providing opportunities for attendees to participate in preconcert activities and scavenger hunts. Tickets for subscribers are on sale now. New subscribers who join by April 25 will receive last year’s subscriber rates. Individual tickets will go on sale in late summer. O — Lori Golazewski

First St., Ann Arbor, Mich. $3-$20. (734) 996-8555 or blindpigmusic.com. O Rubblebucket Orchestra: 9:30 p.m. March 11. O Hana Malhas, Chris Bathgate, Wolfie Complex: 9:30 p.m. March 12. O The Elroys, Graveyard Punks, Wine Me Up, Zymosis: 9:30 p.m. March 16. O Honey & the Honey Bees, Sha Sha La La, Jeremy and Demyan, Christian Carpenter: 9:30 p.m. March 17. O The Clientele, Field Music, Zoos of Berlin: 8:30 p.m. March 18. O Sister Hazel, Matt Duke: 9 p.m. March 19.

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THE PULSE: EVENTS CALENDAR

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 2010

Wino Wednesdays:

$10 OFF any bottle of wine!

Excluding house wines • Dining room only

Featuring: • Seafood, flown in fresh from the Florida Keys • Chicago Stockyard steaks, New Zealand baby lamb chops • The Famous Margherita Pizza (Voted best by our guests) Winter Hours Mon.-Tues. 11:30-9:00pm Wed-Thurs.11:30-10:00pm Friday 11:30-11:00pm Saturday 4:00pm-11pm Sunday 4:00pm-9pm *Subject to change

Open for lunch and dinner

For reservations call:

419-866-5007

www.rosiesitaliangrille.com 606 North McCord Rd. Toledo, Ohio 43615

Sunday through Thursday – All Appetizers Half Price! Bar Top Only. Sunday through Thursday – All Gourmet Pizza Half Off! Bar Top Only.

Live Entertainment Wednesday – Saturday

Raquel Wilson moved to Toledo from Chicago. STAR PHOTO BY CHARLIE LONGTON

Wellspring of advice BRAIN GAIN: New practice is Downtown. By Colleen Kennedy  Toledo Free Press STAR Staff Writer  star@toledofreepress.com

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  Raquel Wilson’s professional philosophy is simple — “keep it simple.” Although it may not sound like a revolutionary idea, Wilson is in a business where simplicity isn’t at all common. Wilson, a licensed independent social worker, recently opened her own private counseling practice. Wilson said she considers herself to be a “generalist,” working with individuals ages five to 102 and a spectrum of issues varying from stress management to social anxiety. The only topics she doesn’t provide counseling for are marriage counseling, eating disorders and substance abuse. A Detroit native, Wilson attended Michigan State University for undergraduate and graduate school, where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and a Master of Social Work. Wilson, 28, said helping others has been a lifelong passion. Growing up she said her family was constantly volunteering and helping others. She considered nursing in college but rejected that idea after struggling with biology. Upon graduating in 2005, she and husband, Adam, moved to Washington, D.C. where she worked at a residential treatment school for severely emotionally disturbed students. After 18 months in the nation’s capital, the couple relocated when Adam’s job transferred him to Chicago. There Wilson worked with Rainbow Hospice counseling near-death patients and their families, an experience she said helped her discover her passion for grief and loss counseling. To stay connected, Wilson returns annually to volunteer at their “Good Mourning”

family camp each September. “I’m energized when I come back from camp,” Wilson said. “The work you see happening with the families is amazing. I leave every year just filled with energy and ready to learn more and get back to the population I serve here and to help them.” In April of 2008, another job transfer brought the Wilsons to Toledo. “It was a tough transition coming from Chicago,” Wilson said. “We lived in the city and there was always something to do. When we moved here, that was my biggest struggle. There are things to do but you have to be savvy and look for them.” Initially, Wilson worked for a mental health agency where she practiced individual and family therapy. But after a year of praying and familiarizing herself with the community, she soon set her sights on starting a private practice. Wilson said, “I felt there was an opportunity for someone new to come aboard, especially working with kids and teens. I feel like I have the ability to connect with them on a certain level and I’ve had a lot of success with that population.” The defining moment in her decision occurred over dinner with her dad, whom she describes as her “rock of wisdom.” “He said, pretty soon you’ll be in your mid-30s and then you’ll be in your 40s, then 50s and you’ll have every reason in the world not to do it.’ ” On Dec. 1, 2009 Wilson opened the doors to Wellspring Counseling Services. As Wilson continues to build her clientele, she said keeping it simple is her advantage. “Therapy isn’t simple,” Wilson said. “A lot of times, people wait so long to seek help from a therapist that their lives are very complex by the time they come to my door. I find that trying to keep the things simple for them helps. It’s just me. I answer the phone and I answer the door.” To learn more about services at Wellspring, visit www.counselingatwellspring.com. O


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Far from nobody Success is a reality for Dre P.

“T

oledo comes first, and I’m proud to say that.” he phrase doesn’t quite roll off the tongue smoothly, but with people like rapper, actor, and reality star Dre P. proudly proclaiming his city the next in which the spotlight will be shone, the words may begin to sound more familiar. Dre P. has been rapping and LIL shedding a positive light on his city for several years, and after receiving the highest ratings on the VH1 reality show “Tool Academy,” the young star’s light is only beginning to shine. The only reason viewers have not seen more of Dre P. on VH1 is because the show in which he starred is owned by the production company that is only responsible for “Tool Academy” and “Jersey Shore,” so the opportunity for placement on other shows is limited; however, Dre P.’s loyalty to the company has raised

some eyebrows, so don’t be surprised to see him on the small box in the future. Since wrapping up “Tool Academy,” Dre P. has thrust his self-promotion into overdrive. After being asked to speak and perform at an alternative school in Tennessee, the city of Clarksville was so impressed by him, that they proclaimed December 17 “Dre Day.” Yes, the man has his own day. His reception in Tennessee was so overwhelming that once Dre P. settled in Nashville, he was unable to leave. After linking up with Toledo native and Tennessee Titans wide receiver Nate Washington, and Young Buck’s former dj, DJ Don Juan, Dre P. has been hosting parties and promoting his music all over the state. And he’s only been a resident of Nashville for about six months. While reality television has helped propel Dre P. onto the radar of a national audience, the journey would not have been made without his musical achievements. While rubbing shoulders

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with the most recognizable VH1 stars, like Hot Wings from “Real Chance of Love” and Heartbreaker of “For the Love of Ray J 2” fame, has certainly brought more attention, his music is what keeps the people listening. Dre P.’s Fly Guy ENTV/Danjaruss Ent mixtape, “106 & Parr,” was released earlier this year, and featured a slew of hip-hop heavyweights such as Ray-J, Plies, and Russell Simmons, and was met with a very warm reception. When asked with whom he collaborated for his upcoming release, “I Love Dre P.,” he answered a very quick and powerful “no one.” Cleverly naming the mixtape as a reassurance to his fans that he is mindful of their influence on his popularity, he playfully explains the absence of features, stating that with a title like “I Love Dre P.,” allowing listeners to hear other people on the album “would be cheating on [him].” Faithful fans can obtain a free copy of “I Love Dre P.” March 14 from www.thatcrack.com and www.datpiff.com, Dre P.’s MySpace page, www. myspace.com/drepmixtape. Following him on Twitter @drep419 would be wise, as periodical updates will be posted. The young star boasts that this musical offering is more like an audio movie than a mixtape, centered on the idea of his reality show, full of skits so that the listener fully understands what a day in the life of Dre P. is like.A Saturday in the life of Dre P. is simply explained: giving back to the city that raised him. The “Fly Life Mixshow: The Truth Behind Reality TV,” can be heard every Saturday evening from 6-7 p.m. from anywhere the internet can be accessed. Dre P., along with his co-host Pimpin Ken, dispels the myths and rumors of reality television, inviting the stars of these shows on the air so the listeners can get the truth from

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702 MONROE ST. ( CORNER OF MONROE NORTH ERIE ) DOWNTOWN TOLEDO

ST. PATRICK’S DAY BASH WED. MARCH 17TH!!

AWESOME DRINKS SPECIALS & THE GREEN BEER WILL BE FLOWING ALL DAY LONG!

LIVE MUSIC: The Corrells (Acoustic Duo), 7 – 11 p.m. • DJ Jason, 11 p.m. Monday: Monday Madness 24oz. Bud & Bud Lights $3.00 Tuesday: Coors Light $1.50 All Day Wednesday: Miller Lite Wednesdays $1.50 All Day Thursday: DJ Rob Sample Thirsty Thursdays *Everything is $2 8pm-2am Friday & Saturday: DJ Jason

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the source. For your musical entertainment, the best of Ohio, specifically Toledo, fills the show. Weekly, listeners call the request line at (347) 677-0746, or log on at www.blogtalkradio/flylifemixshow to hear their favorite Toledo artists get some of the recognition they deserve. This self-proclaimed “young, active, and attractive” superstar-in-the-making has not forgotten his roots not only in Toledo, but in his music as well, claiming if it wasn’t for his music, “[he] would be a nobody.” On the contrary, Dre P., you are far from that. O

TEQUILA HEILA’S DOWNTOWN: NOW OPEN!!

WEEKLY DRINK SPECIALS:

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Mon -Tues: 3pm-Mid Wed: 3pm to 1am Thurs to Sat: 11pm-2:30am Sunday: According to Events myspace: ts_downtown facebook: ts_downtown

Your first and only stop before and after every Mud Hen & Walleye game.


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WEDNESDAY,MARCH10,2010

Dining of Historical Importance! Being Toledo’s most gracious hotel when it opened in 1859 and downtown’s oldest remaining commercial structure still in use, the Oliver House is simply a great place to be! This restored 19th century hotel, with views of the Maumee River, is home to the trademark sizzle of Rockwell’s Steakhouse and Lounge, the home-brewed vibe of the Maumee Bay Brew Pub, the classic charm of Petit Fours Patisserie & The Café, and the vintage fun of Mutz. Come explore the Museum of Brewing and see the brew tanks of the Maumee Bay Brewing Co., an active brewery, producing award winning craft ales and Toledo’s own Buckeye Beer!

Come in and see us at 27 Broadway • Toledo, ohio 43604 • Call 419.243.1302 or visit us on the web.

w w w. t h e O l i verHouseToledo. com

the Oliver House is

equipped.


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There is thy sting “Green Hornet” among recent hot comic releases. By Jim Beard Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

It’s no surprise that two trade paperbacks top Ed Katschke’s list of this week’s new releases. Katschke, of Monarch Cards and Comics in Toledo, chooses paperback collections of comics, which have near-eclipsed their weekly cousins in terms of sales and popularity in comic shops and traditional bookstores. “Avengers/X-Men: Utopia” collects almost a dozen different Marvel comics that make up a recent storyline revolving around the company’s two popular bands of characters. As Katschke says, “Norman Osborn’s Dark Reign has arrived in San Francisco and now Marvel’s merry mutants have a new crisis to deal with!” This is where M a r v e l excels: dozens of weird characters bounding about with large dollops of death and drama. You may not be able to keep everyone straight but you won’t lack for action. For those who like a bit more adult edge in their comics, Katschke recommends “The Boys

Vol. 6: The Self-Preservation Society.” He calls it a “continuation of comic stars Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson’s darkly funny and violent look at super heroes gone bad and running amok.” “The Boys” is definitely not your dad’s comics. This is the book that drew controversy a few years ago with its infamous gerbil scene (or was it a hamster?) and was dropped by DC Comics and picked up by Dynamite. Read at your own risk — which, yeah, can be a beacon of welcome for some tastes. Last Week, readers who picked up Dynamite’s “Green Hornet” No. 1 pondered its unusual pedigree. The series is a comics adaptation of an unfilmed Green Hornet script by writer/ director Kevin “I’m too sexy-fat for this airplane” Smith, and while somewhat evoking Now Comics’ 1989 Hornet comic, it does manage to distinguish itself with a rougher edge. Also, DC’s “First Wave” No. 1 introduces a new universe populated by the pulp heroes of yesterday, most notably Doc Savage. The pulp feeling’s not really there yet but the art’s fantastic and the narrative fun. The more lurid will enjoy the full-blown “eye injury” scene. O

Video games: A hard rain’s gonna fall “Heavy Rain” (Sony Computer Entertainment ***1/2, rated Mature for blood, intense violence, nudity, sexual content, strong language, drug use.) This emotional interactive thriller, a PlayStation 3 exclusive, becomes the ultimate mature choose-your-own-adventure. Fast reaction times and a large screen are prerequisites as players dive into an immersive game world without the safety net of traditional extra lives and bonuses. No time limits either; once a player dies, one of the four characters takes their place. This highly replayable game incorporates information only when the players interact with it instead of the usual heads-up display (HUD). Developers float possible choices (in light colored text next to the corresponding controller button or sequence) among impressive graphics within the “Origami” serial killer storylines, set in the not so distant future of 2011 with past events occurring in 2010. As these deep stories intertwine, separate actions and events change. Players get a wide result range amid an intriguing web revolving around the following four playable characters who all make their initial appearance in the corresponding order: family man Ethan Mars who has two sons, Jason and Shaun, private investigator Scott Shelby, FBI criminal profiler Norman Jayden, and insomniac Madison Paige. As the memorable Jayden, players use a unique environmental interface, which enhances his environment to easily sift through evidence, leads and information files. The game adapts to player choices so the result becomes a personal reflection. Expect a doubledigit hour gameplay total to completely experience each scene and scenario. O — Mike Siebenaler

Join us for a tasting of the world’s finest cigars.

Saturday, March 13 Noon–8:00 Take advantage of discounts and specials.

Cigar Merchant 1415 West Sylvania Ave.

419.478.6747

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WEDNESDAY,MARCH10,2010

Grand Opening March 15th

G N I R ATU Items

FNEew MenSualsa Bar

M AU MEE

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es & Fr

Formally Ground Round

Join us! Doors open at noon

St. Patty's Day in Maumee

Irish & Mexican Food & Drinks available

$5

Music by “Ireland born musician” John Connolly & Company

Irish Dancer • Bagpipes ��� Live Music 5–10pm Guaranteed to be the best Irish party in Toledo Maumee

551 W. Dussel Dr. 419-887-0700

Toledo

2500 Sylvania Ave. 419-472-0700

Oregon

2076 Woodville Rd. 419-693-6695

Carryout

Available


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Hot on the ice

Vitucci has young Walleye poised for playoffs. By Chris Schmidbauer Toledo Free Press STAR Sports Editor cschmidbauer@toledofreepress.com

Toledo Walleye head coach Nick Vitucci had one goal entering the 2009-2010 hockey season. “Right from the first day, I have said the benchmark for a successful season for this team is to make the playoffs,” Vitucci said. Some might have thought that was a lofty goal for a first year expansion team that was rebuilding its roster. But Vitucci has never been known to shy away from his vision. “Getting to the playoffs is a challenge,” Vitucci said. “But I knew that coming in. I think we have done a nice job of building a core of talent that can help us be successful on the ice.” Perhaps this season’s success has just as much to do with the man behind the bench for the Walleye, as well. Vitucci has been Toledo’s hockey czar since he took over the head coaching position with the now defunct Toledo Storm during the 2003-2004 season. In the midst of a losing campaign that season, the Storm fired then head coach Steve Harrison and replaced him with Vitucci. While it was exciting for the Welland, Ontario native to get his

first crack as a head coach, Vitucci knew it was going to be a challenge as well. “Anytime a coach is replaced midseason like that, it means things are not going well by any means,” he said. “I was an assistant at the time so I was probably just as much to blame for the performance as anybody. So I had to look for new ways to help the team improve that year.” Vitucci’s first opportunity to be a head coach was also bittersweet because it came at the expense of a good friend. “It was a very confusing time for me,” he said. “Steve (Harrison) is a good hockey coach and a good friend of mine. It was tough to see him go.” The tough times did not last though, as Vitucci led the Storm to three consecutive Riley Cup playoff appearances from 2004-2007. Just as the Storm seemed to be reclaiming its place at the top of the ECHL, the franchise was bought by Toledo Arena Sports Inc., the group that owns the Mud Hens. The team suspended operations until the completion of the Lucas County Arena, which meant Vitucci was out of a job. “I was certainly concerned initially because the future was uncertain for me,” Vitucci said. “I met with Joe Napoli from the Mud Hens and Michael Miller from Lucas County, and I expressed

Nick Vitucci has the Walleye in the hunt for the Riley Cup. STAR PHOTO BY LAD STRAYER

my desire to join the new franchise. I was very excited and relieved when they offered me the head coaching position.” That was when the real work began for Vitucci and the Walleye organization. Since the franchise ceased operation, much of that hockey talent that had assembled in the Glass City had gone elsewhere. But now just five months into the franchise’s freshman season on the ice, Vitucci and the Walleye

are in the hunt for the Riley Cup playoffs and on the doorstep of completing the goal that was set for the franchise prior to the start of the season. “This team is talented enough to make a run, and I feel good about where we are at as a team right now,” Vitucci said. “It’s been a nice success so far to see the community come out and create such a great atmosphere, but the competitor in me still wants that playoff berth.” O


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Learning from hardship Gene Cross says UT team will benefit from tough season. By Scott Calhoun Toledo Free Press STAR Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

It’s painful finishing 4-28 in an NCAA men’s basketball season. Just ask Toledo men’s head coach Gene Cross, who is 11-53 in his first two seasons as head coach of the Rockets. The season that UT just completed was the program’s worst in the 95-year history of Rocket basketball. Their overall record also ranked fifth worst in Division I this winter. “These kids don’t like the taste of losing,” Cross said. “My job right now is to get them to learn from this season and understand that winning doesn’t happen overnight.” After a win against Indiana-Purdue Fort Wayne early in December, the Rockets put together a 19-game losing skid, including 14 consecutive Mid-American Conference losses. A 48-45 squeaker over Ball State in the team’s home finale at Savage Arena on February 27 saved

UT from possibly enduring its first ever winless MAC season, and from finishing the year without a victory since the campaign’s first month. Since joining the MAC in 1951, the Rockets never finished worse than 3-13. In two seasons under Cross, the team is 0-31 on the road. Another statistical tragedy for the Rockets it that UT finished second to last in Division I scoring offense at 54.2 PPG, barely edging out a 5-23 Dartmouth team that sputtered along at 53.9 per at the bottom of the Ivy League barrel. That’s 333rd out of 334 teams. The Rockets ranked 330th nationally in turnover ratio at sub4.2 and were last or close to it across the board in the remaining MAC statistical categories. Fans accordingly fled Savage Arena this season, with the home attendance average dropping from 5,610 a year ago to 3,953 this year. UT has not trudged through this nightmare with a favorable deck. Asking this team to put together a Cinderella run may have been an unrealistic expectation. “They’ve been through a lot of hardship, but they’re getting experience that will manifest into something great in a matter of time,” said Cross. A third of the way into the season, freshman guard Steve Albrecht, the team’s second leading scorer, suddenly left the program because he did not feel comfortable in Cross’s slashstyle offense. Before Albrecht departed, the

Easter Sunday Brunch Sunday, April 4th

seating 11 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Last at 3 p.m.)

• Western-Style Scrambled Eggs (cheese, peppers, onion) • Waffles and Syrup • Smoked Bacon & Maple Sausage Links • Fresh Seasonal Fruit • Assorted Donuts, muffins • Carved Prime Rib and Beef Au Jus • Carved Cherry Glazed Smoked Ham • Chicken Tuscana • Pork Loin w/ Apples • Baked Salmon • Kielbasa, Cabbage, Noodles

• Peel ‘N Eat Shrimp • Mashed Potato and Chicken Gravy • Prince Edward Blend Veggies • Buttered Corn • Artesan rolls & whipped butter • Betty’s Salad - Tossed Salad • Pasta & Pea Salad , Whipped • Fruit Salad & Mary’s Beet Salad Kids Table: • Corn Dogs, Mac & Cheese • Chicken Tenders & Pizza Rolls Assorted Dessert Cakes & Sugar-free Fruit Pies.

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10630 Fremont Pike | Perrysburg, Ohio | 419-874-3111

Gene Cross has struggled in his first two seasons at UT, but remains optimistic. STAR PHOTO BY JOHN POLLOCK

Rockets were averaging more than 60 points a contest, but afterward the team’s average dipped below 50 points per contest. Then junior starting forward Mouhamed Lo, who was averaging 6.5 points and 4.9 rebounds, received a disciplinary suspension midway through the season and never suited back up. Three players, who were already red shirted, were unavailable to help offset losses from a roster already lacking any senior leadership. That is a lot for a young, inexperienced NCAA team to overcome, but three players were up to the challenge. Guards Jake Barnett (12.9 pts, 71-192 3pt), Malcolm Griffin (7.1 pts), and forward Jordan Dressler (6.1 pts, 4.4 rebounds), all freshmen, have picked up vital experience, Cross said. “You have to start with Barnett. He’s stepped in and established himself as a leader, which is something very rare for a freshman,” said Cross. Cross said he was impressed with Dressler’s

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and Griffin’s play as well. “Dressler played some really big games while having to step in and learn the speed of the game for a player his size,” he said. “Griffin missed the first seven games of the season with a broken hand. For him being able to come back and play, it made him much better from a basketball standpoint.” They now join junior forward Justin Anyijong in solidifying the core of the team, which showed some late signs of an upswing on the horizon. While UT ended with a 72-54 MAC tourney play-in loss at Buffalo, they committed just 12 turnovers, marking the team’s eighth straight MAC contest with 13 or less, which is a promising contrast to an abysmal overall season turnover ratio. Barnett (13 points) and Griffin (12 points) offered up solid balance to Anyijong’s team-high 14 points. “Look at this as a motion picture and not as a standstill snapshot,” Cross said. “We’re trying to establish a new system here. What’s going on now will benefit this team so much in the future.” O

St Patricks Day Party

GR JEL EEN SHO LOTS!

March 17, 2010

Doors open at 10 am • D.J.-Glass City Sounds from 2pm - 2am • Corned Beef Sandwiches

• T-Shirts & Novelties • Free Beads & Leis (while they last)

Delaney’s Lounge Food Served Daily

309 West Alexis (Between Bennett & Telegraph) • (419) 476-2883 Come see Delaney’s Leprechaun!


To t March Off Even 6pm 18th at WWW.TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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Two loud and proud thumbs up Roger Ebert serves as greater inspiration than anything in movies. A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 1, No. 1. Established 2010. Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com Michael S. Miller, Editor in Chief mmiller@toledofreepress.com EDITORIAL

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H

e walked onto the studio stage. His eyes lit up in the brightest smile they could muster without the help of the lower part of his face. He sat down on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” to discuss movies, the Oscars and most of all, himself. JEFF For right now, Roger Ebert is a more inspirational story than any movie he could cover.
This was the first time I had seen Ebert on television in four years. I had seen pictures of him, on his Web site and the now-famous image that accompanied a recent Esquire story. But even though I knew what to expect, it still was a bit shocking. His mouth, hanging limp from his face. The voice that had spoken so passionately and eloquently about so many movies — the voice which helped make me a film buff — was now gone, a victim of the cancer which claimed Ebert’s jaw.
 The man is a hero of mine. I have been an ardent fan of his work since 1988, when I was just 11 and started watching “Siskel and Ebert.” My style has many inspirations, but none are bigger than his eloquent and infectiously witty prose. For a generation of movie fans, Ebert’s criticism spoke loudest and his television show helped establish honest and open discussion about film, in a medium where intelligent talk was becoming more and more rare. Those days are long ago. Gene Siskel, Ebert’s longtime co-host, passed away in 1999. Ebert continued the show with new co-host Richard Roeper until his own illness began to spread. After a first operation, he returned, looking slightly worse for the wear, but still working, still passionate. Then came the next batch of operations which robbed him of his voice and his show.
Ebert can still “speak,” through the use of a computer program that puts voice to the words he writes. On “Oprah” he first demonstrated a new program which speaks with his voice, culled from the hours of recordings that exist of him doing commentaries. But never say that Ebert has been “silenced” by this setback. To the contrary. He speaks louder than ever.
He draws millions of visitors

to his Web site, www.rogerebert.com, which is sionals waste a chunk of their life, and the updated every week with all the new reviews audience’s, with this dreck? Like a blind man whose other senses become even more and other features. He started a blog in 2008, which has blos- acute, Ebert’s writing, which had already somed into one of the most entertaining on won a Pulitzer Prize, has somehow become the Web, covering myriad better than ever.
 In 1990, Ebert analyzed the film “My Left topics that Ebert is passionate about, from movies to poli- Foot,” about cerebral palsy-stricken artist tics to walks through his be- Christy Brown. He wrote, “I am trying to imagine what it would be like to write this loved London. He started a Twitter ac- review with my left foot. Quite seriously. I count in late 2009, and has imagine it would be a great nuisance — unless, become one of the service’s of course, my left foot was the only part of my most prolific users, with body over which I had control. If that were the more than 4,000 tweets to case, I would thank God that there was still some avenue down which I could communidate.
 But more important than cate with the world.”
 Clearly, Ebert still has those avenues, and the quantity of his words is uses them to their fullest extent. their quality. The voice which spoke with such fire may His reviews, always a fountain of substantial now be silent, but its owner still speaks louder criticism, seem deeper now. than ever. And in doing so, he demonstrates a heroic When he sees a film he loves, determination more inspiring than any Hollyhis praise is poetic, lyrical. When he sees a bad wood tale. O one, his usual biting wit comes tinged not only Jeff McGinnis appears at 7 a.m. Wednesdays on “Andrew Z” show. E-mail Jeff with anger, but with 3:36 sad- PMthe 92.5 1988 ZenCircus_TFP310 3/8/10 PageKISS-FM 1 ness: Why would profes- at PopGoesJeff@gmail.com.

mCGINNIS

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