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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO JARROD M. LOPATKA

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SELECTED WORKS OF 2012 JARROD M. LOPATKA 1131 WASHINGTON AVE. WINTER PARK, FL 32789 PHONE: (407) 467-4970 EMAIL: jarrodlopatka@knights.ucf.edu

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CONTENTS

SEMPERIAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONTAINER

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UCF SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS AND DESIGN ADDITION

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SAN MARTIN CHURCH

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REFLECTIONS OF ORLANDO

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407 NORTH PARK DRIVE

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SEMPERIAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONTAINER ARCHITECTURE DESIGN 8, SUMMER 2012 PROFESSOR ALFONSO PEREZ-MENDEZ GUADALAJARA, JALISCO, MEXICO

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Functioning as primary shelter, the container analogizes itself with Gottfried Semper’s four elements of architecture and with the idea that the container could break down and be set up in different places in and around Guadalajara. The idea of hearth is realized through the sequence of construction, permitting the inhabitant to visualize construction methodology and grasp the tectonic elements that synchronize forming shelter. Steel columns and beams, like bones, are the primary constructed order to which all other systems are fastened. Secondary steel fins and pipes act like muscles stiffening the structure, and dissolve into plates with bolts that affix the skin. The tertial skin consists of reinforced concrete panels with intermediate tracery that holds secondary titanium panels. The constructed systems work to provide refuge from climatic episodes in Guadalajara, specifically deflecting sunlight or bending it through diffusion.

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UCF SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS AND DESIGN ADDITION ARCHITECTURE DESIGN 6, SPRING 2012 PROFESSOR JAMES CORNETET ORLANDO, FLORIDA

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1- SCULPTURE PARK 2- GRAVEL PATH 3- 3D DESIGN OUTDOOR YARD

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A Lively Extension Promoting the Passage of Artistic Thought

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GALLERY 1- 3D DESIGN 2- STUDIO A,B 3- PAINT STUDIO 4- 2D DESIGN, STUDIO C OFFICES 1- LOBBY 2- CONFERENCE ROOMS 1- KITCHEN 2- STAFF BATHROOM 3- SLIDE ROOM 4- SERVER ROOM 5- TECH SUPPLY 6- STORAGE ROOM 7- WOMEN’S BATHROOM 8- MEN’S BATHROOM

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EXTRUDED MASSES

DISSEMINATING ENTRIES

UNDULATING ROOF

SECTION A

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CLERESTORIES


GALLERY PERSPECTIVE

SECTION B

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SAN MARTIN CHURCH ARCHITECTURE DESIGN 8, SUMMER 2012 PROFESSOR ALFONSO PEREZ-MENDEZ SAN MARTIN DE LAS CANAS, JALISCO, MEXICO

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The church is situated upon the central site of San Martin, a town that catalyzed out of tequila production. An aqueduct that flows through the site is key to the town’s livelihood, and is formalized in section through the church and adjacent colonnade. These constructs create a plaza in between furthering the public nature of the site. Calligraphies of materials and systematic site specific composition control sun, wind, and rain, and allow only desired phenomena to filter unto the occupants. San Martin Church elevates perception of the environment and becomes joint to the natural tectonics of site.

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ROOF

TERTIARY SKIN

TERTIARY FRAME

SECONDARY FRAME

PRIMARY TRUSSES

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WEST- EAST SECTION

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REFLECTIONS OF ORLANDO JUDGED NOVEMBER 1, 2012 | 1st PLACE CO-WINNER NILS M. SCHWEIZER FELLOWS | RBR 360 COMPETITION ORLANDO, FLORIDA

Coral Gables Building | Architect Robert Murphy | Built 1962 | Demolished 2012 | Curtain Panels Saved

ton ince

Alden R oad

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et

Stre


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CONCRETE CURTAIN

STEEL DIAPHRAGM

BASALT FLOOR + SEATING

CONCRETE BASIN

Reordering the curtain panels of the Coral Gables building into graceful curves allows them to hang as Murphy intended. Through the juxtaposition of the concrete panels with a complementary steel structural system and pools of water that trace the curves, a monument alluding to Orlando’s architectural heritage is created. Reflections and shadows of the fifty-year-old panels become a spectacle in the monument as they dance about the water and porous basalt decking. The monument generates a duality between observe and engage through its perpetual form, and seeks to capture the next generation of Orlando.

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407 NORTH PARK DRIVE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN 7, FALL 2012 PROFESSOR JOHN MAUDLIN-JERONIMO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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Applying the functional dimension of organic structure to the tower generates a construction that is crafted in the same plane as nature composes. The ordering system employs a language that patterns itself through dynamisms of the native red oak. A parallel is made between the biological and constructive fabric of Chicago rendering a more cohesive cultural landscape. The trunk becomes the concrete core of the skyscraper. The branches grow into a steel web that supports the slabs, and the leaves are developed into titanium skin. As the tower feathers up and out like the oak, the intersection at ground becomes the anchoring roots. The tower sponges up its residents and disseminates them through the trunk and branches finally allowing views through the leaves. The skin is adapted from the microscopic section of red oak. The skyscraper starts to merge natural and constructive phenomena through its tectonics and becomes iconic in the Chicago skyline.

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N Park Drive

E Illinois Street

SITE PLAN-LEVEL 1

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SITE PLAN-LEVEL 2


LEVELS 27-34; 51-58

LEVELS 11-18; 35-42; 59-73

LEVELS 19-25; 43-49

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WEST ELEVATION

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NORTH ELEVATION

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CORE

RESIDENTIAL

MECHANICAL

GARAGE

RETAIL

AMENITIES

EAST- WEST SECTION

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RESIDENTIAL ENTRY

RETAIL ENTRY

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2012

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JARROD M. LOPATKA

Architecture Portfolio | Jarrod M. Lopatka  

Selected Works of 2012

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