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J ILL M ALTBY


J ILL M ALTBY 515.240.9841 | jlmaltby@iastate.edu www.jlmaltby.weebly.com 02 | 03


SELECTED WORKS:


THE AESTHETICS OF WASTE

06 | 13

CCIOD

14 | 19

DEMONSTRATION SOHO

20 | 25

MAUSOLEUM

26 | 31

MACHINE

32 | 35

PLOT + FORMS

36 | 39

MOTION STUDY

40 | 41

BOND’S INVESTMENT

43 | 46

RESUME

47 | 48

04 | 05


The Aesthetics of Waste

Jungwoo Ji - Fall 2014 Team: Matt Darmour-Paul, Han Kwon, & Jill Maltby Awards: 2nd place CSI Competition Construction Specification Institute

Boston, MA 10 Weeks Size: 10,000 SF

When confronted with designing the Boston Music Complex in the recently rebranded ‘Innovation District’, we found material itself to be the most politically and architecturally significant factor in our design. We sought to embrace the culture of re-use and salvage that is unique to Boston as it is a city that expands it’s own perimeter when needed. It has historically done so with material considered to be waste, like the remains of the Great Fire of 1872. The cultural significance of the Seaport District is being eliminated by an influx of developer driven urbanization. We were concerned with the speed and severity of this construction, and the cultural amnesia it sets in motion.

SALVAGED SITES | SEAPORT

USE OF WASTE | 18TH CEN. BOSTON

SALVAGE AND TRANSPORT | CONCEPT


1/8” = 1’ GRID FOCUS | MODEL

06 | 07


We salvaged 5 specific buildings currently scheduled for demolition; the Neptune Restaurant, Floating Dock, the Rum Room of Pier 4, the District Hall assembly space, and the Chapel of Our Lady of Good Voyage. We are proposing the buildings are deconstructed into panels to be recomposed on site. Our definition of complex deals with varying scales of both audience performance, but also represents the several stages music travels through. Our project seeks to embrace the political dimensions of architecture through material, by responding directly to an urbanization project that is not inherently sustainable. It seeks to gather up the scale and spaces of buildings that would otherwise be torn down, and re-purpose them in a new way.


SECTION N | PRACTICE | 1/16” = 1’

08 | 09


MA IN

DR (PE OP OP OF LE F Z /LO ON AD E IN G)

EN

TR Y

HA

RB

OR

NE IG AC HB CE OR SS HO

WA L

K-

OD

VIE

W

TO WA R

DS

DO

WN

TO W

N

0) CONTEXT - PLOTTING ARCHAEOLOGICAL GRID

1) GATHER ABANDONDED SPACES

ARCHAEOLOGICAL GRID

2) PROGRAMMATIC DIVISION - CIRCULATION

SEAPORT SPACE TO BE SALVAGED

PROGRAMMING | CIRCULATION BASED

FRAMING | STAGE & FINANCIAL DISTRICT

RESIDUAL SPACE | STAINED GLASS

UNIFORM MATERIAL | EXTERIOR

STRUCTURE | CONCRETE WITH STEEL FRAMING

SYSTEMS | RADIANT | HEAT RECOVERY AT CHIMNEYS

SALVAGED MATERIAL | INTERIOR


RESIDUAL SPACE | VISUALIZATION

SALVAGED MATERIAL PANELIZATION | MODEL

10 | 11


Entry | Ticketing: 400 SF

SKYLIGHT DETAIL 1”=1’ VERTICAL WOOD SIDING RIGID BOARD INSULATION METAL CLIPS STRUCTURAL STEEL BEAM BOLTED TO PRE=FAB CONCRETE WALL RE-PURPOSED BARKING CRAB “CIRCUS TENT” ALUMINUM CLIPS, WELDED TO BEAM

Experimental Performance: 3,500 SF

SKYLIGHT STOP BLOCKING

PRE-FAB CONCRETE WALL, STEEL PLATE EMBEDS REPURPOSED BARKING CRAB SIDING METAL CLIPS

Back of House: 1,000 SF

RIGID BOARD INSULATION VERTICAL WOOD SIDING

SKYLIGHT

Mechanical | RR: 800 SF

M EC H. HRV .

Outdoor Performance Cafe: 2,500 SF

STAINED GLASS/FLOOR DETAIL 1”=1’ RE-PURPOSED STAINED GLASS WINDOW

WOOD SILL STOP BLOCKING RIGID BOARD INSULATION METAL CLIPS VAPOR BARRIER REPURPOSED BARKING CRAB SIDING CONCRETE WALL VERTICAL WOOD SIDING

Water Taxi Stop

STRIP WOOD FLOORING 2 1/2” PLYWOOD LAYERS VAPOR BARRIER RADIANT TUBING CONCRETE SLAB COMPACTED SAND OR GRAVEL VAPOR BARRIER COMPACTED GRAVEL

CAST IN PLACE CONCRETE HAUNCH

MECH

.

PROTECTION CONCRETE STEEL CHANNEL WELDED TO PLATE GROUT

STAINED GLASS TO FLOOR

Practice Rooms: 2,000 SF

L1 & L2

N | 1” = 40’

SELECTED DETAILS


CAFE | VISUALIZATION

12 | 13


CCIOD

Professor Gregory Palermo - Fall 2013 Columbus, IN 12 Weeks Size: 25,000 SF

The Columbus Center for Innovative Objects of Design acts as an outlet for both local and global visitors to experience various scales of innovation. The museum stems from the idea that Columbus is primarily on exhibition, itself. As a city rich with architectural composition, the CCIOD aims to maximize the potential to exhibit approach to design in addition to the final product. Designing with processed-based program at the building’s perimeter, space resolves across the site from showcase to protection-based space. Using the entry sequence as a destination from essential neighboring buildings, the proposal allows for one to shift through space similarly to how the building shifts across the site.

DETAIL #2

STEEL BEAM / GIRDER WOOD PANELING AT CEILING TIMBER COLUMN (RAISED AT BASE) WINDOW WALL

ALUMINUM MULLIONS (8”, BLACK)

SLATE PAVERS CONCRETE SLAB

SUPPLY AIR

1m=

MASTER DIAGRAM

ENTRY SEQUENCE CONCEPT SKETCH

SCALE: 1/5 (metric equivalent of 3” = 1’

W. FACADE DETAIL


ENTRY SEQUENCE | LIGHTING STUDY

14 | 15


temporary gallery

inventor residence lab

temporary gallery

admin.\ archive

main stair

permanent gallery education \ shop entry

permanent gallery

L2

N \ 1\64” =1’

L1

N \ 1\64” = 1’

dock

restaurant


MAIN STAIR | LIGHT EXHIBITION | VISUALIZATION

16 | 17


PERMANENT GALLERY | VISUALIZATION

18 | 19


Demoscene

Chamila Subasinghe - Spring 2013

New York, NY 12 Weeks Size: 40,300 SF

This proposal aims to highlight the intensified relationship between humanity and technology. Through those that align with the Demoscene subculture, the proposal serves as a space for the production, potential collaboration, and ultimate demonstration of the highly digitalized art form; a product known as a Demo. Programmatically, each unit is equipped with digital canvas which is able to penetrate boundaries in order to engage with both building occupants as well as the public at street level via the residents’ preference. As ‘Sceners’ are often introverted by nature, the screen can be as public, or private, as they see fit. In time, the hint at production via the unit canvas system will ultimately draw those curious to the virtual reality lab, where full demonstrations can be found on exhibition as the primary store front program.

SITE SECTION COMPOSITE | SKETCH

UNIT STACKING CONCEPT | SKETCH

DEMONSTRATION | VISUAL


COURTYARD DEMONSTRATION MASTER | VISUALIZATION DIAGRAM


RESIDENT DEMONSTRATION PRODUCTION | VISUALIZATION


BUILDING TO SITE PROPORTION

POTENTIAL FACADES WITHOUT PRESENTATION

POTENTIAL FACADES WITH PRESENTATION

PRESENTATIONS MAXIMIZED

MAXIMIZE FACADE SURFACE AREA FOR ‘DEMOS’ | DIAGRAMS

VIRTUAL REALITY LAB LL

N \ 1/32” = 1’

STOREFRONT L1

N \ 1/32” = 1’

RESIDENTIAL L 2 - 6

N \ 1/32” = 1’

22 | 23


SECTION N 1\16” = 1’


VIRTUAL REALITY LAB STOREFRONT | VISUALIZATION

24 | 25


Mausoleum

Professor James Spiller - Spring 2012

Chicago, IL 6 Weeks Size: 45,000 SF

A project dedicated to the homeless of Chicago, the Mausoleum is located at the intersection of S. Wabash and E. Van Buren. Utilizing film, we shot footage of light, sound, materiality, and behavioral patterns within Chicago. The goal; to discover connections between researched phenomena and observed reality. Isolating a number of scenes within the created film, we mapped the narrative using selected geometries as a codification system. The codification system is called out in the arrangement of the above ground urns, dedicated to the homeless of Chicago, whom the Mausoleum is designed to commemorate. Each major district of Chicago would be represented by color, allowing both building users and those passing on the elevated line to identify those who have passed from their own district. Employing scale, elevation, and light, the mausoleum is designed to create an awareness for the otherwise unknown.

3 point geometries indicate: light 4 point geometries indicate: self Construction lines indicate: emotion

SITE SECTION COMPOSITE | MIXED MEDIA

CODIFICATION

INTERACTION DIAGRAMMING | WATERCOLOR | INK


SITE SECTION COMPOSITE | WATERCOLOR | INK

26 | 27


S. WABASH APPROACH | MODEL


ABOVE GROUND URNS | CONCEPTUAL SKETCH

28 | 29


SECTION S | 1\32” = 1’ | INKVV

L1

N | 1\16” = 1’ | INK


VIEW ACROSS ELEVATED LINE | MODEL

30 | 31


Machine

Professor James Spiller - Spring 2012 Team: Kelsi Thrasher and Jill Maltby

Ames, Iowa 6 Weeks Size: 43 SF

Fear of self-confrontation. Each plastic panel poses a question in attempt to force one to reflect on being. The user would answer each question with the typewriter provided, which contained no paper or ability to record an answer. By typing, an open circuit wired to a VCR located above the ceiling panel would power on. All wiring was strung from the VCR down the already suspended panel, beneath the raised platform and up though the typing podium. The drumhead on the VCR was equipped with a miniature paint roller which had clear fishing lines connected to each of the 5 panels. The more questions one answers, the more enclosed one becomes.

PROCESS INSTALLATION: FEAR OF TIME

DECONSTRUCTED

INTERACTION

SKIN


SKIN STUDY II | MODEL

32 | 33


PODIUM STUDY | SKETCH

PANEL CONCEPT | DRAWING

PODIUM CONSTRUCTED - FEAR OF SELF CONFRONTATION | FINAL MACHIENE


FULL ENCLOSURE EXTERIOR | FINAL MACHIENE

34 | 35


PLOT + FORMS

Professor Jungwoo Ji - Fall 2014 Team: Matt Darmour-Paul, Han Kwon, & Jill Maltby

Demilitarized Zone 6 Weeks Size: 500 square km

An estimated 2.2 million land mines are embedded in the Korean DMZ. We recognize the material presence of danger in our new global stage, and address it straightforwardly as an architectural problem. The regularity of the grid is graphically superimposed over the dynamic terrain of the 38th parallel. Mine clusters and existing growth are allocated as points onto this grid, creating a charted field or PLOT. This PLOT is then given physical FORM by means of columns, planks, and seed stations. PLOT+FORMS are both the process of territorial reclamation and the physical evidence of that process. The PLOT+FORM’s capacity to reveal invisible dangers, while not interrupting existing biological flows, are their primary function. Between mines are a series of seed stations equipped with soil bricks consisting of fertile biomass from both North and South Korea of which are thrown to detonate mines. PLOT+FORMS are both functional and symbolic, creating a new cultural layer by means of peaceful interaction and collective ownership.

SECTION \ 1”= 12’

DETECTION

DETONATION


REGENERATION

PROGRESSION

36 | 37


N. KOREA

1. DETECT

2. MAP

3. CONSTRUCT

4. DETONATE

5. REGENERATE

6. CIRCULATE

S. KOREA

FERTILE BIO MASS

DETONATE

SEED STRATEGY DIAGRAMMING

SITE PLAN ‘MINE LOGIC’

ENEMY \ 1” = 10’


DETECTION

DETONATION

REGENERATION

38 | 39


Motion Study

Professor Francesco Mancini - Spring 2014

Rome, Italy 10 Weeks Graphite study

I had the opportunity to study several spaces in Rome, however few recent works resonated with the same strength in comparison to Renzo Piano’s Parco della Musica. Under the direction of Professor Francesco Mancini, I was able to develop a study starting with human movement and it’s progression through both historic and modern space in Rome. Using the Parco della Musica as a modern piazza, I was able to map and compare user navigation of a historic piazza on the Tiber Island. Together, the drawing series investigates human interaction with the public setting, and attempts to map human progress across the space.

HUMAN MOTION SERIES | SKETCH


PARCO DELLE MUSICA | ENTRY STUDY | GRAPHITE

40 | 41


Bond’s Investment

Elia Zenghelis Master Class - Spring 2015 Team: Aniket Nagdive, Jill Maltby, & Zhaoyu Zhu Additional Critics: Nadia Anderson, Ross Exo Adams, Pete Goche, and Ivonne Santoyo Orozco Boston, MA 10 Days Size: 10,000 SF “The goal of these next ten days is simple really; I want to know what you stand for”

WWII

2013

Historical figures used on notes 1970

Currency viewed as highly complex pieces of technology

1 pound coins replaces 1 pound 1983

The Bond Panorama skyline construction drawing by Air Rade Precaution soldier Arthur Bond

Bank note re-designed 1957

1925

The Bond Panorama composed 1930

1914

1899

1883

1,000 pound notes issued 1879

Victorian days of Bank 1859

demolition of Soane’s bank and re-built. 7 stories above ground and 3 below.

1855

1833

bank fills “island site” = 3.5 acres and is today the present day site

Operation Bernhard: evacuated 1945

WWI currency forgery begins; utilization of foreign coins

1828

demand for gold increases due to potential for invasion by French

1815

1788

the Bank Pickett created (military protection of the bank)

The Restriction Act 1797

1788

Robert Taylor Bank : Complete 1788

The Gordon Riots 1780

1765

1732

The Popery Act of 1698 1698

1688

Foundation: The Bank of England 1694

began as anti-Catholic protest in London against the Papists Act of 1778 (exempts those taking the oath from some provisions of the Popery Act of 1698)

The Bond Panorama composed 1944

N a pol e onic Wa r s Cross-section of public represented in “subscription” Represents collective efforts regardless of power. Sign of “trust” in the Bank of England (1,268 people in 11 days)

Sir Herbert Baker

A C Blomfield

Sir Arthur Blomfield

PC Hardwick

Professor C.R. Cockerell: Begins

John Soane : Begins

Sir Robert Taylor : Begins

George Sampson : Begins

Bond’s Investment draws from a time when the people of London collectively advocated for institutional representation of value as Capitalism continued to develop from its 14th century foundation. London, today, continues to identify with the Bank of England as both a building and an institution, though circulation of capital has mutated from the collective efforts of 16th century London and the foundation of the Bank. Bond’s Investment depicts an abstraction of The Bond Panorama, an image of the 1944 London skyline constructed by Bank of England employee and artist Arthur Bond, who stood watch with ARP (Air Raid Precaution) wardens during World War II as Capitalism continued to navigate away from the collective, and towards the individual.

RESEARCH | ‘PARADIGM’ BANK OF ENGLAND

PROCESS | PANORAMA ABSTRACTION


PATTERN AND CONSTRUCTION FOCUS | INK

42 | 43


BOND’S INVESTMENT

44 | 45


EDUCATION Iowa State University – Ames, Iowa BArch – Professional Degree August 2010 - May 2015 Iowa State University – Rome, Italy Study Abroad January 2014 - May 2014

ADDITIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE

Waukee Warrior Regiment Drum Line – Waukee, Iowa Volunteer Front Line Instructor Summers: 2010-2013 Iowa Financial Partners – Ankeny, Iowa Marketing Assistant June 2002 - May 2011

RELATED WORK EXPERIENCE

PUBLICATIONS

Elia Zenghelis - Master Class Iowa State University Spring 2015

DATUM No. 5 - Binocular Vision Agents of Production: ‘Lens: Music’ Fall 2014

ASK Studio – Des Moines, Iowa Architectural Intern IDP - 2,000 hours January 2015 - Present Summers: 2013, 2014

Lightfoot Documentation Summer 2014

Iowa State University – Ames, Iowa College of Design Teaching Assistant: Design Studies 111 January 2015 - Present

Lightfoot Documentation Summer 2013

RELATED SKILLS

Iowa State University – Ames, Iowa College of Design Teaching Assistant: LaDan Omidvar, Joe Muench Fall 2012, Spring 2015 Iowa State University – Ames, Iowa College of Design Teaching Assistant: Design Studies 115 August - December 2014

DATUM No. 3 - Perspectives ‘Inception of Wrongness’ ‘Boat House’ Fall 2012

Proficient: Revit, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, SketchUp, AutoCAD, Hand Drawing, Sketching, Laser Cutting, 3-D Printing, Microsoft Office

Developing: Rhino, 3DSMax, Adobe After Effects, and Vasari Languages: English (native USA) German (advanced)


AWARDS AND HONORS

REFERENCES

CSI Competition | 2nd Place “The Aesthetics of Waste” | Construction Specifications Institute of Central Iowa Fall 2014

MR. BRENT SCHIPPER, AIA, LEED AP – Principal of ASK Studio ASK Studio – 3716 Ingersoll Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50312 (515) – 277 – 6707

William M Dikis, FAIA Service Scholarship American Institute of Architects, Iowa Chapter Fall 2014

bschipper@askstudio.com

Lightfoot Scholar Department of Architecture, Iowa State University Spring 2014 Designation Lightfoot Scholar Department of Architecture, Iowa State University Spring 2013 Designation Spiros Mentzelopoulos Book Award Selected by second year architecture faculty Fall 2012

ADDITIONAL INTERESTS/ACTIVITIES Iowa Women in Architecture: Students 5th year coordinator and student branch founder Fall 2012 – present DATUM - President Student-run architectural journal at Iowa State University Editor, former treasurer, writer, photographer, publicity coordinator Fall 2011 – present Jazz Ensemble 1 Jazz vibraphonist and soloist Fall 2010 – Spring 2011

MR. JUNGWOO JI -Lecturer and Principal of EU.K Architects Department of Architecture at Iowa State University (914) - 419 - 4589 techarch@iastate.edu MR. JAMES SPILLER – Lecturer and Studio Instructor Department of Architecture at Iowa State University (515) - 294 – 3543 jspiller@iastate.edu

DR. MIKESCH MUECKE - Associate Professor and Advisor Department of Architecture at Iowa State University (515) - 294 - 8786 mikesch@iastate.edu

MS. MINDY COOPER - Academic Advisor and Design Learning Communities Coordinator College of Design at Iowa State University (515) - 294 - 3680 macooper@iastate.edu

46 | 47


J ILL M ALTBY 515.240.9841 | jlmaltby@iastate.edu

www.jlmaltby.weebly.com


Architecture Undergraduate Portfolio  

Works completed from 2011 - 2015 in the Department of Architecture at Iowa State University.

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