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Lewis Hay III

Setting the Course for the Next Era


From all of us here at NextEra Energy, thank you! Thank you for your commitment to excellence, and for encouraging each of us to improve every day. Thank you for always doing right thing, even when it wasn’t easy. Thank you for treating people with respect, for enhancing diversity on a range of fronts, and for building the best team in the industry. Thank you for your strategic vision, which enabled this company to earn its current position as the No. 1 producer in North America of renewable energy from the wind and sun. Thank you for teaching us to challenge each other honorably, but when a decision in made, to move forward together, as one team. Thank you for encouraging us to get the details right, while keeping in mind the big picture.

Thanks to your leadership, Lew, we are so very proud to be working for the company that, for seven straight years, those who know our industry best have voted one of the World’s Most Admired Companies, and the No. 1 company in our industry. You were the right leader at the right time, Lew. You have left us better and stronger than when you arrived. Some 15,000 employees, our families, millions of customers across the United States and Canada, and countless shareholders and other stakeholders are better off because of your vision, your leadership and your determination. So as you move on, Lew, we join together in wishing you, Sherry and your family the very best in all things. Sincerely, Jim and the entire NextEra Energy team


1999


The Miami Herald August 5, 1999 Thursday FINAL EDITION

FPL GROUP HAY NAMED NEW CFO BYLINE: From Herald Staff Reports SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. 3C LENGTH: 801 words FPL Group (FPL), the parent company of Florida Power & Light, has named Lewis Hay III as its chief financial officer. The utility holding company said Wednesday that Hay previously served as CFO of U.S. Foodservice, a $6 billion food-service distribution company in Columbia, Md. U.S. Foodservice was spun off by Sara Lee Corp. in 1989, and Hay was credited with being instrumental in improving the company's internal growth and operational performance, assimilating 20 acquired companies and taking the company public in 1994. FPL also announced two appointments at its FPL Energy subsidiary, the unit buying and building power plants outside of Florida and the United States. Glenn E. Smith, vice president of development for FPL Energy's domestic natural gas projects, was named senior vice president of development. Dilek Samil, formerly treasurer for FPL Group, was named vice president of finance at FPL Energy.


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2000


TPC WINDFARMS CALIFORNIA

Eveliqui quo volorest alibustis non sent, sunt.Cat et eaturiam, con prae et eumquae qui odit aut dolore estio. – Mike O’Sullivan


2001


WALL STREET JOURNAL June 19, 2001, Tuesday

WHO'S NEWS SECTION: Section B; Page 18, Column 2 LENGTH: 13 words FPL Group Inc names Lewis Hay III president, chief executive and director (S) LOAD-DATE: June 19, 2001 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH JOURNAL-CODE:

WSJ

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2002


St. Petersburg Times (Florida)

December 18, 2001, Tuesday, 0 South Pinellas Edition SECTION: BUSINESS; BRIEFLY; Pg. 2E LENGTH: 724 words FPL CEO TO BECOME CHAIRMAN: Lew Hay, FPL Group Inc. president and chief executive, will add the post of chairman to his titles. He will replace Jim Broadhead, who is retiring at the end of the year. Shares of FPL closed at $ 54.15, down 59 cents. LOAD-DATE: , 2001 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH TYPE: DIGEST


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2003


2004


CHARLEY

FRANCES

JEANNE


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2005


DENNIS

KATRINA

RITA


WILMA


2006


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2007


2008


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2009


FPL  Group  Named  Power  Company  of  the  Year JUNO  BEACH,  Fla.-­‐-­‐(BUSINESS  WIRE)-­‐-­‐Dec.  4,  2009-­‐-­‐  FPL  Group,  Inc.  (NYSE:  FPL)  was  named  Power   Company  of  the  Year  at  the  PlaHs  2009  Global  Energy  Awards  last  night.   The  recogniNon  honors  FPL  Group  as  the  leading  power  company  in  the  world  for  2009.  The  award  was   presented  at  a  ceremony  in  New  York  City  aHended  by  more  than  500  energy  execuNves  from  around   the  world.  PlaHs,  the  leading  global  provider  of  informaNon  on  the  energy  industry,  receives  more  than   200  nominaNons  for  its  annual  awards  program.  NominaNons  have  come  from  more  than  30  countries.   FPL  Group  was  selected  as  Power  Company  of  the  Year  from  among  six  finalists.   “It’s  a  tribute  to  FPL  Group’s  15,000  employees  that  we  were  chosen  as  Power  Company  of  the  Year.   Thanks  to  our  talented  and  dedicated  team,  we  have  North  America’s  No.  1  renewable  energy  provider,   a  uNlity  that  combines  high  reliability  and  the  lowest  bills  in  the  state,  and  an  enviable  environmental   profile  that  posiNons  us  well  for  the  future,”  said  FPL  Group  Chairman  and  CEO  Lew  Hay.   Judges  for  the  PlaHs  awards  have  included  former  OPEC  energy  ministers,  naNonal  regulators,  former   heads  of  major  energy  companies  and  leading  academics  and  legislators.  Nominees  for  Power  Company   of  the  Year  are  evaluated  based  on  their  ability  to  develop  and  implement  a  strategic  plan  that   “opNmizes  performance  and  growth  while  taking  an  aggressive,  proacNve  approach  toward  a  radically   altered  business  and  trading  environment.”  The  specific  judging  criteria  are  financial  results,  operaNonal   excellence,  innovaNon,  and  strategic  vision.   FPL  Group  was  also  a  finalist  at  the  2009  Global  Energy  Awards  in  the  following  categories:   • Green  Energy  IniNaNve  of  the  Year,  for  the  company’s  EarthEra  Renewable  Energy  Trust,  an  innovaNve   way  for  businesses  and  consumers  to  make  a  difference  in  the  fight  against  climate  change  with   confidence  that  every  penny  they  spend  is  going  directly  to  the  construcNon  of  new  wind  and  solar   energy  projects.   • Energy  ConstrucNon  Project  of  the  Year,  for  the  company’s  DeSoto  Next  GeneraNon  Solar  Energy   Center,  the  naNon’s  largest  photovoltaic  solar  power  plant,  which  President  Barack  Obama  helped   commission  in  DeSoto  County,  Fla.,  in  October.   • CEO  of  the  Year,  for  Lew  Hay’s  leadership  in  building  one  of  the  world’s  premier  electric  power   companies.   FPL  Group  has  received  a  number  of  other  notable  awards  in  2009.  The  company  was  ranked  No.  1  in  its   industry  for  the  third  year  in  a  row  in  Fortune  magazine’s  Most  Admired  Companies  survey  and  was   named  to  the  Dow  Jones  Sustainability  Index,  the  Carbon  Disclosure  Leadership  Index,  and  the  list  of  the   Global  100  Most  Sustainable  Large  CorporaNons.   PlaHs  is  a  division  of  The  McGraw-­‐Hill  Companies,  a  leading  global  informaNon  provider,  and  sister  to   such  brands  as  Standard  &  Poor’s,  J.D.  Power  &  Associates,  AviaNon  Week  McGraw-­‐Hill  ConstrucNon.  


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2010


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t solar power is as “We’d love to tell you tha said FPL’s chairman, economic as fossil fuels,” Silagy, the vice president Lewis Hay III, left, with Eric for FPL’s solar thermal for development at the site under construction mirror assemblies currently ry 2010. In former in Indiantown, Fla., in Februa rs and wild hogs, swamplands teaming with otte utilities is running an one of the nation’s biggest renewable power. Across experiment in the future of ie, the FPL Group utility 500 acres near Port St. Luc ctor Set of 190,000 is assembling a life-size Ere usands of steel pylons shimmering mirrors and tho can see. When it is that stretch as far as the eye year, this vast project will completed by the end of the t solar plant. But that is be the world’s second-larges array is being grafted not its real novelty. The solar largest fossil-fuel onto the back of the nation’s l gas. It is an experiment power plant, fired by natura er generation can be in whether conventional pow er in a way that lowers married with renewable pow ment. costs and spares the environ (John Van Beekum/The New

York Times)


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Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Florida) May 24, 2010 Monday Broward Metro Edition

NAME NOW NEXTERA BYLINE: Julie Patel {TOPIC} FPL Group SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. 1D LENGTH: 100 words FPL Group officially changed its name to NextEra Energy at its annual shareholders' meeting Friday. Shareholders praised the company for its record profit, suggested trimming executive expenses and said the company should keep an arms' length from regulators and other state officials. Company chairman Lew Hay said the company "way outperformed" the S&P 500 index and earned a record adjusted net income last year: $1.65 billion, up 7 percent from $1.55 billion in 2008. Florida Power & Light, the company's regulated utility and the largest one in the state, increased its profit by 5 percent. {ZONE} SB LOAD-DATE: May 24, 2010 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


USA TODAY December 16, 2010 Thursday FINAL EDITION

Obama meets with CEOs to talk about jobs; President urges them to invest in job creation BYLINE: Richard Wolf, David Jackson, Matt Krantz and Laura Petrecca SECTION: MONEY; Pg. 1B LENGTH: 1464 words WASHINGTON -- Nearly five of the free world and the produced agreement on two toward a growing economy.

hours of top-level talks between the leader leaders of the corporate world Wednesday fronts: They're making slow, steady progress And they've got a long way to grow.

At a meeting across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, 20 corporate leaders told President Obama that more consumer demand and less-burdensome government regulations still are needed before businesses can create millions of new jobs and reduce the 9.8% jobless rate. In what both sides described as a cooperative session, the leaders of companies ranging from General Electric to Google applauded two moves the administration has made since what Obama has called a "shellacking" for Democrats at the polls Nov. 2: the compromise tax cuts package nearing passage in Congress and the free trade agreement nearly completed with South Korea that could boost U.S. exports by $11 billion a year. Still missing was any commitment by the business leaders to launch new hiring initiatives while demand remains weak and the economic future remains uncertain. Obama asked the CEOs to spend some of the cash sitting on the sidelines -- more than $900 billion by some of the largest U.S. companies. They didn't bite -- yet. "We focused on jobs and investments," Obama said as he walked back from the government's Blair House in below-freezing temperatures. "They feel optimistic that by working together, we can get some of that cash off the sidelines." Some of the CEOs said they're already hiring. Others said further action by consumers and the government are needed to spur increased investment.


“It was a broad-ranging discussion with the president, covering everything from innovation to job creation, tax reform and education,” said Mark Gallogly, managing partner and co-founder of Centerbridge Partners, a private investment firm, who attended the meeting. “One of the focuses was driving a greater level of investment in the U.S. in order to create jobs.” The session was the largest yet among many Obama has held with business leaders since coming to the White House 23 months ago. Yet for all the handshakes and back slaps, his relationship with business at times has been as icy as Washington’s latest cold snap. He has railed against corporate salaries and imposed new regulations on Wall Street. The history of more meetings than solutions hasn’t been lost on lobbyists. “That’s what he’s been doing for two years,” said Bruce Josten of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which spent more than $32 million in the midterm elections, virtually all of it to oppose Democrats running for Congress. This time, he said, the group’s members “are hoping that it’s a little bit more than a charm offensive.” Valerie Jarrett, one of Obama’s closest aides and his liaison to the business community, tried to assure them it was. “There was a lot of cooperation and a lot of energy and enthusiasm about working together” during the closed-door meeting, she said on CNBC. “I think it was a win-win-win for everyone.” Nary a negative word was heard from either side as they emerged -- and possibly for good reason. A mile away, the Senate was passing a two-year extension of the tax cuts enacted under President Bush in 2001. While the meeting was underway, U.S. and South Korean negotiators announced they would meet this weekend to fine-tune the agreement worked out this month on automobile trade practices. “The president clearly wants to get the economy moving, and he’s willing to listen to a broad range of views,” said Lew Hay, CEO of NextEra Energy, in an e-mail after the meeting. “He recognizes that jobs are created by the businesses of America and that we need to ensure that businesses have the right incentives in place to invest in the economy and create jobs.” Cash on the sidelines Still dogging the economy three years after the official start of the recession is companies’ caution about investing in hiring and bringing new capacity online. “There is a lot of cash on the sidelines right now, but it’s because of uncertainty in demand,” said David Cote, CEO of Honeywell International. “That’s what’s got everybody concerned.” The largest U.S. companies, excluding financial firms, had stockpiled a record $902.4 billion in cash through Sept. 30, according to Standard & Poor’s. That amount of cash is up 10% from a year ago and is expected to hit another record at the end of the year, said S&P’s Howard Silverblatt.

Companies are reluctant to expand production capacity because demand has been increasing so slowly, and there’s no indication that’s about to change, he said. “Companies want to expand, they want to make more money, but the problem with a lot of uncertainty is that many still don’t have a high comfort level that if they produced more, they could sell it,” Silverblatt said. “If I’m selling 100 widgets now, I won’t make 110 unless I think I can sell the extra 10.” A new survey by human resources consultants Towers Watson shows that 25% of North American companies have reduced staff and will continue to do so as a way to cut costs. An additional 8% of firms say they have not cut staff but plan to do so. Ravin Jesuthasan, managing director at Towers Watson, said one major element continues to hold back many firms from hiring: fear of an unstable future. “There is uncertainty about how the global economy is going to do and how the U.S. economic and regulatory environment is going to be changing,” he said. Some companies say they’re spending and hiring. Boeing plans to hire up to 5,000 workers next year in Seattle and South Carolina because of projected export growth, CEO Jim McNerney told Bloomberg Television. He said business leaders urged Obama to sign additional trade deals with countries such as China and India.

The fear that companies might permanently make do with less has haunted Obama since he took office. He told USA TODAY in an interview last December that some of the more than 8 million jobs lost during the recession might not return without a series of new government initiatives to jump-start private-sector hiring. “You’ve got essentially a 7 million to 8 million gap between where jobs should be for relatively full employment and where we are,” the president said then. “That is my greatest fear, is we don’t close that gap.” To do his part in closing the gap, Obama has relied largely on the $814 billion economic stimulus law signed in February 2009 and a series of smaller tax breaks and subsidies intended to jump-start hiring. He’s also called for doubling U.S. exports in five years. On Wednesday, Obama laid out his philosophy. “I believe that the primary engine of America’s economic success is not government,” he said. “It’s the ingenuity of America’s entrepreneurs. It’s the dynamism of our markets. And, for me, the most important question about an economic idea is not whether it’s good short-term politics or meets somebody’s litmus test. It’s whether it will help spur businesses, jobs and growth.”

“The president clearly wants to get the economy moving, and he’s willing to listen to a broad range of views,” said Lew Hay, CEO of NextEra Energy, in an e-mail after the meeting. “He recognizes that jobs are created by the businesses of America and that we need to ensure that businesses have the right incentives in place to invest in the economy and create jobs.” Scott Davis, CEO of UPS, said the company added more than 50,000 employees for the holiday season. “We’re doing our part to help out,” he said on CNBC after the session. General Electric is deploying its cash in ways to boost U.S. jobs and manufacturing as well as reward shareholders, said company spokeswoman Anne Eisele. Last week, GE said it would invest $50 million in a joint venture to build high-speed rail systems, a move that may create 250 new jobs in the U.S. and preserve 3,500 more. Otis Baskin, a management professor at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management, said many CEOs have tabled hiring because they don’t want to repeat layoffs if another slowdown comes.

Despite the lofty talk, Republicans and small-business groups said they doubt Obama’s meeting will change anything. House Republican leader John Boehner, who’s in line to become speaker next year when the GOP assumes control of the House, said the health care law remains a burden on small businesses, and the pending trade deal with South Korea still leaves others previously negotiated with Colombia and Panama languishing. Stephanie Cathcart of the National Federation of Independent Business said the president needs to shift his focus. “If you really want to talk about creating jobs, then you should be meeting with small businesses,” she said. Still, many of the business leaders leaving Wednesday’s session were pleased with the results.

“Going forward, they don’t want to go through the painful experiences they have gone through in the past,” Baskin said.

Greg Brown, co-CEO of Motorola, said the new tax-cut deal and South Korean free trade agreement are steps in the right direction.

‘My greatest fear’

“We now need to build on that momentum,” he said.


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Power up the American Power Act; BYLINE:

David Brooks; National Columnist SECTION: A LENGTH: 719 words

In 1860, Samuel Curtis, a Republican congressman of Iowa, sponsored a bill to create a transcontinental railroad. The debate over that public-private partnership was long and messy. Democrats said the proposal was unconstitutional. Others rightly argued that it meant huge giveaways to the rich. But the railroad effort, backed by Abraham Lincoln, swept forward. “Nations are never stationary,” Rep. James Campbell told the House. “We cannot remain inactive without the loss of trade, of commerce, and power.” After the legislation was approved in 1862, there were continual setbacks. The Union Pacific Railroad languished. Scandals mounted. Yet despite it all, the final spike was hammered into place at Promontory Point, Utah, in 1869, linking the nation and heralding a new burst of prosperity. That history is a reminder that large efforts are generally plagued by stupidity, error and corruption. But by stumbling forward, it’s possible to achieve important things. Energy innovation is the railroad legislation of today. This country is studded with venture capitalists, scientists, corporate executives and environmental activists atremble over the great opportunities they see ahead. The energy revolution is a material project that arouses moral fervor - exactly the sort of enterprise at which Americans excel. Still, when you actually look at the details of global warming legislation, you run into myriad questions. Is cap-and-trade really the most appropriate policy tool to reduce carbon emissions? Do the benefits of the most ambitious global warming bills really outweigh the costs? Two essays by Jim Manzi “Conservatives, Climate Change, and the Carbon Tax” from The New Atlantis and “Dunce Cap-and-Trade” from National Review - present data suggesting they do not. Nonetheless, the vision is certainly right. To remain the world’s pre-eminent nation, the U.S. will have to develop energy sources that are plentiful, clean and don’t enrich the worst people. That means in the short term, the U.S. has to unleash billions of dollars of potential energy investments now being pent up by uncertainty and regulatory hurdles. To make a difference

in the long term, the U.S. will have to invest more and differently in energy research and development. Technology companies spend 5 percent to 15 percent of revenue on research and development. Energy companies, on the other hand, spend only one-quarter of 1 percent. The federal government spends $30 billion on health research, but only $3 billion on clean energy research. It’s clearly going to take legislative action to catalyze private investment and to increase federal research to where it should be - about $25 billion a year, according to Mark Muro of the Brookings Institution. The best vehicle now is the American Power Act, drawn up by John Kerry, Joe Lieberman and Lindsey Graham. The bill, like all politically plausible bills these days, is larded with special-interest provisions and public giveaways to defuse opposition and win votes. But it does perform key tasks. To boost innovation, it raises the price on carbon and devotes some of that money (not nearly enough) to research and development. It also establishes a predictable price for carbon. Lew Hay, the chief executive of the power provider FPL Group, e-mailed me to say that if he can get that certainty on the carbon price and if there can be a renewable energy standard to create a market for carbon-free energy, his company could boost investments right away: “Regarding wind energy investment at our NextEra Energy Resources subsidiary, we think we might invest about $1.5 billion to $2 billion more per year. Regarding solar, we think NextEra Energy Resources might invest $500 million or more per year outside of Florida and that our Florida Power & Light subsidiary might invest about $1 billion a year inside Florida.” Last but not least, he wrote, a new law would be a “huge factor” in deciding whether to move forward with new nuclear units. You get the sense that this country is eager for a new wave of energy development. There will be excess, stupidity and greed. But it would be simply amazing if, through narrow political gamesmanship, Washington continued to stand in the way.

David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times, 620 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018-1405. LOAD-DATE: May 5, 2010


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2011


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Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Florida) March 4, 2011 Friday Online Edition

FPL PARENT ON FORTUNE'S MOST ADMIRED COMPANIES BYLINE: Posted by Julie Patel on March 4, 2011 12:01 PM {TOPIC} House Keys SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. Web LENGTH: 223 words NextEra Energy, parent company of Florida Power & Light, ranked number one for the fifth year in a row among electric and gas utilities on Fortune magazine's "world's most admired companies" list. This year, the company and Southen Co. tied for that honor. NextEra also made the top ten list of all companies for social responsibility and it's one of the most admired companies in the state "We put 'doing well by doing good' into practice every day. We are delivering superior value and service to our customers, competitive returns to our investors, and excellent growth opportunities for our employees," NextEra Energy Chairman Lew Hay said in a statement. Fortune named 350 companies Thursday to the most admired list out of more than 650 companies that were evaluated. The magazine starts with about 1,400 companies and narrows them down to include the largest companies by revenue for each of the 57 industry groups. Then, Fortune surveys about 15,000 executives, directors and analysts to assess the companies that qualify in each industry group based on nine criteria: innovation, the quality of its employees, use of corporate assets, social responsibility, quality of management, financial soundness, long-term investment value, quality of services, and global competitiveness. NextEra reported a profit close to $2 billion last year. LOAD-DATE: March 5, 2011 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: BLOG PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


2012


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2013


1 of 16 DOCUMENTS

The Washington Post March 9, 2013 Saturday Regional Edition

Obama seeks views of experts, executives on energy policies BYLINE: Steven Mufson;Juliet Eilperin SECTION: A-SECTION; Pg. A14 LENGTH: 486 words President Obama solicited ideas on a wide variety of energy and climate issues in a meeting Thursday with more than a dozen outside experts and business executives, with an eye toward what he might accomplish in his second term through executive action and publicprivate partnerships, according to participants. Topics included steps to promote energy efficiency, how to modernize the nation's electrical grid to make it more resilient and "green," as well as the need for more information about leakage of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, from hydraulic fracturing of shale gas. Many of the 14 outside participants hailed from the energy sector, including Anadarko Executive Chairman James T. Hackett, Southwest Gas chief executive Jeffrey Shaw and NextEra Energy Executive Chairman Lewis Hay III. But the session also featured academics and business executives from different fields, such as Harvard University law professor and regulation expert Cass Sunstein and FedEx chairman Fred Smith, who has sought alternatives to oil in powering his company's vast vehicle fleet. Josh Earnest, special assistant to the president and principal deputy press secretary, told reporters that Obama vowed in the meeting to use existing executive authority across the government and leverage public-private partnerships to advance his energy agenda. "The president reiterated his commitment to a cleaner and more secure energy future," Earnest said.


NextEra Energy’s Lew Hay receives prestigious national leadership award FPL also cited for its storm recovery assistance to the Northeast JUNO BEACH, Fla., Jan. 10, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- The electric utility industry has honored NextEra Energy, Inc., Executive Chairman Lew Hay with its “Distinguished Leadership Award.” The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) award, established to recognize outstanding individual achievement, was presented Jan. 9 during the organization’s board of directors meeting. Hay is the fifth utility executive to receive this honor. “There is no one more deserving of this award than Lew Hay, whose leadership has set a new bar for excellence in our industry,” said EEI President Tom Kuhn. “Lew has never wavered in his commitment to NextEra Energy’s shareholders, customers and the communities that his company serves.” Lew Hay is executive chairman of NextEra Energy, Inc. (: NEE), one of the nation’s leading electricity-related services companies and the largest renewable energy generator in North America. Previously, he served as chief executive officer of NextEra Energy. “I am humbled to receive the highest individual honor our industry offers,” Hay said following the award presentation. “Electric utilities are partners in so many ways, and utility CEOs excel when we learn from one another. Excellence in our industry will always mean a strong commitment to the customers who count on us every day.” FPL award In addition, the company’s affiliated Florida Power & Light Company received EEI’s annual “Emergency Assistance Award” for helping restore power to areas of the Northeast devastated by Hurricane Sandy and the Super Derecho storm. The award recognizes utilities for their outstanding response in aiding other electric companies to help restore service to the public following a storm or natural disaster. Selections are based on a company’s ability to respond to a crisis quickly, overcome difficult circumstances and utilize innovative service recovery techniques. FPL is one of 15 utilities honored for its assistance work following the two storms. “FPL’s restoration assistance following these storms was truly remarkable,” said Kuhn. “Getting the lights back on quickly and safely following a major storm is never easy. Working through the industry’s mutual assistance program, FPL’s crews were essential in helping their fellow utility workers restore service in affected neighborhoods. Importantly, FPL’s assistance also shows the compassion of the company and its workforce in helping others in their time of need.” Hurricane Sandy FPL started planning its assistance to the Northeast while finishing its own restoration work after Tropical Storm Sandy passed near the Florida coast. After

reaching hurricane strength – the largest Atlantic hurricane in history – the storm made landfall in New Jersey in late October. According to EEI, the hurricane at its peak caused power outages for nearly 10 million customers in the Northeast. FPL employees and contractors worked 16-hour days in frigid temperatures, snow and flood conditions over a two-week period and assisted 11 utilities from Virginia to New Jersey. FPL sent a workforce nearly 1,000 strong, the largest mutual assistance contingent in the company’s history, and restored power to approximately 50,000 customers in New Jersey alone. In the New York area, more than 200 of these workers helped restore customers of Con Edison and other utilities, and provided expertise on staging sites, operations and logistics. In addition, FPL and its affiliated NextEra Energy Foundation donated more than $200,000 – including $51,000 raised from FPL employees – to the American Red Cross for Hurricane Sandy relief efforts Super Derecho The Mid-Atlantic States were slammed by an intense line of thunderstorms in late June. Named “Super Derecho” for this special type of violent, lengthy windstorm, it produced wind gusts of up to 91 mph, causing widespread destruction, 20 fatalities and massive power outages affecting customers in major urban areas. FPL deployed 233 workers, who traveled more than 1,000 miles in fewer than 48 hours, to help four utilities restore electric service. FPL crews worked primarily in the Washington – Baltimore area, which was heavily damaged by the storm. “Giving mutual assistance to other utilities is a hallmark of the electric industry, and FPL is proud of the help our workforce provided our fellow Americans in recovering from these historic storms,” said FPL President Eric Silagy. “Floridians have benefited from the resources provided by utilities outside our area following major storms. We’re pleased to have had the opportunity to help restore vital electric service to residents of the Northeast.” Mutual assistance helps utilities in storm-affected areas speed service restoration by making available additional resources – such as line workers, support personnel and equipment – from utilities in areas largely unaffected by a storm. The utilities requesting assistance absorb the cost of the workers FPL sends.


Executive Comment Headline Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecat qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

offictoribus culparum que iexcessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

offictoribus culparum que iuti nessitaquate

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.” Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harciebit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum quitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.” Executive XYZ remembers: Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi coe.”

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis m qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum


“Ecate magnis m qui omnis et harcien

Executive XYZ remembers:

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

debit am iumque.”

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

Executive XYZ remembers:

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

offictoribus culparum quitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

offictoribum aut harum excessedit ressinc

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi coe.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

Executive XYZ remembers:

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.” Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers:

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

cum qui omnis et harciebit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers:

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”


Executive Comment Headline Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis m qui omnis et harcien

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

debit am iumque.”

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum quitati nessitaquate Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum quitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi coe.”

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

Executive XYZ remembers:

offictoribum aut harum excessedit ressinc

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers:

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi coe.”

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

Photo of Executive

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

with Lew at event mentioned

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

in the comments

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Executive XYZ remembers: temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

cum qui “Ecate magnis m qui omnis et harcien

Executive XYZ remembers:

Executive XYZ remembers:

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”


Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

offictoribus culparum que iuti nessitaquate

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

aut occaepedi coe.”

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: Photo of Executive with Lew at event mentioned in the comments

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Photo of Executive with Lew at event mentioned in the comments

cum qui omnis et harciebit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

Executive XYZ remembers:

Executive XYZ remembers:

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

Executive XYZ remembers:

Executive XYZ remembers:

“Ecat qui omnis et harcien temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum.”

“Ecate magnis m qui omnis et harcien Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

temporestrum sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate volupidipsum aut harum

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

excessedit ressinc ipicideliti doluptat dem

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

debit am iumque.”

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

Photo of Executive with Lew at event mentioned in the comments

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

Executive XYZ remembers: “Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi Executive XYZ remembers:

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

cum qui omnis et harcien temporestrum

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

sant aut occaepedi corenitati nessitaquate

offictoribus culparum que iuntotatis eatiossi

volupidipsum aut harum excessedit ressinc

iusa apelibus dolore parum restor sed earum

cum qui omnis et harciebit am iumque.”

ipicideliti doluptat dem debit am iumque.”

verrorum sequam faccae sitas magnis dolori

“Ecate magnis eati coreped que eatiore, qui


Executive Letters Inserted here


Executive Letters Inserted here


Executive Letters Inserted here


Executive Letters Inserted here



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