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MArch Architectural Design 2011


Shun-Chieh Yang presenting his work at the Eyebeam Gallery, New York City


The Masters studio in Architectural Design is a 12-month full-time programme concentrating on advanced architectural design. We believe that design is a mode of research and that research through design both underpins leading architectural practice and allows the individual to discover his or her individual expression; it takes many forms from speculative drawing to the construction of working prototypes. Research through design does not start with data collection; it starts with invention, which is then tempered by analysis, critical architectural thinking, and discourse. The programme is designed for both recent graduates and for qualified architects; people who wish to be part of a more speculative design environment. In the relatively short time since it’s inception in 1993, a high proportion of alumni have gone on to be influential teachers and practitioners. The programme also continues to provide a strong route into doctoral research at UCL. Once again the output from the programme this year has been extraordinarily impressive. The advanced level of work that is achieved by students in such a short 12 month programme is testament to both the quality and commitment of the teaching staff but also to the tenacity and enthusiasm of the students. The studio atmosphere is one of competition and ambition but it is the sense of passion and the desire to speculate that really dominates. The 2010/2011 programme was structured to introduce students to the concept of research through design, by asking students to investigate a set of theoretical propositions through design and drawings. The propositions were set to mirror the interests of the specialist teaching groups. Once students joined their specialist teaching groups they confirmed the subject of their thesis project and report for the year. Early on in the year students attended workshops in Rhino and Rapid prototyping, Processing, Arduino and digital production techniques. As a result there has been an increasingly diverse range of research and speculations this year. Most notably physical making in the form of digital fabrication, the responsive device and the inhabitable installation have been a renewed and strong presence in the years work. As programme directors we have enjoyed and embraced this addition to the panoply of student output and, as we pass the metaphorical baton to the incoming Director and Bartlett Professor of Architecture, Frederic Migayrou, we look forward with great enthusiasm to his renewed vision for the programme and its transition to GAD (Graduate Architectural Design). The 2010/2011 programme was directed by Professor Stephen Gage and Andrew Porter. Andrew Porter was also the Programme coordinator.


Rosanne Chang presenting her work at the Eyebeam Gallery, New York City


Programme Directors: Andrew Porter Stephen Gage Tutors: Andrew Porter Luke Pearson Kevin Carmody Andy Groarke Lewis Kinneir Phil Watson Stephen Gage Ruairi Glynn Shaun Murray Stuart Munro Enric Ruiz-Geli Konrad Hofmann Report Coordinator: Godofredo Pereira

Lecturers: Mark Garcia, Ranulph Glanville, Chris Leung, CJ Lim, Rachel Armstrong & Rachel Cruise Special Thanks to Our Guest Critics: New York: Grahame Shane, Tim Furzer, Paul Pangaro, Marek Walczak, & Seth Garlock. London: Mark Garcia, David Darelle, Christine Hawley, Dave di Duca, Marjan Colletti, Murray Frazer, Alan Penn, & Frédéric Migayrou

Students: Jose Castaneda Aranda Ana Filipa Braganca Rong-Shan Chang Georgia-Anna Chatzidaki I Ju Cheng Wei-Chung Chuo Wen Fang Xiao Wen Fang Isik Hong Yu-Hao Huang Hao-Chun Hung Jason Immaraju Kiseong Jeong Amey Kandalgaonkar Hakan Karas Dionysia Kypraiou Wei Tao Li Bo Li Huajing Liu Jun Ma Yuki Nakagawa Kyung Sik Park Ollie Palmer Allison Piehn Pegah Sepehrdad Ming Shi Tong Sun Marielle Rivero Vazquez Anne Carina Voelkel Xuepei Wang Elizabeth Williams Shun-Chieh Yang Hui Ye Chia Chi Yeh Nan Zhang Yuan Zhang


I Ju Cheng Desire-Land, Simulation of Hyper-Reality Reflection This thesis examines the world in the reflected image as a virtual output built on humans’ desire according to Mirror Stage theory of Lacan. The mirror image serves as a bridge between the mind and reality world, representing a scene that is representative of the human’s psychological aspect. To discuss the representation of human desire, the research of different cultures throughout history and social phenomena nowadays are merged into the design process. The seven deadly sins, the eighteen levels of hell, and Dante’s Inferno point out moral standard and illustrate the punishment in a cruel afterlife. As technology develops, the mass production and change of social status subvert the original value of objects to where people project their desire onto the consuming and consumption. The advertisement provides an illusion of pleasant life composed by the product promoted, a system of objects that could be seen as a simulated image. The project goes on to discuss the consumerism in the shopping mall which contains many departments of products. Using common objects in the shopping mall, three dimensional scenes are created based on the sense and atmosphere of departments. However, with reflected material and specific view points, the rendering image can form a hell-like picture with uncanny reflection. The pieces and distorted shades in the reflection can be zoomed in to examine the composition of objects and reveal the phenomena of consumerism in modern times.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


I Ju Cheng

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Kiseong Jeong Perception for an Unrealized city (Nashville) This thesis is about perceiving new spaces through a personal viewpoint of London and an unrealized city plan of the architect John Nash. Perception process is complex, rendering differences within object and space. Different interpretations happen as each individual has a different memory, experience and information. Through perceived information, a whole new interpretation and expectation is possible. Through vision, one can host information of light, shadow, depth of space, scale, and design. The hippocampus of the brain manages memory, information used to interpret the object differently. The process of visual perception is applied to the London city environment, looking for new perceptions and using the unrealized ones of John Nash as a trajectory for further development. The thesis perceives a current London with the information of Nash’s unrealized city plans, specifically on St Martin’s lane where the British Museum and Trafalgar meet.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: An enlarged single part of the mechanical system Middle: Behaviour of the imaginary mechanical system Bottom: The process of perception of Nash’s unrealized plan-detail


Top: Cross section of Creating Nash’s unrealized London Bottom: Recovery of the connection between the British Museum and Trafalgar Square


Kiseong Jeong

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Above: The Augmented Nash’s Unrealized Plan


Dionysia Kypraiou Digital Reconsecration of the Levelled Churchyard Driven by the desire to comment on the ubiquitous use of new technologies and research on a number of notions and ideas such as the human body in motion and its relation to technology, the short life expectancy of the new technologies that creates a dialogue with the organic mortality of the human body, the tracesmaterial and immaterial, the notion of the ghost as well as the circle of life and death under the qualities of a shadowy, dark architecture that Antony Vidler has defined as the “Architectural Uncanny”, I undertook the first steps to the project. Through the misuse of a 3d scanner that I set as my “desiring tool” and inspired by an anecdotal story of the St.Pancras exchurchyard referring to an unceremonious dislocation of dismantling human remains and tombstones due to the construction of the Midland Railway in 1860’s, a ritual performed on the site leads to the creation of a point cloud of my scanned moving hands as a proposal of a digital reconsecration of the site. The point cloud operates as a vehicle to navigate into the site while it transforms the current view of the site itself and is visualized in a diagrammatic way; for it reacts in three different ways by Knitting, Extruding and Cutting its body. The idea of this triptych is based on the myth of the three Greek goddesses called Moirai(Fates) that were believed to be responsible of the human lives-as if they held death into their hands.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: Extruding the hardy tree


Top: Knitting the point cloud, Bottom: Extruding St. Pancras Church


Dionysia Kypraiou

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Above: A Moment of Cutting- Sir Soane’s Mausoleum


Yuki Nakagawa Memory of Shadow: Hysterical Parametricism Growing up in a rural area of Japan, a visitor came to my house. As he approached the entry path, his shadow was cast on the shoji and projection of this shape and movement appeared on the other side. I contemplated who’s shape this was and who might be best to answer the front door. At that moment the thin skin of the house shoji created such wonder. Working years later in Tokyo, I never again experienced this phenomenon of my past. It seems this sensation does not live much in a modern urban town. This project looks at this fading custom and how architecture can modify it in its transition into the future. Responding to the growing concern over aging society in developed countries, a traditional house from a marginal village is relocated to Tokyo. The house begins to deform in order to accommodate changes in human size, environment and society. The deformation codes in grasshopper (scripting), a widely used software in the construction industry, are set based on earlier researches into light and shadow using photograms and features of a traditional Japanese house.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: Exterior wall deformation Middle: Roof deformation Bottom: Fusuma deformation script


Top: Deformation Middle: Simulation shadow of memory Bottom: Exterior, Ceiling opening, Tokonoma


Allison Piehn Conjunctions of And In a present that is hyper-saturated with media and options, the associated psychophysiological experience is complex and varied. Relative to the architectural landscape, decisions involving program and physicality seem infinite and exponentially confused as the architect and client take on a breadth of topics previously not required. The results become unfocused and understandably so. In attempt to manage these infinite influences, emotion has and continues to be a rather complicated mechanism used by the mind. Yet, commonly stigmatized as an inadmissible meter riddled with prejudices, the topic of emotions is rarely addressed for its capacity to host multiple ways of thinking and lay insight into design strategy. This thesis experiments with the correlation between information input and emotive reaction, speculating on their influence into the evolving architect and client relationship as it concerns the design of the built environment. To put the topic of the team design into an academic practice may afford a look at the tabooed conflicts, reductions, monstrosities, achievements, and potentials of the workings of the design industry. To design through this study artifacts of emotion are composed into landscapes of data to use as an experimental architectural field to perform collections of sentiment. These readings take part within a devised polygraphic landscape operationalized through a balloting orchestra of instruments. This orchestra of sentiment triggers the incubation of seeding to germinate the landscapes of data maintaining familiarities and growing nuances. Please visit http://vimeo.com/apiehn to view full film.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Allison Piehn

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Hui Ye The Reincarnation of Atlantis In this design, I used the legend of Atlantis to be the starting point of exploring the birth and death of city. The process of Atlantis’ life is allusive to the decline of old China and the rebirth of new China. At this situation, China and Atlantis break the wall of time and space and lay over together. This is also a process of reincarnation. Through the research, I found that cities are complicated and have a lot of different factors. When we focus on the societal layer to read a city, we can find many narrative elements, such as history, culture and symbols. This research helped me find another way to describe a city. First I explored the different elements of a city as well as the relationship between them, and then I extracted them. These elements include government, industry, media, education, and construction. This is the process of deconstructing the city. After this deconstruction, I used a narrative method to represent the changing process of a city. This narrative took the form of a mechanical language to materialize the social system and to express the connection between different elements. Through these two processes, I can re-systemize the city by another design language and represent a “new” city. The whole project is a process of compiling and reforging. mars-arch.blogspot.com

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: Masterplan of the Atlantis Middle: Poseidon’s View Bottom: Timebased Movement


Top: Atlantis Escape from the Sea Bottom: The “New Atlantis”


Hui Ye

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Hui Ye

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Georgia-Anna Chatzidaki THE IN-BETWEEN SPACE This project investigates the condition of the in-between space, a condition which has been investigated by many philosophers, sociologists, and architects. The description of the work’s in-between space can be compared to Pierre Levy’s understanding, stating “the in between identifies with the incident that is triggered between two entities and it is an entity on its own as well, which represents the constant transformation of the one to the other.” The exploration of the idea of the inbetween in this project is located in the novel, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’s Alice in Wonderland. This novel has a clear distinction between two worlds; that of the real world and that of the dream world. The transition from the real world in to the dream world takes place in a powerful in-between space which has elements from both worlds. The in-between being the transitional space of study, through the transformations and deformations and of objects. The composition of the in-between ceiling by thousands of yarns represents a dual sequence of connection of the in-between space with the real and the dream world simultaneously. The objects are visual imprints of Alice’s memory as she commenced her journey falling through the hole. They are first presented in the in-between in their wholesome and recognizable original state like that of Alice’s memory, but then begins the passage of transformation in state and in transit. A transformation to the correct scale is displayed by the objects and a necessity to move to the other side. A dispersion of objects allows the movement of objects from one inbetween portal to the next.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Jason Immaraju A CRUDE ISLAND Historically, intensified energy flows have simultaneously been the reason behind massive cultural transformations and entropic damage to the planet. Now, the capitalist and political forces that control energy distribution networks have exchanged natural destruction for short-term profits while the public at large continues to consume at increasing rates. This paradox of progressive development at the expense of the environment reveals the instability of the current energy distribution methods. These stratified energy systems must be critiqued and re-evaluated, particularly the petroleum industry. This project is titled “A Crude Island” as a reference to the site under investigationthe Inglewood Oil Fields in Los Angeles, California. These 950 acres act as an open framework to implement the ideas discussed in the thesis through a longterm programmatic narrative. After unplugging the oilfield from the surrounding energy grid and corporate control, a massive disassembly of the existing infrastructure created a kit of parts to construct a new structural framework for sustainable algae biofuel production and landscape cultivation. The oil extracted from the algae bioreactors is used in conjunction with the remaining drops of crude oil to propagate the barren landscape with precision cultivation machines assembled from discarded equipment. “Landscape printers” guided by virtual parameters accurately plot native seeds in defined parcels and are designed to expire within the printed forests after the oil supply is slowly depleted. This long-term landscape transformation results in the formation of a Los Angeles Central Park containing the corpses of the oil-based technologies responsible for its creation.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: Ground level view of Landscape Printer Bottom: Evolution of the printed landscape (200 year timeframe)


Top: Algae Biofuel Filling Station for cultivating printhead, 2030 Bottom: Constructed system from reassembled infrastructure, 2012


Jason Immaraju

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

Top: Landscape Printer, 2012 Bottom: Landscape Printer, 2080


Above: Reconstructed Algae Bioreactor Farm


Ana Filipa Braganca EMPATHIC DESALT ECOLANDSCAPE Located in Alentejo, the Desalt EcoLandscape aims to fight one of the consequences of Global Warming: a reality of severe drought that Portugal will likely face in the near future. In addition, the existing supply of water is declining. In this project, desalination is studied and explored as the main technological resource that can assist in fighting these problems. These desalination buildings are designed to work as systems that must perform in order for the landscape to survive. These buildings became a part of a desalination oasis where local people can congregate, absorbing a new and sustainable way of living, participating and contributing to its development. Conditions are created to allow people to keep up with their agricultural activities. Citizens may grow their own “private� garden in a communal place, while they re-learn how to live as a group. This didactic environment encourages people to leave with an empathic feeling. Need and Tradition bring people together, and at the same time, empathy towards a sustainable ecological world is necessary.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Rong-Shan Chang Micro-Green Performative Architecture Architecture is the performance space of particles. Within architecture, particles from a building have an interactive effect with the particles in the environment. We can see everything from the “Particle” angle, meaning that we can see everything from the smallest part to the whole environment. This thesis analyzes the local environmental issues in Taiwan, specifically that of river pollution and proposes adopting hypothesis “Particle X” as resolution. I used a local plant, Kandelia Candel, which fits the environment from the past as a concept to design eight strategies from its lifecycle. Each idea which comes from the lifecycle changes the design, and the design becomes an experience. I used these ideas to build in the site and try to resolve the river pollution problem and city landscape. Therefore, the environment will be seen as a whole range of particles, and the hypothesis factor, “Particle X”, will be put into the site to see how the environment will change. I integrated these modular design ideas together and ultimately apply them on a greater scale to a city, as if under the Domino Effect. Eventually, the site can become a clean river park, full of vibrancy and will restore a clean habitat for the species and citizens who live by the riverside.

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson


Kyung Sik Park Sculptured Architecture by Water with Simultaneous Process in Subterranean The purpose of the architectural project can be described by the assumptions. Can the aesthetic latency of the underworld be extended to the possibility of design for the positive use of people in underground space? ‘Is there a potential for negative association with the dark to be changed to the positive recognition for people, to create a harmony between light and dark?’ My architectural proposal is a cemetery, monument, church and car park in the centre of the Smithfield of London. All the programmatic functions stem from the physical conditions and history of the Smithfield. These functions would reinvigorate this district during the daytime and operate to solve the urban problems. However, the main function of the proposal is a dark museum. The Dark Museum offers visitors an experience of the different levels of dark space, which could change basic perceptions of the dark. The architecture is designed in the ontological meaning of the simultaneity from design process to constructing methodology. These simultaneous relationships include death and living, form and space, dark and light, private and public, inner-oriented and outeroriented, and experience and watching. These relationships form the basis for the design, and devices for the meaning of architecture. The architecture is sculptured by water. Water puddles in the city form an illusion that stores the information and image of the city. Furthermore, water has the potential to change the geological landscape.

Tutors: Kevin Carmody + Andy Groarke + Lewis Kinneir

Top: The Developed Section Perspective Bottom: The Developed Sections


Above: The Dark Museum


Kyung Sik Park

Tutors: Kevin Carmody + Andy Groarke + Lewis Kinneir

Top: The perspective and section of third stage drawing Middle: The perspective and section of fourth stage drawing Bottom: The perspective and section of last stage drawing


Left: The Gargoyle Sculpture Device Right: Distortion of City through Water


Pegah Sepehrdad The Relevance of Women in the Permanence of Architectural Spaces Within the Context of the City: The study sought to explore how culture defines permanency of architectural spaces. The red lights in the Soho area at the heart of London and its counterpoint of Iran in which architecture is more based on religion has been explored architecturally. Red-light in Iranian architecture serves just as a means of attraction but in European countries it is a phenomenon which is culturally more charged. It represents vulnerability of women working in the sex industry and their exploitation by their male customers. Red-light recalled the idea of gender discrimination in societies and the man-made environment. I sought to explore how architecture can enable women to be part of the city and examined how the women sex workers who have been historically marginalised by the city and society as a whole, can be integrated and supported by the fabric of the city. Red light as a cultural signal was my medium by which people’s behaviour and their emotional reactions toward my architecture around threshold conditions were tested. Making light models and testing them either in an actual site or animating them was my methodology to study the idea of causes and effects in architecture. A 1:1 installation was created with the idea of interactivity between people and space to define how the knowledge behind the technology and red-light as a cultural signal can define women in architectural spaces and city and control people’s reactions to it. The installation dealt with people’s perception of the space.

Tutors: Kevin Carmody + Andy Groarke + Lewis Kinneir

Top: Narrative Curated about Behaviours Around Threshold


Action and Interaction within the Installation Space


José Antonio Castañeda Unrealistic Scenarios: ¨The Gargoyle’s System¨ The project is the result of the search for a personal architectural language, bordering between fantasy and reality, as well as between the material and the immaterial. These boundaries are crossed in order to create unrealistic scenarios where I could readdress the ¨Question Concerning Technology¨ of Heidegger to be the question concerning architecture. These new scenarios allow the discussion of different topics within the same space, therefore, encouraging new architectures that deal with technology, philosophy, narrative and history. A series of natural technologies (such as wind, light, water, heat and vibrations) are implemented by means of 3D simulations on a group of metaphoricalgargoyles located in the city of Venice, Italy, specifically in the front garden of the ¨San Pietro de Castello ¨ church. Those simulations triggered many reactions and interactions within the system of the gargoyles, allowing a translation of all this information into an architectural language. Thus, traces of information show the reactions occurring on the gargoyles at the time of application; natural technologies are collected, synthesized and reinterpreted as pieces of architecture and furniture that then deals with time, movement and speed. These traces of information are fed by others, therefore, creating a continuous flow of information, a matrix that works at different speeds, and which exists only in the cyberspace created in the site. Moreover, the system transforms from time to time based on the changes occurring around it, as well as relative to their different position within the site.

Tutor: Phil Watson

Above: Experiments with Movements


Top Left: Water-Carved Gargoyle Body Top Right: Section of Gargoyle Body Bottom: Taking over the Site


Xiao Wen Fang Body As Architecture This project develops ideas of the relationship between the body and architecture, concerning the space we inhabit and the space between body and physical world. Spaces often are not designed around the body but rather something inhabited as a result of utility and constructed technique. The project develops a method of dealing with this disparity. Dancing is broken into moments becoming orchestrated points of reference between motion and location of parts of the body. These create additional moments that dance together, making spatial performance within the compass of the body that are seen as gestures to be used in the formation of an external envelop that develops as a skin enclosure of the body. Four phases of tactics were used to reveal conditions of space over time. 1)Unfolding the technology of dancing to visualize the interior of a dancer’s shoes, based on personal dancing experience. 2) Creating references to motion using the idea of protocellular exchanges as a method of dealing with the spaces between points on and around the body in differential motion. 3) Using Venus de milo as a narrative to create connective pieces as possible sites along the body. 4) Placing a ship in a desert - a site subject to differential motions. It develops changing points of system within a system - with light and color changing in the “tea garden� over time.

Tutor: Phil Watson

Above: Space Between the Shoes


Top: Decay System of Shoes, Room of Shipwreck Middle: Third Space of Motion Bottom: Dancing Garden


Xuepei Wang This thesis concerns a theoretical architecture that may be composed between the real and the simulated. Researching ideas of vision and environment in different animal species as a method to review the space we inhabit, it was found that different individuals simulate the “real” with different images of environment. This complied with explorations of iconography and symbolism concerns a limitation of technology in social communication and cultural diversity in space. Each individual experiences or describes the world in different ways. This “sensation of the world”is a “real simulation” that combines with each individual’s imitators, affecting the way that an individual takes ownership of their world. First, humans have more complex and comprehensive social phenomena to deal with than many other species of animals. Social systems, living environments, and memory contribute to the perception and understanding of space and society. Second, time-based mediums that extend the concept of simulation and embeddedness are concerned. Examples such as car manufacturing in Detroit and the advent of the garage space speak of technological feedbacks in social and space systems and reassembles of components. Third, the relationship between technology and the city morphology is researched. The simulation extends to deal with culture and evolution using technology as a tactic for reviewing future architecture positions. The transformation of the city acts as the simulation of a technological spreading, a reality that reconceptualizes and attempts to reintegrate multicultural identities. The intangible connections in new urban morphologies will create new futures for architectural spaces in new simulations.

Tutor: Phil Watson

Top: Part of the Door-Fast Pattern, Door Section Middle: Part of the Door, Site Plan of the Garden Bottom: The Imitator- The Handle


Top: Cable Bottom: The Door to the Garden


Xuepei Wang

Tutor: Phil Watson


Above: Bridge


Yu-Hao Huang Archiving the Contemporary, Incorporating the Present The purpose of my thesis is to analyze the relationship between architecture and technology, where architecture will be changed by this variable in accordance with time. In the past, people have tended to use the macro perspective to see the world but this thesis creates a synthetic system to describe a micro landscape where the world view approaching architecture has changed scale. Heidegger was influential in the theory and design of the project. Concepts such dasein, self, supporting and thingness are embodied in the theory and execution. In choosing the site of Heidegger’s hut as a metaphor, the discussion of intersections between people and dwelling emerges as a significant concept. When engaging with the world, we try to improve and promote the advancements. With this attitude taken, technology is made to help explore the possibilities of the world and research the truth in the environment. As the technology is promoted, it reveals and releases the possibilities latent in the world for reconstructing ourselves and environments. Through this, humans tried to break the limitation of the environment to build the new vista. This thesis follows that if humans are technology, then the objects of technology are transcripts of the way we spatialize our relationships with the environment. This definition of technology allows for an architecture concerning technology that would be a medium for people to know the concealment of the world.

Tutor: Phil Watson

Top: Path of Cooking Behaviour Middle: Translator/Window Bottom: Translator/Window


Top: Micro Landscape Containing Water, Light, Rock and Time Bottom: Translator/Window


Yu-Hao Huang

Tutor: Phil Watson

Top: Entropic System in the Kitchen Bottom: Connection between Human, Kitchen and the Forest


Top: Decomposing Furniture


Elizabeth Williams The Paradox of the Boundary Within the evolution of the contemporary architectural setting, there is a quest revolving around a consideration for the condition of the line and the diverse settings for its dissolution. Each particular landscape presents possibility for examination and integration : the boundaries dividing each avenue of knowledge and information, the margins of representation and aesthetic exploration, the confines of established communications and interactions. Though we attempt to define ourselves by domains and definitions, the scope of parameters that architects must face in this contemporary is not ascertainable as such. The constructed residues we leave behind demonstrate our ideas of permanence and existence, as well as the ideals of form that pervade through that particular time. These then shift and adjust in relation to each transforming present. The great river carving through the heart of a country presents a tangible example for how we consider ourselves within changing environments. The Mississippi prevails in space and in time in such a manner that we have difficulties with that scale of comprehension. Such an artery, consistently pumping various avenues of life through a tremendous territory, presents a magnitude for exploration and investigation. The condition of the line consistently demonstrates gargantuan significance and influence within this muddy basin. Within the effluent survives a possibility for an architecture that is, like its environment, shifting and adjusting amongst the diversity of a monumental environ. This architectural frontier retains no static edge; the boundary, within this contemporary and within the territories of this mighty river, is actually a condition that does not exist.

Tutor: Phil Watson


Elizabeth Williams

Tutor: Phil Watson


Wen Fang Swarm Intelligence 1. Introduction Fish formations can keep changing to fit the outside environment. This social behaviour creates an inspiring appearance and gives the animal a great survival advantage. My project this year is about taking research at swarm behavior, and trying to build the system to imitate this intelligence. 2. My Research Swarm behavior is the collective motion of a large number of self-propelled entities. From the perspective of the mathematical modeller, it is an emergent behavior arising from simple rules that are followed by individuals and does not involve any central coordination. One of the Artificial Intelligence (aided by computer programs) to imitate swarm intelligence is Cellular Automata (CA), which consists of a regular grid of cells, and uses very simple mathematic rules to define the states between each cell and its neighbours. 3. New Models My model comes from CA, and I developed it to make it more intelligent for future use. This improvement include: 1) changing the zero-player game to an input–oriented game, which makes the model can be interacted by people. 2} changing the two-states rule (on and off) to a multiple-states rule. 3) each cell will have more than one property, and different properties will follow different rules. Finally, I made a physical model that can rotate with a tracing program and cooperate in the CA program to test my system.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Top: First Prototype using top-down tracking, Middle: 3d visual model of swarm intelligence, Bottom: Sketch of model and mechanism


Abobe: Model images


Wen Fang

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Above: Swarm Intelligence


Hao-Chun Hung Dynamic Catcher: The platform in-between human and architecture. The dynamic catcher project proposes this hypothesis: What is the relationship between the human, architecture and environment? The dynamic catcher project develops the idea through a series of investigations and experiments of current technological theories, and determines how these technologies implement and respond by peoples’ motion. Furthermore, the project also researches the different behaviors of humans, such as: curiosity, habits and addiction. This project is not only talking about technology and producing energy, it also focuses on how mental states relate to available opportunities for participation. The principal objective of this project is the attemp to invent a property of human engagement with the world that allows people to make a meaningful and embodied interaction. This is demonstrated by the creation, manipulation and sharing of meaning through engaged interaction with artifacts. The project reveals that human natural behavior can be maintained and preserved. The aim of this project is to use behavioral issues inherent within peoples’ consciousness to engage with their environment and provide another way to think of interactive architecture. Interactive architecture is not only about, robots or mechanisms. It could be an object, a piece of furniture or an element combined with real human life.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Huajing Liu Investigation of Spatial and Temporal Ambiguity A series of experiments were made to investigate the relationship between proportion, time, architecture and music, trying to attract observers by creating spatial and temporal ambiguity. People make use of an architecture, enjoy an architecture, or even admire an architecture. These are all relations between human and architecture (buildings). Creating an architecture that appeals to its observer may become an interest of architects. According to Pask’s point of view, ‘Man is prone to seek novelty in his environment and, having found a novel situation, learn how to control it.’ (Pask, 1968) Therefore, in order to ‘induce sensations of delight’, efforts were made to keep observers in new situations, consequently allowing people to engage in architecture for longer durations. The music flows on a time basis, providing novelty constantly. The entire piece contains only four pitches believed to be the most perfect by Pythagoras. The rules of music were set on the basis of the Golden Ratio in Mathematics, Pythagorean Tuning in musical theory, and Fibonacci sequence. Different amounts of water in glass cups create different pitches of sound and as such the music was played by using an acrylic rod hitting the edge of a cup. Three sets of four glass cups were knocked by twelve acrylic rods, playing the music temporally and spatially. On top of each cup, a halogen lit the instrument, generating elegant shadows of the ripples on a pure white floor.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Top: Basic Musical Rules - Pitches, Middle: Duration of Notes, Bottom: Final Codes (vary between Musical and Random)


Top: Prototype_03.1 - Experiment with Codes of Music & Sense of Floating Bottom: Prototype_03.2 - Experiment with Codes vary between Musical and Random & Influence of Ripples and Chair


Huajing Liu

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Top: Prototype_03.1 - Experiment with Codes of Music & Sense of Floating Bottom: Prototype_03.0 - Experiment with Random Codes at TESTBED1


Top left: Prototype_03.0 - Experiment with Random Codes at TESTBED1 Top right and bottom: Details


Ollie Palmer Ant Ballet The Ant Ballet machine is a theatre of the absurd; a performance space in which the desires of an entire ant colony are subverted and entangled with those of another – all without the knowledge of the players. This project follows an investigation into ant communication, and a collaboration with scientists to synthesise specialised communication pheromones. Two ant colonies sit on an aluminium test bed, which is monitored from above by an computer vision system. The movements of the colonies on the bed are analysed, and a mechatronic arm then plots a series of artificial pheromone trails – which ants cannot discern from their own. The movements of the colonies are influenced by the artificial trail compound. This aids an augmented Pas de Deux, or invisible conflict, between two or more ant colonies. However, no individual ants are aware of the machine, the falseness of the pheromone, or the movements of their colony as a whole. Shown here are images from the first 8-hour Ant Ballet performance in Barcelona, 13th August 2011.

This project has been kindly supported by many institutions and individuals, including London Zoological Society, UCL Organic Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma Barcelona and Pestival.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Ollie Palmer The Godot Machine A singular ant sits atop a white globe, monitored from above by a camera surrounded by a halo of light. If the ant moves forwards, the sphere rotates backwards. If the ant moves left, the sphere moves right. No matter which direction the ant moves in, the sphere will always return the ant to the top. The ant will always remain on top of her world. As ants use pheromone trails to communicate, and inform others of the location of food sources, a well-fed ant should start laying a trail pheromone to inform others that she has food. However, on this machine, there are no other ants. Once she reaches her original starting point, and lacking visual markers, she may choose to follow her trail, thereby strengthening it – and making it more desirable to follow. However, more she follows the trail, the more she strengthens it, and thus the more attractive it becomes, and likely she is to follow it...

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Chia Chi Yeh Adaptive Blinking, Visible Interactions “The role of the architect is to make visible that which is invisible.” It was considered that when people enter a space or walk through a building facade, they begin to be conscious of their surrounding environment and understand it by virtue of their unique visual sense. All spatial experiences and descriptions of buildings are all about personal feelings of the elements, scale, shape and the semiotics of buildings. People perceive the interaction that they are directly experiencing through their own human perspective. However, I assume that the relationship between people and building space could be transformed by disruptive technology. My purpose is to design an interface which is anthropomorphized from a human’s point of view to observe how people react with their environment when architecture enters people’s lives and social spaces and their social behaviours. The new interface will not be only an invisible relationship, but also the visible interactions presented by humanized semiotics and installations. It will translate the invisible human feeling and emotions into physical form that is a performing creature with responsive actions. The adaptive building installation is animated and reflects the emotions that arise from interaction with the users. When a building facade is perceived as having its own thought process, it might be considered as “another user” in the space. A combination of anthropomorphism and computation operates with the interactive device, improving the relationships between humans and their environments.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Top: Voyeur_Interactive Projection, Middle: Adaptive Blink and Eye Body, Bottom: Search


Top: Detection, Middle: details of blink machine, Bottom: Anthropomorphical Environment, Eye Robot and model sketch


Chia Chi Yeh

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Above: Shying and Avoiding


Tong Sun Air factory in Beijing According to the data collected in November 2010, the air pollution in Beijing is highly related to the wind condition. When the wind speed is lower than 2.35 m/s, the air in Beijing is more likely to be heavily polluted. Secondly, the study of pollutant particles and its resources indicate that burning of fossil fuels is the main source of the pollutant in Beijing. In the form of a long tube, the down-draft air cleaning system is developed by using water droplets to clean the pollutants. The surface physical properties of water droplet are utilized to capture the pollutant. The air movement created by the gravity of water droplets is utilized to gather the polluted air. Therefore, the air factory is designed in the Olympic forest park at the end of city axis of Beijing. When the air pollution is heavy, the air factory has curtains to separate the outdoor and indoor space, which also helps people to visualize the relationship between wind speed and air pollution. The columns that support the roof of the factory are also the tubes for the water droplet air cleaning system and rainwater storage system. Air getting into the building through the roof is purified and delivered to visitors at the bottom of the columns. Furthermore, the laminar flow of smoke is studied to develop the architectural geometry.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Above: site plan & local area plan-air factory


Yuan Zhang Dream back Lou-Lan This past year, I have been studying the sandstorm because it has become a more remarkable climate phenomenon in this area (inner Mongolia in China) than any other extreme events due to the changing climate. After selecting the specific site in Loulan city, which has been buried for thousands of years by the moving sand dune, I have researched the history, culture and present situation of this area. I then started to imagine a tourist town, trying to reclaim a way to visit the lost city, and preventing its eventual disappearance, and recalling the memory of the lost culture from several aspects.

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn


Wei Tao Li Territories Beyond The Dunes The Earth’s natural environment is changing all the time. The change happening without peoples’ awareness; quietly and invisibly in many kinds of different areas. Such are the UK islands. This project focus on the Braunton Burrows which is the largest sand dune system in England, dividing areas of study and design into the large size sand dune system, the medium size communities and the small size architecture. The architecture here is no longer just buildings for human beings: everything is designed for the natural participants and it is part of the ecosystem. At the same time, this project is about making ecological changes to a large scale system by designing architecture on a small scale. The architecture is designed to change the relationships by controlling the seeds dispersal and the rabbit population. At the same time, there will be a new kind of weird sand dune landscape - one that is changing all the time along with the lives inside. The new sand dune system is able to provide both meat to the hungry and work to the unemployed. The forgotten area on the coast will reconstruct a new relationship with the local society. The dunes are getting further away from their definition as a boundary. A new type of ecological island is being generated as the original one is disappearing - the territories beyond the dunes.

Tutor: Shaun Murray


Top: Territories Beyond the Dunes Bottom (left to right): Seed Bridge, Seaside Skyscraper, Rabbit House, Sandy Gate, Rabbit Prison


Wei Tao Li

Tutor: Shaun Murray

Above: Seeds RV


Above: Rabbit Office


Jun Ma Smuggling Energy This project first investigated the narratives related to smuggler activities in Cornwall, attempting to explore and transfer the natural energy to the available energy for different uses within a local chapel, promoting local economy and social ecology. More specifically, the latent moist and salty energy along Gunwalloe coastline are imported and exported secretly and smartly (like smuggling) by the embedded architectural interventions through capturing the movement of natural resources, as well as exploring the potential of landscape topography. Finally, the developed ecological framework will deal with the new idea of ‘smuggling energy’. Four types of micro-scaled interventions are nestled in different positions of the landscape, hijacking four distinct natural energies of the environment: moist air, fog, sea-spray and flood. Consequentially, the ‘island’ will become an autonomous system co-existing with the interventions for harvesting water and salt energy. The interventions would be data visualization tools and water production methods connecting people and the environment. As a physical process, the change of the natural resources on the landscape is rough to calm through the change of the interventions. This process can be compared to the psychological purification of the people within the church. Finally, the parish would become a ‘spirit hotel’ for tourists to consume.

Tutor: Shaun Murray

Top: Scope drawing, Middle: Trapping moist air Bottom: Vapor-Water transformation


Top: Salt producing process, Bottom: Sea-spary collecting process


Marielle Rivero Vazquez Dissident Morphologies Dissident morphologies is architecture with imprints of its site and time for a world that no longer needs universal principles, but a proposal assembled from many components, as a bundle made from different strings: physical context, social needs, natural awareness and narrative. It is a series of interventions on the Cuckmere Valley, at the south coast of England, where a quiet valley is transgressed by the dynamic force of a river. The vessels are strategically set in the landscape as a system that responds to the complex qualities of the site. From physical variables (geo-morphology, moisture, wind speed, tide, conductivity, alkalinity) to historical events(defensive remains from the WWII, aircrash site), the deep study of the site and the correlation of the different scenarios gave as a result a tangible canticle to reinvent the site and calls to relate the human with the nature. Each vessel is a tool to decode, re-link and re-understand the site. When a pebble is transported by the sea along the coastline, both pebble and sand left behind some remains on the other body. Dissident morphologies is a synthesis of the experience of reading and making scarfs in a site as a way to relink the nature with the personal and social experience of enjoying it. The visitors have the chance to be “weavers� of a new morphology by depositing new memories to the site, then architecture is not merely about transforming a space but also is considered as a physical support for memory.

Tutor: Shaun Murray

Top: Geomorphology, Middle: floating daphneas, Bottom: Site complexity


Above: Vessel of Air


Amey Kandalgaonkar Anomalous Islands Investigating anarchic landscapes in an ecological context This project is aimed towards criticizing the mundane nature of contemporary urban landscapes. These space are attributed to specific behaviours and are constantly monitored by capitalist forces to maintain the law and order. The project is situated on island of Brownsea in Poole Harbour on south coast of England. It is a nature reserve and represents a strong ecosystem with minimum human intervention - thanks to its last owner Mrs. Mary Christie. In an extreme contrast, the island is placed against sandbanks which boasts the most expensive real estate in UK. The site is analysed on three ecological levels; the environmental ecology, the mental ecology and the social ecology. The failing junctions within these ecologies are recognised and architectural interventions are proposed to re-engineer their failure. The project progresses by constructing a narrative around the historical character of Mrs. Christie who lived alone on island from 1927 to 1960. She was infamous for her hatred for civilisation and eccentric love for nature. She took up the massive task of building habitats for endangered squirrels and birds on the island. She nurtured the growth of acoustic follies, enchanted forests, floating archipelagos and refuting fortresses. Nature is allowed to take over the architecture and both are allowed to grow in abundance.

Tutor: Shaun Murray


Top: The Wetlands - A habitat for migratign seabirds Bottom: The Woodlands - floating seed burial grounds for endangered Red Squirrels


Amey Kandalgaonkar

Tutor: Shaun Murray


Top: The Heathlands - Migration high lines for millions of communal spiders Bottom: The Coastlands - Reconstruction of cliffs for burrowing birds


Li Bo THE PHYSICAL VIKING NAUTICAL CHART This thesis is about Viking history and Viking navigational techniques, aiming to translate the Viking ship’s log book into a man-made island. Like a physical nautical chart, this island represents these records by constructing its landscape. At first, a Viking ship is made over into a survey vessel, sailing from Orkney to other islands of Viking settlements. This ship will carry different components, some to record typical navigational information during the journey, and others to collect plastic garbage from sea to build a series of man-made habitats along the ship’s route. Marine life habitats, such as concentrations of nautical birds, could be used as a kind of navigation mark by Viking sailors where man-made habitats grow and become navigation marks on the North Atlantic. After the journey, the ship returns back to Orkney to use its components in constructing a floating artificial reef nearby Orkney Island. The artificial reef will use tidal energy to construct an island. Then this voyage repeats again and again. The ship continues to use these man-made habitats as navigation marks to sail and collect information from the North Atlantic to build the physical nautical chart. These navigation marks can also feedback the information of seabirds’ population on the North Atlantic to the chart and exert influence on the island’s landscape.

Tutor: Shaun Murray


Top Row: Survey Vessel, Navigation Mark, Viking Obelisk, Viking Obelisk Detail Bottom Row: The Seeds of the Island, The Birth of the Island, The Growth of the Island, The Death of the Island


Anne Carina Voelkel Revealing Mask of Metabolic Personality Revealing Mask of Metabolic Personalities discloses the complex flux of constitutive relations from mind to skin to being, which we usually experience only via the surface of an individual mask. The abandoned ‘Mole Man Site’ in Hackney, London serves as an inspiring and nesting environment to unfold a metabolical system of a mask. Through the obscure motivations of the previous owner William Lyttle who created a massive tunnel network underneath and around his premises, the ‘Mole Man Site’ gained its own personality made up of multiple visible and invisible layers behind the protecting fence line. An engaging artificial autopoietic organisation of a mind / mask system, with real observer interactions picks up the idea of zones that are accessible to the conscious or concealed in the unconscious. It integrates the corrugated metal barrier of the site as a connective threshold / boundary between inside (private site) and outside (public space) into a unity that goes beyond the usual visible reach. The set up shows that a mask is more than the common understanding of just being an interface between two sides that can be adopted and customised from either side as we go; instead it represents the inherent boundary that unifies the constitutive metabolic operating components that it houses (body and mind) with a subject and couples it to its immediate environment. The incorporation of collected skin microbes act as a placeholder for the multiple layers of the mind behind the mask which do not just underline the metabolic organisation of such a system, but also serve as one of several elements in the spatial, autopoietic construct. The composition of these elements takes on Freud’s spatial allocation and function of the mind’s elements as well as the natural way of dispersion and disturbance of microbes via moisture and dust in the air as well as the changing conditions of the environment caused by external participants.

Tutor: Shaun Murray

diary: ASSEMBLING SCREEN V.1.0

TUESDAY

diary: preparing dishes

date: 12/07/11 week: 28

FRIDAY 4

0

date: 08/07/11 week: 27

4

0

Above: Trace Screens


Top: Pendulum, Inhaling-Exhaling Membrane Bottom: Inhale, Exhale


Anne Carina Voelkel

Tutor: Shaun Murray

Above: Subconscious Collector


Above: Oscillating Cage


Nan Zhang Breathing a New Landscape: The Regeneration of Silvertown My project aims to develop part of Silvertown, an area of east London that was once occupied by light manufacturing and has associated problems with air quality and the more general pollution of nearby land and river resources. The intention of the project is to create work that will purify air and water in the local area and help re-establish the health of the ecological environment. A series of research investigations were undertaken in order to be able to measure the current scale of pollution in the area, to select a site that is in need of improvement, to quantitatively measure the improvement my project would provide, and determine its possible method of operation. This research investigations considers the human respiratory system and studies the function of the lung as a filter for air pollution. It is suggested that a design based on how the human lung operates could offer inspiration for providing filtration in the project. The respiratory system could be adapted for use in the built environment to transform the air quality – and hopefully the water quality – of the inhabited, local environment. The final research area is the execution of the design project, suggesting how ‘Breathing a New Landscape’ could be implemented as an architectural strategy that applies the research to a real situation.

Tutor: Shaun Murray


Isik Hong How can the Image of Landscape from Pinhole be Recorded and Visualised? This project, entitled ‘physical holes in actual space,’ is about the movement of the image in camera obscura. The project began with an interest in the camera obscura, and the phenomena of the real exterior image being transmitted into an interior surface by a pinhole. In detail, it explores the trace of the image which is projected through a pinhole in order to capture and visualise the hidden spaces. It is an architecture of traces of motion described on a virtual site of projection. At the same time, the project explores the movement of the clouds in the sky as viewed through a pinhole of a camera obscura. Clouds are phenomena which have a dynamic movement in our environment. This project attempts how the trace, record and visualise their changes over time on the projection surface of the camera obscura. Moreover, the factors which affect the shape of trace are investigated and revealed. Through the research, experiments, and drawings, the tactics and methods are examined as a way to visualise the trace of image in differing environments. Through this process, a series of ‘calibrating objects’ are revealed and constructed. Lastly, The trace-generated objects form part of the landscape, representing meteorological data which illustrates certain times and places. The objects from each site are adopted into appropriate functions which correspond with the three sites; a house, church and observatory.

Tutor: Shaun Murray

Top: Plan from St. Paul’s Cathedral Middle: Perspective-Residence from Living Room Bottom: Section-Residence from Living Room


Top: Concept Middle: Perspective-Observatory from Hedge Bottom: Perspective-Church from St. Paul’s Cathedral


Shun-Chieh Yang ILHA FLYMOSA Even in modern times, war and violence still exist around the world. After World War II, many countries have to face wars or the threat of war. For example, Afghanistan, Israel, Iraq, Northern Ireland and some African nations have war in their own territory. On the other hand, Korea, Taiwan, China, and the United States still have to deal with threatening situations. This project tried to design an environment that could release the limited land and avoid conflicts. It could be seen as the narrative background of the novel and the inspired proposal. In this project, there were four main parts. The first was, through the experimental process, developing a specific language of architecture. The second one is using the language to design the system of the environment. The last one would be developing the details of the system. Those steps all come from the main purpose, release the territory, avoid the conflict and lead the project to an architectural proposal. By developing this new future environment, the project took into consideration the psychological, political, cultural, scientific, behavioral, geographic, and historical elements and combined them into a system. This analysis made the elements achieve architecture and also made the architecture influence the elements. This project also presented the connections between the future and me, and used the development of an architectural language to explore the relation between the world and me. In addition, the project took my primary issue as an extending meaning of the fable and also stated the value of existence, specifically the value of my existence.

Tutor: Stuart Munro

Top-Bottom: Environment, Rock and Nest, Section, Section, Station Section.


Top: Lake Rock Path Bottom: Lake Rock Plan


Shun-Chieh Yang

Tutor: Stuart Munro


Above: Taipei Scope


Shun-Chieh Yang

Tutor: Stuart Munro


Above: Taipei Scope 2040


Wei-Chung Chuo The Auto-distraction space In order to imagine the life of a fast-paced future city, this project explores humanity’s love affair with the automobile and the journeys that ensue. Unusual and non-conformist architectures, combined with different elements of automobiles, represent a peculiar space that can fulfill the needs of those people who wish to escape from the reality of city life. The interior of an automobile has become a transit space between reality and fantasy. Unlike traditional architectural scales, this semi-auto interior provides different size spaces such as bathrooms, living rooms, and bedrooms, which could allow people to live in reality and in illusion at the same time. This project examines the possibility of a new hybrid internal space of architecture, which relates to people’s car and cityscape fantasies. The Auto-Distraction Space provides long commuting drivers with physical and spiritual respite from the fast pace of city life, restoring the occupant’s own individuality. In this project, dislocated car elements, mechanical materials, and people’s eccentric behaviour predict the transition of individual space in the complex and high-density city of the future. This project represents the identity and autonomous space to let people rely on and connect to reality. This shelter not only satisfies physical demands, but also, with its shell and operational mechanism, protects the occupants from the outside environment. in the uncertain future. Just like their routine life in a modern city, it gives designers an opportunity to predict the veiled intention that is concealed from ordinary life.

Tutor: Stuart Munro


Hakan Karas The Forest of Geometries The project explores the relationship between architectural spaces and how they might be seen to change over time. It establishes a series of links between the idea of the city and a forest as a way of dealing with space-time geometries. The field of examination is Istanbul between 15th and 19th centuries. The project site is Harem that had been built as a part of the Royal Topkapi Palace over this 400-year period. The harem stands here as a little forest within a wider forest that is Istanbul, maintaining several types of architectural connections from classical Islamic styles to Renaissance and Rococo. This project examines simultaneously occurring events that changed the architectural spaces of the Harem. It argues that each architectural space of the Harem had developed over time in a similar way with a tree in a forest. Pointing other words, creating architectural spaces depends on the behavior of the forest, an environment carrying a natural series of filters and recordings. It is a dynamic system filtering air and light, and altering its spaces over time; hence, as trees grow, the spaces expand and contract. The seasons, the light permeations, the canopy, rain and air have considerable effects on those changes.

Tutor: Phil Watson


Ming Shi FORBIDDEN SOHO This project is about projecting people’s memory, imagination and potential expectation to create a new architectural film, which bases on actual environment in Soho Square. A film is developed to aid architects in imagining diversified possibilities for future development of this area. In a certain place, there may be something that people desire but is rarely prepared in the current architecture. What people need can vary from one to another, thus making it significant for architects to understand clearly about their different expectations. This challenges the research to visualize different people’s spatial desires and realize them in other architectural ways. Many of these desires appeared in people’s subconscious but were forbidden by their rational thinking. To search these forbidden thoughts and translate them to architectural form becomes a the vital issue of the thesis. Based on this point, a special kind of projector is invented as the main translating and visualizing device to create different imaginary FORBIDDEN SOHO clips. Applying the feeling of personal homesickness to Soho Square, the projector visualized my personal imagination through film clips showing the half real and half invisible architectural space. It is not only overlapping one place on the other, but also building a bridge to connect them logically and developing a new architectural form.

Tutor: Stuart Munro


M.Arch AD Students at the World Financial Center, New York City


Unit Index: 1 I Ju Cheng Kiseong Jeong Dionysia Kypraiou Yuki Nakagawa Allison Piehn Hui Ye Georgia-Anna Chatzidaki Jason Immaraju Ana Filipa Braganca Rong-Shan Chang

4 Wen Fang Hao-Chun Hung Huajing Liu Oliver Palmer Chia Chi Yeh Tong Sun Yuan Zhang

Tutors: Andrew Porter + Luke Pearson

5 Wei Tao Li Jun Ma Marielle Rivero Vazquez Amey Kandalgaonkar Bo Li Anne Carina Voelkel Nan Zhang Isik Hong

2 Kyung Sik Park Pegah Sepehrdad Tutors: Kevin Carmody + Andy Groarke + Lewis Kinneir

Tutors: Stephen Gage + Ruairi Glynn

Tutor: Shaun Murray 3 Jose Castaneda Aranda Xiao Wen Fang Xuepei Wang Yu-Hao Huang Elizabeth Williams Hakan Karas Tutor: Phil Watson

6 Shun-Chieh Yang Wei-Chung Chuo Ming Shi Tutor: Stuart Munro


Editorial by Andrew Porter & the MArch Architectural Design Students

Copyright 2011 the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

Publication Designed by Jason Immaraju & Amey Kandalgaonkar

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN 978-0-9568445-3-8

Cover Image: “Swarm Intelligence� by Wen Fang Printed in England by Quadracolor Published by Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL

Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL Wates House, 22 Gordon Street London WC1H 0QB T. +44 (0)20 7679 7504 F. +44 (0)20 7679 4831 www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk


Bartlett MArch Architectural Design 2011