Page 1

PORTFOLIO JILL FALLON


JILL FALLON

m.arch ncsu 2013 b.a. tulane 2008 jill12fallon@gmail.com, 803.984.2333


WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM

01-08

WRAPPER HOUSE 09-16

WELLNESS CENTER 17-22

PROFESSIONAL: DUDA PAINE 23-34

PROFESSIONAL: LITTLE 35-38

CHANNEL HOUSE 39-46

URBAN INSERTION 47-50

CITY RESEARCH 51-54

ROUDNICE CASTLE 55-62

CULINARY INSTITUTE 63-70

WYLY THEATRE 71-74

FINE ARTS 75-81


01 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM


WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM design project site: kill devil hills, nc instructors: matt griffith, wayne place


15 16 17 18 19 20 21

03 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM

fire exit elevator women’s men’s restoration area outdoor exhibition space exit

8 janitorial 9 electrical 10 mechanical 11 flight path 12 simulation room a 13 simulation room b 14 exhibition space

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

entry kitchen cafe seating men’s women’s gift shop lounge


in order to design a new museum to commemorate the wright brother’s famous flight, i first sought to understand the true importance of the event that took place there. i thought about how flying is a regular part of many peoples lives, how it has revolutionized the way we are able to communicate and explore the world, and how it paved the way for space exploration. i realized that the wright brothers did so much more than simply take the first flight. it marked the moment in time where humans went from an earthbound species into occupiers of the sky as well. in order to express this idea, i decided to begin the voyage into the museum by having visitors walk over a pond and through a cantilevered building into a dark, stony corridor surrounded by earth. in order to achieve this, a giant mound would be created by scooping out the land for the pond and displacing the earth in a large dune resting against the exhibition space. visitors would have a moment in the middle of this sequence where the mound separates to the outside, and they are met with the original flight path, a place for contemplation, before they continue down the dark corridor. Emerging from inside the mound, visitors arrive in the great exhibition space, where light washes down from a sawtooth roof and planes are displayed all around. the visitor then can experience flight simulators and explore the restoration area in the wing of the building. next, they travel upstairs to a balcony hovering above the planes of the exhibition room. they then travel outside on the second floor, across their original path and emerge atop the entry building, cantilevered over the pond. the effect of being suspended over water, high up in the air, at the end of this circulation sequence, would hopefully remind the visitor of flying, and reinforce the importance and true meaning of this historical site.

04 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM


sustainability was a major consideration in this design. the mound of earth acts as a thermal regulator to four major rooms inside of it and to the east wall of the of the exhibition space. in the exhibition hall, the large room is daylit through the use of the sawtooth roof. the south facing facade has a generous overhang which allows winter light in, and keeps summer light out. the east facade is almost entirely closed off to avoid solar heat gain. the west facade was treated with vertical, mechanized louvres to respond to the sun’s path throughout the day, and the north facade has generous openings to allow for soft diffused light. additionally, the created pond is used for water runoff from the parking areas and building, and helps passively cool the building.


volume

structure

enclosure

06 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM


07 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM


08 WRIGHT MEMORIAL MUSEUM


09 WRAPPER HOUSE


WRAPPER HOUSE design project site: raleigh, nc instructor: david hill


the wrapper house is designed to bring the outside in and the inside out.

inspired by the simple beauty of light shining through trees, the house is wrapped in a framework of wooden slats which creates dappled, streaming light and provides a sense of both openness and privacy.


emphasis on:

outdoor living front porch privacy: low exposure to elements: low other: allows street viewing and helps encourage neighborly interaction back patio privacy: high exposure to elements: high rooftop patio privacy: medium exposure to elements: medium other: slats in wrapper allow varying levels of exposure

emphasis on:

sustainability the wrapper house is designed to take advantage of passive solar heating and cooling. south facade summer: high sunlight largely deflected by wrapper winter: low sunlight can stream into large expanses of glass north facade expansive glass for diffused light east/west facade completely solid to avoid overheating 13 WRAPPER HOUSE


1 wood slats 2 flitch beam 3 flitch column 4 wood flooring 5 deck supports 6 waterproofing 7 rigid insulation 8 metal decking 9 header 10 top plate 11 insulation 12 lvl 13 steel pipe 14 low e glazing 15 gypsum board 16 waterproofing 17 air cavity 18 hardi panel 19 metal fastener 20 double sill plate 21 anchor bolt 22 foundation wall 23 floor joist 24 wood column 25 steel plate 26 anchor bolt 27 crawl space

emphasis on:

flexibility of space option a: master suite bed

bed

kitchen/ living

bed

floor one bed

study/ living

floor two

15 WRAPPER HOUSE

option c: live/work

option b: duplex bed

kitchen/ living

bed

bed

kitchen/ living

floor two

kitchen/ living

floor one

floor one outdoor living

bed

outdoor living

office

office

floor two

outdoor living


17 WELLNESS CENTER


WELLNESS CENTER for individuals living with lupus

design project site: raleigh, nc instructors: laura battaglia, katrina stoll


the wellness center was designed to sit on a semi-industrial site in downtown raleigh. the site has an irregular shape bound by train tracks on one side and capital boulevard (a major roadway) on the other. an old factory exists on the site and was incorporated into the building design. the newer buildings are elongated to capture north and south light and provide daylighting and passive solar heating and cooling. when asked to focus on a specific audience who would use the facility, i chose to focus on individuals living with lupus. my former position as development coordinator at the lupus foundation of america, nc chapter gave me extensive knowledge of lupus and a passion for helping those faced with the challenge of chronic disease. the symptoms of lupus also suggested some specific implications in terms of the design of the building. design considerations for individuals living with lupus: photosensitivity - angled roofs towards the to allow diffused light to enter the space, rather than harsh south or east light severe joint pain - very limited changes in elevation within the building 90% women - created larger changing areas, sauna, and steam rooms for women than for men depression - spaces for mental health activities: alternative medicine, group & individual therapy, meditation, and hypnosis fatigue - frequent rest areas throughout circulation to allow for breaks cognitive dysfunction - clear circulation paths

19 WELLNESS CENTER


Steam

Sauna

Steam

Sauna

Kitchen

Cafe Women’s Changing

Men’s Changing

Reception

Group Therapy

Main Entrance

Meditation

Lounge Patio

MIND WING

Individual Therapy

BODY WING

Tai Chi/Yoga Individual Therapy

Hypnosis Fitness Center Outdoor Lounge

Hypnosis

Massage

Massage

POOL WING Outdoor Lounge

Acupuncture

Wet Lounge

N

Hot Pool

Outdoor/Indoor Pool

Outdoor/Indoor Pool

Outdoor Lounge Jacuzzi

20 WELLNESS CENTER


the circulation path brings a visitor through the existing building first where they can change and prepare for their therapies. they continue through until they reach a long axis where they can go forward to the body wing or left to the mind wing. the program called for wet and dry spaces. the wet spaces were further divided into a fast pools and slow pools. i created a wet zone which featured two slow pools for relaxing, a jacuzzi and warm pool. the fast pool which could be used for water exercise has a swim-through corridor to the outdoor pool.

21 WELLNESS CENTER


23 PROFESSIONAL WORK


PROFESSIONAL WORK duda paine architects, little professional work summer 2013, 2012


601 MASS AVENUE DUDA PAINE ARCHITECTS

601 massachussetts avenue is an 11 story, wedge shaped building along one of the most prominent streets in washington d.c. the building strategy changed and adapted throughout the design process. using autocad and revit files as well as professional renderings (pictured left), i created a presentation quality light-up model with an acryclic core. this model was displayed at the aia nc center for architecture and design for 5 weeks. the exhibition showcased the work of duda paine architects in honor of the 2012 aia north carolina firm of the year award.


NORTH HILLS MASTER PLAN DUDA PAINE ARCHITECTS

the north hills development in raleigh, nc is one of the most popular shopping centers in the triangle region. the concentration of residential, office, and retail spaces make it an urban center apart from downtown raleigh. in order to continue the growth of the development, we created a master plan proposal which includes high rise offices and residential towers. as part of the design process, i analyzed the site and created numerous diagrams to better understand and convey knowledge of the area. the diagram below shows the flow of vehicular traffic and the hierarchy of roadways on the site.

ER

AD RO

TM OU TH

RO AD

IT

SAINT ALBAN’S

DRIVE

DA R

FR

ON

TS

TR

EET

PARK AT NORTH HILLS STREET

FO

RK

SR

-RA MP

SIX

OFF-RAMP

OA D I-440

ON

SS

LA

ILL

M

OFF-RAMP

INE

BELTL


NORTH HILLS TOWER II

DUDA PAINE ARCHITECTS

the north hills tower II is designed to be a monumental, iconic building in an emerging urban center in raleigh, nc. the original design was all glass, orthagonal and similar in concept to the neighboring captrust tower. when asked to reduce curtainwall costs, we took the opportunity to revisit the overall design of the building, to create a powerful, yet elegant building expression. our team created countless physical models, diagrams, and drawings in order to reach a design that pleased both architect and client.


WTCC CLASSROOM + ADMINISTRATION LITTLE DIVERSIFIED ARCHITECTURAL CONSULTING

the administration and classroom building at wake technical community college is meant to symbolize the future of the school as a driving force in innovation, technology, and sustainability. as a summer intern, i was involved with the project in many capacities. i created a physical model of the building, a presentation site plan and ground floor plan, and spent much of the summer editing various aspects of the building model in revit.

28 PROFESSIONAL WORK


29 CHANNEL HOUSE


CHANNEL HOUSE design project site: raleigh, nc instructor: david hill


N

N

N

E

E

W

N

N

N

E

E

E

E

W

W S

W

W S

S

W S

S

S

the channel house was designed as a response to solar orientation and prevailing winds and was influenced by the southern vernacular house form of the dogtrot. the form, which originated around 1800, was popular in the southeast because of its effectiveness in passive cooling by providing a large open space in the center of the house through which air can flow. the central volume of the channel house is characterized by large operable doors perpendicular to raleigh’s prevailing southwest winds that can be opened to cross ventilate the entire volume. the rooms on either side of the opening are cross-ventilated through suction created by operable doors and windows at either end. in addition, the opening provides an outdoor + indoor space to gather the family together and enjoy fresh air and expansive views.

31 CHANNEL HOUSE


the form of the house was also strongly influenced by the site’s solar orientation. since southern light hits the front facade of the house at a 30-degree angle, large L-shaped overhangs were placed to minimize harsh east and west solar gain in the summer, while allowing solar penetration during the winter. the result of this configuration is a form that is reminiscent of metal extrusions and steel channels; this in turn prompted the decision to use extrusions as the aesthetic expression.

4

12

11

2

9

1

8

10

3

extruding the private spaces from the central volume followed. the main building stands as the giver of form to the smaller spaces. the central volume serves as the point of origin in many other ways including rainwater collection, natural ventilation, photovoltaic panels producing solar energy, heating and cooling pipes, plumbing, and the electrical system.

5 7 6

1 kitchen 2 built-in cabinets 3 dining/breezeway 4 master bedroom 5 bedroom 6 front porch 7 air cooling pond 8 fireplace 9 living room 10 built-in shelving 11 back patio 12 fire pit

32 CHANNEL HOUSE


while the channel form worked well for the solar orientation, it left a significant amount open space to be covered in glass. significant amounts of heat loss + heat gain were avoided because of the angles of the overhangs, the amount of insulation on non-glazed surfaces, and the use of low-e glazing. the problem of privacy in glazed areas remained. in order to increase privacy, channel glass was integrated into the design in certain areas. channel glass is a translucent recycled glass product rolled into a channel shape and is a better insulator than standard glass.


10

the second iteration of the channel house was an opportunity to test the flexibility of the scheme. the professor assigned a new solar orientation with north towards the street and south facing the backyard. he also asked for an increase in square footage.

11

12

9 7

8

6

3

in order to continue capturing the prevailing winds from the southwest (integral to the passive cooling strategy), the extrusions switched sides allowing wind to be channeled through the center of the house.

2

5

4

1

35 CHANNEL HOUSE

1 bedroom 2 living room 3 dining/breezeway 4 front porch 5 study 6 kitchen 7 laundry 8 storage 9 bedroom 10 bedroom 11 back patio 12 fire pit

in order to accommodate the increase in square footage, the back extrusion extended further to hold an additional bedroom. on the front of the house, a new extrusion was added to create a study. the space between the study and master bedroom was covered to create a front porch.


S

S

N

S

E E

W

E

W

E

W

W S scheme I

N scheme II, new orientation

N

N


37 URBAN INSERTION


URBAN INSERTION design project site: feldkirch, austria instructor: paul tesar

1. continuity


given a street elevation in a small, traditional austrian village, i studied three ways to insert a new facade into the existing city fabric. after extensive diagramming of the street elevation, three facade schemes were developed that represent different ways to approach urban insertion into traditional city fabric. the inserted facades are hand-drawn and painted with watercolors.

2. transformation


1. continuity

(first page) implement only traditional building elements to create an aesthetically continuous facade solution

2. transformation

introduce contemporary elements, large horizontal ribbon windows with moveable shutters on a steel track

3. contrast

reversal of building elements, bring terra cotta roof to the facade as a rainwater screen. maintain rhythm of street fabric, but with contemporary technology

3. contrast


41 CITY DIAGRAMS + MODELS


CITY DIAGRAMS + MODELS

research site: charleston, sc instructors: don kranbuehl, jessica johnson moore


the charleston peninsula was researched and diagrammed in terms of: physical characteristics: landforms, topography, rivers, marshes, etc. city fabric: location of built structures circulation: major/minor routes, highways and waterways history: as related to landform, where marshes were filled in to create more land mass

43 CITY DIAGRAMS + MODELS

CITY MODEL the city model (previous page) is a three dimensional representation of the diagrams representing the charleston peninsula. topography is represented on both land and sea. areas of river are shown in plexiglass with marsh areas represented with a frosty texture. the top layer of topography on the actual peninsula shows the original shape of the peninsula, before marsh areas were filled in. additionally, the city fabric is incised onto the landforms and the two main circulation paths are represented with bent metal. PRECINCT MODEL the precinct model shows an area of downtown charleston containing the site for our ‘museum of the city’ project. this precinct contains some important historical buildings including the daughters of the confederacy building and the market. we went to charleston and measured each building for height, width, setbacks, and reconstructed the area to get an overall feeling of the texture of the city. the precinct sat on the waters edge and was partially filled-in marshland. the ground plane expresses where former marshland existed through an open weave texture, which also pays tribute to the woven baskets popularly sold in the market.


44 CITY DIAGRAMS + MODELS


45 ROUDNICE CASTLE


ROUDNICE CASTLE

university master plan + castle renovation/library addition

urban planning + design project site: roudnice nad labem, czech republic instructor: thomas bitnar


during my semester abroad in the czech republic, i had the opportunity to reenvision roudnice castle, which dates back to the 12th century and is located 45 miles north of prague. the castle, surrounding buildings and land are virtually unused today. the location, however, would make it an ideal place for a university. it sits next to an active rail line, a navigable river, and a small, but active town square. the first step was to develop a master plan for transforming the site into a university.

components of master plan: - improve connections between the town square, rail line, and river by creating large stepped terraces that funnel circulation through the campus - transform castle into hub of academic activity, with library inserted in central courtyard - promote sustainability through an ‘energy quad’, which is a reinterpretation of a french garden and is designed to harness green energy and produce fresh food - renovate and adapt all existing buildings before new construction of buildings - provide naturalistic outdoor areas for student use (ex: english garden) to promote exercise and well-being


48 ROUDNICE CASTLE


as part of the overall master plan, the castle was to be transformed into the hub of acitivity for the university. the program called for a contemporary library inserted into the courtyard of the castle with three levels of parking underground. for many years, the courtyard was a manicured french garden. most recently, it has become a parking lot for castle events. it was important to reintroduce green space into the courtyard while inserting the library. in order to achieve this, the library was inserted at the ground level with a green roof creating a courtyard at the +1 level.

+0 library


pavil ion libra s ry par

par

king

kin

par

kin

g

g

+1 0

-1

-2 -3

castle courtyard insertions

+1 pavilions

four pavilions sit among the green space on the +1 level. each rise from a corner of the library and serve the spaces below it. -

math & science pavilion arts & humanities pavilion vertical circulation pavilion public cafĂŠ pavilion


it was important to improve pedestrian connections between the river, campus, castle, and town square. to achieve this on the castle scale, larger openings were created on each facade which connect to paths stretching throughout the site. many of the paths are covered by wood pergola structures, providing shade and allowing vines to grow on them while directing circulation.

51 ROUDNICE CASTLE


one pathway wraps around the castle at the parking level (-1) allowing a public shortcut from the riverside to the town square. (left) within the castle courtyard, bisecting paths on the library (0) level and pavilion level (+1) create connections to the larger campus and bring public visitors into the green spaces, coffee shop, public computers, and three story parking garage. (right)


53 CULINARY INSTITUTE


RALEIGH INSTITUTE OF CULINARY ART design project site: raleigh, nc instructor: frank harmon


cook + cultivate the raleigh institute is a culinary school that gives students the opportunity to cook and cultivate food onsite. it is designed so that the public can also reap the rewards of the students’ education through the restaurant, greenhouse, and produce shop. the location is in the warehouse district of downtown raleigh. the existing site is series of three parking lots, each with a different elevation. the design for the institute follows these elevation changes with openings shifted to engage the public at all three levels.

55 CULINARY INSTITUTE


the greenhouse stretches across the roof of the building and reaches down at either end forming the public and student entrances. the greenhouse is a separately conditioned space which helps control for humidity and heat gain in the other facilities. it serves as a circulation spine throughout the length of the building, allowing views and light onto the first floor through vision glass and the actual path for circulation on the second floor.

56 CULINARY INSTITUTE


the greenhouse and rooftop gardens yields most of the produce used in the demonstration kitchen and restaurant and provides a surplus to be sold to the public. an outdoor + indoor agricultural classroom is located on the second floor adjacent to one of the rooftop gardens. traditional farming practices are taught in the plots at either end of the facility. the plants in the greenhouse would be grown hydroponically using the verticrop system. the use of hydroponics within the greenhouse allows for year round food production, greater variety in plant species grown, decreased water use, and higher yield than traditional farming. growing food onsite for consumption eliminates transportation costs and associated carbon emissions as well as providing the freshest possible produce. 57 CULINARY INSTITUTE


58 CULINARY INSTITUTE


the greenhouse utilizes the verticrop system which provides a cost effective solution for local crop production with significant operating cost savings over traditional field agriculture. the technology represents a paradigm shift in farming and food production by providing up to 20 times the yield of field crops, while using 8% of the water required for land farming. growing leafy green vegetables in a unique, suspended tray configuration on a moving conveyor system, verticrop provides maximum exposure to light along with precisely measured nutrients for each plant. designed to grow in closed loop and controlled environments, verticrop eliminates the need for harmful herbicides and pesticides, while maximizing food taste and nutrition.

59 CULINARY INSTITUTE


60 CULINARY INSTITUTE


61 WYLY THEATRE


WYLY THEATRE

precedent study site: dallas, tx instructors: matt griffith, wayne place


the wyly theatre was chosen as a precedent study because of its innovative use of structure which allows for an unconventional theatre design in which all facilities are stacked above and below house. this design allows for ample flexibility in theatre configuration, giving the directors ultimate artistic freedom. visitors descend into the underbelly of this cube-like building only to emerge up into an enormous and entirely flexible performance space surrounded by expansive views of downtown dallas.

enclosure

63 WYLY THEATRE


volume

structure

circulation


65 FINE ARTS


FINE ARTS

undergraduate work tulane university instructors: sandy chism jeremy jernegan


68 FINE ARTS


when assigned to represent an aspect of human anatomy through clay, i chose to represent the sound processing center of the inner ear, the cochlea. the piece evolved into a larger symbol of the music of new orleans (where i attended school). through repetition of this form and variations in size and shape, i sought to create visual rhythm. the clay was mixed with gold vermiculite, a shimmering material, and then painted with a blue-green glaze and a copper wash yielding a colorful but gritty surface.

the dove sculpture is meant to express different interpretations of the same object. biologically, a dove and a pigeon are the exact same. the difference is our perception of them. the sculpture is enscrawled with images of pigeons, but guides the viewer to see the dove as a larger symbol. a symbol of promise, hope, and auspiciousness.

69 FINE ARTS


70 FINE ARTS


71 FINE ARTS


JILL FALLON

m.arch ncsu 2013 b.a. tulane 2008 jill12fallon@gmail.com, 803.984.2333

Portfolio  

This document contains works in art and architecture by Jill Fallon who graduated in December 2013 with a M.Arch Degree from North Carolina...