Issuu on Google+

2009 National Board Certification Day/Talking Points & Key Messages 

On December 16, 2009, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) publicly announced the  2009 class of National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) and related data. All NBPTS data released is derived  from information reported by NBCTs and candidates.

Talking Points About 2009 National Board Certification Day 

· There are 8,874 new National Board Certified Teachers in 2009. This brings the total number of teachers  certified by NBPTS to more than 82,000.  

· New in 2009: NBPTS improved the score reporting process by providing standardized feedback statements 

to all candidates who scored below the accomplished level on a portfolio entry. For each entry, candidates can  receive up to nine feedback statements specific to four portfolio entrees. These standardized statements are  developed to reflect the NBPTS Five Core Propositions and indicate general areas where candidates might  wish to reevaluate their performance(s). 

· In a September 2009 interview with NBPTS, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan referred to the 2009 

class of NBCTs as an “extraordinary group.” He said teachers who achieved National Board Certification have  “demonstrated a commitment to taking their teaching practice and the teaching profession to a different  level….As we move forward on this turnaround agenda nationally, I would love for National Board Certified  Teachers to be at the forefront of that movement.” 

· More than half of all NBCTs teach in Title I eligible schools as reported by the National Center for  Education Statistics.   

· Further evidence that National Board Certification is growing as an education reform movement:  · The number of NBCTs has more than doubled in the past five years (from more than 40,000 in 2005  to more than 82,000 in 2009).  · States with the highest number of teachers achieving National Board Certification in 2009 were:  North Carolina (1,509), Washington (1,248), South Carolina (798), Illinois (732) and Florida (651).  · Fifteen states had at least a 20 percent increase in the number of 2009 NBCTs over the number of  teachers who achieved certification in 2008.    

· NBCTs are nationally recognized as being among the best teachers in the profession. For example: · Four of the last nine National Teachers of the Year are National Board Certified Teachers. · More than a quarter of the 2009 State Teachers of the Year are National Board Certified Teachers. · More than one­third of the 2008 Presidential Awardees for Excellence in Math and Science  Teaching are National Board Certified Teachers.


Key Messages about NBPTS and National Board Certification 

· National Board Certification has evolved from individual teachers achieving certification into a systemic  education reform movement by developing, recognizing and retaining many of the nation’s best teachers.  National Board Certification is changing the culture of learning in classrooms, schools and districts— leveraging National Board Certified Teachers to build human capital—especially in high­need schools. In  many schools, districts and states across the nation, NBCTs are assuming leadership roles—serving as  mentors, facilitating professional development and leading education reform efforts in their districts and  states. 

· Several states are capitalizing on the expertise and unique human capital of National Board Certification in  their “Race to the Top” proposals. They are using accomplished teachers to increase effectiveness and improve  school conditions to better meet the needs of students in high­need schools.

· NBPTS is bringing to scale its Take One! program (a component of National Board Certification) by  combining it with its Targeted High Need Initiative (THNI). Cohorts of educators are building school­based  learning communities focused on high­need schools. Independent evaluations, as well as the schools  themselves, are reporting positive outcomes—e.g., a strong learning culture, best practice sharing and  improved student performance. 

· NBCTs improve student achievement. NBPTS has a positive impact on student achievement, according to a  congressionally mandated report by the National Research Council (NRC) released in June 2008. The NRC  report states: “The evidence is clear that National Board Certification distinguishes more effective teachers… with respect to student achievement.” 

· National Board Certification is a widely accepted form of performance­based pay. National Board 

Certification is a model of pay­for­performance that is supported by teachers and administrators nationwide.  More than two­thirds of the states provide salary incentives and cover the costs for teachers who pursue and/or  achieve this advanced credential. 

· National Board Certification retains teachers. National Board Certification is a proven way of ensuring that  the most highly­accomplished teachers remain in the classroom. In Florida, for example, nearly 90 percent of  NBCTs remain in teaching—which far exceeds the average 60 percent retention rate for all teachers statewide.  Many NBCTs mentor new and struggling teachers—those most likely to leave within the first five years of  teaching. 

· National Board Certification for Educational Leaders/Principals. On December 8, 2009, NBPTS launched  the development of National Board Certification for Principals, the first phase of an expanded program,  National Board Certification for Educational Leaders, which will also lay the groundwork for a new teacher  leader certification. Investments from the nation’s major public, private and philanthropic sectors have  contributed to the development of National Board Certification for Educational Leaders. For more information  about this initiative, including the Core Propositions, visit www.nbpts.org/principals. 

· All 50 states, the District of Columbia and more than 700 school districts recognize National Board  Certification as a mark of distinction.  


Other Information: Media inquiries should be directed to Jimmy Minichello, 703.465.2171, or  jminichello@nbpts.org. Other communications­related questions should be directed to Barbara Gleason,  703.312.7280, or bgleason@nbpts.org.


Talking Points: 2009 National Board Certification Day