Page 1

JI

YINGLIN

PORTFOLIO 2013 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE APPLY FOR JOB/INTERNSHIP


PORTFOLIO I YINGLIN JI Yinglin Ji graduated from North Carolina State University in 2013 with a Master of Landscape Architecture degree. She earned her Bechalor in Environmental Science in Tongji University, Shanghai, China, where she was born and grew up. In graduate school, she worked as studio and seminar teaching assistant for several semesters, and got involved in different activities and achieved several honors and awards.


EDUCATION 2006.9-2010.6 Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Environmental Science Tongji University, Shanghai, China 2008.1-2008.9 Non-degree Exchange student Environmental Science and Management Portland State University, OR, United States 2010.8-2013.6 Master of Landscape Architecture(MLA) Landscape Architecture North Carolina State University, NC, United States AWARDS & ACTIVITIES - 2013 University Olmsted Scholar - 2012 NC ASLA Award of Excellence - 2012 Teaching Assistant Award of Excellence (NC State University) - 2011 International Student Award of Excellence (NC State University) - Second Place, 2013 ULI Competition (NC Urban Land Institute) - 2012 NC ASLA Award of Merit: ARTISTS’ BACKYARD - 2012 Hardscape North America (HNA) Award for ‘Best-of-the-Best’ Permeable Clay Brick Project: ARTISTS’ BACKYARD

PROFESSIONAL SKILL - Construction experience from document development to on-site installation - Leadership and teaching experience with strong interpersonal, oral and written communication skills - Cross-cultural experience from multi-culture background - Strong computer technical skills and free-hand drawing skills - Strong design skills from conceptual to detail development TECHNICAL SKILL Bilingual in Chinese (Mandarin and Shanghai dialect) - PROFICIENCY AutoCAD Sketchup Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign/AffterEffects ArcGIS (ArcMap), Google Earth MicroSoft Office, Mac Office - FAMILIARITY V-ray for SU, Podium for SU AutoCAD Civil 3D, Rhinoceros, 3Ds Max Ecotect

Email: yji3@ncsu.edu

JI.

M. LARCH NCSU


ADDITIONAL

ACEDEMIC DELANCEY SUB-PARK URBAN PUBLIC SPACE (INDIVIDUAL)

DROSSCAPE URBAN WETLAND (GROUP + INDIVIDUAL)

COMMON GROUND

COLISEUM TUNNEL

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT (INDIVIDUAL)

REGIONAL MASTER PLAN (GROUP COMPETITION)

P.11

DRAWINGS

DESIGN+BUILD (GROUP)

P.19

P.03

ARTISTS’ BACKYARD

P.25

P.39

P.47


SELECTED WORKS 02

DESIGN WITH NATURE

Attached is a sample of Yinglin’s studio and competition works. They are mostly positioned within a continuum that showcases my work in Landscape Architecture as it deals with hydrology sustainability, public realm, urban design and regional planning. Despite of their contexts, they convey and respond to the idea of creating sustainable and people-oriented future environment through landscape approaches.


AERIAL VIEW OF MANHATTAN LOWER EAST SIDE AND PROJECT SITE

01

DELANCEY SUB-PARK LOWER EAST MANHATTAN, NEW YORK CITY, NY ABANDONED UNDERGROUND TROLLEY STATION REDESIGN SIZE: 6.6 ACRES

LOWER EAST SIDE

PROJECT SITE

WILLIAMSBURG BRIDGE


DELANCEY PARK

WHAT’S IN THERE?... LAND USE DIAGRAM (MANHATTAN MAIN AREA)

ABANDONED STATION EXSITING CONDITION

RETHINK THE CITY’S UNDER-SIDE ? ‘Many floors below your shoes is a room with the lights on’, by Alec Wilkinson. The often overlooked underground spaces beneath New York City provide a great chance to rethink the health of a city’s underside. By transforming an abandoned former trolley terminal station under delancey street to a public park, this project aimed to improve the sub-surface condition under our habitual street from the aspects of both visual aesthetic and environmental restoration. It also enrich the Lower East Manhattan with a valuable urban oasis, as well as to offer its residence a place with vibrancy and personality.

PROJECT GOAL Parks are scattered around LES, but most are lack of identity and self-contained. Delancey Park aims to create a green open space with its unique characteristics and diversity to serve as a connection point, as well as a destination for surround communities.

IDENTITY

HOW MANY PEOPLE GO THERE EVERYDAY?...

CONNECTION

SUBWAY RIDESHIP (MANHATTAN)

BUS SUBWAY

Transport connection

Green/Biking connection

Nightlife

Streetlife

Vertical connection

Manhattan subway stations 2012 annual flowrate and its variation compared to 2011, overlayed with a map of currentely abandoned stations, which forms a vast unused underground space.

Street Art

History

Diversity

Community connection

04


THE GENERAL SOLUTION

SPACE ENVISION (PERSPECTIVE LOOKING INTO THE CENTRAL PARK SPACE FROM MOSS GREEN WALL)

(GROUND TRANSFORMATION)

As an important connection point, one of the central goal is to foster the underground circulation with access and exit points connecting destinations aboveground. In order to allow maximum undergound sunlight exposure, the whole design is based on a 15-degree-shifted axis. Sufficient man-made lighting comes from various sources to ensure healthy plant growth and night time safety. Those eye-catching red pillars support the structure, as well as provide light when needed. Also, aimed to be a vibrant destination place, the park is programmed with diverse activity space to encourage people to stay.

‘THE PAPER BELT’

PUSH UP

ESSENCE OF THE FORM

Access under belt

Access over belt

Segmental programming

‘MULTI-SURFACE’ DESIGN The overall design focuses on multiple surfaces of this landscape which are both separated and connected. The top surface is transformed to a urban plaza along with commercial development, maximizing circulation and providing sufficient resting spaces is the main idea. The underground ceiling is the surface between the above and under layers, which is partially transformed to a main lighting source when natural lighting is deficient. The third layer is the actural underground space which is designed to become a park with easy access and green infrastructure.

HERE, YOU CAN DO THINGS LIKE...

DELANCEY PARK PROGRAMMING THE BIG LAWN ORDINARY DAY

1

CONCERT NIGHT

MOSS GROUND WITH LIGHTING

2


DELANCEY PARK GREEN CONNECTION

PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

PEDESTRIAN + BIKE

06

VEHICLE + SUBWAY

BUILDING FOOTAGE

LIGHTING AREA

DAYLIGHTING

SLOPE GARDEN WITH MALL ENTRANCE UNDERNEATH

STEPPED LAWN ORDINARY DAY

3

CAFE STAIRCASE

STREET FRONT ORDINARY DAY

RED STAIR

MOVIE NIGHT

8

9

10

STREET-FOOD FESTIVAL

11


560’

support columns

O

DELANCEY PARK PLAN VIEW N

520’ SERIES SECTIONS CUT ALONG SITE.

480’

L

440’

K

400’

J

360’

I

320’

H

280’ platform

M

F

200’

E

D

subway train track

240’

glass fence

G

160’

120’

A PLACE WITH VIBRANCY With the existing subway line still active, Delancey has a huge visitors flowrate, about 30000 people every day, which hums the park with ever-lasting energy and vitality.

C

80’

B

One of the most important ideas of the design is to create a landscape with much easier accessibility. The slopping connection between upperground and underground provides diverse and easy access for people commute either way, and also make the communication and interaction between two levels possible.

40’

The vibrancy is also epitomized by the diverse user grounps. It is a park for daily commuters, strollers, travelers, shoppers, bikers, joggers... or people who want to sit, read, rest, drink, eat, play...

A

00’


DELANCEY PARK 08

SECTION H-H Section perspective showing the upper-ground and underground relationship


Williamsburg Bridge

SECTION LATITUDINAL

subway train

0

40

80

160 ft

bicycle and pedestrian lane on bridge


DELANCEY PARK

SECTION F-F

10

SECTION L-L

LEFT: SLOPPING LAWN IN A SUNNY WEEKEND AFTERNOON, LOOKING TOWARD UNDERGROUND PARK RIGHT: MOVIE NIGHT AT DELANCEY IN A SUMMER NIGHT

sidewalk

slope to surface connecting bridge

proposed commercial

green wall with lights

red lighting support

lighting sculpture

slope garden

underground mall entrance

staircase from cafe

slope lawn/ amphitheatre

green wall with ombrophyte plants

subway entrance on exess street


DOWNTOWN EAST MINNEAPOLIS, EXISTING CONDITION

02

PROJECT AREA

COMMON GROUND DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOLIS, MN GERALD R. HINES URBAN DESIGN COMPETITION (2013) SIZE: ABOUT 54.9 ACRES


Primary area Optional area

DISTRICT RELATIONSHIP

AXIAL RELATIONSHIP

Downtown Minneapolis has been investing and planning for a far-reaching transit network. Metro Transit, the transit agency, currently operates one light rail line (Hiawatha), a commuter rail line (North Star), numerous bus lines, and even carpool service.

The project site is surrounded by several distinguished districts, such as Minneapolis downtown core on left, new Viking Stadium on right, historic riverside on top, and several neighborhoods on bottom, which forms a multi-edge space on site. A common ground with great diversity, connection, and interaction, provides enormous development potential.

Two major axials intersect at the heart of entire project site, the Armory, which is currently a parking facility, and will be reclaimed to a central market and community center in the proposal.

Marcy-Holmes Gateway Waste to energy plant

HIG

HW AY

Master plan area

TRANSIT SYSTEM

COMMON GROUND

EXISTING CONDITION ANALYSIS

Baseball Stadium Riverfront

Basketball Stadium Downtown

University of Minnesota

The Armory Minneapolis convention center

Viking Stadium

Cedar Cultural Center

Ventura Village

12

A SELF-SUSTAINED COMMUNITY AS ‘ENERGY’ GENERATOR

A COMMON GROUND FOR DIVERSE POPULATION A

Adam + Ben - Lives in a senior community in north Common Ground - Walks to central plaza or Power Cell Gym via Portland Ave for fitness class - Kelvin loves to play with friends in the downstair playground after school.

C

Tamicka - Walks or bikes to work at Hennepin County Medical Center - Lives in Common ground affordable housing nearby - Takes classes at Power House learning center

D

F

PLANET

PEOPLE

PROFIT

Grace + Johnson - Own and run an art studio in Common ground, both live and work at the same place - Biking to riverside or go to Power Cell Gym for fitness during leisure time

Bob + Lauren -

Walk to work in Downtown Drive to get groceries nearby Live in modern loft near historic district Has two kids go to boarding school, come home every weekend and holiday

E

Yue + Ning

G

Aaron

- Foreign travelers from China, first time in Minneapolis - Stay in ‘VIP BOX’ hotel, due to its great location - Attracted by destination points in downtown area.

- Lives in affordable housing in Common Ground - Take TRL to work at the waste to energy plant - Walk to buy groceries nearby

COMMON GROUND

EXISTING + PROPOSED LAND USE Existing open space

Existing surface parking Proposed underground parking ramp Proposed above ground parking ramp

Proposed building Proposed open space (public) Proposed open space (private) Existing open space Proposed tree

28%

Proposed building

10%

Optional lot (not developed) Undevelopable lot Existing building

Existing building

OPEN SPACE

Surface parking lot

SURFACE PARKING

Existing building

65% OPEN SPACE

4%

The following proposal aims to create a self-sustained community with diverse programs and walkable scale to facilitate people with living, working or even a brief stay. The proposed gym and renovated Armory, together with the new Viking Stadium, works cohesively to power a community with its ever-lasting vitality, and also to serve as a destination point. The community also aims to establish itself to be an energy sustainable neighborhood with lowest energy waste and sustainable energyproducing sources.

B

- Undergrad student in University of Minnesota - Biking from apartment to school through Portland Ave. - Love to hang out with friends in Common ground at Friday night.

SURFACE PARKING

The project site is located in Downtown East, where the city of Minneapolis has long been keen on redevelopment that creates value for individual property owners, city residents, and the greater region. However, currently this area has been largely used as surface parking lots and some small businesses. Thanks to the approval of the plan for the new Viking Stadium, the development interest of Downtown East has been rocketed. The transformation of an urban greyfield into a prosperous neighborhood and regional destination has increasing possibilities.

Heather

URBAN DESERT / SPACE SHORTAGE

RELOCATE PARKING

CORE DEVELOPMENT

PERIPHERAL DEVELOPMENT


DESIGN STRATEGIES PERMEABLE ACCESS

PROPOSED LAND USE

RESIDENTIAL PLAYGROUND AFTER SCHOOL TIME


DECENTRALIZATION

FOSTER BIKABILITY

COMMON GROUND

CENTRALIZATION

SITE PLAN DETAIL The site plan mainly illustrated the core development of Common Ground. The open space around power cell gym is an important social ground facilitated with diverse programs for its residents, and the LRT stop in front of the stadium provides sufficient visitor volume.

MASTER PLAN ENVISION The main concept of the master plan is emphasised on two main axes across the common ground: the first axis is Portland Ave, connecting south neighborhood district with mississippi riverside; the second axis connects the area across highway with vikings stadium, armory till the baseball stadium through a proposed landbridge over highway

14


HOLIDAY SEASON AT POWER CELL GYM PLAZA


COMMON GROUND 65% 15% 10%

Daily Commuters : 130,000

90.5%

By Car

Public Transit Bicycling Walking

‘DESERTED TO INTIMACY’ ALTER THE DOWNTOWN SCALE

Located right beside the Minneapolis Central Downtown area, those deserted parking lots form a striking contrast with the forested high-rise buildings next to them. This proposal offers a design with relative intimacy spaces and small scale to mitigate the contrast, but maintain its identity. Instead of creating an extension of downtown with more skyscrapers, by applying low-rise buildings with discrete arrangement creates more walkable spaces and a distinguishing ‘Common Ground’ identity.

Double Skin Facede To Retain Heat

SECTION A - MIXED USE SCALE: 1” = 64’

0

10

20

40 ft

Solar Panels

Rooftop Garden

Parking

Residential + Underground Parking

Residential Playground

Residential Courtyard

Commercial + Residential Residential Open Space

16

Green Roof

Commercial + Office Pedestrian Coridoor

Pedestrian Corridor

19’ Pedestrian

Sidewalk+ Zone Bioswale 19 ft.

8’ Parking

6’ Bike

11’ Drive

Lane Lane One-way Street Bike Parking Lane Traffic 8 ft. 6 ft. 22 ft.

11’ Drive Lane

6’ Bike

Street Trees

Benches

Bollards with Lighting Lane Sidewalk+ Bike Street Lane Lighting Bioswale Power Cell Gym central plaza 6 ft. 19 ft.

Plaza

Gym

Gym

BUILDING STRATEGIES Recycle Greywater + Stormwater - Sustainable Energy Consumption - Building Green - Daylighting + Natural Ventilation Spaces STREET STRATEGIES

Detention + Infiltrate Stormwater - Encourage Bikeability - Foster Diverse Street Life

SECTION B - THE ARMORY

Learning Center

Sidewalk+ Bioswale 19 ft.

Street Bike One-way Parking Lane Traffic 8 ft. 6 ft. 22 ft.

Bike Sidewalk+ Lane Bioswale 6 ft. 19 ft.

COMMON GROUND

CHANGE THE WAY TO COMMUTE

DOWNTOWN 2013

The Armory

Sidewalk+ Bioswale 19 ft.

Drive Lane 11 ft.

Two-way Lightrail Lane 28 ft.

SCALE: 1” = 64’

0

Drive Lane 11 ft.

Sidewalk+ Street-front Seating 30 ft.

10

20

40 ft


PROJECT PROFORMA TOTAL PROJECT DEVELOPMENT COST

$ 457,000,000

The urban design competition was accomplished by a team consisting of 5 people majoring in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, and Urban Planning from NC State University or University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Project proforma is prepared by one of our team member from urban planning, as well as the corresponding phasing strategy. The main idea of this proposal is to create a community with intimacy and human scale, instead of high-rise blocks, in which way to foster outdoor street activities, as well as sustainable transportation methods. Furthermore, it is realizable to build rapport among people throughtout the neighborhood.

FUNDING SOURCES Source

Amount

Percent of Total

EQUITY

Land Equity Historic Preservation Tax Credit Total Equity

175,000,000 3,000,000 178,000,000

35.2% 0.6% 35.8%

SUBSIDY

PAYG Bond from Minneapolis City TIF

30,000,000

6.0%

Minneapolis City Parking Ramp Subsidy Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Community Development Grant

15,000,000

3.0%

Total Subsidy

1,000,000 600,000 46,600,000

0.2% 0.1% 9.4%

Commercial Loan

276,000,000 497,000,000

Hennepin County Tax Abatement

LOAN

TOTAL FUNDING

Total Development Cost PHASE 1

285,198,278

PHASE 2

15,668,528

PHASE 3

13,323,654

55.5% 100%

TOTAL

314,190,460

DEVELOPMENT PHASING STRATEGY PHASE 2 - 2015

PHASE 1 - 2014

TOTAL BUILD OUT

PHASE 3 - 2016

PUBLIC

RESIDENTIAL

PARKING

INSTITUTIONAL COMMERCIAL

PORTLAND AVE

Sidewalk 20 ft.

SECTION C - PORTLAND AVENUE

Bioswale 6 ft.

SCALE: 1” = 24’

Two-way Bike Lane 8 ft.

0

Bioswale 6 ft.

6

12

On-street Sidewalk Parking 5 ft. 8 ft.

24ft

One-way Traffic (Two Lanes) 22 ft.

Bioswale 6 ft.

Sidewalk + Street-front Plaza 40 ft.

Commercial + Office


COMMON GROUND

A WEEKEND NIGHT AT COMMON GROUND GATEWAY

18


03

DROSSCAPE

1 mile

RALEIGH, NC REVIVAL URBAN WASTING LAND WITH SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE SIZE: 12.8 ACRES

‘DROSSCAPE’ - URBAN LANDSCAPE TRANSFORMS FROM DROSS TO ASSETS The word ‘drosscape’ is used by Alen Berger to describe the wasting land in urban America, ‘Dross is understood as a natural component of every dynamically evolving city. As such it is an indicator of healthy urban growth... ’

CROSS SECTIONS ALONG SITE (EXISTING)

The site is located on Western Blvd, North-West Raleigh, within the NC State University boundary. Three-quarter of the site is surface parking lot, and the rest consists of several small businesses. In certain sence, it is indeed a stagnant place on a busy boulevard, in other words, a ‘drosscape’. The proposal is aimed to revive this place with a new mixed-use neighbohood development including residential, office, commercial, along with a community center to serve the surrounding area.

Since the site sits on a ridge area, sloping from north-west to south-east, next to the very tip of an upstream tributary, such critical location with high pollutants input, such as urban runoff pollution and domestic sewage, will easily affect downstream hydrology health. In aware of the importance of a healthy and sustainable hydrology environment, this project focuses on reclaiming the place through the design of a mixed-use community with a water-sustainable landscape. SITE HYDROLOGY AND TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS N

Runoff accumulation

Runoff direction

Stormwater (red line) and sewege (green line)

Slope analysis


WAKE COUNTY HYDROLOGY

Watersheds

Major rivers

Water supply watersheds

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) sites

Municipal areas

DROSSCAPE

SITE STORMWATER CACULATION

20 Runoff picks up considerable amount of pollutants like gasoline, oil, heavy metals, trash, etc from various urban surfaces into the natural aquatic system, which may cause water pollution at different levels. The highlighted stream system, Walnut Creek, is one of the two major creeks system within Raleigh’s municipal area (showed with yellow color block). From the diagram, several places along Walnut Creek and its tributary are highlighted, where stormwater running through may potentially cause pollution in the adjacent natural water system.

SE NEU ER R IV


DROSSCAPE BIRD’S EYE VIEW N

2

BUILDING USE

residential food market office retail community center

1

TREATMENT WETLAND

STORMWATER BASIN

CIRCULATION

main walkway secondary path


FUNCTIONAL LANDSCAPE

EXISTING

MITIGATE RUNOFF POLLUTION

316,672 SF2

40,221 SF2

SINGLE

4 POINTS

BICYCLE PEDESTRIAN

BUS STOP BUS ROUTE SITE ENTRANCE

PREVENT EROSION

INVITE WILDLIFE

RESULTS

Creating a landscape has not only aesthetic value, but also practical function fits the big context. In spite of its water treatment intention, wetland landscape also has great wildlife-attracting potential and aethetic value, not to mention the amenities it creates for the people living in this community.

91,840 SF2

PROPOSED

Urban stormwater runoff is a leading source of water quality problems in today’s urbanized area. Besides, another problem regarding of healthy water environment is the grey water. The average person generates over 25 gallons of greywater each day, which leads to a great potential of grey water harvest and recycle. Therefore, the most important mission of this project is trying to solve water non-point pollution from its beginning and establish a self-water -cycling community by integrating an urban wetland into the neighborhood.

SUSTAINABLE WATER USE

DROSSCAPE

RECYCLE GREY WATER MITIGATE RUNOFF POLLUTION

DESIGN SCENARIO COMPARISON

NEIGHB ORH CONNEC OOD TION

106,094 SF2

55,354 SF2

BUILDING

IMPERVIOUS

15

82

FOOTPRINT

%

229,931 SF2

SURFACE

%

MULTI + HIERARCHY

GREEN

6 POINTS

CIRCULATION

AREA

ACCESS

PEDESTRIAN / BIKE

471

%

POINT

N/A

22

N/A

HUMAN AMENITIES

SECTION A-A A

SCALE:

0

10

20 FT

A

SCALE:

0

10

20 FT

SECTION B-B B

B

PLANTING SUGGESTION Spikerush

Common Threesquare Bulrush

WETLAND TREATMENT TIER

Soft Rush

Iris spp.

Arrowhead/ Duck Potato

Reed Canary Grass

Pickerelweed

Sweet Flag

WETLAND FLOODING POND

Spatterdock

Ponytail Grass

PLANTER

Ponytail Grass

Elijah Blue Fescue

Elijah Blue Fescue Variegated Sedge

SIDEWALK BIOSWALE


WETLAND D - TERRACED WETLAND TO ACCOMMODATE THE NATURAL GRADE

WATERSHED A

GREYWATER OPERATING SYSTEM

Greywater generated from sinks, washing machines, dish washers, showers and bath tubs of the building is collected in the settling tank installed underground.

The entire site is divided into four sections, or ‘ watershed’, each has its own independent greywater filtration and stormwater retention system. The diagram above illustrated the general process of how such constructed wetland bio-filtrate greywater and reuse it. Exploded diagram on right shows the detail of such multi-layer system. Although each watershed has its unique shape which is pre-determined by the spare space after the building development, the wetland operating principle is the same.

WATERSHED KEY PLAN A

Collected greywater is distributed evenly to the first wetland tier through flow splitter (effluent flow moves vertically and sub-surface in this senario). Each tier has a 1% slope to help water flow fully exposuring with plant roots and medium.

Settling tanks, storage tanks, and filters are installed underground.

Trails integrated within wetland and urban farm systems.

B

D C

Processed clean water from wetland can be utilized as irrigation water for the farm.

In subsurface-flow wetland, plants are rooted in a gravel (limestone or lavastone) or sand medium.


DROSSCAPE 24

STORMWATER OPERATING SYSTEM WATERSHED B

WATERSHED C

WATERSHED D


04

COLISEUM TUNNEL NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY, RALEIGH, NC CAMPUS DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT DEVELOPMENT SIZE: 1.7 ACRES

North Entrance

NO

RTH

Co lis e TH

IN T

m

u

TRA

SOU

RAC

K

Tu nn el

So uth

Ent ran ce


COLISEUM TUNNEL 26

TUNNEL NORTH ENTRANCE PANORAMA PHOTOGRAPHY BY YINGLIN JI

THE TUNNEL - ‘SMALL BUT GREAT’ Coliseum tunnel is one of the three tunnels under a railroad track, connecting NC State University’s north and south campus, which plays an enormous role in university students’ and staff’s daily commute. Due to lack of maintainence and long history, many defects of the tunnel have becoming increasingly obvious, such as no ADA access, darkness, poor visibility, and potential safety hazard. The project aims to redesign the tunnel’s two entrance spaces, in order to create a more feasible and safety landscape for its vast users, including disabled people. TUNNEL SOUTH ENTRANCE PANORAMA PHOTOGRAPHY BY YINGLIN JI


? MOVEMENT

STAY

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES + IDEATING

RECLAIM THE CAMPUS FORGOTTEN PLACE Instead of being anonymous, this project aims to reclaim the campus tunnel with character and vitality, and meanwhile, improving the accessibilty.

ADA ACCESS

SCALE: 1” = 30’ 0

30

60

120 ft

The main design concept is to answer the distinct needs of the tunnel north and south entry due to their different context. The north side neighbors a steam plant and a surface parking lot shared by nearby departments. Therefore, movement (sending people to their destinations) is the primary purpose of this place. However, on the other side, because of the adjacency to many public amenities, theatre, food store, etc, it is necessary to provide a little open space for people to sit, talk, eat, or rest.

DESIGN STRATEGIES

MASTER PLAN PLAN LEGEND A COLISEUM DECK TUNNEL Tunnel is facilitated with more lighting structure to ensure night time safety.

B TUNNEL ENTRY

VEGETATION

PAVED LAWN

LAWN PAVING

SHELTER

POCKET SPACE

TREE & BAMBOO

DIAGONAL LAYOUT

DIAGONAL CONNECTION

The entries are transparently shelted to allow maximum nature sunlight entering tunnel during day time.

C NORTH PLAZA The central open space of north side, designed with diagonal linear pattern to reinforce the concept of movement and connection.

D GRASS SEATING AREA WITH LIGHTING SCULPTURE

Paving intergrated with grass, lighting sculptures, and lighting benches.

E EAST ENTRY

A

This entry is designed to mainly serve circulation from Department of Mathematics.

F ELEVATED ACCESSIBLE LAWN Existing trees are removed to allow more accessibility to the boundary of train valley, to value the scene of railroad.

G STEPPING LAWN

A designed gathering space for small group activities.

LIGHTING & SEATING H

I

H SOUTH EAST GROUP SPACE

Outdoor padio for small group activties with semipravite enclosure and overhead shelter.

I SOUTH WEST GROUP SPACE

Outdor elevated padio for group activites, and communication with upper level activities.

J SIDEWALK PLANTING

Planting beds next to sidewalk with diagonal pattern to reinforce the idea of movement, as well as to serve as a buffer space between pocket gathering spaces and main circulation space.

MAKE THE TUNNEL ACCESSIBLE ! Bird’s eye view shows the basic design form, space layout, and its context. This is a study model to help improve the design, therefore it does not exactly represent the final scheme. (physical model with photoshop rendering on top of it)


STEA MP

SUR

FAC E PA RK

ING

LAN

TRA

IN T

T

RAC

COLISEUM TUNNEL

K

28

TAL L

EY S

COL I

TUD

ENT

CEN

TER

E. D U

NN

SEU

MP ARK

ING

DEC

K

AVE .


DESIGN DETAIL ILLUSTRATION STAIR AND LAWN STEPPING PAD DETAIL

LINEAR PAVED LAWN DETAIL

SECTION

0

LATITUDINAL RELATIONSHIP

25

50

100 ft


LEFT :

LEFT : The main idea of south side is to encouraging people to stay to create a vibrate activity space, which can be achieved by these small pocket spaces with either public or private feeling.

RIGHT : Many lighting sculptures are placed in north side with clear space design to ensure unobstructed circulation and night time safety. A ramp extended from entrance provides ADA accessibility. Physical model made by Yinglin Ji

SCALE: 1� = 50’

COLISEUM TUNNEL

Transparently shelted tunnel entrance provide a safe and wide space to connect surface ground, compared with existing condition.

30


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT


COLISEUM TUNNEL

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

32


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT


COLISEUM TUNNEL

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

34


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT


COLISEUM TUNNEL

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

36


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT


COLISEUM TUNNEL

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

38


FEASIBILITY STUDY AND MASTER PLAN

05

‘SITE AS MACHINE’

ARTISTS’ BACKYARD NC STATE UNIVERSITY, RALEIGH, NC ‘DESIGN + BUILD’ - LANDSCAPE AS LABORATORY SIZE: 0.45 ACRE

Working in close collaboration with numerous campus stakeholders, the studio designed and constructed this environmentally innovative site. Leading-edge strategies were employed, including rain water collection systems, rain gardens, permeable pavements, material recycling and repurposing, urban arboriculture, structural and amended soils, and hydro-zoned plantings. The project has created an engaging environment that helps to educate students about the importance of sustainable site design. PHASE 2: CONVEYANCE CHANNEL WITH WOOD BRIDGE OVER IT


PHASING ARTISTS’ BACKYARD + OWEN’S REFUGE PHASING

Phase 2

Phase 1

Completed: Spring 2012 + Spring 2013

Completed: Summer 2011

Phase 3

Phase 5

Phase 4

2015

2016

2017

MASTER PLAN

Phase 2 : Looking from Patio (Completed) Artists’ Backyard : North Entry

Artists’ Backyard : South Entry

Exit

COMPLETED PHASES Digital model generated by sketchup to show the overall look of compeleted phases (Phase I + Phase II). The existing four fabulous oak tree are preserved to create shades. The final built design was slighted different from original master plan, in order to coordinate with reality.

Turlington Residence

Artists’ Backyard : Rain Garden

Green Stair

Artists’ Backyard Phase II (Completed)

Owen’s Refuge : Gateway

Owen Residence

Owen’s Refuge : Upper Owen’s Garden + Creek

Cates Ave. 40

Existing Oaks

Phase 1 : Looking from North Entry (Sketchup Design)

Artists’ Backyard Phase I (Completed)

Conveyance Channel + Scupper North Entry

Future Artists’ Backyard Phase III Rain Garden

Patio + Outdoor Furniture

Phase 1 : Looking from North Entry (Completed)

DESIGN BUILD

Phase 2 : Looking from Patio (Sketchup Design)


PHASE II: CONVEYANCE CHANNEL WITH WOOD BRIDGE OVER IT

ARTIST’S BACKYARD BEFORE RENOVATION


DESIGN BUILD

42

ARTIST’S BACKYARD PHASE 2 AFTER COMPLETION


STEP 1: PLANNING + OUTREACH (PHASE 2) COMMUNITY OUTREACH

PHASE 1: ARTISTS’ BACKYARD NORTH ENTRY PLAZA WEBSITE

http://design.ncsu.edu/design-build/ Studio applied team-based working format. Students were assigned to different small teams for better collaboration and efficiency. Used to be a muddy yard with no access, Artists’ Backyard has totally changed after 2 years endeavor. Phase 2 was a continuous effort after the completion of phase 1 north entry. The major contribution of phase 2 includes the patio area, rainwater collection and conveyance system, green stair, permeable brick path, and wood brige.

For more information, please watch the video:

http://vimeo.com/42241076 PHASE 2: GREEN STAIR SEATING PLACE


STEP 2: DESIGN REFINEMENT + DETAILING + CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT (PHASE 2) FROM PAPER TO REALITY

ENVIRONMENTALLY INNOVATIVE DESIGN

PHASE 2: CONVEYANCE CHANNEL WITH WOOD BRIDGE

Planting Design Ideation

44 Green Stair and Seating Area Sketching

DESIGN BUILD

In-class Discussion

Artists’ Backyard Overall Site Plan

Artists’ Backyard Phase 2 Layout Plan

Rainwater Collection Sytem Design for Future Rain Garden


STEP 3 : BUILD IT !!! (ARTISTS’ BACKYARD PHASE 2) DEMOLITION

PHASE 2 : ADJUSTABLE CHAIR IN GRAVEL SEATING AREA The whole construction period, from demolition to total completion, took about 7 weeks. It had been a great opportunity for me to truely experience the joy of transforming a design become reality. Total cost of Artists’ Backyard phase 2 is $20,282.

Existing Deck Demolition

CUT, DRILL, WELD...

Smoothing Steel Frame

Cutting Steel Footing for Patio Table

Welding Steel Footing for Outdoor Furnishing

Finished Furniture Footing


PLANTING

Planting Day with Family

Arranging Plants Location

46

DESIGN BUILD

DIG, SHOVEL, MEASURE...

Digging Trench for Underground Pipe

Installing Green Stair and Its Bench

Form Work with Freshly Poured Concrete Footing to Stable the Furnitures

PHASE 2 : SCUPPER AT THE END OF CONVEYANCE CHANNEL FOR FUTURE RAIN GARDEN (INSTALLATION COMPLETED)


06

DRAWINGS

CHARLESTON IMPRESSION LEFT: Sketch of Charleston, SC, regional plan and the plan of I’ON neighborhood in Mt. Pleasant. (Water color on top of black ink) RIGHT: Sketch of one of the two canal connecting West Lake and East Lake in I’ON neighborhood in Charleston. (Water color on top of pencil)


THE PRAIRIE RIDGE

PINE FOREST

CRAPE MYRTLE IN SHADOW

Sketch of the open air outdoor classroom at the Prairie Ridge of the North Carolina Museum of Nature Science. (Black ink)

Sketch of the open air outdoor classroom at the Prairie Ridge of the North Carolina Museum of Nature Science. (Color pencil on top of ink)

Sketch of crape mytle tree in the shadow, Duke campus (Pencil) DRAWINGS

48


JI.

M. LARCH NCSU

Email: yji3@ncsu.edu


THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

YINGLIN JI College of Design, NC State University Master of Landscape Architecture Email: yji3@ncsu.edu Phone: 919-600-3266 Address: 3005B Kings Ct Raleigh, NC 27606 United States


JI. yji3@ncsu.edu

Yinglin Ji/ Landscape Architecture portfolio2013  

Selected Works during my study in Landscape Architecture/NCSU

Yinglin Ji/ Landscape Architecture portfolio2013  

Selected Works during my study in Landscape Architecture/NCSU

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