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Mark Wigley, expert on network theory, continues this discussion in his essay “The Architectural Brain.” He uses the analogy of the brain to define a network: “The network itself is a brain, a thinking machine and each thought belongs to the network as a whole regardless of the particular geometry being activated at any moment…”5 This version of a network is a collaborative, socialized one—similar to Rifkin’s economic observations of empathic connections. Wigley goes on to discuss the possibilities of a radical networked architecture: “An extended pattern of interconnections defined each situation rather than the things being connected. Architecture could be seen as an agile, responsive and evolving system like any other to be found in the natural world.”6 His argument parallels the ones made by Weinstock: by designing an intelligent system rather than an isolated component, architecture can become a much more integrated part of the natural environment in the way it performs and negotiates with various changing parameters. Wigley’s historical overview of network practices in architecture all point to a concept of society’s inclinations towards freedom. Walls open up, structure becomes lighter and perceptions of space are based more on ambient intensities than physical edge conditions. Vertical hierarchy moves towards a more horizontal democratic distribution of ideas, materials and energy. Anthony Burke continues the discussion of different ways network practice has been executed in contemporary design. He outlines the concept of a protocol, defined as a “language that regulates flow, directs netspace, codes relationships and connects lifeforms.”7 This idea of “Protocological Architecture” is evident in Burke’s work in the form of complex design diagrams describing layers of movement trajectories, fields of activity and generative nodes. He uses these diagrams as a method to develop an ambient system of navigating and perceiving the open system rather than dictating physical boundaries. These schematic plans develop ideas of organization and relationships between the parts and are an effective method to help design a network. The project uses cybernetic strategies to network the energy system with an intelligent ecology. It will demonstrate the possibilities of using environmental inputs (through the use of sensors) and human inputs to create an open system. The project will also develop its own protocol language as a way to drive its specific purpose. In this way, the project merges existing network technology with a reworked energy flow system to regulate a self-powered landscape that is activated by changing human and environmental conditions.

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Radical Energy Systems  

<2011>Speculations on connecting decentralized energy flows with networked ecologies in the post-oil era. M.Arch AD Thesis Report - Bartlet...

Radical Energy Systems  

<2011>Speculations on connecting decentralized energy flows with networked ecologies in the post-oil era. M.Arch AD Thesis Report - Bartlet...

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