Page 1

February 2012/Issue 40

think. what you can be

[ the time issue ]

I’m n o t ju s t t w o m in u t e s a f t e r n in e ,

n a t im e . , not eve d n o c e s ot a m in u t e , n

not a In fact, check me out from a different view, an d Yo u’ ll fi nd th at I’m st ill pr et ty ne w . , y b g in n d le a p han usual a I’m lo n g e r t S o t e ll m e , Hi p s t e r , w h a t a m I?

solve this & Inside

see page 2

Is time travel really possible? • Should school start later? • What’s your time personality?


Wanna win one of the smallest video cameras in the world? The Muvi Atom is just 5,5 cm tall and 1 cm wide, so you can clip it onto your bike helmet or school bag and record your year in style.

How to enter Solve the riddle on the cov er of this issue, then send your answer to thinkoutloud@ hip2b2.com, along with you r name, grade, school and phone number . For more on the Muvi Atom, visit www.theg adgetshop.co.za. Competition closes on 31 March

ED YOU SM11IL, we challenged you to take a funny

re are some In November 20 ver as your face. He co y ile Sm e th h it w photo tries we received … of the awesome en

2012.

YOU EDITED

Mikha’il Hathey, Bryan Gordon Edward, Likhona Mayikana, Karishma Naraindath, Janna and Karin Hammond

2

only six month er and it already has ov ery Ev ! ers ten lis 0 00 24 cked day, the shows are pa ts fac ng ati with fascin and rocking music, so . hit www.hip2b2radio e th for com right now n smartest radio statio … e onlin

ON MXIT

challenged our 115 000 MXit users who makes this mag? We to solve this riddle. Can you crack it?

While precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of information, neither the editor, publisher, New Media nor BSquare Communications can be held liable for any inaccuracies, injury or damages that may arise.

2

YOU TUNED IN HIP2B Online Ras olddio is

Hi hipsters Issue, 2012. We are the learner editors of the Time issue has this with Getting the opportunity to help apply and read to you ask We ing. been overwhelm time is of the the teachings and stories. Know that second. Plan essence and make the most of every ahead of time. your day with a diary to pave your way think outside life, re explo to you want This year, we e. Reach for the befor the box – do what's never been done e possible. ssibl impo the make and odds stars, define the count. it make – This is your time, and your time only

Editor Janna Joseph | Art director Craig Baxter | Brand assistant Sharon McTavish | Digital editor Jill Cicero | Copy editor Vivian Dart | Publisher Reyana Nacerodien | Educational consultants Wordwise | Published on behalf of BSquare Communications (Pty) Ltd by New Media (Pty) Ltd New Media House, 19 Bree Street, Cape Town, 8001; Tel 021 417 1111; Fax 021 417 1112 | Advertising National advertising director Aileen O’Brien 021 417 1228; aileen.obrien@newmediapub.co.za | production & circulation Production manager Shirley Quinlan | Circulation manager Neilton Adams 021 417 1214 | Reproduction New Media Repro | Printing Paarl Media Cape | For all New Business enquiries contact Bridget McCarney on 021 417 1111 | Finance manager Mark Oaten | Editorial director Adelle Horler | Creative director Crispian Brown | Production director Lucrezia Wolfaardt | Executive directors Editorial development director Irna van Zyl | Business development director John Psillos | Managing director Bridget McCarney | hip2B2 Head Office: HIP2B2 General manager Cathryn Treasure | HIP2B2 Brand manager Louise Day | If you want to get involved with the brand, contact Cathryn Treasure on cathryn@hip2b2.com or 021 461 9322

Mark Shuttleworth started to HIP2B2 because he wanted rs to rne lea ool sch h hig ire insp Maths choose – and excel in – e aus Bec y? Wh and Science. rs doo the n ope ts jec these sub es. niti ortu opp re futu y man to

When did we start?

In 2002 after Mark Shuttleworth came back from his ‘First African in Space’ trip.

YOU asked

Last year, we challenged you to ask us the questions you’ve always wanted answered, and this is the winning question. Congratulations, Samet Citlak from Glenwood High School in Durban – your curiosity has won you an awesome skater hamper!

If the Earth spins at 1 000 mph (about 1 600 km/h) and travels through space at an incredible 67 000 mph (about 108 000 km/h), how come we don't feel it or wobble around?

We don’t feel it because we’re moving with it at a roughly constant speed. See, we With pointed fangs it sits in wait, don’t feel movement so much as acceleration, or a change in speed. That’s why it's With piercing force it doles out fate, sometimes hard to tell if the car you're in is moving as long as it’s going smoothly. Over bloodless victims proclaiming its might, But in a way, we do feel the Earth spinning – it acts against gravity, throwing Eternally joining in a single bite. What am I? us outwards like a spinning funfair ride. So we actually weigh a bit less than we would if the Earth wasn’t spinning. In fact, since the Earth isn’t really SMS ‘HIP riddle’ followed by your name spinning at the poles, you’re about 0,3% heavier there than you are at the and answer to 31445, and you could win a equator, where everything spins the fastest. So if you can feel that difference, sporty, water-resistant Quartz watch. you can indirectly feel the Earth’s movement! Standard rates apply. Competition closes on 31 March 2012. Oh, and if Earth suddenly stopped moving (don’t worry, it can’t) we’d the legal be thrown off in all directions like water droplets on a shaking stuff Terms and conditions apply. Please see www.hip2b2.com for more details. To request a copy of the terms ABC 96 652 dog. But seriously, don’t worry about that, okay? and conditions please email info@hip2b2.com or call +27 (0) 21 4619742 for more information.

FACTS The shortest war of all time was fought by Zanzibar and England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after just 38 minutes.

Hoerskool Jan de Klerk, Krugersdorp Hey Esther … thanks for your email, and congrats! Your curiosity just won you the ! Smart Style hamper in the Humour Issue s… Keep questioning the world and who know a maybe you’ll be the next Newton! – Jann

YOU WENT MOBILE

What do we do?

www.hip2b2.com – our Magazine – One million interactive website. copies to 4 000 HIP2B2 Radio – listen live on schools nationwide, four www.hip2b2radio.com. times a year. Facebook, MXit & Twitter – . Brand Ambassador find us on these social media Programme – specially selected learners who organise brand and HIP2B², p community events all over Mark Sh ioneered by uttlewort tr . h, is a ntry a cou d the emark Commun run by BSquare ications iTHINK Challenge – a (Pty) Ltd . national Amazing Race-type s, ool competition for sch ek. during National Science We

t he s m a r t es t r a d io s tat i o n o n l ine

Tune in for...

I already know it’s going to be a busy year here at HIP HQ. We’re working on some awesome new ideas to empower all of you to build the foundations for your dreams. And as time is one thing that always seems to fly by, we have to make the most of every second, every minute, as we won’t get them back again. Older people often say that ‘time is precious’ and if I look at what my team plans to do this year, I know it’s true. Rock on 2012 – make it a sizzling one!

– Esther Ntshabeleng, Grade 11,

Your news, your views

of HIP

My favourite story in the humour issue had to be t '8 funny ideas that made it big'. How a grea small and le simp a from come could tion inven think idea was just amazing to me. It made me , apple us famo the and about Sir Isaac Newton . Laws nal itatio Grav his with up when he came When an apple falls, a typical human being would just pick it up and eat it, so what made ed Newton ask why and how it fell? What start that laws into loped deve idea le out as a simp explain many things around us. This inspired me to keep learning and to be curious about everything that goes on around me, no matter how small it may be. That's what makes Maths and Science fun: being curious and trying to find solutions.

images:Jan Ras, Jacques Stander, supplied. MXit prize (Quartz watch) supplied by Posh Promotions (info@poshpromotions.co.za)

YOUR SPACE

I've always found time comforting …

If you're having a bad day, you know it'll be over in a matter of hours. And if you're having an awesome experience, time reminds you to make the most of every moment. Right now, you're at the beginning of a brand-new year, and this issue is here to make you think about that precious thing called time. Every second of this year is yours. Yours to learn in and laugh through as you step towards your future. I challenge you to make this your biggest, best year ever. After all, it's your life and it's your time. So get out there and have the time of your life … janna

What is HIP2B2?

you won

- cathryn, General manager, hip2b2

2 B 2 P I From H

Have you seen our mobisite, designed specifically for your cellphone? No? Well, what are you waiting for ... type m.hip2b2.com into your cellphone browser for smart news, fun facts, career advice and quirky quizzes, all literally at your fingertips. You can even listen to our online radio station!

smart stuff: Running robots, talking dolphins & other news .... 4 it's about time: Where do minutes and seconds come from? ... 6 ONE-HOUR WONDERS: It doesn't take long to rock the world ... 8 career quiz: What's your time personality? ................... 10 smart survival: Could you live without your cellphone? .... 12 smart style: Win a hamper of time-saving stuff ....... 13 chill out: Movies, music, books, games & more ............... 14

A cricket's ears are found above its knees.

Smart inven tions

News

Music

Study tips

hook up with hip2B2 To find us, hit Tradepost, then Entertainment, then Mag Rack

Email: thinkoutloud @hip2b2.com

Visit our website: www.hip2b2.com

Fax: Twitter: To follow Join our Facebook 021 461 9742 us, search page (search ‘HIP2B2_SA’ 'HIP2B2')

SMS ‘HIP’ and your thoughts to 31445

Standard SMS rates apply.

PO Box 440, HIP2B2 Radio: Tune in Green Point, on www.hip2b2radio. Cape Town, com or search 'HIP2B2 Radio' on Facebook 8051

On average, men blink 17 000 times a day. Women blink nearly twice as much.

Technology

Hit www.hip2b2radio.com on your cellphone or computer to turn airwaves into brainwaves.

facts, For a daily dose of fun Twitter. _ on ’ search ‘HIP2B2 SA

tter five-le I’m a . I’m a y y r count und word. M ill o w p s r m e o t c t ree le er. first th u with wat o y x tters le rela r u t fo er My las ke you suff ry t a will m What coun . ly e t z a e la r B g – Ash am I?

Brain teasers

Entertainment

join Search ‘HIP2B2’ right now to ebook. Fac on e pag the smartest fan

YOU SMSED

Career info

Earth-saving advice

SMS riddle answer: Spain

Ed’s letter


Wanna win one of the smallest video cameras in the world? The Muvi Atom is just 5,5 cm tall and 1 cm wide, so you can clip it onto your bike helmet or school bag and record your year in style.

How to enter Solve the riddle on the cov er of this issue, then send your answer to thinkoutloud@ hip2b2.com, along with you r name, grade, school and phone number . For more on the Muvi Atom, visit www.theg adgetshop.co.za. Competition closes on 31 March

ED YOU SM11IL, we challenged you to take a funny

re are some In November 20 ver as your face. He co y ile Sm e th h it w photo tries we received … of the awesome en

2012.

YOU EDITED

Mikha’il Hathey, Bryan Gordon Edward, Likhona Mayikana, Karishma Naraindath, Janna and Karin Hammond

2

only six month er and it already has ov ery Ev ! ers ten lis 0 00 24 cked day, the shows are pa ts fac ng ati with fascin and rocking music, so . hit www.hip2b2radio e th for com right now n smartest radio statio … e onlin

ON MXIT

challenged our 115 000 MXit users who makes this mag? We to solve this riddle. Can you crack it?

While precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of information, neither the editor, publisher, New Media nor BSquare Communications can be held liable for any inaccuracies, injury or damages that may arise.

2

YOU TUNED IN HIP2B Online Ras olddio is

Hi hipsters Issue, 2012. We are the learner editors of the Time issue has this with Getting the opportunity to help apply and read to you ask We ing. been overwhelm time is of the the teachings and stories. Know that second. Plan essence and make the most of every ahead of time. your day with a diary to pave your way think outside life, re explo to you want This year, we e. Reach for the befor the box – do what's never been done e possible. ssibl impo the make and odds stars, define the count. it make – This is your time, and your time only

Editor Janna Joseph | Art director Craig Baxter | Brand assistant Sharon McTavish | Digital editor Jill Cicero | Copy editor Vivian Dart | Publisher Reyana Nacerodien | Educational consultants Wordwise | Published on behalf of BSquare Communications (Pty) Ltd by New Media (Pty) Ltd New Media House, 19 Bree Street, Cape Town, 8001; Tel 021 417 1111; Fax 021 417 1112 | Advertising National advertising director Aileen O’Brien 021 417 1228; aileen.obrien@newmediapub.co.za | production & circulation Production manager Shirley Quinlan | Circulation manager Neilton Adams 021 417 1214 | Reproduction New Media Repro | Printing Paarl Media Cape | For all New Business enquiries contact Bridget McCarney on 021 417 1111 | Finance manager Mark Oaten | Editorial director Adelle Horler | Creative director Crispian Brown | Production director Lucrezia Wolfaardt | Executive directors Editorial development director Irna van Zyl | Business development director John Psillos | Managing director Bridget McCarney | hip2B2 Head Office: HIP2B2 General manager Cathryn Treasure | HIP2B2 Brand manager Louise Day | If you want to get involved with the brand, contact Cathryn Treasure on cathryn@hip2b2.com or 021 461 9322

Mark Shuttleworth started to HIP2B2 because he wanted rs to rne lea ool sch h hig ire insp Maths choose – and excel in – e aus Bec y? Wh and Science. rs doo the n ope ts jec these sub es. niti ortu opp re futu y man to

When did we start?

In 2002 after Mark Shuttleworth came back from his ‘First African in Space’ trip.

YOU asked

Last year, we challenged you to ask us the questions you’ve always wanted answered, and this is the winning question. Congratulations, Samet Citlak from Glenwood High School in Durban – your curiosity has won you an awesome skater hamper!

If the Earth spins at 1 000 mph (about 1 600 km/h) and travels through space at an incredible 67 000 mph (about 108 000 km/h), how come we don't feel it or wobble around?

We don’t feel it because we’re moving with it at a roughly constant speed. See, we With pointed fangs it sits in wait, don’t feel movement so much as acceleration, or a change in speed. That’s why it's With piercing force it doles out fate, sometimes hard to tell if the car you're in is moving as long as it’s going smoothly. Over bloodless victims proclaiming its might, But in a way, we do feel the Earth spinning – it acts against gravity, throwing Eternally joining in a single bite. What am I? us outwards like a spinning funfair ride. So we actually weigh a bit less than we would if the Earth wasn’t spinning. In fact, since the Earth isn’t really SMS ‘HIP riddle’ followed by your name spinning at the poles, you’re about 0,3% heavier there than you are at the and answer to 31445, and you could win a equator, where everything spins the fastest. So if you can feel that difference, sporty, water-resistant Quartz watch. you can indirectly feel the Earth’s movement! Standard rates apply. Competition closes on 31 March 2012. Oh, and if Earth suddenly stopped moving (don’t worry, it can’t) we’d the legal be thrown off in all directions like water droplets on a shaking stuff Terms and conditions apply. Please see www.hip2b2.com for more details. To request a copy of the terms ABC 96 652 dog. But seriously, don’t worry about that, okay? and conditions please email info@hip2b2.com or call +27 (0) 21 4619742 for more information.

FACTS The shortest war of all time was fought by Zanzibar and England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after just 38 minutes.

Hoerskool Jan de Klerk, Krugersdorp Hey Esther … thanks for your email, and congrats! Your curiosity just won you the ! Smart Style hamper in the Humour Issue s… Keep questioning the world and who know a maybe you’ll be the next Newton! – Jann

YOU WENT MOBILE

What do we do?

www.hip2b2.com – our Magazine – One million interactive website. copies to 4 000 HIP2B2 Radio – listen live on schools nationwide, four www.hip2b2radio.com. times a year. Facebook, MXit & Twitter – . Brand Ambassador find us on these social media Programme – specially selected learners who organise brand and HIP2B², p community events all over Mark Sh ioneered by uttlewort tr . h, is a ntry a cou d the emark Commun run by BSquare ications iTHINK Challenge – a (Pty) Ltd . national Amazing Race-type s, ool competition for sch ek. during National Science We

t he s m a r t es t r a d io s tat i o n o n l ine

Tune in for...

I already know it’s going to be a busy year here at HIP HQ. We’re working on some awesome new ideas to empower all of you to build the foundations for your dreams. And as time is one thing that always seems to fly by, we have to make the most of every second, every minute, as we won’t get them back again. Older people often say that ‘time is precious’ and if I look at what my team plans to do this year, I know it’s true. Rock on 2012 – make it a sizzling one!

– Esther Ntshabeleng, Grade 11,

Your news, your views

of HIP

My favourite story in the humour issue had to be t '8 funny ideas that made it big'. How a grea small and le simp a from come could tion inven think idea was just amazing to me. It made me , apple us famo the and about Sir Isaac Newton . Laws nal itatio Grav his with up when he came When an apple falls, a typical human being would just pick it up and eat it, so what made ed Newton ask why and how it fell? What start that laws into loped deve idea le out as a simp explain many things around us. This inspired me to keep learning and to be curious about everything that goes on around me, no matter how small it may be. That's what makes Maths and Science fun: being curious and trying to find solutions.

images:Jan Ras, Jacques Stander, supplied. MXit prize (Quartz watch) supplied by Posh Promotions (info@poshpromotions.co.za)

YOUR SPACE

I've always found time comforting …

If you're having a bad day, you know it'll be over in a matter of hours. And if you're having an awesome experience, time reminds you to make the most of every moment. Right now, you're at the beginning of a brand-new year, and this issue is here to make you think about that precious thing called time. Every second of this year is yours. Yours to learn in and laugh through as you step towards your future. I challenge you to make this your biggest, best year ever. After all, it's your life and it's your time. So get out there and have the time of your life … janna

What is HIP2B2?

you won

- cathryn, General manager, hip2b2

2 B 2 P I From H

Have you seen our mobisite, designed specifically for your cellphone? No? Well, what are you waiting for ... type m.hip2b2.com into your cellphone browser for smart news, fun facts, career advice and quirky quizzes, all literally at your fingertips. You can even listen to our online radio station!

smart stuff: Running robots, talking dolphins & other news .... 4 it's about time: Where do minutes and seconds come from? ... 6 ONE-HOUR WONDERS: It doesn't take long to rock the world ... 8 career quiz: What's your time personality? ................... 10 smart survival: Could you live without your cellphone? .... 12 smart style: Win a hamper of time-saving stuff ....... 13 chill out: Movies, music, books, games & more ............... 14

A cricket's ears are found above its knees.

Smart inven tions

News

Music

Study tips

hook up with hip2B2 To find us, hit Tradepost, then Entertainment, then Mag Rack

Email: thinkoutloud @hip2b2.com

Visit our website: www.hip2b2.com

Fax: Twitter: To follow Join our Facebook 021 461 9742 us, search page (search ‘HIP2B2_SA’ 'HIP2B2')

SMS ‘HIP’ and your thoughts to 31445

Standard SMS rates apply.

PO Box 440, HIP2B2 Radio: Tune in Green Point, on www.hip2b2radio. Cape Town, com or search 'HIP2B2 Radio' on Facebook 8051

On average, men blink 17 000 times a day. Women blink nearly twice as much.

Technology

Hit www.hip2b2radio.com on your cellphone or computer to turn airwaves into brainwaves.

facts, For a daily dose of fun Twitter. _ on ’ search ‘HIP2B2 SA

tter five-le I’m a . I’m a y y r count und word. M ill o w p s r m e o t c t ree le er. first th u with wat o y x tters le rela r u t fo er My las ke you suff ry t a will m What coun . ly e t z a e la r B g – Ash am I?

Brain teasers

Entertainment

join Search ‘HIP2B2’ right now to ebook. Fac on e pag the smartest fan

YOU SMSED

Career info

Earth-saving advice

SMS riddle answer: Spain

Ed’s letter


Take note (and rock your exams)

You know how some people always seem to be scribbling during class? Think you don’t need to take notes in class? Well, according to Professor Walter Well, that doesn’t mean they aren’t Pouk at America’s Cornell University, you shouldn’t put your pen down just listening … different people learn in yet. Why? Because this prof has been studying students’ ability to remember different ways. Some learn by seeing things, others learn by hearing information during his lectures, and you won’t believe how much they forgot … things and some people even learn % 75 : ys % da 62 After After 20 minutes: 47% two days: 69% After 75 After one day: by feeling or experiencing things. And if you’re the kind of person who Eish! So that really important thing your teacher said at the beginning of the year? learns best when you see something, You’ll probably forget it by exam time. Unless you write it down, that is: note-taking doodling might help you ‘see’ what fights off forgetfulness by helping your brain to file things properly. As you write, you’re hearing and take your brain filters and organises information so it’s easier to remember. And, of it in better. Tell that to your teacher next time course, that scribbled note will also help you remember the things you learnt she catches you today when exam time rolls around. doodling …

In 2009, an athlete broke her ankles just trying to walk. A year later, she’s breaking all the world records, running faster than every competitor. Sounds like an awesome story, right? Especially when you realise that this athlete is a robot! At the USA’s University of Michigan, a robot called MABEL can sprint at up to 10,9 km/h, which is about twice as fast as the average human walks. MABEL also runs a lot like we do: she’s got a system of springs that act like tendons, her torso is heavier than her legs and she can run with both feet off the ground. Sure, 10,9 km/h isn’t all that fast compared to a human being (Usain Bolt can reach top speeds of about 40 km/h). But MABEL can keep it up for way longer than any human can – so if she was chasing you, she would eventually catch you. Visit www.hip2b2.com/ mabel to see the robot runner in action.

You probably know some cats and dogs that get along really well. But have you ever seen piglets raised by a tiger, or a snake living with a hamster? Visit www.hip2b2.com/ beastfriends to check it out.

4

Every day, you generate a lot of kinetic – or movement-related – energy just by walking around (and if you don’t, you should probably get off the couch, lazybones). You also use a lot of energy every day, thanks to all of your cellphones and other gadgets. So it was only a matter of time before someone put two and two together … time & spacE That someone is Professor Tom Krupenki n, an engineer Our very own Karoo could soon at the University of Wisconsin, USA. Tom host the world’s largest and most and his fellow researchers are working on an energy sensitive radio telescope, called the harvester that can be installed in the sole of a person’s shoe Square Kilometre Array. Because it . There, the device will store the picks up radio waves, which are energy the wearer creates by walking or running, saving it up to fuel much more powerful than light other gadgets. Just walk around, plug your cellphone into your shoes and waves, this telescope will help us you’ll never have to worry about being to understand the universe’s powerless again. past better than ever before.

Wanna chat? Over the years, dolphins have been able to learn over 100 human-created hand signals and sounds. We, on the other hand, have no idea what they’re talking about. But two US scientists aim to fix that with their Cetacean Hearing And Telemetry – or CHAT – project. Thad Sterner is an artificial intelligence researcher, which means he studies the ability of machines to make human-like decisions, and Denise Herzig is a dolphin biologist. Together, they’re hoping to decode dolphin speech by fitting human divers with waterproof computers and microphones. These smart gadgets will record dolphin sounds underwater, and then run the noises through a pattern-detection programme. The computer’s controls will also allow a diver to send out dolphin-type noises. So maybe one day, humans and dolphins will be able to have a real conversation. What we’ll talk about is another matter entirely …

FACTS Dolphins sleep with one eye open.

9

ll a r o f r e t a w h s e r f : n o i t u l SA so it is able, and some of lot of it isn’t drink a t bu , ter wa t so in bu ff, Earth is covered to purify the stu come up with ways ve ha le op . Pe ste ic. nous wa downright tox wer or create poiso her use loads of po iversity of Un by far, the methods eit led rican scientists – Af uth So of h nc the Luckily, a bu n Lewis – spotted ng professor Aliso eri gin en l ica em riendly, Cape Town ch developed an eco-f solution. They’ve art sm a nd called fou d gap and have ing a new metho hly toxic water, us hig an cle to y down wa cost-effective ngs polluted water . This basically bri on ati llis sta cry salts e eutectic freez ing toxins to form temperature, caus ing ez fre ble ssi po . to its lowest forms ice and floats nice, clean water can be sold lts sa and sink, while the the s .9% drinkable, plu 99 is ter wa ing The result dy wins. rposes, so everybo or used for other pu

A wet, hairy leg may get sunburned faster than a wet, shaved one. Droplets on the hairs can

ALARM SPRING Unwinds when released, driving the alarm lever (10).

8 ALARM HAND When this hand lines up with the hour hand, they fit together and cause two wheels in the gear train to shift, releasing the alarm spring (9).

oa t y a w r u o y k l a W ne charged cellpho

Run, robot, run!

Beast friends

an alarm clock?

just doodle it

33 escapement wheel Links to the pallet (5) and pushes it from side to side.

GEAR TRAIN The differentsized wheels spin at different speeds, driving the hour and minute hands and turning the escapement wheel (4).

1

4

10

7

5

pallet Ticks from side to side, spinning the balance wheel (6).

6

4AM OR ELSE … In 1787, US clockmaker Levi Hutchins invented America’s first mechanical alarm clock. It only went off at 4 am, because that was the time he needed to wake up.

fla fub

pla der

thi rcs

2

balance wheel Spins back and forth like a dog shaking its head, keeping regular time.

BRAIN BUSTERS Animal instincts

HANDS ON SCIENCE @Sci-Bono: Build and launch a real rocket: Advanced rocketry workshop, Grade 11

maths & science learners: Saturday 31 March & 2 to 5 April

Build an electronic gadget! Join the Amateur Radio Electronics Club, Grade 10 – 12, Thursday afternoons

7

Clock-a-doodle-doo! Don’t have an alarm clock? Why not get a rooster? In the Middle Ages, monks used this bird’s morning call as a signal for early prayers. Some nations still use the rooster as an alarm today!

Discover Science

CROWN To start the clock, you turn this key, which winds up the mainspring (2).

ALARM LEVER Hits the metal bells to sound the alarm.

clock HANDS

Snippets by Nicklaus Kruger; Puzzles by Ellen Cameron-Williger; Alarm clock deconstruction by Bruce Farthing and Anthony Samboer; images: sasan(sxc), UggBoyUggGirl(flickr), beteton(sxc), Sheepguardllama(flickr), johnonolan(flickr), Likethegrandcanyon(flickr), salanki(flickr), drmatiz(sxc)

OUR WIRED WORLD

smart stuff

Deconstruction

What’s inside

lag ril

ALARM DIAL The dial you turn to set the alarm by moving the alarm hand (8).

MAINSPRING Powers the clock by spinning the gear train (3). No electricity is required to run this system.

GOING DIGITAL Today, we often use digital clocks instead of the mechanical kind shown here. But did you know that the clock on your cellphone works almost the same way as this one, except that all the functions are carried out by a microchip instead of by wheels and springs.

beg msk

pli ndh

Examine a future career in medicine with the Apprentice Doctor®: Grade 10 – 12 workshops & Pre-med Holiday camp,

31 March – 3 April

Master the physics curriculum with computer technology workshops: TRAC, Grade 10 – 12 Express the music in your soul, design animation: Multimedia Club House Improve your results: Free after school support for Grade 12’s with the Learning Channel,

Monday – Thursday afternoons at Sci-Bono Discovery Centre, Newtown, Johannesburg and Residentia Secondary, Sebokeng.

Dow Lab Conduct physics, chemistry and life science experiments in our brand new fully equipped lab.

Over 350 world class interactive exhibits.

al has jumbled in the boxes above. Each anim The names of six African animals are it? is r missing the same letter. Which lette a seven-letter name, but they’re all

ble creature jumme Jigsaw of the na the work out

Turn to page 14 for the answers.

Can you zzle pieces, without that’s spelt on these pu ? out m the actually cutting

For school bookings please contact: Cynthia Sithole or Siphokazi Ndzamela at 011 639 8400 cynthia.sithole@sci-bono.co.za Siphokazi.ndzamela@sci-bono.co.za

Bee reasonable

Reception: 011 639 8400 www.sci-bono.co.za

Each hexagonal cell in the beehive above must be surrounded by all the numbers from 1 to 6, with no repeated numbers in each cell. Solve the beehive conundrum using only your powers of logic.

Visit us on Miriam Makeba, between Jeppe and President Street, Newtown, Johannesburg

act as tiny magnifying glasses, focusing the sun’s rays and burning the skin.


Take note (and rock your exams)

You know how some people always seem to be scribbling during class? Think you don’t need to take notes in class? Well, according to Professor Walter Well, that doesn’t mean they aren’t Pouk at America’s Cornell University, you shouldn’t put your pen down just listening … different people learn in yet. Why? Because this prof has been studying students’ ability to remember different ways. Some learn by seeing things, others learn by hearing information during his lectures, and you won’t believe how much they forgot … things and some people even learn % 75 : ys % da 62 After After 20 minutes: 47% two days: 69% After 75 After one day: by feeling or experiencing things. And if you’re the kind of person who Eish! So that really important thing your teacher said at the beginning of the year? learns best when you see something, You’ll probably forget it by exam time. Unless you write it down, that is: note-taking doodling might help you ‘see’ what fights off forgetfulness by helping your brain to file things properly. As you write, you’re hearing and take your brain filters and organises information so it’s easier to remember. And, of it in better. Tell that to your teacher next time course, that scribbled note will also help you remember the things you learnt she catches you today when exam time rolls around. doodling …

In 2009, an athlete broke her ankles just trying to walk. A year later, she’s breaking all the world records, running faster than every competitor. Sounds like an awesome story, right? Especially when you realise that this athlete is a robot! At the USA’s University of Michigan, a robot called MABEL can sprint at up to 10,9 km/h, which is about twice as fast as the average human walks. MABEL also runs a lot like we do: she’s got a system of springs that act like tendons, her torso is heavier than her legs and she can run with both feet off the ground. Sure, 10,9 km/h isn’t all that fast compared to a human being (Usain Bolt can reach top speeds of about 40 km/h). But MABEL can keep it up for way longer than any human can – so if she was chasing you, she would eventually catch you. Visit www.hip2b2.com/ mabel to see the robot runner in action.

You probably know some cats and dogs that get along really well. But have you ever seen piglets raised by a tiger, or a snake living with a hamster? Visit www.hip2b2.com/ beastfriends to check it out.

4

Every day, you generate a lot of kinetic – or movement-related – energy just by walking around (and if you don’t, you should probably get off the couch, lazybones). You also use a lot of energy every day, thanks to all of your cellphones and other gadgets. So it was only a matter of time before someone put two and two together … time & spacE That someone is Professor Tom Krupenki n, an engineer Our very own Karoo could soon at the University of Wisconsin, USA. Tom host the world’s largest and most and his fellow researchers are working on an energy sensitive radio telescope, called the harvester that can be installed in the sole of a person’s shoe Square Kilometre Array. Because it . There, the device will store the picks up radio waves, which are energy the wearer creates by walking or running, saving it up to fuel much more powerful than light other gadgets. Just walk around, plug your cellphone into your shoes and waves, this telescope will help us you’ll never have to worry about being to understand the universe’s powerless again. past better than ever before.

Wanna chat? Over the years, dolphins have been able to learn over 100 human-created hand signals and sounds. We, on the other hand, have no idea what they’re talking about. But two US scientists aim to fix that with their Cetacean Hearing And Telemetry – or CHAT – project. Thad Sterner is an artificial intelligence researcher, which means he studies the ability of machines to make human-like decisions, and Denise Herzig is a dolphin biologist. Together, they’re hoping to decode dolphin speech by fitting human divers with waterproof computers and microphones. These smart gadgets will record dolphin sounds underwater, and then run the noises through a pattern-detection programme. The computer’s controls will also allow a diver to send out dolphin-type noises. So maybe one day, humans and dolphins will be able to have a real conversation. What we’ll talk about is another matter entirely …

FACTS Dolphins sleep with one eye open.

9

ll a r o f r e t a w h s e r f : n o i t u l SA so it is able, and some of lot of it isn’t drink a t bu , ter wa t so in bu ff, Earth is covered to purify the stu come up with ways ve ha le op . Pe ste ic. nous wa downright tox wer or create poiso her use loads of po iversity of Un by far, the methods eit led rican scientists – Af uth So of h nc the Luckily, a bu n Lewis – spotted ng professor Aliso eri gin en l ica em riendly, Cape Town ch developed an eco-f solution. They’ve art sm a nd called fou d gap and have ing a new metho hly toxic water, us hig an cle to y down wa cost-effective ngs polluted water . This basically bri on ati llis sta cry salts e eutectic freez ing toxins to form temperature, caus ing ez fre ble ssi po . to its lowest forms ice and floats nice, clean water can be sold lts sa and sink, while the the s .9% drinkable, plu 99 is ter wa ing The result dy wins. rposes, so everybo or used for other pu

A wet, hairy leg may get sunburned faster than a wet, shaved one. Droplets on the hairs can

ALARM SPRING Unwinds when released, driving the alarm lever (10).

8 ALARM HAND When this hand lines up with the hour hand, they fit together and cause two wheels in the gear train to shift, releasing the alarm spring (9).

oa t y a w r u o y k l a W ne charged cellpho

Run, robot, run!

Beast friends

an alarm clock?

just doodle it

33 escapement wheel Links to the pallet (5) and pushes it from side to side.

GEAR TRAIN The differentsized wheels spin at different speeds, driving the hour and minute hands and turning the escapement wheel (4).

1

4

10

7

5

pallet Ticks from side to side, spinning the balance wheel (6).

6

4AM OR ELSE … In 1787, US clockmaker Levi Hutchins invented America’s first mechanical alarm clock. It only went off at 4 am, because that was the time he needed to wake up.

fla fub

pla der

thi rcs

2

balance wheel Spins back and forth like a dog shaking its head, keeping regular time.

BRAIN BUSTERS Animal instincts

HANDS ON SCIENCE @Sci-Bono: Build and launch a real rocket: Advanced rocketry workshop, Grade 11

maths & science learners: Saturday 31 March & 2 to 5 April

Build an electronic gadget! Join the Amateur Radio Electronics Club, Grade 10 – 12, Thursday afternoons

7

Clock-a-doodle-doo! Don’t have an alarm clock? Why not get a rooster? In the Middle Ages, monks used this bird’s morning call as a signal for early prayers. Some nations still use the rooster as an alarm today!

Discover Science

CROWN To start the clock, you turn this key, which winds up the mainspring (2).

ALARM LEVER Hits the metal bells to sound the alarm.

clock HANDS

Snippets by Nicklaus Kruger; Puzzles by Ellen Cameron-Williger; Alarm clock deconstruction by Bruce Farthing and Anthony Samboer; images: sasan(sxc), UggBoyUggGirl(flickr), beteton(sxc), Sheepguardllama(flickr), johnonolan(flickr), Likethegrandcanyon(flickr), salanki(flickr), drmatiz(sxc)

OUR WIRED WORLD

smart stuff

Deconstruction

What’s inside

lag ril

ALARM DIAL The dial you turn to set the alarm by moving the alarm hand (8).

MAINSPRING Powers the clock by spinning the gear train (3). No electricity is required to run this system.

GOING DIGITAL Today, we often use digital clocks instead of the mechanical kind shown here. But did you know that the clock on your cellphone works almost the same way as this one, except that all the functions are carried out by a microchip instead of by wheels and springs.

beg msk

pli ndh

Examine a future career in medicine with the Apprentice Doctor®: Grade 10 – 12 workshops & Pre-med Holiday camp,

31 March – 3 April

Master the physics curriculum with computer technology workshops: TRAC, Grade 10 – 12 Express the music in your soul, design animation: Multimedia Club House Improve your results: Free after school support for Grade 12’s with the Learning Channel,

Monday – Thursday afternoons at Sci-Bono Discovery Centre, Newtown, Johannesburg and Residentia Secondary, Sebokeng.

Dow Lab Conduct physics, chemistry and life science experiments in our brand new fully equipped lab.

Over 350 world class interactive exhibits.

al has jumbled in the boxes above. Each anim The names of six African animals are it? is r missing the same letter. Which lette a seven-letter name, but they’re all

ble creature jumme Jigsaw of the na the work out

Turn to page 14 for the answers.

Can you zzle pieces, without that’s spelt on these pu ? out m the actually cutting

For school bookings please contact: Cynthia Sithole or Siphokazi Ndzamela at 011 639 8400 cynthia.sithole@sci-bono.co.za Siphokazi.ndzamela@sci-bono.co.za

Bee reasonable

Reception: 011 639 8400 www.sci-bono.co.za

Each hexagonal cell in the beehive above must be surrounded by all the numbers from 1 to 6, with no repeated numbers in each cell. Solve the beehive conundrum using only your powers of logic.

Visit us on Miriam Makeba, between Jeppe and President Street, Newtown, Johannesburg

act as tiny magnifying glasses, focusing the sun’s rays and burning the skin.


The tale of time

Way back in 3 500 BC, the ancient Egyp tians didn’t have watches or cellphone clocks. Inste ad, they used that big, burning clock called the sun to keep track of the day. They built huge stone pillars and used the shadows they cast to divide each day into parts. For the next few thousand years, sundials were all the rage. It became the norm to split the time between sunrise and sunset into 12 hour s. That’s because 12 is divisible by two, three and four, making it easy to split the day into fract ions. But how did they tell the time at night? Well, ancient engineers created water clocks, which dripped water out of a tank at a constant rate, as well as hourglasses, which leaked sand through a hole.

fast fact

The sulphur-crested cockatoo in Australia is a real smooth mover. It can can pick up a musical beat and move in time with it.

It's

about

time

were invented? cks clo re befo e m ti el on how did people stay know when to wake up? could you trav how does your body w? It’s time to find out… back in time right no d cortisol, which

Got a minute? Sun, sand and water may make a great beach, but they couldn’t solve the ancient world’s time-keeping troubles. Firstly, water and sand can’t keep perfect time. And secondly, a day isn’t always the same length, so an hour only really meant ‘one twelfth of a day’ until the first mechanical clocks arrived in the 1300s. The earliest clocks only measured hours because the tech wasn’t accurate enough for shorter periods. But as the gadgets became more precise, the hours could be divided into sections called minutes, from pars minuta prima – Latin for ‘first very small part’ – and then minutes were split into seconds, from pars minute secunda, or ‘second small part’. Like 12, the number 60 was used because it’s easy to split into fractions. So next time you check your watch, take a moment – or better yet, a second – to thank the many smart people who made it happen.

Body time Your body is way smart – it doesn’t even need a watch to keep time. Why? Because it has a built-in clock that keeps you running 24/7. Every morning, you wake up thanks to a small patch of cells in your brain called the SCN or suprachiasmatic nucleus. These cells keep track of light levels outside, and when they detect daylight, they tell a nearby gland to stop squirting out your sleep hormone, melatonin. Okay, so now you’re awake. But your body clock doesn’t stop there – it also helps you get out of bed by

6

making a stress hormone calle ure so boosts your heart rate and blood press get a rush also You roll. to y read and alert you’re e. nalin of the fight-or-flight hormone adre body your in icals chem As the day wears on, the and t spor ol, scho with cope change to help you brain’s at its everything else. By mid-morning, your afternoon – the peak, and your muscles are strongest in thing drops every ing, even just in time to score that goal. In the darkness then h, couc the on ge to an all-day low as you loun ZZZZZ … ZZZZ n. agai tonin mela ucing prod falls and you start

WHY SCHOOL SHOULD START LATER

A teenager’s body clock lags an hour or two behind an adult’s, which is why the headmaster of Monkseaton School in England decided to start school an hour later. The result? Exam results shot up by 20 to 30%!

In a heartbeat

pushing blood Your heart also keeps a regular beat, minute. But per s time through your body about 70 time, and this er prop keep t don’ ts some people’s hear ! them for up ’s time n mea could on Thankfully, US electrical engineer Wils tion solu t smar a with up Greatbach came Exam warp nt in 1956. He was trying to build equipme So you’re writing an exam and he when you hear the dreaded words: that could monitor heart sounds ‘Time’s up!’ Huh?!? But it feels used the wrong part and stumbled upon rical like you’ve just started … The a machine that sent out regular elect busier your brain gets with a he s year few next the Over signals. demanding task like a test, the ce perfected the pacemaker, a small devi less attention it can pay t ches an hum a e that can be placed insid to keeping time. . time in ping pum t to keep the hear

BY Linda Pretorius; images: arjanRichter(flickr), stiggeh(flickr), cema(sxc), satty4u(sxc), BrettJordan(flickr), ElvarFreyr(flickr), friskytuna(flickr), liza31337pt2(flickr), miguelsancheese(flickr),

TIME KEEPERS VS TIME BUSTERS

t’s Monday morning in a world without time. You wake up when the sun hits your face – which is lucky because your teacher said she’ll be cross if you’re late for school. Thankfully, the bus doesn’t take too long today and the robots turn green pretty fast, so you get to school feeling grea t – only to discover they rang the bell early and you’re late for class. Oh well, it’s hard to be on time when no one knows what ‘on time’ means … Life would be tough if we couldn’t mea sure time. Which is why human beings have spent thousands of years creating a system that works. But who came up with the hours, minu tes and seconds we use today? Well, let’s just say it took a lot of, er, time and effort …

of an athlete anatomSomye peo ple kee Scientists in Australia have shown that many elite athletes have a specific gene in their DNA called ACTN3. This gene creates the protein called actinin, which helps muscle fibres to contract, or tense, strongly.

p time. Others race But what makes a top runner go so against it. fast?

How fast are you?

Visit http://tinyurl. com/timerace to find out!

The greyhound also has a flexible spine and long legs, which help it take longer leaps. In a race, this dog hits an average speed of 63 km/h – next time you’re in a car going 60 km/h, imagine being able to run that fast!

According to a US study, many top sprinters have shorter heels and longer toes than us slowpokes. The short heels help them push off the ground and the toes keep in contact with the ground slightly longer to ensure a powerful lift-off. South African paralympic athlete Oscar Pistorius doesn’t have feet. Instead, he’s got blades made of carbon fibre, which is a very strong, very light material that helps Oscar run really fast. The blades are also really springy, allowing Oscar to compete against able-bodied athletes!

The greyhound has an extremely deep chest, which leaves lots of space for the lungs and heart to pump oxygen to the body.

C

M

Y

Race against time OK, so we have cars that can go faste r than sound … but you’d need to go faster than light if you wanted to travel backwards or forwards in time. The prob lem is, Einstein was pretty sure that nothing can beat the speed of light. But don’t despair; if you really wanted to, you could travel back TIME TRICK in time right now … seriously. You Actually, you’d only have could even celebrate your birthday been able to pull this off and then go back in time and until December 2OOO, celebrate it again! when Samoa decided to How? Just take a trip to skip December 3O and the Fiji islands in the Pacific celebrate New Year’s Ocean. Fiji lies just west of Eve a day early. Why? an imaginary north-to-south To stay in synch with their nearby trading line called the International partners, Australia and Date Line, where officials New Zealand. decided that every calendar day begins on Earth. If you celebrate your birthday on Fiji, then fly eastward s for two hours at about 11 pm, you’d land in nearby Samoa shortly after midnight on the same day, just in time to start celebrating for another 24 hours!

FACTS According to quantum physics, the shortest possible moment of time is 0,0000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 second.

meet the man who drives faster than sound (and doesn’t get a speeding fine) UK fighter pilot Andy Green plans to break the land speed record in a superfast car called the Bloodhound SSC in 2013 … and he’s going to do it right here on the Northern Cape’s Hakskeen Pan! He’s already beaten the speed of sound (1 080 km/h), and he plans to hit 1600 km/h – faster than a fighter jet! We caught up with him in SA …

Why did you choose Hakskeen Pan?

We spent over two years searching the globe for a surface that was consistently flat and hard, with no vegetation, lots of space, easy access, accommodation, on-site power, good communications and the ideal weather. Hakskeen Pan is honestly the best surface in the world.

How does it feel to drive faster than sound?

The speed doesn’t affect you … it’s the acceleration you feel. As I speed up, my body experiences a force of +2 g – twice the force of gravity – which pushes blood to my head because I sit feet-first. It takes 30 seconds plus to hit top speed – long enough for my body to open my veins and lower my blood pressure and pulse to pull blood to my feet. Then it’s time to cut the engine, changing the force on my body from +2 g to -3 g as I slow down 100 km/h in the first second alone. That’s like driving a car at 100 km/h and stopping it in one second. Suddenly, my blood’s getting pulled to my feet, and I have to tense my thighs, calves and stomach muscles to push the blood back upwards. If I don’t, I’ll black out. Visit www.hip2b2.com/andygreen for more of this interview.

The world record speed for a human skydiver is 988 km/h. That’s almost the speed of sound!

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Careers at the CSIR The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is a leading scientific and technology research organisation, implementing projects throughout Africa and making a difference in people’s lives. But to achieve these goals, highly skilled people are required - which is why we are always looking for bright, passionate people to embark on this journey with us. The organisation employs scientists, researchers and engineers, as well as staff to support the science base in disciplines such as human resources, communication and training. So, if you are passionate about science, about braving new frontiers; if you are committed to the relentless pursuit of innovation and excellence, the CSIR may be the employer for you. For more information on our bursary, studentship or internship programmes, go to: www.csir.co.za/recruitment/graduates.php


The tale of time

Way back in 3 500 BC, the ancient Egyp tians didn’t have watches or cellphone clocks. Inste ad, they used that big, burning clock called the sun to keep track of the day. They built huge stone pillars and used the shadows they cast to divide each day into parts. For the next few thousand years, sundials were all the rage. It became the norm to split the time between sunrise and sunset into 12 hour s. That’s because 12 is divisible by two, three and four, making it easy to split the day into fract ions. But how did they tell the time at night? Well, ancient engineers created water clocks, which dripped water out of a tank at a constant rate, as well as hourglasses, which leaked sand through a hole.

fast fact

The sulphur-crested cockatoo in Australia is a real smooth mover. It can can pick up a musical beat and move in time with it.

It's

about

time

were invented? cks clo re befo e m ti el on how did people stay know when to wake up? could you trav how does your body w? It’s time to find out… back in time right no d cortisol, which

Got a minute? Sun, sand and water may make a great beach, but they couldn’t solve the ancient world’s time-keeping troubles. Firstly, water and sand can’t keep perfect time. And secondly, a day isn’t always the same length, so an hour only really meant ‘one twelfth of a day’ until the first mechanical clocks arrived in the 1300s. The earliest clocks only measured hours because the tech wasn’t accurate enough for shorter periods. But as the gadgets became more precise, the hours could be divided into sections called minutes, from pars minuta prima – Latin for ‘first very small part’ – and then minutes were split into seconds, from pars minute secunda, or ‘second small part’. Like 12, the number 60 was used because it’s easy to split into fractions. So next time you check your watch, take a moment – or better yet, a second – to thank the many smart people who made it happen.

Body time Your body is way smart – it doesn’t even need a watch to keep time. Why? Because it has a built-in clock that keeps you running 24/7. Every morning, you wake up thanks to a small patch of cells in your brain called the SCN or suprachiasmatic nucleus. These cells keep track of light levels outside, and when they detect daylight, they tell a nearby gland to stop squirting out your sleep hormone, melatonin. Okay, so now you’re awake. But your body clock doesn’t stop there – it also helps you get out of bed by

6

making a stress hormone calle ure so boosts your heart rate and blood press get a rush also You roll. to y read and alert you’re e. nalin of the fight-or-flight hormone adre body your in icals chem As the day wears on, the and t spor ol, scho with cope change to help you brain’s at its everything else. By mid-morning, your afternoon – the peak, and your muscles are strongest in thing drops every ing, even just in time to score that goal. In the darkness then h, couc the on ge to an all-day low as you loun ZZZZZ … ZZZZ n. agai tonin mela ucing prod falls and you start

WHY SCHOOL SHOULD START LATER

A teenager’s body clock lags an hour or two behind an adult’s, which is why the headmaster of Monkseaton School in England decided to start school an hour later. The result? Exam results shot up by 20 to 30%!

In a heartbeat

pushing blood Your heart also keeps a regular beat, minute. But per s time through your body about 70 time, and this er prop keep t don’ ts some people’s hear ! them for up ’s time n mea could on Thankfully, US electrical engineer Wils tion solu t smar a with up Greatbach came Exam warp nt in 1956. He was trying to build equipme So you’re writing an exam and he when you hear the dreaded words: that could monitor heart sounds ‘Time’s up!’ Huh?!? But it feels used the wrong part and stumbled upon rical like you’ve just started … The a machine that sent out regular elect busier your brain gets with a he s year few next the Over signals. demanding task like a test, the ce perfected the pacemaker, a small devi less attention it can pay t ches an hum a e that can be placed insid to keeping time. . time in ping pum t to keep the hear

BY Linda Pretorius; images: arjanRichter(flickr), stiggeh(flickr), cema(sxc), satty4u(sxc), BrettJordan(flickr), ElvarFreyr(flickr), friskytuna(flickr), liza31337pt2(flickr), miguelsancheese(flickr),

TIME KEEPERS VS TIME BUSTERS

t’s Monday morning in a world without time. You wake up when the sun hits your face – which is lucky because your teacher said she’ll be cross if you’re late for school. Thankfully, the bus doesn’t take too long today and the robots turn green pretty fast, so you get to school feeling grea t – only to discover they rang the bell early and you’re late for class. Oh well, it’s hard to be on time when no one knows what ‘on time’ means … Life would be tough if we couldn’t mea sure time. Which is why human beings have spent thousands of years creating a system that works. But who came up with the hours, minu tes and seconds we use today? Well, let’s just say it took a lot of, er, time and effort …

of an athlete anatomSomye peo ple kee Scientists in Australia have shown that many elite athletes have a specific gene in their DNA called ACTN3. This gene creates the protein called actinin, which helps muscle fibres to contract, or tense, strongly.

p time. Others race But what makes a top runner go so against it. fast?

How fast are you?

Visit http://tinyurl. com/timerace to find out!

The greyhound also has a flexible spine and long legs, which help it take longer leaps. In a race, this dog hits an average speed of 63 km/h – next time you’re in a car going 60 km/h, imagine being able to run that fast!

According to a US study, many top sprinters have shorter heels and longer toes than us slowpokes. The short heels help them push off the ground and the toes keep in contact with the ground slightly longer to ensure a powerful lift-off. South African paralympic athlete Oscar Pistorius doesn’t have feet. Instead, he’s got blades made of carbon fibre, which is a very strong, very light material that helps Oscar run really fast. The blades are also really springy, allowing Oscar to compete against able-bodied athletes!

The greyhound has an extremely deep chest, which leaves lots of space for the lungs and heart to pump oxygen to the body.

C

M

Y

Race against time OK, so we have cars that can go faste r than sound … but you’d need to go faster than light if you wanted to travel backwards or forwards in time. The prob lem is, Einstein was pretty sure that nothing can beat the speed of light. But don’t despair; if you really wanted to, you could travel back TIME TRICK in time right now … seriously. You Actually, you’d only have could even celebrate your birthday been able to pull this off and then go back in time and until December 2OOO, celebrate it again! when Samoa decided to How? Just take a trip to skip December 3O and the Fiji islands in the Pacific celebrate New Year’s Ocean. Fiji lies just west of Eve a day early. Why? an imaginary north-to-south To stay in synch with their nearby trading line called the International partners, Australia and Date Line, where officials New Zealand. decided that every calendar day begins on Earth. If you celebrate your birthday on Fiji, then fly eastward s for two hours at about 11 pm, you’d land in nearby Samoa shortly after midnight on the same day, just in time to start celebrating for another 24 hours!

FACTS According to quantum physics, the shortest possible moment of time is 0,0000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 second.

meet the man who drives faster than sound (and doesn’t get a speeding fine) UK fighter pilot Andy Green plans to break the land speed record in a superfast car called the Bloodhound SSC in 2013 … and he’s going to do it right here on the Northern Cape’s Hakskeen Pan! He’s already beaten the speed of sound (1 080 km/h), and he plans to hit 1600 km/h – faster than a fighter jet! We caught up with him in SA …

Why did you choose Hakskeen Pan?

We spent over two years searching the globe for a surface that was consistently flat and hard, with no vegetation, lots of space, easy access, accommodation, on-site power, good communications and the ideal weather. Hakskeen Pan is honestly the best surface in the world.

How does it feel to drive faster than sound?

The speed doesn’t affect you … it’s the acceleration you feel. As I speed up, my body experiences a force of +2 g – twice the force of gravity – which pushes blood to my head because I sit feet-first. It takes 30 seconds plus to hit top speed – long enough for my body to open my veins and lower my blood pressure and pulse to pull blood to my feet. Then it’s time to cut the engine, changing the force on my body from +2 g to -3 g as I slow down 100 km/h in the first second alone. That’s like driving a car at 100 km/h and stopping it in one second. Suddenly, my blood’s getting pulled to my feet, and I have to tense my thighs, calves and stomach muscles to push the blood back upwards. If I don’t, I’ll black out. Visit www.hip2b2.com/andygreen for more of this interview.

The world record speed for a human skydiver is 988 km/h. That’s almost the speed of sound!

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Careers at the CSIR The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is a leading scientific and technology research organisation, implementing projects throughout Africa and making a difference in people’s lives. But to achieve these goals, highly skilled people are required - which is why we are always looking for bright, passionate people to embark on this journey with us. The organisation employs scientists, researchers and engineers, as well as staff to support the science base in disciplines such as human resources, communication and training. So, if you are passionate about science, about braving new frontiers; if you are committed to the relentless pursuit of innovation and excellence, the CSIR may be the employer for you. For more information on our bursary, studentship or internship programmes, go to: www.csir.co.za/recruitment/graduates.php


bright ideas

STARTING A SOCIAL NETWORK

1

Time taken:15 minutes

3

2

In March 2006, a company called Odeo held a brainstorming session to come up with new ways to make money on the Internet. One of the groups met in a park in San Francisco, and that’s where Jack Dorsey (@Jack) said it would be nice if they could just SMS their ideas to FOLLOW US a whole bunch of people. And that's how, in less time than it takes you to get ready for school, Twitter began. Want a daily dose of CREATING WHAT'S NEXT? Smelly Tweets. British company Mint fun facts and smart A SUPERHERO Digital have recently developed a device called Olly info? Just search ‘HIP2B2_SA’ (www.ollyfactory.com) that monitors your computer Time taken: about a minute for Twitter and Facebook updates, and releases smells on Twitter. In 1962, comic book creator Stan Lee was based on those – for example, you could make your trying to create a new superhero. He wanted girlfriend's status updates smell like roses. something that appealed to teens, but he didn’t know what superpower to use. As he sat in his office thinking, his mind wandered and he found himself staring blankly at the wall. And then – KERPOW! – the idea hit him like a spider-bite out of the blue. Why not create a superhero who could stick to ceilings and walls? Stan hurried off to tell his publisher, saying he got the idea from watching a fly on the wall while he was typing. And in that moment, SpiderMan was born – and he keeps getting better. When the movie was released in 2002, it earned $821,71 million (about R6,6 billion)! WHAT'S NEXT? Scientists at the University of UC Berkeley in California have been working on special gloves that will allow non-superheroes to climb up the sides of a building – just like Spidey!

Time taken: 8 minutes, 30 seconds

3 … 2 … 1 … Lift off! When a space shuttle rockets up, up and away, it's got a long way to go before it reaches Earth's orbit – about 350 km, or just over three times the length of the Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour. Must take a while, right? Nope! It covers this distance in just 8,5 minutes, leaving Earth in less time than it takes you to get to school! WHAT'S NEXT? Seaweed-powered space planes. No kidding. By 2050, the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company plans to launch a plane that'll be able to fly from London to Tokyo in two-and-a-half hours, compared to the current 11,5 hours. It'll also be eco-friendly, emitting only water.

Time taken: About 10 minutes

At 223 m tall and with 50 floors, the Carlton Centre in Jo'burg is the tallest building in Africa. Reckon you could run to the top in under half an hour? In 2003, Australian athlete Paul Crake did almost double that, running all the way up the 1 576 stairs of New York City’s Empire State Building (measuring 381 m, or the height of 76 giraffes) in less time than it takes you to eat a sarmie: nine minutes, 33 seconds. WHAT'S NEXT? Instead of running up stairs, how about building a super-fast elevator? The 117-floor, 442 m tall World One skyscraper currently under construction in Mumbai, India, will have elevators that travel at speeds of eight metres per second! That means it’ll take just 55,25 seconds to reach the top floor!

8

5

fast fact

Every human on Earth spent about half an hour as a single cell.

Need to withdraw cash? Easy – just find an ATM, right? But who do we have to thank for these smart money-machines? The credit goes to Scottish inventor John Shepherd-Barron, who needed to withdraw money one morning in 1965. But when he got to the bank, it was closed. A while later, he was lying in the bath when a thought hit him: wouldn’t it be great if we could get cash from a vending machine, like we get sweets and chocolates? And just like that, the ATM was born. WHAT'S NEXT? Imagine a world without notes or coins. It might not be too far off … there are already apps that allow people to pay for stuff with just their cellphones! But what could all those ATMs become?

In 2008, live on American TV, 13-year-old Andrew Dahl set a Guinness world record by inflating 308 balloons in one hour … with his nose! Visit www.hip2b2.com/balloonboy to see him in action. WHAT'S NEXT? When you pop a balloon, it's all over pretty fast. But what actually happens when a balloon pops? Scientists can now use advanced cameras to slow super-fast events down up to 1 000 times to understand exactly how things work. Visit www.hip2b2.com/balloonpop for a mindblowing slow-motion video of someone piercing a water balloon.

Time taken: a 20-minute nap

BY Will Sinclair; images: heza(flickr), lanpernas2.0(flickr), nelsonebelt(flickr), lucynietodark(flickr), officialUSnavyimagery(flickr), katelynfay(flickr), neiltron(flickr), spaceamoeba(flickr), sqback(sxc); Balloon prize (Sensor watch) supplied by Posh Promotions (info@poshpromotions.co.za)

4

Time taken: About 20 minutes

Wanna turn a bright idea into a booming business? Visit www. hip2b2.com/research for everything you need to know.

Time taken: 1 hour

ROCKING THE FASHION INDUSTRY

und o s t ' n s e s. It do d do n d o l c u e o s c 0 u 0 o uch y es. 3 6 m t u w n o i h M d 0 e 6 is One hour. but you'd be surpr ts count … , en like much make those mom lly if you rea got an idea? CHANGING THE WORLD OF BANKING FOREVER

SETTING A TOTALLY CRAZY WORLD RECORD!

7

R U O H E ON nders wo

RUNNING UP THE TALLEST BUILDING IN TOWN

6

LEAVING PLANET EARTH

8

FROM NATURE

Time taken: About 5 minutes

One fine afternoon in 1948, Swiss engineer George de Mestral took his dog on a hunting trip in the mountains. He returned to find his dog and his pants covered with spiky little seeds. While he was picking them off, he thought, 'Hey, these stick to clothes better than anything!' And that's where he got the idea for Velcro. When George put the seeds under a microscope, he discovered that they had hundreds of tiny hooks that grabbed onto fur and fabric. In nature, this helps the seeds spread to new areas. In our world, Velcro has spread even further – it's on takkies, under car mats and even in space! WHAT'S NEXT? Velcro is ideal for military gear, but its krrrzzzzkk! sound could give a soldier’s position away. That's why no-noise Velcro was created, reducing that ripping sound by 95%. It’s bound to hit the non-military world soon, so watch this space!

Competition closes on 31 March 2012.

EARNING A WHOPPING R25 MILLION! Time taken: 1 hour

On 8 November, 2011, part one of The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn was released. By the next day, the film had raked in a vampirific $72 million (over R600 million) in Canada and America alone. That's R25 million an hour! WHAT'S NEXT? Imagine being able to feel the air rushing by when Jacob runs to Bella's rescue, or to smell the forest around Edward Cullen's house … 4D movies might one day be possible, turning films into experiences, so get your senses ready!

The sewing machine was dreamed up – literally – by US inventor Elias Howe in 1945. He had a nightmare that he was being attacked by arrow-shooting enemies, when he noticed that the arrows were flying through his tent and pulling canvas threads along with them. He woke up and created the sewing machine, which feeds cotton through fabric using an arrow-like needle. WHAT'S NEXT? Clothes made out of milk. Yes, you heard right: German fashion designer Anke Domaske recently unveiled a line of clothing made out of a silky fabric called QMilch. This fabric is made from a milk protein called win or lose casein, and it's not just You could, of course, also lose smooth and eco-friendly – mllions. On 8 August 2011, in the it's also good for your skin, middle of the global economic especially if you suffer crisis, investors around the world lost a collective $1 trillion (that's from skin allergies! a dollar sign, a one, and twelve zeros) in a single day of stock GETTING A HOT TIP market trading.

9

WIN!

So, can you blow up a balloon with your nose? Film yourself trying (don't hurt yourself, though) and email the video to thinkoutloud@ hip2b2.com, along with your name, grade, school and phone number, and you could win a Sensor digital watch with a calorie counter and heart rate monitor!

10

BHP BILLITON CAREER CENTRE @SCI-BONO @ SCI-BONO A full service career centre servicing learners and out of school youth in Gauteng: • Finding my way, Grade 7: ease the transition from primary to high school. • Subject choice, Grade 9: make informed decisions for Grade 10. • Academic Skills, Grade 10: improve study skills with time management & exam preparation techniques. • Launch your career, Grade 11 – 12: prepare for life after school with information about career and study options. • Career Speed dating, Grade 8 – 11: a fun fast way to find out about a variety of careers directly from young professionals.

SENDING AN SMS IN WORLDRECORD TIME

Time taken: About half a minute The world's fastest text message was typed by a UK woman named Mellissa Thompson in August 2010. She took 25,94 seconds to type: ‘The razor-toothed piranhas of the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are the most ferocious freshwater fish in the world. In reality they seldom attack a human.’ How fast can you type that on your phone? WHAT'S NEXT? The mobile instant messaging industry – BBM, WhatsApp and so on – made $6,8-billion (R57 billion) in 2010. That means it’s starting to catch up with SMS, which made $114,6 billion (R959 billion).

FACTS In 1992, SA entrepreneur Henri Johnson invented a machine that could calculate the angles and speed of a ball as it flies through the air. Today, the technology is used in tennis, cricket and even golf tournaments all over the world.

• Surfing the workplace, prepare to enter the workplace with CV writing, job application and interview skills. • Psychometric Assessments: contact the Career centre to make individual and group bookings for assessment with trained professionals Visist the BHP Billiton Career Centre @Sci-Bono Discovery in Newtown, Johannesburg. To make a booking contact Kaylene Thomas at 011 639 8476 or kaylenet@sci-bono.co.za.


bright ideas

STARTING A SOCIAL NETWORK

1

Time taken:15 minutes

3

2

In March 2006, a company called Odeo held a brainstorming session to come up with new ways to make money on the Internet. One of the groups met in a park in San Francisco, and that’s where Jack Dorsey (@Jack) said it would be nice if they could just SMS their ideas to FOLLOW US a whole bunch of people. And that's how, in less time than it takes you to get ready for school, Twitter began. Want a daily dose of CREATING WHAT'S NEXT? Smelly Tweets. British company Mint fun facts and smart A SUPERHERO Digital have recently developed a device called Olly info? Just search ‘HIP2B2_SA’ (www.ollyfactory.com) that monitors your computer Time taken: about a minute for Twitter and Facebook updates, and releases smells on Twitter. In 1962, comic book creator Stan Lee was based on those – for example, you could make your trying to create a new superhero. He wanted girlfriend's status updates smell like roses. something that appealed to teens, but he didn’t know what superpower to use. As he sat in his office thinking, his mind wandered and he found himself staring blankly at the wall. And then – KERPOW! – the idea hit him like a spider-bite out of the blue. Why not create a superhero who could stick to ceilings and walls? Stan hurried off to tell his publisher, saying he got the idea from watching a fly on the wall while he was typing. And in that moment, SpiderMan was born – and he keeps getting better. When the movie was released in 2002, it earned $821,71 million (about R6,6 billion)! WHAT'S NEXT? Scientists at the University of UC Berkeley in California have been working on special gloves that will allow non-superheroes to climb up the sides of a building – just like Spidey!

Time taken: 8 minutes, 30 seconds

3 … 2 … 1 … Lift off! When a space shuttle rockets up, up and away, it's got a long way to go before it reaches Earth's orbit – about 350 km, or just over three times the length of the Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour. Must take a while, right? Nope! It covers this distance in just 8,5 minutes, leaving Earth in less time than it takes you to get to school! WHAT'S NEXT? Seaweed-powered space planes. No kidding. By 2050, the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company plans to launch a plane that'll be able to fly from London to Tokyo in two-and-a-half hours, compared to the current 11,5 hours. It'll also be eco-friendly, emitting only water.

Time taken: About 10 minutes

At 223 m tall and with 50 floors, the Carlton Centre in Jo'burg is the tallest building in Africa. Reckon you could run to the top in under half an hour? In 2003, Australian athlete Paul Crake did almost double that, running all the way up the 1 576 stairs of New York City’s Empire State Building (measuring 381 m, or the height of 76 giraffes) in less time than it takes you to eat a sarmie: nine minutes, 33 seconds. WHAT'S NEXT? Instead of running up stairs, how about building a super-fast elevator? The 117-floor, 442 m tall World One skyscraper currently under construction in Mumbai, India, will have elevators that travel at speeds of eight metres per second! That means it’ll take just 55,25 seconds to reach the top floor!

8

5

fast fact

Every human on Earth spent about half an hour as a single cell.

Need to withdraw cash? Easy – just find an ATM, right? But who do we have to thank for these smart money-machines? The credit goes to Scottish inventor John Shepherd-Barron, who needed to withdraw money one morning in 1965. But when he got to the bank, it was closed. A while later, he was lying in the bath when a thought hit him: wouldn’t it be great if we could get cash from a vending machine, like we get sweets and chocolates? And just like that, the ATM was born. WHAT'S NEXT? Imagine a world without notes or coins. It might not be too far off … there are already apps that allow people to pay for stuff with just their cellphones! But what could all those ATMs become?

In 2008, live on American TV, 13-year-old Andrew Dahl set a Guinness world record by inflating 308 balloons in one hour … with his nose! Visit www.hip2b2.com/balloonboy to see him in action. WHAT'S NEXT? When you pop a balloon, it's all over pretty fast. But what actually happens when a balloon pops? Scientists can now use advanced cameras to slow super-fast events down up to 1 000 times to understand exactly how things work. Visit www.hip2b2.com/balloonpop for a mindblowing slow-motion video of someone piercing a water balloon.

Time taken: a 20-minute nap

BY Will Sinclair; images: heza(flickr), lanpernas2.0(flickr), nelsonebelt(flickr), lucynietodark(flickr), officialUSnavyimagery(flickr), katelynfay(flickr), neiltron(flickr), spaceamoeba(flickr), sqback(sxc); Balloon prize (Sensor watch) supplied by Posh Promotions (info@poshpromotions.co.za)

4

Time taken: About 20 minutes

Wanna turn a bright idea into a booming business? Visit www. hip2b2.com/research for everything you need to know.

Time taken: 1 hour

ROCKING THE FASHION INDUSTRY

und o s t ' n s e s. It do d do n d o l c u e o s c 0 u 0 o uch y es. 3 6 m t u w n o i h M d 0 e 6 is One hour. but you'd be surpr ts count … , en like much make those mom lly if you rea got an idea? CHANGING THE WORLD OF BANKING FOREVER

SETTING A TOTALLY CRAZY WORLD RECORD!

7

R U O H E ON nders wo

RUNNING UP THE TALLEST BUILDING IN TOWN

6

LEAVING PLANET EARTH

8

FROM NATURE

Time taken: About 5 minutes

One fine afternoon in 1948, Swiss engineer George de Mestral took his dog on a hunting trip in the mountains. He returned to find his dog and his pants covered with spiky little seeds. While he was picking them off, he thought, 'Hey, these stick to clothes better than anything!' And that's where he got the idea for Velcro. When George put the seeds under a microscope, he discovered that they had hundreds of tiny hooks that grabbed onto fur and fabric. In nature, this helps the seeds spread to new areas. In our world, Velcro has spread even further – it's on takkies, under car mats and even in space! WHAT'S NEXT? Velcro is ideal for military gear, but its krrrzzzzkk! sound could give a soldier’s position away. That's why no-noise Velcro was created, reducing that ripping sound by 95%. It’s bound to hit the non-military world soon, so watch this space!

Competition closes on 31 March 2012.

EARNING A WHOPPING R25 MILLION! Time taken: 1 hour

On 8 November, 2011, part one of The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn was released. By the next day, the film had raked in a vampirific $72 million (over R600 million) in Canada and America alone. That's R25 million an hour! WHAT'S NEXT? Imagine being able to feel the air rushing by when Jacob runs to Bella's rescue, or to smell the forest around Edward Cullen's house … 4D movies might one day be possible, turning films into experiences, so get your senses ready!

The sewing machine was dreamed up – literally – by US inventor Elias Howe in 1945. He had a nightmare that he was being attacked by arrow-shooting enemies, when he noticed that the arrows were flying through his tent and pulling canvas threads along with them. He woke up and created the sewing machine, which feeds cotton through fabric using an arrow-like needle. WHAT'S NEXT? Clothes made out of milk. Yes, you heard right: German fashion designer Anke Domaske recently unveiled a line of clothing made out of a silky fabric called QMilch. This fabric is made from a milk protein called win or lose casein, and it's not just You could, of course, also lose smooth and eco-friendly – mllions. On 8 August 2011, in the it's also good for your skin, middle of the global economic especially if you suffer crisis, investors around the world lost a collective $1 trillion (that's from skin allergies! a dollar sign, a one, and twelve zeros) in a single day of stock GETTING A HOT TIP market trading.

9

WIN!

So, can you blow up a balloon with your nose? Film yourself trying (don't hurt yourself, though) and email the video to thinkoutloud@ hip2b2.com, along with your name, grade, school and phone number, and you could win a Sensor digital watch with a calorie counter and heart rate monitor!

10

BHP BILLITON CAREER CENTRE @SCI-BONO @ SCI-BONO A full service career centre servicing learners and out of school youth in Gauteng: • Finding my way, Grade 7: ease the transition from primary to high school. • Subject choice, Grade 9: make informed decisions for Grade 10. • Academic Skills, Grade 10: improve study skills with time management & exam preparation techniques. • Launch your career, Grade 11 – 12: prepare for life after school with information about career and study options. • Career Speed dating, Grade 8 – 11: a fun fast way to find out about a variety of careers directly from young professionals.

SENDING AN SMS IN WORLDRECORD TIME

Time taken: About half a minute The world's fastest text message was typed by a UK woman named Mellissa Thompson in August 2010. She took 25,94 seconds to type: ‘The razor-toothed piranhas of the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are the most ferocious freshwater fish in the world. In reality they seldom attack a human.’ How fast can you type that on your phone? WHAT'S NEXT? The mobile instant messaging industry – BBM, WhatsApp and so on – made $6,8-billion (R57 billion) in 2010. That means it’s starting to catch up with SMS, which made $114,6 billion (R959 billion).

FACTS In 1992, SA entrepreneur Henri Johnson invented a machine that could calculate the angles and speed of a ball as it flies through the air. Today, the technology is used in tennis, cricket and even golf tournaments all over the world.

• Surfing the workplace, prepare to enter the workplace with CV writing, job application and interview skills. • Psychometric Assessments: contact the Career centre to make individual and group bookings for assessment with trained professionals Visist the BHP Billiton Career Centre @Sci-Bono Discovery in Newtown, Johannesburg. To make a booking contact Kaylene Thomas at 011 639 8476 or kaylenet@sci-bono.co.za.


is in out of time? And how does th pla just or time of d ahea , Are you on time find out! affect your future career? do this quiz and time yourself to lies to you. W hat you ’ll nee d: What to do : Circle the answer that best app ugh the quiz.

a cellphone timer, no int erruptions and time!

Press STOP and check your time. How long did this quiz take you ?

s you to work thro You will need to time how long it take

, are you: stion 3) When you go to a party on 2 and go straight to que

(skip questi a. Always first to arrive 2) onds, then hit question sec b. Often late (wait five to question 2) c. On time, every time (go

an assignment, When you have to do ? what usually happens

which of these animals woul you most li d ke to be? a. A dolphin (skip questi on 4 and go straight to question 5) b. A lion (go to question 4) c. A crocodil e (wait five seconds, th hit question en 4)

minute and then rush to a. I leave it for the last on 10) get it done (go to questi lots of e hav and due b. I do it long before it’s s off ond sec five ke (ta s time to make change stion 10) your time and go to que n hand it in late (wait c. I often forget and the stion 10) five seconds and go to que

-travel, If you were able to time where would you go? worlds

need?

a. Less than seven hours (skip ques tion 9 and go straight to question 10) b. Seven to nine hours (go to question 9) c. More than nine hours (wait five seco nds, then go to question 9)

zzzzzzzz

Teens between the age of 10 and 16 need nine to 10 hours of sleep at night. No one’s sure why, but scientists think it may be because the brain changes a lot during puberty, and sleep gives your grey matter time to regroup.

er ancient a. Back in time to discov hit question 5) (wait five seconds, then on 5 and go sti b. To the future (skip que 6) straight to question in the moment c. Nowhere – I want to live 5) (go to question

When you have spare time, what do you usually do? a. Chill on the couch wa tch

ing TV or chatting to my friends (wa it five seconds, then go to que stion 8) b. Catch up on homework and housework (skip question 8 and hit question 9) c. Read a book or search the Internet for cool facts (go to que stion 8)

When do you ten d to concentrate best and get the most wor k done? a. Ear

When are you most tired?

nds then go to question 7) a. In the afternoons (wait five seco up to go to school (go to question 7) b. In the mornings – I hate waking p question 7 and hit question 8) c. At night – I go to sleep early (ski

10

or exam, do you:

have to be forced a. Never finish in time and it five seconds, then to put down your pen (wa go to question 3) 3 ryone else (skip question b. Finish long before eve on 4) and go straight to questi question 3) to (go e tim c. Finish just in

a. Less than two minutes (go to C on page 11) b. Exactly two minutes (go to D on page 11) c. Two to three minutes (go to A on page 11) d. Three to four minutes (go to B on page 11) e. Longer than four minutes (go to E on page 11)

How many hours of sleep do you

When you write a test

ly in the morning (skip question 6 and hi t question 7) b. In the afternoo n after school (go to question 6) c. Late at night (w ait five seconds, then go to questio n 6)

FACTS Until people discovered the erasing power of rubber, writers used bread crumbs to remove mistakes.

fast fact

Your core body temperature is lowest at 4:30am and peaks at 7pm. If you want to win a soccer match, it’s best to play in the afternoon when your body temperature and adrenalin levels are high. Visit www.hip2b2.com/bodyclock for more info.

C. Tim e Rac er

B. Time DELAYER You’re patient, thorough and happy to spend a whole day on a task you enjoy … but you tend to put off important tasks that don’t really interest you. (You know that urge you get to clean your room when you should be studying?) YOUR CAREER MATCH: Ever considered becoming a paleontologist? A paleo-what?! A paleontologist studies the fossils of plants and animals that lived looooooooong ago, like the mighty dinosaurs. You won’t have to worry too much about deadlines, but you’ll need to be extremely accurate when you sort through all your data. That patience will come in handy when you’re extracting a fragile fossil – imagine holding a 200-million-year-old fossil in your hands! TO GET THERE: You’ll need to complete a BA or BSc in Archaeology at university, then specialise in Paleontology. At school, you’ll need top marks in Maths and Science, and Geography will also help. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Psychology, Archaeology

Have you considered the number of career options within the

Finance and Accounting sector?

D. Time Keeper You’re the perfect person to have around in an

You’re a quick-thinking fast learner who emergency. You’re great at multi-tasking, you thrive loves coming up with new solutions. You under pressure and you make decisions faster than love figuring out how things work. someone can say, ‘Eish! What just happened!?!’ YOUR CAREER MATCH: With your YOUR CAREER MATCH: With your super-fast reaction times, you could be the ideal air-traffic ability to analyse things and make controller. When dozens of planes are flying in quick decisions, you could become and out of an airport, there’s an air-traffic a great economist. Economists controller somewhere nearby making sure watch what’s going on in they don’t crash into each other. With want more? the world – unemployment For more about these careers, thousands of lives at stake, this is one rates, natural disasters and of the most stressful jobs in the hit www.sacareerfocus.co.za. so on – and predict how world, but if you can stay calm under You can also visit www. they’ll affect the economy. pressure, you might just love it. hip2b2.com or catch our They then use this info to careers show on HIP2B2 Radio TO GET THERE: You’ll need strong Maths advise businesses. and Physical Science skills to work out (www.hip2b2radio.com). the co-ordinates and flight plans. After TO GET THERE: You’ll need school, you’ll study for four to six years top marks in Maths, so you can through the Air Traffic and Navigation Services study a BCom in Economics, a BTech in (ATNS) in Johannesburg’s Aviation Training Academy. Economic Management or Bachelor of Social YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Being a Pilot Sciences in Economics at university. or a Paramedic. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Stockbroking, Actuarial Science, Engineering

e. time staller You can’t help being forgetful and you’re often running late. Some people think you’re lazy, but you just need something to grab your attention. You like being your own boss, and you don’t mind working long hours on something that excites you. YOUR CAREER MATCH: Believe it or not, you might have the makings of an entrepreneur. Like Mark Shuttleworth and Apple’s Steve Jobs, entrepreneurs create and manage their own businesses – and with hard work, they can make it big! TO GET THERE: You don’t need to study anything specific, but a college or university course in Small Business Management or Entrepreneurship will help. At school, Maths and Science will give you vital problem-solving and analytical skills. Visit www.hip2b2.com/research for some great tips on turning an idea into a smart business. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Sales and Marketing, Accounting

Time Management Tips

1. Set a schedule – Stick a planner on your wall to keep track of important projects and exams. 2. Be realistic – Give yourself MORE time than you think you’ll need. If your homework should take two hours, schedule three. 3. Be flexible – Don’t make your programme so full that you don’t have time for unexpected stuff. 4. Break big projects into smaller chunks – Do one small thing each day instead of one big thing at the last minute. 5. Do the hardest homework first – When your concentration is at its peak, you’ll work things out a whole lot faster.

In 1894, the first big Coke sign appeared on a building in the US town of Cartersville, Georgia. It’s still there today.

From the exciting, edge-of-your-seat world of stockbroking to the highly valued practice of financial planning, the Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and other Financial Services (Fasset) Sector has a career for every aspiring number cruncher. Just some of the many careers in the finance and accounting sector include accountancy, bookkeeping, debt collecting, tax practitioning and accounting technicians. There are so many opportunities available in the fields of finance and accounting that the possibilities are truly endless.

BLACKMOON 08637

You’re organised, focused, and excellent at planning ahead. You’re always on the go and you can fit a lot into every day. YOUR CAREER MATCH: With all that organisational awesomeness, you could make a top geneticist. Geneticists decode DNA, unlocking the secrets inside the cells of living things. For example, if someone says a celeb is the father of their child, it’s a geneticist’s job to compare the star’s DNA with the baby’s to find out the truth. Because geneticists work with tiny molecules, they need to be super-precise and focused – if you’re one millilitre or a . millisecond off, the experiment won’t work TO GET THERE: You’ll need to do a BSc in Genetics at university. To get in, you’ll need high marks in Maths and Science, and Life Sciences are highly recommended. ry YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Microbiology, Surge

BY Michelle Ainslie; images: edyourdon(flickr), jorgweingrill(flickr), abdallahh(flickr), aceben(flickr), rococohobo(flickr)

THINK. WHAT YOU CAN BE

A. time manager

086 101 0001 fassetcallcentre@fasset.org.za www.fasset.org.za Fasset is the Sector Education and Training Authority for Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and Other Financial Services.

F A S S E T


is in out of time? And how does th pla just or time of d ahea , Are you on time find out! affect your future career? do this quiz and time yourself to lies to you. W hat you ’ll nee d: What to do : Circle the answer that best app ugh the quiz.

a cellphone timer, no int erruptions and time!

Press STOP and check your time. How long did this quiz take you ?

s you to work thro You will need to time how long it take

, are you: stion 3) When you go to a party on 2 and go straight to que

(skip questi a. Always first to arrive 2) onds, then hit question sec b. Often late (wait five to question 2) c. On time, every time (go

an assignment, When you have to do ? what usually happens

which of these animals woul you most li d ke to be? a. A dolphin (skip questi on 4 and go straight to question 5) b. A lion (go to question 4) c. A crocodil e (wait five seconds, th hit question en 4)

minute and then rush to a. I leave it for the last on 10) get it done (go to questi lots of e hav and due b. I do it long before it’s s off ond sec five ke (ta s time to make change stion 10) your time and go to que n hand it in late (wait c. I often forget and the stion 10) five seconds and go to que

-travel, If you were able to time where would you go? worlds

need?

a. Less than seven hours (skip ques tion 9 and go straight to question 10) b. Seven to nine hours (go to question 9) c. More than nine hours (wait five seco nds, then go to question 9)

zzzzzzzz

Teens between the age of 10 and 16 need nine to 10 hours of sleep at night. No one’s sure why, but scientists think it may be because the brain changes a lot during puberty, and sleep gives your grey matter time to regroup.

er ancient a. Back in time to discov hit question 5) (wait five seconds, then on 5 and go sti b. To the future (skip que 6) straight to question in the moment c. Nowhere – I want to live 5) (go to question

When you have spare time, what do you usually do? a. Chill on the couch wa tch

ing TV or chatting to my friends (wa it five seconds, then go to que stion 8) b. Catch up on homework and housework (skip question 8 and hit question 9) c. Read a book or search the Internet for cool facts (go to que stion 8)

When do you ten d to concentrate best and get the most wor k done? a. Ear

When are you most tired?

nds then go to question 7) a. In the afternoons (wait five seco up to go to school (go to question 7) b. In the mornings – I hate waking p question 7 and hit question 8) c. At night – I go to sleep early (ski

10

or exam, do you:

have to be forced a. Never finish in time and it five seconds, then to put down your pen (wa go to question 3) 3 ryone else (skip question b. Finish long before eve on 4) and go straight to questi question 3) to (go e tim c. Finish just in

a. Less than two minutes (go to C on page 11) b. Exactly two minutes (go to D on page 11) c. Two to three minutes (go to A on page 11) d. Three to four minutes (go to B on page 11) e. Longer than four minutes (go to E on page 11)

How many hours of sleep do you

When you write a test

ly in the morning (skip question 6 and hi t question 7) b. In the afternoo n after school (go to question 6) c. Late at night (w ait five seconds, then go to questio n 6)

FACTS Until people discovered the erasing power of rubber, writers used bread crumbs to remove mistakes.

fast fact

Your core body temperature is lowest at 4:30am and peaks at 7pm. If you want to win a soccer match, it’s best to play in the afternoon when your body temperature and adrenalin levels are high. Visit www.hip2b2.com/bodyclock for more info.

C. Tim e Rac er

B. Time DELAYER You’re patient, thorough and happy to spend a whole day on a task you enjoy … but you tend to put off important tasks that don’t really interest you. (You know that urge you get to clean your room when you should be studying?) YOUR CAREER MATCH: Ever considered becoming a paleontologist? A paleo-what?! A paleontologist studies the fossils of plants and animals that lived looooooooong ago, like the mighty dinosaurs. You won’t have to worry too much about deadlines, but you’ll need to be extremely accurate when you sort through all your data. That patience will come in handy when you’re extracting a fragile fossil – imagine holding a 200-million-year-old fossil in your hands! TO GET THERE: You’ll need to complete a BA or BSc in Archaeology at university, then specialise in Paleontology. At school, you’ll need top marks in Maths and Science, and Geography will also help. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Psychology, Archaeology

Have you considered the number of career options within the

Finance and Accounting sector?

D. Time Keeper You’re the perfect person to have around in an

You’re a quick-thinking fast learner who emergency. You’re great at multi-tasking, you thrive loves coming up with new solutions. You under pressure and you make decisions faster than love figuring out how things work. someone can say, ‘Eish! What just happened!?!’ YOUR CAREER MATCH: With your YOUR CAREER MATCH: With your super-fast reaction times, you could be the ideal air-traffic ability to analyse things and make controller. When dozens of planes are flying in quick decisions, you could become and out of an airport, there’s an air-traffic a great economist. Economists controller somewhere nearby making sure watch what’s going on in they don’t crash into each other. With want more? the world – unemployment For more about these careers, thousands of lives at stake, this is one rates, natural disasters and of the most stressful jobs in the hit www.sacareerfocus.co.za. so on – and predict how world, but if you can stay calm under You can also visit www. they’ll affect the economy. pressure, you might just love it. hip2b2.com or catch our They then use this info to careers show on HIP2B2 Radio TO GET THERE: You’ll need strong Maths advise businesses. and Physical Science skills to work out (www.hip2b2radio.com). the co-ordinates and flight plans. After TO GET THERE: You’ll need school, you’ll study for four to six years top marks in Maths, so you can through the Air Traffic and Navigation Services study a BCom in Economics, a BTech in (ATNS) in Johannesburg’s Aviation Training Academy. Economic Management or Bachelor of Social YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Being a Pilot Sciences in Economics at university. or a Paramedic. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Stockbroking, Actuarial Science, Engineering

e. time staller You can’t help being forgetful and you’re often running late. Some people think you’re lazy, but you just need something to grab your attention. You like being your own boss, and you don’t mind working long hours on something that excites you. YOUR CAREER MATCH: Believe it or not, you might have the makings of an entrepreneur. Like Mark Shuttleworth and Apple’s Steve Jobs, entrepreneurs create and manage their own businesses – and with hard work, they can make it big! TO GET THERE: You don’t need to study anything specific, but a college or university course in Small Business Management or Entrepreneurship will help. At school, Maths and Science will give you vital problem-solving and analytical skills. Visit www.hip2b2.com/research for some great tips on turning an idea into a smart business. YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Sales and Marketing, Accounting

Time Management Tips

1. Set a schedule – Stick a planner on your wall to keep track of important projects and exams. 2. Be realistic – Give yourself MORE time than you think you’ll need. If your homework should take two hours, schedule three. 3. Be flexible – Don’t make your programme so full that you don’t have time for unexpected stuff. 4. Break big projects into smaller chunks – Do one small thing each day instead of one big thing at the last minute. 5. Do the hardest homework first – When your concentration is at its peak, you’ll work things out a whole lot faster.

In 1894, the first big Coke sign appeared on a building in the US town of Cartersville, Georgia. It’s still there today.

From the exciting, edge-of-your-seat world of stockbroking to the highly valued practice of financial planning, the Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and other Financial Services (Fasset) Sector has a career for every aspiring number cruncher. Just some of the many careers in the finance and accounting sector include accountancy, bookkeeping, debt collecting, tax practitioning and accounting technicians. There are so many opportunities available in the fields of finance and accounting that the possibilities are truly endless.

BLACKMOON 08637

You’re organised, focused, and excellent at planning ahead. You’re always on the go and you can fit a lot into every day. YOUR CAREER MATCH: With all that organisational awesomeness, you could make a top geneticist. Geneticists decode DNA, unlocking the secrets inside the cells of living things. For example, if someone says a celeb is the father of their child, it’s a geneticist’s job to compare the star’s DNA with the baby’s to find out the truth. Because geneticists work with tiny molecules, they need to be super-precise and focused – if you’re one millilitre or a . millisecond off, the experiment won’t work TO GET THERE: You’ll need to do a BSc in Genetics at university. To get in, you’ll need high marks in Maths and Science, and Life Sciences are highly recommended. ry YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY: Microbiology, Surge

BY Michelle Ainslie; images: edyourdon(flickr), jorgweingrill(flickr), abdallahh(flickr), aceben(flickr), rococohobo(flickr)

THINK. WHAT YOU CAN BE

A. time manager

086 101 0001 fassetcallcentre@fasset.org.za www.fasset.org.za Fasset is the Sector Education and Training Authority for Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and Other Financial Services.

F A S S E T


...a black mamba bite

How long can you survive...?

...without the sun

There are snakes and then there are SNAKES!!! ... and this SNAKE!!! is the longest, fastest and deadliest of its kind in Africa. It’s called a black mamba but it’s actually grey or brown. If you get to see the black part of a mamba – inside its mouth – you’re in big trouble. Its bite injects 100 to 120 mg of venom, which is a bit of a waste when 10 to 15 mg is enough to kill an adult. The poison can shut down the heart and lungs in 20 minutes. The only treatment: black mamba anti-venom. Like, yesterday. Anti-venom is fast-acting stuff, but takes a while to make. First, someone well-trained (and a little crazy) has to ‘milk’ the snake, which means getting it to bite into a cloth stretched over a glass container so the poison drips from its fangs. *shudder* Then they must dry the venom and inject tiny amounts over time into a big animal, like a horse. The horse isn’t harmed, but its body produces molecules called antibodies, which recognise the poison and make sure it gets destroyed. After about a year, the liquid part of the horse’s blood, called plasma, can be taken out and injected into a human victim, where the antibodies will fight the poison.

...without your cellphone

Okay, so your body would survive perfectly t well without your cellphone – in fact, it migh ? mind your t abou what But r. longe ve even survi A recent study at the University of Maryland, ly USA, found that people under 25 are functional d aske s rcher resea The . addicted to digital technology give up all about 1 000 students from 10 countries to music – even and TV et, Intern the , ones cellph – media felt. they for 24 hours, and to write down how struggled The results were surprising. All the students and lonely , angry , ssed depre us, anxio to cope, feeling of them most , more s ’ What a. medi to ted addic even gadgets for didn’t even manage to stay away from their the full 24 hours!

How long would we survive if the sun went out like a giant lightbulb? The logical answer is this: plants need sunlight to make food for themselves. Without it they’d die, leaving us with no oxygen or plants to feed ourselves and the animals we eat. It would also get pretty cold. According to David Stevenson of the California Institute of Technology, If you’re lost at sea, your survival time depends on a bunch of factors: the average global surface temperature would 1.How cold is the water? If you’re in water that’s above 21˚C, you’ll survive at least drop below –18˚C within a week. In a year, three hours. If it’s as cold as Clifton Beach in Cape Town (around 10˚C), you’ll it would be –74˚C. Humans could survive in have about two hours to find help before you black out. If it’s heated areas, but we’d soon run out of supplies down to 3˚C, you’ve only got about 45 minutes. and fuel. All in all, we’d probably last a few 2.Do you have a life jacket? If so, you can survive a lot longer weeks at best. if you get into the H.E.L.P. (Heat Escape Lessening Posture) position. Luckily, the sun isn’t going anywhere Hold your arms tightly across your chest and pull your legs together for about five billion years, so we may as If the sun disappeared, we’d and up toward your body. This will help you store heat and save well make the most of it. In South Africa, also lose out on a whole bunch energy for about twice as long as you otherwise would. the Department of Energy has plans to of incredible solar-powered 3.Are you surrounded by sharks? If you’re bobbing around in a build the largest solar park in the world, gadgets. Hit www.hip2b2.com/ predator’s path, you just might look like lunch. But if you have a Shark which would generate 10% of our annual solarstuff to check out a few Shield, you should be okay. Developed by SA’s KwaZulu-Natal Sharks of our favourites ... electricity! It’s set to be built in the Board, this device sends out an electric impulse that causes muscle Northern Cape, because there’s very little spasms in a shark’s nose. It doesn’t hurt, but they won’t stick around. rain or cloud and loads of sunlight. Visit www.hip2b2.com/sharkshield to see the Shark Shield in action.

...being lost in open water

solar solutions

12

survive &

By Jacqui Lund; Images: sophieg(flickr), wikimedia, llamnudds(flickr)stylushappenstance(flickr)binababy12(sxc); Clap-On Clock supplied by www.thegadgetshop.co.za

Well, US illusionist Who needs to survive in a box, you may ask? . He challenged himself David Blaine had to do exactly that in 2003 on’s River Thames to live in a perspex box dangling above Lond had to be rushed to but without food ... for 44 days! He survived, his body weight. of 25% t abou hospital afterwards, having lost his crazy stunts – he’s for us famo is e Blain Why did he do it? Well, in ice for more than 63 been buried alive for seven days and encased it just goes to show But on. hours – so he doesn’t really need a reas to it ... mind your put y what you can achieve if you reall yourself off in a seal to on reas good y reall Sometimes, there’s a ted wan to prove how box. A Scottish geologist named Iain Stewart d himself in an airtight locke important plants are to our survival. So he and for oxygen! – pany com for box for two days with only plants s on top of Mount level the to lar simi – en oxyg He started with 12,5% Everest – to see if the plants could raise the levels to a more normal 21%. On his first day he got a killer headache. On the second en day he chilled on his hammock as the oxyg and ide outs go So . ased levels gradually incre hug a tree – it’s making the air you breathe.

ere’s Davi d! Th

SMART SURVIVAL

...in a box

Can you go without your cellphone for 24 hours? Try it and email what it was like to thinkoutloud@ hip2b2.com, along with your name, school, grade and contact number and you could win a funky Clap-On digital alarm clock, which looks like a plain block of wood until you clap your hands to make it show the time. Competition closes on 31 March 2012.

ver? Why can’t we live fore At the end of every package of DNA is a little tail called a telomere. Think of it like the plastic bit on the end of a shoelace, keeping it from unravelling. Every time your cells divide, the telomeres get shorter, and when a telomere gets too short, the cell it’s in will die. As cells age, so do we, but scientists are working on ways to fix the telomere and slow down the ageing process.

FACTS Some people suffer from arachibutyrophobia, which is the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth. Seriously.


Dear diary

Bumping beats

Got a never-ending list of things to do, places to go and people to see? Of course you do – it’s called high school life. To stay on time and on top of everything all the way through to December, jot your plans down in this funky 2012 diary.

www.cna.co.za

fashion, accessories & gadgets

Nothing gets you moving quite like a pumping playlist. Mixed by DJ Costa and packed with 57 killer tracks, this Bump 29 CD is sure to keep you awake and ahead of time all day.

www.lookandlisten.co.za

Rise and sparkle! This blinged-up baby alarm clocks only use a single cell battery to keep time. It comes in five glamolicioius colours, so you can choose the one you’d most like to see when you wake up – on time – every morning. www.bigblue.co.za

Nail’s pace

BY Lindi Miti; images: Shavan Rahim, Jan Ras

Rimmel’s 60 Seconds nail polish dries in less than – you guessed it – 60 seconds, plus the Xpress brush allows for one-second application. So all you need for 10 perfect nails is a bottle of your favourite colour and 70 seconds. www.indigobrands.com

Whether it’s a two-hour exam or a 24-hour day, time is precious and you can’t get it back. Make every second count with this awesome stuff …

catch me if you can Are you always late for school because you just … keep … snoozing? Well, Tocky doesn’t just make a noise to get you out of bed. It also rolls around your room, so you have to get up and catch it if you want to turn it off. Awesome!

www.thegadgetshop.co.za

win!

Wanna win all this stuff?

That’s how we roll Snap a pair of Star Wheels to your heels and whizz your way through the human traffic, cutting your travelling time in half. Just watch where you’re going, and try not to make those poor wheel-less souls too jealous.

www.sportsmanswarehouse.co.za

Running in red

Athletes may be talented, but they wouldn’t hit such record-breaking times without a good pair of running shoes. Put your fastest foot forward with New Balance’s limited edition dragon-inspired takkies. Rocking a fiery design and tough-grip soles, they’re bound to grab attention as you zoom by in a flash of red and gold.

www.shelflife.co.za

Hair today … Create rockstar looks in seconds with Colour Xtreme Hair Art Spray. It takes seconds to apply and a single hair wash to remove, giving you the licence to try a new colour every day. Watch out, Nicki Minaj!

www.clicks.co.za

Just tell us what your favourite story in this issue is, and why. Email your answer – with your name, school, grade and phone number – to thinkoutloud@hip2b2.com or SMS ‘HIP style’ followed by your answer to 31445, and all this stylish stuff could be yours! Standard SMS rates apply. Competition closes on 31 March 2012.

It’s impossible to fold a piece of paper in half more than seven times. Go ahead and try!

Earth is the only known planet with enough oxygen for fire to burn.


Can a hero really dodge a bullet? It doesn’t matter how many bad guys there are or how far James Bond has to run across an open warehouse – y he always seems able to dodge ever . rmed unha ally virtu pe esca bullet and ible? poss ly real this is But l Not likely, Mr Bond. See, bullets trave the nd arou lly usua really, really fast – ral speed of sound, and sometimes seve t bulle the of d soun the so – r faste s time hero our h reac leaving the gun might only after the bullet does. Poor Bond wouldn’t ss even know when to start dodging, unle er. trigg the ng pulli guy bad the saw he And even then, it takes about 0,25 to 0,75 seconds for humans to react to can something, and in that time, a bullet es. metr red hund few good a l trave t So even if Bond knew where the bulle nd seco split a have would be, he’d only to move out of the way. And if he was he dodging a whole crowd of bad guys, … long wouldn’t be a hero for very

Talk that talk, by Rihanna

Last time she was Loud. This time, she’s Talking That Talk. Here’s what to expect from RiRi’s sixth album:

rics

5

minutes with Zahara We chat to SA’s

Our FAVE track ‘We Found Love’, featuring Calvin Harris

ly 14% Romantic ats ubby techno bein Harris) lv Ca of 17% Cl sy rte (cou s

hm 16% Dubstep rhyt es ng-along chorus 15% Catchy, si ing vocals 20% Sparkl ng nstantly changi techo to p po 18% Co om (fr s be vi

latest singing sensation, whose debut album went platinum in just 13 days. My real name is Bulelwa Mkutukana, but I ) to slow ballads needed a stage name to represent who I am. We found Zahara – which means blooming RAISED flower in Arabic – on Google. It’s perfect, BY WOLVES, because I love nature. by Jennifer Lynn Barnes Loliwe, my debut album, is based on Reviewer: Jenna Portnoi, Grade SMS ‘HIP ew CD? nd school to n ’s my experiences growing up in Phumlani, a 10, Kimberley Girls’ High School n n y of Rihar name, grade as 31 March 2012. East London, where I lived until I moved to With so many werewolf in a cop u se Wanna w’ followed by yoapply. Competition clo and vampire books out Jo’burg last year to record the album. I think Rihanna Standard SMS rates right now, some of them are it has been so successful because people 31445. starting to blend together. can relate to my lyrics – I write to inspire, Barnes brings a refreshing not to make hits. Also, I think the public take on the life of a werewolf was ready for a new sound. pack and what it means to NANCY I taught myself to play a guitar that my father be a part of one. DREW had given my sister when I was in Matric. The fact that Bryn (the Reviewer: Gemma-May My parents couldn’t afford to pay for my main character) survived a Grotepass, Grade 10, tertiary eductation, so I decided to learn to Pretoria High School for Girls werewolf attack and was play the guitar. Then one night, when I was Catch a virtual thief with your taken in and raised by performing at a club in East London, TK computer mouse in the Nancy Drew werewolves makes this Nciza – co-owner of TS Records – watched computer games, based on 56 mystery story so enticing – I could me and offered me a contract. stories published in 1930. As teen not put this book down! detective Nancy Drew, it’s your task to Last year somebody told me I sound like If Chase Crawford had crack clues and explore new places as Tracy Chapman. I’d never heard her music, walked into the room, I you solve your way through the game. but now I’m a big fan. would have told him to Be warned: these games are extremely My favourite subject at school was come back when I was difficult and require lots of lateral business economics. It opened my mind done. Rating: 3/5 thought. And don’t be surprised when to world affairs. you’re stumped every now and again! Oh, and if you don’t think Nancy’s your type of hip gal, consider this: Hillary Clinton and former First Lady Laura Bush considered Nancy as their inspiration Reviewer: Michaela Stead, Grade 11, Danville Park Girls’ High, Durban when they were growing up. Rating: 4/5 Johnny English Reborn is a wonderful, comical and enjoyable movie. It will keep you laughing on the edge of your seat from the beginning to the very end. PUZZLE ANSWERS Johnny English, played by Rowan Atkinson, is a secret agent who ANIMAL INSTINCTS The missing returns from Mozambique and gets recruited to stop an evil plot to kill the letter is O: buffalo, leopard, ostrich, gorilla, gemsbok and Chinese Premier, with the help of his new partner, Agent Tucker (Daniel dolphin; JIGSAW JUMBLE: The word is ant; BEE REASONABLE: Kaluuya). The rest of the story follows their hilarious attempts to stop the Visit www.hip2b2.com/ assassins – attempts that usually end in disaster! Awesome stuff! Rating: 4/5 beereasonable for the solution.

My Future, My Career

JOHNNY ENGLISH REBORN

14

LAST MINUTE JOKE When do clocks die? Answer: When their time is up!

FREE CAREER EDUCATION FOR YOU 2 hour broadcasts in cinemas, covering life in the workplace, academic requirements, bursary info and more. Here’s the line-up: Date

Session 1

Session 2

26/02

Entrepreneurship

Tourism & Hospitality

04/03

Computers and IT

Communications

11/03

Mining & Engineering

Construction

18/03

Banking & Finance

Accounting

15/04

Criminal Justice

Law

22/04

Health Services

Education

29/04

Arts & Culture

Transport, Logistics & Distribution

Open to Grade 9 to 12 learners in Gauteng, Cape Town, PE, East London, Durban, Kimberley, Bloemfontein, Polokwane and Rustenburg. School pre-registration essential, call Shine Solutions on 011 566 0660 now to book. Quote ref #: S2M Seats limited, first come – first served.

Free learning – Free coke – Free popcorn *Terms and conditions apply

Music review and Zahara interview by Nikki Benatar; Images: Nu Metro Home Entertainment: Paramount Studio; kalahari.net; HarpercollinsUK/Louise Rennison; supplied; maxchang(flickr), fanthefiremagazine(flickr)

pop culture

CHILLout

Crazy Movie Physics

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