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JJ Wyatt

Portfolio 2010

P.O. Box 4734 Greenville, SC 29608 U.S.A.


Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive...


Table of Contents

Urban Design Studio

Giza- Grand Egyptian Museum (G.E.M)

3

Off-Campus Multi-Disciplinary Studio

Project Okurase

6

Graduation Studio

Re-Tanning The Landscape

11

... then go and do that. What the world needs is people who have come alive.


GIZA-GEM: URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

PROFESSORS: DR. HALA NASSAR and ROBERT HEWITT SPRING 2008

OVERVIEW & ANALYSIS

Background

The Grand Egyptian Museum requires the creation of an esplanade linking the museum to the Giza pyramids, and upgrading surrounding urban fabric. During a 7 day site visit. Clemson and Ain-Shams University students divided the site into sectors to perform site analysis. My sector was Sector 1. Returning to the states the final design product was a group studio effort. G.E.M. Zones: The focus of our design was the esplanade. Esplanade

Car Parking

Piazza & Atrium

Dunal Park

Nile Park

Lands of Egypt Park

Recreational Gardens

Sector 1

5

4

3 2 1

Sectors

Land Use

Density

Built Conditions

Transportation

3


GIZA-GEM URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

DEVELOPMENT

Design Principles Nile and Canal Systems Intertwined boulevard system around canal and esplanade.

Cosmology Progression from antiquity to modernity.

Natural barrier to monument site. With primary and secondary crossing points. Ancient canal system links monument site with urban fabric, green spaces and agriculture.

The ancient Egyptians were avid astronomers. The sun symbolized their core values. Using rays of the sun from the pyramids we transition from historic pyramids to the modern G.E.M.

Zone Development

Future Zone

Contemporary Zone

Antiquity Zone


GIZA-GEM URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

Final master plan and illustrations showing further development of the conceptual master plan.

MASTER PLAN


PROJECT OKURASE: GHANA Background

PROFESSORS: ROBERT MILLER and RAY HUFF SPRING 2009

OVERVIEW & ANALYSIS

A rural Ashanti village of 5,000 people in Ghana. The project sponsor teamed with Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston to fulfill vision of a medical and educational center for the community and surrounding areas. Before the start of the semester two graduate students traveled to the site for analysis. A team comprised of graduate architect and undergraduate landscape and architecture students to develop a sustainable site that could be easily constructed by the residents of the village. As a group we performed analysis, and conceptual master planning. Individually we worked to further the design. I was responsible for development of site circulation, site entrances, landscape vegetation and the final rendered master plan.

Program Analysis

Rural Ghanaian and Ashanti Villages

Education Performance Accomodations Service

Private courtyard spaces organized around larger public courtyard.

6


PROJECT OKURASE: GHANA Context to Village, Environmental, Topology,Winds, Transportation. Site Analysis:

ANALYSIS

Environmental Studies

Studies of air movement and shade were applied when developing the site. A series of shaded courtyards oriented to generate wind. 7


PROJECT OKURASE: GHANA Design Principles

DEVELOPMENT

COURTYARDS

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

SPATIAL CONNECTIONS

CIRCULATION

WATER

HUMAN COMPORT

PROGRAMMATIC GROUPS SHOULD BE GATHERED AROUND OUTDOOR SPACES, EACH HAVING A UNIQUE CHARACTER.

PEDESTRIAN AND VEHICULAR TRAFFIC ARE SEPARATE WITH VARIABLE PEDESTRIAN CONTROL.

THE SETTLEMENT IS COMPOSED AROUND TWO PRIMARY COURTYARDS, ONE PUBLIC AND ONE PRIVATE.

ALL RAIN WATER WILL BE CAPTURED AND STORED ON SITE FOR USE BY THE CENTRE.

COURTYARDS ARE LINKED BY DIRECT VISUAL ACCESS.

SHADED LANDSCAPE AND WELL VENTILATED BUILDINGS WILL PROVIDE MAXIMUM HUMAN COMFORT.

8


PROJECT OKURASE: GHANA Entry Development Primary Entry: Northern road branches, wider path leads to hospital, parking lot, and service road to rear of site. Screened by vegetation. Narrow path pedestrian leading through check point to main courtyard.

DEVELOPMENT Secondary Entry: Southern entry used occasionally for deliveries. Follows same concept as primary entry but is less elaborate.

a

a

KEY PLAN

KEY PLAN 0

10

20

40

0

10

20

40

Vegetation Development

Identification of tree forms and function Suggestions of native trees to use depending on availability and budget Location of low planting beds

9


PROJECT OKURASE: GHANA

Project under construction: Summer 2010

MASTER PLAN

10


RE-TANNING THE LANDSCAPE

PROFESSOR: DR. GALEN NEWMAN FALL 2010

OVERVIEW

Background Continued growth and increasing residential densities of informal settlements in Cairo threaten residents health, ecological networks and historic monuments. I selected a portion of the tannery area that will be relocated in the identified informal area the historic district of Al-Fustat to redevelop as my graduation project. My design revives shared spaces, the ecological network and provides economic opportunities through historic settlement patterns.

Tannery Relocation

Total Area- 126.935 Acres Population- 28,571-57,143 People

Total Removed Area- 70.815 Acres Remaining Population- 15,943-31,886 People Obsolescence of Shared Spaces Residential

Commercial

Study of typical evolution and development around family, work, and community shared space. The need to increase density fills in shared space.

Mixed Use

11


RE-TANNING THE LANDSCAPE

ANALYSIS

Contextual & Site Specific Analysis

Commerce

Graveyard

Structure-300s AD

Unexcavated Archeology Site

Historic

Museum

Community Services

Structure- 800s AD

Possable Built Over Archeology Site

Residential

Mixed Used

Vacant Land

Structure-1300s AD

Archeological Excavation Site

Recreation Area

Industrial

Archeology

Graveyard- Pre 1000 AD

Private Garden

Artisan

Factory

Vegetation High Soil Contamination

Graveyard- 1940s AD

Primary Paved Roads Secondary Paved Roads

Good Fair Poor

Secondary Unpaved Roads Metro Unpaved Paths Bus Stop

1-4 Floors 5-7 Floors 8-9 Floors +10 Floors

Economic Analysis Inventory of the primary economic opportunities in the area.

Research on suq network and identification of the funduq.

Improvements to the market system, and separation of work space, storage, and commercial areas. Solutions for traveling markets.

12


RE-TANNING THE LANDSCAPE

DEVELOPMENT

Design Principles Typology 1 25%

Unbuilt Sq Ft.

32,448

2 50%

21,632

3 75%

Land uses broken down by public and transportation accessibility. Unified by ecological network.

Spatial Arrangement

16,224

4 90%

5,408

5 100%

0

Built Area Unbuilt Area

Progression of demolition of shared spaces in one acre. Identification of 50-75% built space offers same amount of density as existing conditions but preserves shared spaces.

Site Development

Extensions of existing privacy levels and secondary roads. Land use by block influenced by privacy levels and surrounding uses.

Two linear parks preserving historic sites. Linked together through private and public shared spaces.

13


RE-TANNING THE LANDSCAPE 10.2 Acres Open Park

3.5 Acres Built Sq Ft: 94,640 75%

Square footage of built area by block. Resulting area provides same density as remaining site while generating shared spaces

35 Acres Open Park

2.6 Acres Built Sq Ft: 56,243

2.7 Acres Built Sq Ft: 73,008 75%

50%

8.3 Acres Built Sq Ft: 21,632

1.4 Acres Built Sq Ft: 56,243 75%

DEVELOPMENT

50%

1.8 Acres Built Sq Ft: 48,672 75%

10.0 Acres Built Sq Ft: 270,400 75%

3.1 Acres Built Sq Ft: 83,824

3.5 Acres Built Sq Ft: 75,712

75%

50%

2.1 Acres Built Sq Ft: 56,784

2.5 Acres Built Sq Ft: 67,600 75%

75%

1.4 Acres Built Sq Ft: 37,856 75%

1.5 Acres Built Sq Ft:32,448 50%

7 Acres Built Sq Ft: 164,853

.9 Acres Built Sq Ft: 24,336 75%

2.6 Acres Built Sq Ft: 70,300

1.7 Acres Built Sq Ft: 45,968

75%

75%

1.6 Acres Built Sq Ft: 50% 34,611

50%

3.2 Acres Built Sq Ft: 69,222

50%

35 Acres Open Park 1.8 Acres Type: 2 Built Sq Ft: 38,938

50%

Shared Space Typologies

Built area produces different types of shared spaces corresponding with the principles.

Public

Private

Public


RE-TANNING THE LANDSCAPE

MASTER PLAN

Open Recreational

Live Commercial

Funduq

Linear Pedestrian

Educational

Private Residential


JJ Wyatt

jessiew@clemson.edu (336)414-2808 P.O.Box 4734 Greenville, SC 29608

Education: Affiliations:

• •

2005-2011 2001-2005

Clemson University - B.L.A. Salem Academy - High School Diploma

• • •

American Society of Landscape Architects, Student Division CU ASLA, Clemson University A.S.L.A. Sierra Club

Academic & Work Experience: International

• • • • •

National

Summer 2010

International Equestrian Design, Montreal, Canada, (Design Intern)- Program development, master planning and detail design of equestrian properties. Cairo, Egypt- Site analysis for redevelopment of city around the Museum of Civilization. Spring 2010 Charleston, SC- Studied at Clemson Architecture Center. Develop master plan for Project Spring 2009 Okurase in Ghana. Cairo, Egypt- Site analysis for redevelopment of city around the Grand Egyptian Museum. Spring 2008 Winter 2004-2005 London, England- High school choir performed for the Queens’ Charities. Toured Canterbury and historic cathedrals

• •

Summer 2009 May 2007

January 2005

1996- Present

Technical & Professional Skills:

Word (Expert) Power Point (Expert) Excel (Expert) Diagraming

Hogany Tops Farm, Aubrey, TX, (Assistant Manager)- Management of a 40 horse show barn Dallas/Fort Worth, Tx- Toured Fort Worth Water Garden, Kimbell Museum, Heritage Park and Las Colinas. J.Dabney Peeples Design, Easley SC, (High School Intern)- Made blueprints and assisted in design drawings Equestrian: Extensive experience specializing in hunter jumper discipline, breeding, management and training for upper level national competitions.

Auto-CAD (Proficient) Illustrator CS4 (Proficient) Photoshop CS4 (Proficient) Hand Rendering

InDesign CS4 (Proficient) Sketch-Up- (Proficient) GIS (Rudimentary) Model Building


JJ Wyatt Portfolio 2010