Issuu on Google+

Communications   A  resource  pack  for  helping  staff     to  improve  internal  communications    

                           

 

                              Compliled  by:  J.  Ingle,  Thinking  Writing,  2014  

 

1  


Introduction     The  word  cluster  on  the  front  page  shows  key  words  that  come  from  a   survey  by  Queen  Mary’s  communications  team,  who  asked  a  range  of   people  about  what  they  thought  of  Queen  Mary.  If  you’re  thinking   about  communicating  with  students,  staff  or  the  outside  world,  it’s   worth  checking  the  guidelines  they’ve  produced:  (LINK).  Alternatively,   you  could  give  them  a  ring  (CONTACT  DETAILS).    

Communicating  by  email:     The  majority  of  communication  with  colleagues  is  by  email.  As  a  means   of  communication,  the  main  functions  of  email  are:   • To  exchange  information   • To  request  information   • To  participate  in  shared  information  exchanges     Think  about  the  effect  your  email  has  on  the  reader.  If  you  need  to   write  more  than  half  a  page,  or  your  email  is  urgent,  then  it’s  probably   better  to  reach  for  the  phone.  This  is  because  the  reader  may  not  read   everything  carefully,  or  may  not  access  their  emails  every  day.     We  read  differently  on  a  screen  than  on  a  printed  page  and  this  is   reflected  in  the  ways  we  write  emails.  For  example,  it’s  easier  for  your   reader  if  you  use  short  paragraphs  (one  or  two  sentences)  or  bullet   points.   Have  you  included  the  key  information?  Is  there  anything  unnecessary   or  irrelevant?      

2  


Automated  email  responses   Look  at  the  three  examples  of  automated  email  responses:   1.  What  do  you  think  the  effect  of  these  emails  would  be  on  the   student  receiving  them?   2.  Which  do  you  think  is  the  best  and  why?  

   

 

3  


3.  What  do  your  colleagues  think  and  why?   4.  How  could  they  be  improved?  

               

 

4  


Email  and  letter  templates   Here  are  three  examples  of  templates:  one  an  email  and  two  letters.     Activity:     Rank  them  from  best  to  weakest  in  terms  of  how  effective  they  are  at   communicating  their  content  to  students  

   

 

5  


6  


Activity:     1.  Look  at  the  one  you  identified  as  the  weakest  and  note  down  what   you  think  the  problems  might  be.   2.  None  of  them  are  perfect.  How  could  you  improve  the  other  two?    

 

7  


3.  Sometimes  we  have  to  write  longer  emails  and  letter.  Look  at  the   one  below  and  see  how  it  could  be  improved:    

 

 

8  


And  finally  …  

Activity:   Go  to  your  email  application  or  templates  and  choose  either  a  couple  of   templates  or  emails  from  your  sent  box  and  see  how  you  can  improve   them  

                             

 

9  


Top  tips  for  email  etiquette:         1.  Choose  the  right  tool   Email  is  not  always  the  most  appropriate  way  to  convey  your  message,  especially  in   sensitive  or  political  situations.  Consider  whether  a  phone  call,  face-­‐to-­‐face  meeting  or   letter  would  be  more  effective.  Don't  use  e-­‐mail  as  an  excuse  to  avoid  personal  contact.     2.  Start  with  a  salutation   Your  email  should  open  by  addressing  the  person  you’re  writing  to.  Messages  should   begin  with:   • Dear  Mr  Jones,  or  Dear  Professor  Smith,  (for  someone  you  don’t  know  well)     • Dear  Joe,  or  Dear  Mandy,  (if  you  have  a  working  relationship  with  the  person)   It’s  fine  to  use  Hi  Joe,  Hello  Joe  or  just  the  name  followed  by  a  comma  (Joe,)  if  you  know   the  person  well.     3.  Stick  to  one  topic     If  you  need  to  write  to  someone  about  several  different  issues  then  don’t  put  them  all  in   the  same  email.  It’s  hard  for  people  to  keep  track  of  different  email  threads  and   conversations  if  topics  are  jumbled  up.       4.  Be  concise   Reading  an  overlong  email  is  daunting.  Get  the  main  points  onto  the  first  screen.  Use  a   logical  structure,  keep  points  brief,  and  use  attachments,  links  to  more  information   online,  sub-­‐headings,  spaces  and  bullet  points  to  present  information  in  easily  digestible   chunks.  Make  sure  to  state  action  points  clearly  and  near  the  top.     5.  Sign  off  the  email   For  internal  emails,  you  can  just  put  a  double  space  after  your  last  paragraph  then  type   your  name.  If  you’re  writing  a  more  formal  email  you  should  sign  off  appropriately.   • Use  Yours  sincerely,  (when  you  know  the  name  of  your  addressee)  and  Yours   faithfully,  (when  a  specific  person  is  not  identified,  e.g.  when  writing  Dear   Sir/Madam,)  for  very  formal  emails.   • Use  Best  regards,  or  Kind  regards,  in  most  other  situations.   • Even  when  writing  to  people  you  know  well,  it’s  polite  to  sign  off  with  something   such  as  All  the  best,  or  Best  wishes,  before  typing  your  name.   • Add  a  signature  block  with  appropriate  contact  information.                      

 

10  


Signature  example:       Catriona  Heaton           Full  name  (include  salutation  if  appropriate,  eg   Office  Manager     Dr)   Marketing  and  Communications     Job  title   Queen  Mary  University  of  London     Directorate,  School,  Institute  or  Faculty     Institution   Tel:  +44(0)  20  7882  7428     email:  c.heaton@qmul.ac.uk       Contact  details:  put  them  in  order  of  how   E107,  Queens'  Building,  327  Mile  End   useful  they  are  -­‐  if  you  want  people  to  call  you,   Road,  London,  E1  4NS   put  that  first.       Use  the  international  code.     www.qmul.ac.uk       Add  your  work  mobile.         Twitter:  www.twitter.com/QMUL       Central  website   Facebook:     www.facebook.com/OfficialQMUL       Useful  links  –  may  vary     YouTube:   www.qmul.ac.uk/about/youtube       Flickr:  www.flickr.com/photos/qmul         6.  Be  sparing  with  group  email     Send  group  email  only  when  it's  useful  to  every  recipient.  Use  the  ‘Reply  All’  button  only   when  compiling  results  requiring  collective  input  and  only  if  you  have  something  to  add.       7.  Use  CC  and  BCC  appropriately     Don't  use  BCC  to  keep  others  from  seeing  who  you  copied.  Do  use  BCC  when  sending  to   a  large  distribution  list,  so  recipients  won't  have  to  see  a  long  list  of  names.  Be  cautious   with  your  use  of  CC.  Only  copy  people  who  are  directly  involved.  Try  not  to  use  CC  unless   the  recipient  in  the  CC  field  knows  why  they  are  receiving  a  copy  of  the  message.  CCing   can  sometimes  be  confusing  as  the  recipients  might  not  know  who  is  supposed  to  act  on   the  message.     8.  Use  the  spell-­‐checker  and  double-­‐check  recipient  details   Edit  and  proofread  before  hitting  ‘Send’.       9.  Use  Out  of  Office     Remember  to  activate  the  Out  of  Office  Assistant  facility  before  going  on  holiday  or  if   you  know  you  will  not  have  regular  access  to  email.  Include  alternative  contact  details  –   either  your  own  or  a  colleague’s  –  and  your  planned  return  date  in  your  message.   Information  on  how  to  set  your  Out  of  Office  can  be  found  here.       10.  Respond  promptly   Reply  promptly  to  serious  messages.  If  you  need  more  than  24  hours  to  collect   information  or  make  a  decision,  send  a  brief  response  explaining  the  delay.  Consider   whether  it  might  be  better  to  call  or  meet  to  discuss  things.    

 

11  


Communications ebook