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Forestar  Multi-­‐Family   FrontRunner  PR    


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Table  of  Contents   ABOUT  FRONTRUNNER  PR/MEET  OUR  TEAM               EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY                 BACKGROUND  INFORMATION               SECONDARY  RESEARCH                 PRIMARY  RESEARCH                   SWOT  ANALYSIS                     CRITICAL  ISSUES                     OUR  PLAN                       STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #1     STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #2     STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #3     LOGISTICS                       BUDGET                         CONCLUSION/FUTURE  RECOMMENDATIONS       APPENDIX  A-­‐  QUALTRICS  SURVEY             APPENDIX  B-­‐  FOCUS  GROUP               APPENDIX  C-­‐  LIST  OF  APARTMENTS  WITHIN  5  MILES     APPENDIX  D-­‐  POWERPOINT  PRESENTATION      

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ABOUT  FRONTRUNNER  PR  

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FrontRunner  PR  is  a  small,  student-­‐run  public  relations  agency  that  prides  itself  on  being  on  the  forefront  of  social  media.    We  aim  to  use  our   extensive  knowledge  and  background  about  social  media  in  order  to  inform  companies  about  how  to  best  use  virtual  engagement  in  their   respective  industries.    Forestar  Group,  Inc.  has  chosen  to  partner  with  our  firm  in  order  to  create  a  positive  online  presence  that  their   consumers  will  find  engaging  and  useful.  

MEET  OUR  TEAM  

DESTINY  BENNETT  

Destiny   Bennett   is   a   senior   at   The   university   of   Texas   at   Austin   double   majoring   in   public   relations   and   journalism,   as   well   as   attaining   a   business   certificate.       She   is   a   published   journalist   with   stories   featured   in   AustinWoman   Magazine   and  burntORANGE.    This  fall  she  also   interned   in   the   marketing   department   of   the   Marriott   Downtown   Austin.     She   is   expected   to  graduate  in  May  2012,  after  which,   se   plans   to   pursue   a   career   in   financial  communications.  

 

ERIN  FRAMEL  

Erin   Framel   is   a   senior   at   The   University   of   Texas   studying   public   relations,   corporate   communications   and   business   foundations.     She   is   an   active   member   of   Chi   Omega,   and   currently   works   as   a   research   analyst   at   Capitol   Market   Research,   a   local   company   that   conducts   feasibility   studies  for  real  estate  developers.    She   has   also   worked   for   Chanel   in   their   public   relationship   department  in  New   York   City   and   served   as   the   PR   representative   on   the   UT   campus   for   Rent   the   Runway.   Framel   expects   to   graduate   in   May   2012   and   hopes   to   pursue  a  career  in  PR  in  New  York  City.  

KHRYSTYN  HENRY   Khrystyn   Henry   is   a   senior   at   The   University   of   Texas   at   Austin   majoring   in   public   relations   and   business   foundations.     She   is   currently   a   social   media   and   tour-­‐marketing   intern   at   Triple   8   Management   in   Austin.     She   has   also   worked   as   a   promotions   and   in-­‐game   entertainment   intern   for   the   Grand   Prairie   Airhogs,   an   independent   professional   baseball   league   near   Dallas.     She   is   an   active   member   of   Alpha   Phi,   and   served   as   historian   in   2010.   She   plans   on   graduating   in   May   2012   and   pursuing   a   career   in   the   music  or  live  entertainment  industries.    

DANIELLE  KAPLAN  

Danielle   Kaplan   is   a   senior   at   The   University   of   Texas   at   Austin   studying   public   relations   and   international   business   foundations.     She   currently   interns   at   Giant   Noise,   an   entertainment-­‐focus   public   relations   firm,   as   well   as   an   associate   editor   at   The  Society  Diaries  Magazine.    She  has   also  worked   at  Harrison  &  Shriftman  in   New   York   City   and   as   public   relations   intern  at   Catherine   Nicole  Jewlery.     She   is   an   active   member   of   Alpha   Epsilon   Phi   where   she   was   Vice   President   of   Recruitment  in  2010.     She  will  graduate   in  May  2012  and  hopes  to  pursue  a  PR   career  in  lifestyle  brands.  


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COURTNEY  MAYS   Courtney   Mays   is   a   senior   at   The   University   of   Texas   at   Austin   studying   public   relations   and   business   foundations.     She   currently   manages   the   blogger   affiliate   program   of   a   locally-­‐founded   website   Food   on   the   Table,   and   is   an   active   member   of   Kappa   Kappa   Gamma.     She   has   also   worked   as   Governmental   Relations   intern   for   Quicksilver   Resources   and   in   the   MarComm   department   of   Environmental   Defense   Fund.     She   will   graduate   in   May   2012   and   hopes   to   pursue   a   communication   career   in   the   energy  industry  

 

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HUNTER  NEVOTTI  

SAPNA  PATEL  

Hunter   Nevotti   is   a   junior   at   The   University   of   Texas   at   Austin   studying   public  relations  and  seeking  a  business   foundations   certificate.       He   grew   up  in   McKinney,   Texas   and   went   to   McKinney  High  School.    He  is  an  active   member   of   Sigma   Phi   Epsilon   and   was   their   house   m anager   this   past   summer.     He   is   looking   to   get   the   position   again   this  next  fall.    He  expects  to  graduate  in   May   2013   and   looks   to   possibly   go   to   law   school   in   Dallas   or   Houston,   or   pursue   a   career   in   public   relations   or   marketing.  

Sapna   Patel   is   a   denior   at   The   University  of  Texas  at  Austin  pursuing  a   dual   degree   in   public   relations   and   communication   studies   with   an   emphasis  in  corporate   communications   and   a   certificate   in   business   foundations.     She   is  currently   an  intern   at   The   BeHive  Austin,   as   well   as   a   tutor   at   the   Sanger   Learning   and   Career   Center.     Patel   is   a   member   of   Texas   Sweethearts   and   served  as   treasurer   in   spring   2010,   service   co-­‐chair   in   fall   2010   and   vice-­‐president   in   fall   2011.     She   is   expected   to   graduate   in   May   2012   and   upon   graduation   she   hopes   to  pursue  a  career  in  nonprofit  PR.  

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FRONTRUNNER  PR   “Staying  on  the   forefront  of  social   media”  


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EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  

 

Forestar   Group,  Inc.  is   a  real  estate,  mineral  and  fiber   resource  company   that   fosters  social  and   moral   responsibility   within   the   company   and   the   Austin   community.   Forestar   is   currently   building  their  newest  apartment  complex,  La  Promesa  Apartments  located  in  northwest  Austin.   La  Promesa,  or   “promise”  in  Spanish,  is   a  luxury   apartment  complex,   which   remains   consistent   with   Forestar’s   brand   identity   and   target   audience.     Our   team’s   overall   purpose   is   to   assist   Forestar  by  creating  a  social  media  campaign  that  will  increase  the  resident  retention  rate  by   providing   relevant   information   and   creating   an   engaging   community   for   residents.   Our   team   also   took   a   closer   look   at   Forestar’s   competitors   and   realized   that   no   one   was   using   social   media  correctly.  This  led  us  to  conclude  that  Forestar  has  an  opportunity  to  utilize  social  media,   not   only   to   create   a   community,   but   also   to   differentiate   itself   from   its   competitors,   which   would  theoretically  decrease  the  turnover  rate.       After   analyzing   the   research   conducted   by   Forestar,   as   well   as   our   own   primary   research   consisting   of   a  quantitative  survey  and  a  qualitative  focus  group  (see  Appendix  A   and  B),   our   team   concluded   that   Facebook   would   be   the   optimum   social   media   site   in   which   to   connect   with   residents.   The   findings   from   our   research   and   our  S.W.O.T.   analysis   led   us   to   three   critical   factors:  1.)  People  are   not  as  likely  to  opt-­‐in  to  social  media  pages  for  apartment  complexes,   due   to   negative   past   experiences,   2.)   Very   few   residents   are   aware   of   their   apartment   complexes’   social   media   page,   and   3.)   Many   apartment   complexes’   social   media   pages   have   only  one-­‐way  communication  causing  residents  to  not  interact  with  them.     Our   team   created   separate,   yet   cohesive,   strategies   and   tactics   that   address   each   of   these   critical   factors.   Each   tactic   utilizes   Facebook   and   strives   to   be   engaging   as   well   as   useful   to   residents.  Facebook  tabs,  prize  giveaways  and  informative  third-­‐party  articles  are  some  of  the   tactics   that  we  believe  will   create  a   positive   social  media  experience.  We   constructed  this   plan   with  a  budget  of  $43,050.  We  have  also  provided  additional  recommendations;  however,  these   are   dependent   on   further   research   to   see   how   much   communication   with   residents   it   too   much,  given  that  it  is  important  to  not  spam  them  (See  Appendix  D).         We  hope  that   our  strategic   plan   and   recommendations   help   Forestar   create  an   engaging  social   media  site  that  helps  increase  resident  retention  rates.  FrontRunner  PR  firmly  believes  that  by   developing   a   creative,   functional   and   hassle-­‐free  social   media   site,   Promesa   residents   will  have   a  positive  living  experience  and  will  choose  to  re-­‐sign  their  lease  in  the  coming  years.  

“Our  team’s   overall   purpose  is  to   assist   Forestar  by   creating  a   social  media   campaign   that  will   increase  the   resident   retention   rate…”  


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BACKGROUND  INFORMATION   With  its  origins  stretching  back  to  1955,  Forestar,  then   known  as  Lumberman’s  Investment  Corporation,  has   always  made  it  a  priority  to  foster  a  sense  of  social   responsibility  and  service  through  its  building  practices.   The  Austin-­‐based  real  estate,  mineral  and  fiber  resource   company  boasts  a  real  estate  portfolio  of  more  than   159,000  acres  with  98  projects  spanning  9  states.  One  of   the  company’s  defining  factors  is  its  active  new  project   investments  in  growth  corridors  or  areas  that  show  signs   of  potential  growth  in  population,  number  of  households   and  employment.  These  factors  are  highly  attractive  to   homeowners.     In  2006,  the  real  estate  segment  of  the  company  became   known  as  Forestar.  The  company’s  mix  of  single-­‐family   residential  projects  and  multi-­‐use  communities  are  of  the   highest  quality  and  standards  and  are  factors  that  the   company  takes  pride  in.  The  majority  of  their  properties   are  in  Texas,  with  others  located  in  Georgia.  

   

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PROMESA  PROBLEM  STATEMENT  

“Promesa  is  a  modern  ranch  style  apartment  community  that  is  being  developed  by  Forestar.  Our  environmentally  chic  apartment  community  is  designed   with  the  convenience  and  comfort  of  our  residents  in  mind.    We  believe  Promesa  offers  an  uncompromising  value  in  apartment  living.”-­‐  Promesaliving.com  

The  overall  purpose  of  this  strategic  campaign  is  to  utilize  social  media  in  order  to  increase  the  resident  retention  rate,  thereby  decreasing   the  turnover  rate.    In  order  to  achieve  this  goal,  we  aimed  to  create  a  positive  residential  experience  and  to  differentiate  La  Promesa   Apartments  from  its  competitors  through  the  use  of  innovative  and  strategic  social  media.  FrontRunner  PR  strived  to  create  a  campaign  that   explicitly  illustrates  the  most  effective  and  efficient  way  to  employ  social  media,  specifically  Facebook,  in  hopes  of  creating  a  sense  of   community  amongst  residents  that  will  help  impact  our  overarching  purpose.    

www.images.google.com,    www.promesaliving.com  


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Secondary  Research   WHO  ARE  WE  TRYING  TO  REACH?   Target  Demographics:                      Age:  25-­‐39                      Marital  Status:  Single  or  married  with  kid(s)                      Education:  BA  or  MA  degrees                      Employment:  full-­‐time                      Income:  $35,000-­‐  55,000    

WHAT  ARE  THEY  LIKE?   Our  primary  target  is  “middle-­‐aged  professionals,”  which   consists  of  a  blend  of  various  segments:  successful  and   single  adults,  newlywed  couples,  young  families  and   recently  divorced,  single  parents.    These  are  the  people   who  have  bought  their  first  luxury  apartment,  and  are   currently  in  a  transition  phase  in  their  lives,  or  are  looking   for  an  easier  and  smaller  living  situation.    The  people  in   this  target  have  steady  jobs,  as  well  as  the  financial  means   to  live  in  a  secure  and  upscale  multi-­‐family  home  and   neighborhood.       The  demographics  for  La  Promesa’s  zip  code  are  extremely   similar  to  our  chosen  target  market.    Zip  code  78732   contains  a  high  segment  of  25-­‐39  year  olds  with  bachelors   or  associates  degrees,  and  who  are  employed  full-­‐time   making  $75,000  to  $149,999.    In  addition,  most  are   married  couples  with  or  without  children.    La  Promesa’s   target  market  fits  comfortably  in  zip  code  78732,  which   shows  the  compatibility  of  residents  of  this  Austin  area  to   the  multi-­‐family  home  they  would  reside  in.    

http://www.movoto.com/neighborhood/tx/austin/78732.htm,  www.images.google.com  

MEET  MIKE  AND  KELLY  TAYLOR   Mike   and   Kelly   Taylor   (32,   31)   are   college   sweethearts   and   have   been   married   for   six   years.     They   have   a   one-­‐year-­‐old   daughter   named   Ashley.     The   Taylors   both   attended   The   University   of   Texas,   where   they   met   at   a   fraternity/sorority   date   function.   Mike   moved   to   Atlanta   to   work   in   a   law   firm,  while  Kelly  finished  her  degree  in  advertising.    Kelly  moved  to  Atlanta   to  be  an  account  executive  in  her  old  stomping  grounds.    The  couple  moved   back   to   Austin   after   Mike   landed   a   job   back   in   their   old   college   town   of   Austin  as  a  lawyer  working  for  the  University  itself;  Kelly  now  works  at  T3.   The  couple  loves  to  spend  time  outdoors  at  parks  with  Ashley  and  cooking   in   their   first   home   together   in   Austin.     Kelly   goes   running   every   morning,   and  Mike  is  in  a  poker  group  with  some  buddies  in  the  neighborhood.    The   couple   drives   a   silver   2011   Toyota   Prius   and   loves   the   environmental   friendliness  of  the  car.    Now  that  Ashley  is  starting  to  walk,  the  Taylors  have   added  a  dog,  Baxter,  to  their  family,  who  loves  to  run  around  Town  Lake  in   the  morning  with  Kelly,  but  also  enjoys  going  to  the  dog  park  in  their  new   complex,  La  Promesa,  for  some  fresh  air.  


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WHO  ARE  THE  COMPETITORS?   Out  of  the  49  apartment  projects  within  a  5-­‐mile  radius  of  La  Promesa,  only  10  apartments  maintain  an  active  Facebook  page  (in  that  they   post  at  least  monthly)  for  their  specific  property.  This  shows  that  while  many  of  La  Promesa’s  competitors  are  not  using  social  media,  it  is  a   growing  trend  among  properties  in  their  direct  market.  The  t10  properties  using  social  media  are  Dakota  Springs,  Martha’s  Vineyard,  Alexan   Vistas,  Park  Side  at  Lake  Creek,  Summit  Creek  Apartment  Homes,  Alexan  Ribelin  Ranch,  Hardrock  Canyon,  Ranch  Stone  Garden  Homes,  Nalle   Woods,  and  Acacia  Cliffs.  Most  of  the  properties  posted  a  link  from  their  website  to  their  Facebook  page.       While  many  of  student  apartments  are  aiming  their  social  media  at  a  very  wide  audience  of  potential  residents,  the  apartments  in  Promesa’s   market  area  are  using  their  social  media  to  give  relevant  information  and  beneficial  updates  to  current  residents.  All  of  the  10  properties  had   posted  photos  from  events,  listed  important  weather  updates,  shared  maintenance  tips  with  residents,  talked  about  interesting  local  Austin   events  and  listed  special  contests  and  giveaways  hosted  by  the  community.     Additionally,  6  of  those  10  properties  are  utilizing  tabs  on  their  page.  Many  of  the  sites  have  a  tab  titled  “Available  Apartments”  where   visitors  can  view  floor  plans  and  pricing  on  open  apartments.  Here  you  could  click  “like,”  “ask,”  or  “share”  to  interact  with  the  available   apartment  by  sharing  it  with  friends  or  inquiring  for  more  information.  Several  of  the  properties  also  had  a  “Questions”  tab  where  the   community  could  post  a  question  and  visitors  could  post  an  answer.    Two  of  the  properties  (Nalle  Woods  and  Acacia  Cliff)  also  had  a  blog  tab   where  you  could  read  interesting  articles,  hear  about  fun  events  in  Austin,  learn  about  community  service  opportunities,  and  get  other  great   information.    

APARTMENTS  AND  SOCIAL  MEDIA  

 

Many  apartment  complexes  today  are  using  social  media  to  connect  with  current  and  potential  residents.  Social  media  provides  an   opportunity  for  apartments  to  communicate  with  residents  on  a  different  level  and  through  a  different  medium.  Instead  of  simply  using   email  or  flyers,  this  medium  allows  for  two-­‐way  communication  where  the  apartment  complex  can  post  relevant  news,  remind  residents   about  bills,  share  photos  from  events  or  communicate  in  a  number  of  other  ways.  Most  importantly,  residents  have  the  opportunity  to   respond  via  comments  and  posts.       The  two  most  notable  social  media  sites  used  by  apartments  today  are  Facebook  and  Twitter.  While  many  other  social  media  sites  have   become  popular  in  the  past  few  years,  these  two  are  the  most  relevant  to  apartments  due  to  their  high  volume  and  frequency  of  use  among   many  different  demographics.  According  to  eBizMBA  Rank,  which  is  a  constantly  updated  average  of  all  social  media  websites’  Global  Traffic   Rank,  and  U.S.  Traffic  Rank  for  both  Compete  and  Quantcast,  Facebook  and  Twitter  are  the  top  two  most  popular  social  media  sites.   Facebook  boasts  around  700,000  unique  monthly  visitors  and  Twitter  has  about  200,000  unique  monthly  visitors.  Since  apartments  want   their  information  accessible  to  as  many  potential  residents  as  possible,  as  well  as  to  connect  with  as  many  current  residents  as  they  can,   these  two  sites  are  the  most  useful.        

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WHAT  ARE  OTHERS  DOING?   Today,  student  apartments  are  the  leaders  among  multi-­‐family  complexes  in  the  use  of   social  media.  Whether  or  not  they  are  using  it  effectively,  they  appear  to  be  the  ones  using   social  media  most  frequently  and  creatively.  Due  to  the  high  resident  turnover  rate  for   student  complexes,  there  is  a  greater  need  for  these  apartments  to  attract  attention  to   themselves  and  differentiate  their  complex  from  their  competitors.  Because  of  this,  many   of  their  social  media  efforts  are  directed  at  attracting  as  many  “likes”  and  followers  as   possible  in  order  to  attract  potential  residents.     Aspen  Heights,  a  chain  of  all-­‐student  neighborhoods  located  in  college  towns,  has  become  a   leader  among  student  living  complexes  in  the  use  of  social  media.  Each  of  Aspen  Height’s   neighborhoods  has  a  distinct  Facebook  page  and  Twitter  account  named  after  the   university  that  it  is  built  next  to.  For  example,  the  one  in  San  Macros  is  called  “Aspen   Heights  Texas  State.”  Aspen  Height’s  Facebook  pages  utilize  tabs,  which  are  separate  links   on  the  left  hand  side  of  the  page  that  you  can  click  on  in  order  to  view  a  separate  page  with   distinct  information.  For  example,  Aspen  Heights’  site  has  a  tab  called  “Photos”  and  when   you  click  it  you  are  sent  to  a  page  with  all  of  the  photos  that  Aspen  Heights  has  posted  and   all  of  the  photos  that  others  have  tagged  Aspen  Heights  in.  Another  tab  is  called  “Interest   List”  and  here  you  are  taken  to  a  form  where  you  can  give  Aspen  Heights  your  contact   information  if  you  are  interested  in  living  there.  The  use  of  tabs  allows  visitors  to  easily   navigate  the  Facebook  page  and  find  the  content  that  they  are  most  interested  in.    

 

http://www.facebook.com/Aspentxstate  

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Lorem  Ipsum  

11  

9  

Apartment  sites  like  Aspen  Heights  have  gained  their   strong  following  through  several  strategies.  The  goal  for   many  apartments  is  to  get  web  surfers  to  initially  visit   the  site  and  also  to  “like”  the  page  and  become  involved.   Through  our  research  we  found  that  several   communities  have  done  this  by  offering  incentives,  such   as  discounted  parking,  to  residents  who  “like”  the  page.   This  provides  an  opportunity  for  residents  to  initially   engage  with  the  site  and  therefore  they  are  more  likely   to  visit  again.  Next,  many  apartments  have  to  once  again   give  residents  a  reason  to  visit  again.  If  you  give   followers  an  excuse  to  come  back  and  visit  the  site  a   handful  of  times,  they  will  not  only  see  the  content  that   drew  them  in  initially  (like  a  contest  or  giveaway),  but   will  also  see  the  other  relevant  and  interesting  content   that  is  posted  on  the  site.  Aspen  Heights  did  this  by   encouraging  users  to  comment  and  write  on  their  wall  by   hosting  contests  like  the  “Sorority  Status  Showdown”   where  sororities  competed  for  $500  prize  for  their   philanthropy  by  liking  the  page  and  commenting  on  their   sorority  name.  

 

http://www.facebook.com/Aspentxstate  


10   Ipsum    Lorem  

12  

Another  attraction  to  their  Facebook  page  is  Aspen  Height’s  active  Facebook  wall.  Aspen  Heights  employees  not  only  post  about  apartment   news  like  availabilities  in  their  homes,  but  also  post  fun,  conversation-­‐provoking  comments  like  funny  YouTube  videos.  Additionally  Aspen   Heights  posts  community  service  opportunities,  hosts  fun  contests  on  their  wall,  posts  photos  of  apartment  events  and  contest  winners,   shares  an  array  of  videos  about  Aspen  Heights,  informs  students  about  upcoming  local  events,  and  writes  features  on  interesting  residents.   The  variety  of  posts  attracts  a  wide  array  of  comments  and  responses  from  residents  and  truly  initiates  a  two-­‐way  conversation.  

 

http://www.facebook.com/Aspentxstate  


Lorem  Ipsum   Aspen  Heights  in  Athens,  Georgia  has  also  done  a   great  job  managing  its  Twitter  page.  Similar  to   their  Facebook  page,  Aspen  Heights  tweets   relevant  news,  upcoming  local  events,  giveaways,   community  events,  and  other  relevant   information.  Additionally,  they  do  a  great  job  of   encouraging  their  followers  by  re-­‐tweeting  posts   that  they  find  interesting,  tweeting  back  at  people   that  tweet  at  them,  and  tweeting  at  new  followers   and  thanking  them  for  joining  their  following.        

 

www.twitter.com/aspenheights  

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12   Ipsum    Lorem  

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Primary  Research   ONLINE  SURVEY   To  get  a  general  idea  about  the  use  of  social  media  and  apartment  complexes,  we  created  an  online  survey.    The  survey  was  distributed  to  a   convenience  sample  of  our  friends  and  family  through  mediums  like  Facebook  and  email,  resulting  in  156  respondents.    Most  respondents  were   between  the  ages  of  18  and  22,  predominately  female  (85  percent)  and  spend  $500  to  $900  on  rent  per  month.  The  majority  of  respondents   found  out  about  their  current  apartment  complex  through  word-­‐of-­‐mouth  (47  percent)  and  referrals  (24  percent).    Although  we  realize  these   results  may  not  be  generalizable  to  the  public,  we  are  confident  that  our  findings  are  a  good  starting  place  for  future  research.     What  social  media  sites  are  you  active  on  at  least  once  a  week?   Almost  all   of  our   respondents   are  active  on  social   media  websites.    Facebook  is  used   on  a   regular  basis  by   98   p ercent  of   our   respondents  and  Twitter   is  used  on  a   regular   basis   by   85   percent.     The   group   uses   other   social   media   sites,   such   as   Pinterest,   LinkedIn,   Foursquare,   etc.,   more   sparingly.    Although   we   described   “using   on   a   regular   basis”   as   at   least   once   a   week,   we   found   that   around   80   percent   of   our   respondents   are   active   at   least   once   a   day.   When   asked   if   respondents   would   be   more  or  likely  to  choose  an  apartment  complex  because  of  a  social  media  presence,   26   percent   said   “yes,”   they   would   be   more   inclined,   while  74   percent   answered   “no”   or  “unsure.”   Does  your  apartment  complex  have  a  social  media  site?  

Facebook  

Twitter  

The  next  portion  of  our  survey  focused  on  interacting   with  their   apartment   complex   through   Facebook   and   Twitter.    Only   32   respondents   (24   percent)   said   that   they   know   that   their   apartment   has   a  Facebook  page,   but   out   of  the  32  respondents,  only   11  said  they  have  “liked”  their  apartment  complex’s  page.    Only  three  respondents  (2   percent)  said  that  they  know  that  their  apartment  has  a  Twitter  page,  and  only  two   of  these  people  are  following  them.  When  asked  if  respondents   would  interact  with   their  apartment  page  if  they  had  social  media  pages,  the  majority  said  “no.”    Based   on  these  results,  Facebook  seems  like  the  most  beneficial  social  media  route  to  take.    

The  last  portion  of  the  survey  focused  on  how  an  apartment  complex  could  get  respondents  to  interact  more  with  their  social  media   pages.    Respondents  seemed  most  interested  in  interacting  with  their  apartment  complex’s  social  media  pages  if  a  promotion  was  offered  in   exchange  for  liking  their  page  (example,  discounted  monthly  parking)  or  for  other  prize  giveaways.    The  things  that  respondents  were  most   willing  to  post  on  social  media  pages  are  maintenance  requests  and  complaints.    About  half  of  the  respondents  answered  that  they  would  be   interested  in  attending  apartment-­‐sponsored  events,  and  60  percent  of  these  respondents  said  they  would  want  their  apartment  complex  to     invite  them  to  the  events  via  social  media  sites.  


Lorem  Ipsum  

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13  

FOCUS  GROUP  

“Last  year  my   apartment   complex  had  a   Facebook,  but   I  don’t  think  I   ever  looked  at   it  because   there  was  no   reason  to...”   -­‐Focus  Group  Participant  

In  mid-­‐October,  we  gathered  a  group  of  six  individuals  who  live  or  have  lived  in  apartments  in  the  past   twelve  months.    The  participants  represent  five  different  apartment  complexes  in  varied  areas  of  Austin   including  downtown,  West  Campus,  and  north  of  campus.    A  member  of  our  team  acted  as  moderator   to  lead  the  group  in  a  discussion  that  provided  ideas  and  concrete  examples  to  explain  the  numbers   gathered  in  the  Qualtrics  survey.    We  collected  insights  about  apartment  living,  social  media,  and  the   current  use  of  social  media  by  apartment  complexes.     When  searching  for  an  apartment  complex,  the  participants  voiced  a  number  of  similar  concerns.    They   desire  good  management  that  responds  timely  and  appropriately,  a  feeling  of  security  from  a  guard  or   cameras,  and  parking  for  the  owners’  and  their  guests.    Our  participants  concluded  that  customer   reviews  would  help  them  know  that  these  requirements  are  covered.     When  it  comes  to  social  media,  participants  engage  with  businesses  when  useful  information,  coupons,   giveaways,  and  interaction  with  brands  are  available.    They  currently  interact  with  accounts  that  post   timely  and  relevant  updates,  provide  discounts  and  promotional  events,  do  not  post  unnecessary   information,  nor  bombard  them  with  too  much  information.    The  line  between  informative  and   harassment  seems  blurred  but  makes  a  huge  difference  in  how  the  participants  want  to  be  contacted.       Email  should  be  reserved  only  for  necessary  things  according  to  the  focus  group,  such  as  rent  and  utility   bills.    The  group  emphatically  agreed  that  no  text  messages  are  allowed,  “because  it  is   annoying.”    Facebook  and  other  social  media  are  too  much,  especially  for  unnecessary  events  according   to  one  participant.    Multiple  members  blocked  their  apartment  complex’s  Facebook  account  because  it   was  excessive  and  ineffective.    They  claimed  that  using  Facebook  in  addition  to  emails  made  it   repetitive.     Participants  prefer  minimal  information  and  zero  clutter.    The  number  one  annoyance  is  receiving  the   same  information  from  more  than  one  place,  since  it  creates  clutter  and  fills  multiple  inboxes.    They   would  rather  go  to  a  website  than  a  Facebook  page,  but  also  agreed  that  discounts,  incentives,  and   events  would  be  nice  on  the  Facebook  page.    Communication  about  bills  and  rent  should  come  by   email.    Excessive  amounts  and  unnecessary  information  are  the  two  biggest  deterrents  from  interaction   with  apartment  fan  pages.     See  Appendix  B  for  a  full  moderator  and  notes  detailing  the  participants’  entire  conversation.  

 


In-­‐Depth  Research  Analysis  

• • • •

Community  oriented  environment   Promesa  will  have  new  amenities  in  club  house   Focus  on  customer  service   Reasonable  price  range  

Forestar  is  known  for  being  more  than  “just  another  apartment  complex.”    Two  of   their  main  goals  include  creating  a  community  for  their  residents  and  providing   excellent  customer  service.    All  of  their  properties  aim  to  meet  these  goals  in  order   to  remain  a  “luxury  apartment”  in  the  minds  of  consumers.    Specifically,  La  Promesa   is  trying  to  foster  the  belief  by  creating  a  fun,  new  clubhouse  with  special  amenities   to  encourage  residents  to  hang  out  together.    Compared  to  competitors,  La   Promesa  offers  these  amenities  at  a  very  reasonable  price.  

• • •

Apartment  not  present  on  Twitter  or  Facebook   No  support  system  to  implement  new  strategies   Easy  to  not  use  social  media  effectively  

In  order  to  supplement  the  feeling  of  community  at  their  properties,  La  Promesa   could  bring  the  community  online  through  the  use  of  social  media.    Currently,  the   apartment  complex  is  not  present  on  Facebook  or  Twitter,  which  puts  them  at  a   disadvantage.    They  also  lack  a  strong  support  system  that  will  consistently  keep  up   with  social  media  sites  and  implement  the  new  strategic  plan.    Social  media  should   only  be  used  if  there  is  a  100  percent  commitment  to  it,  and  it  is  done  in  a  non-­‐ annoying  way.    It  is  very  easy  to  not  utilize  social  media  to  its  full  potential.  

Can  look  at  what  other  apartments  are  doing   good  or  bad  and  plan  accordingly   Can  use  different  social  media  outlets  for   different  purposes  

One  way  to  make  sure  that  social  media  sites  are  being  used  to  their  full  potential  is   to  check  up  on  what  other  apartment  complexes  are  doing.    See  what  seems  to  be   working  or  not  working  for  them,  and  how  their  residents  react  to  each  post.     Keeping  up  to  date  on  what  competitors  are  doing  is  a  great  way  to  adapt  your  own   social  media  sites  to  changing  trends,  which  will  in  turn,  keep  your  residents  happy.     Another  opportunity  with  social  media  is  to  create  different  sites  for  different   purposes.    This  could  be  done  exceptionally  well  with  Twitter.  

Competitors  in  the  area  

As  with  all  companies,  there  are  many  competitors  in  the  same  area  as  La  Promesa.     In  particular,  La  Promesa  has  68  competing  apartment  complexes  within  a  5  mile   radius.    Many  of  these  complexes  are  luxury  apartments  and  are  targeting  the  same   group  of  people.    Also,  they  may  be  at  an  advantage  if  they  have  been  in  the  area   for  some  time  already,  as  many  have  been  established  since  the  80s.  

 Lorem   14   Ipsum  

 

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SWOT  ANALYSIS  


Lorem  Ipsum  

 

17  

15  

INTRODUCTION  INTO  CRITICAL  ISSUES   After  analyzing  primary  and  secondary  research  and  conducting  a  SWOT  analysis,  we  came  across  three  major  critical  issues:     Critical  Issue  #1:  People  are  not  as  likely  to  opt-­‐in  to  social  media  pages  for  apartment  complexes,  due  to  negative  past  experiences.     In  our  focus  group,  we  learned  that  many  apartment  complexes  have  tried  using  social  media  pages  (Facebook  and  Twitter)  in  the  past,  but   have  not  been  effective.    All  of  our  focus  group  participants  stated  that  their  apartment  complex  would  push  information  onto  them  way  too   frequently,  which  they  found  “annoying.”    They  all  agreed  that  they  would  rather  the  apartment  complex  contact  them  through  email  than  a   Facebook  or  Twitter  page.    Also,  in  our  online  survey,  we  asked  respondents  if  they  would  “like”  their  apartment  on  Facebook  or  follow  their   apartment  on  Twitter,  and  the  majority  of  respondents  said  “no.”    When  asked  if  they  would  be  more  inclined  to  look  for  an  apartment   complex  with  a  social  media  presence,  the  majority  of  respondents  also  said  “no.”     Critical  Issue  #2:  Very  few  residents  are  aware  of  their  apartment  complex’s  social  media  page.     We  were  interested  in  the  amount  of  awareness  of  apartment  complexes  using  social  media,  so  we  asked  a  few  questions  about  awareness  in   our  online  survey.    We  asked  respondents  if  their  apartment  complex  had  a  Facebook  page,  and  nearly  60  percent  responded  that  they  were   unsure  whether  their  apartment  complex  did  or  did  not.    When  asked  if  their  apartment  complex  had  a  Twitter  account,  almost  80  percent  of   respondents  said  that  they  were  unsure  if  they  had  one  or  not.    This  confirms  that  the  majority  of  people  do  not  recognize  an  online  social   media  presence  in  their  apartment  complexes.     Critical  Issue  #3:  Many  apartment  complexes’  social  media  pages  have  only  one-­‐way  communication  causing  residents  to  not  interact  with   them.     Our  focus  group  participants  that  were  aware  of  their  apartment  complexes’  social  media  pages  all  had  similar  things  to  say.    The  apartment   complexes  are  treating  the  social  media  pages  as  another  way  to  market  to  the  residents,  instead  of  trying  to  engage  them  or  encourage  them   to  post.    The  majority  of  things  that  apartment  complexes  seem  to  be  using  their  social  media  pages  for  are  to  invite  residents  to  apartment-­‐ sponsored  social  events  as  well  as  to  remind  them  to  renew  their  lease.    The  messages  were  so  frequent  and  irrelevant  to  so  many  residents,   that  they  were  annoying  and  easily  ignored.     In  order  to  effectively  use  social  media,  specific  strategies  and  tactics  will  need  to  be  put  into  place  to  overcome  these  critical  issues.     FrontRunner  PR  has  looked  at  what  other  companies  are  doing  effectively  or  ineffectively  with  their  pages  in  order  to  create  a  social  media   plan  for  Promesa  Apartments  that  will  engage  residents  and  create  a  relevant  purpose  for  visiting  the  sites.    Our  plan  revolves  around  a     Facebook  page  that  includes  important  information  for  the  resident,  as  well  as  a  fun  community-­‐like  experience.  


Lorem   16   Ipsum  

18  

Our  Plan   FACEBOOK  PAGE   While  many  apartment  complexes  today  run  Facebook  pages,  few  of  them  use  the  latest  advancements  available  on  Facebook  effectively.   Today,  many  companies  are  using  tabs  on  their  sites  to  offer  visitors  the  chance  to  choose  which  content  and  features  they  want  to  view  and   use.  For  example,  Delta  Airlines  offers  a  “Delta  Assist”  tab  where  visitors  can  submit  feedback  from  their  travel  experience  and  a  “Ticket   Counter”  tab  where  visitors  can  book  their  travel  via  Facebook.  While  some  apartments  have  begun  to  use  tabs,  few  are  using  them  to  their   full  capabilities.  For  example,  Aspen  Heights  is  utilizing  tabs  and  has  a  tab  that  allows  you  to  give  your  contact  information  if  you  are   interested  in  leasing,  but  they  also  have  several  tabs  that  are  not  fully  functioning.  For  example,  they  offer  a  tab  titled  “Tell  the  Manager”  and   another  called  “Questions”  but  neither  of  these  tabs  work  properly.    

 


Lorem  Ipsum  

19  

17  

For  La  Promesa  we  propose  that  Forestar  uses  tabs  to  add  content  and  usefulness  to  their  Facebook  page.  The  most  notable  tab  will  be  the   tab  used  for  paying  rent.  Here  residents  will  be  able  to  pay  their  rent,  check  on  the  processing  of  their  bills  and  be  reminded  when  rent  is  due.   La  Promesa  will  be  one  of  the  first,  if  not  the  first,  apartment  complex  to  have  this  feature  available  on  their  page,  which  will  push  this   complex  to  the  forefront  among  its  competitors.    Additionally,  there  will  be  a  maintenance  tracker  tab  where  residents  can  submit  a   maintenance  request,  see  when  it  has  been  received,  know  when  maintenance  personnel  will  be  visiting  their  apartment  and  who  is  coming   and  view  when  the  repair  is  complete  (much  like  the  Domino’s  Pizza  Tracker).  These  two  very  useful  features  will  draw  residents  into  the  site   and  provide  value  to  users,  while  giving  them  a  reason  to  visit  the  page  on  a  regular  basis.    This  will  also  encourage  them  to  view  the  other   content  available  on  the  site.  

Because  of  the  use  of  these  two  very  innovative  and  useful  features,  residents  will  have  a  great  reason  to  visit  the  Facebook  page  on  a  regular   basis,  therefore  encouraging  them  to  view  the  other  content  that  will  be  available  on  the  site.  There  will  be  a  blog  tab  where  relevant  articles   and  exciting  stories  about  what  is  going  on  in  the  community  will  be  posted.  Additionally,  the  Facebook  “wall”  will  be  a  place  for  residents  and   La  Promesa  employees  to  share  information  with  each  other  like  details  about  community  service  events  or  important  weather  updates.  On   the  “wall”  residents  will  be  encouraged  to  post  about  lost  items,  extra  tickets  to  football  games  or  concerts,  private  parties,  etc.  Apartment   employees  will  also  post  pictures  from  community  events  and  tag  residents  in  order  to  encourage  residents  to  get  to  know  their  neighbors     and  start  to  communicate  via  social  media  through  the  use  of  “likes”  and  comments.  


Lorem   18   Ipsum  

WALL  

 

20  


Lorem  Ipsum  

PAY  BILLS  ONLINE  

 

21  

19  


Lorem   20   Ipsum  

PRIZE  GIVEAWAYS  

 

22  


Lorem  Ipsum  

MAINTENANCE  TRACKER  

 

23  

21  


Lorem   22   Ipsum  

RATINGS  PAGE  

 

24  


Lorem  Ipsum  

BLOG  

 

25  

23  


24   Ipsum    Lorem  

26  

STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #1   Critical  Issue  #1:  People  are  not  as  likely  to  opt-­‐in  to  social  media  pages  for  apartment  complexes,  due  to  negative  past  experiences.     Participants  in  the  focus  group  often  talked  about  their  disdain  for  becoming  a  fan  of  their  apartment’s  Facebook  page  due  to  constant  event   invitations  spamming  their  inbox  or  news  feed.  Therefore,  our  goal  is  to  create  a  more  positive  social  media  experience  for  residents  in  order   to  increase  the  number  of  residents  choosing  to  opt-­‐in  to  La  Promesa’s  social  media  pages.  Three  months  after  opening,  we  would  like  to  have   90  percent  of  La  Promesa  residents  “like”  the  page.  We  will  accomplish  this  objective  by  not  only  creating  incentives  for  those  who  like  the   page  but  also  by  informing  residents  of  the  valuable  information  available  on  the  Facebook  page.     Tactics:   • Offer  discounted  rent,  parking  or  other  incentives  for  “liking”  the  page  when  signing  their  lease   • Have  leasing  agents  provide  information  about  the  Facebook  page  to  residents  when  they  sign  their  lease  in  order  to  inform  them   about  its  relevant  and  helpful  features     While  it  is  important  that  Promesa  garners  a  high  number  of  “likes,”  the  complex  must  work  to  keep  their  fans  and  not  lose  them  due  to   dissatisfaction  with  the  page.    Our  objective  is  to  maintain  the  number  of  Facebook  “likes”  and  have  no  more  than  a  5  percent  decrease  each   month.    Our  strategy  to  meet  this  objective  is  to  make  the  Facebook  page  useful  to  residents  in  order  to  encourage  and  maintain  their   continued  involvement  and  discourage  them  from  opting-­‐out.    We  will  also  encourage  residents  to  try  paying  their  rent  via  the  Facebook   page.    Once  they  have  tried  it,  there  will  be  an  increased  probability  that  this  will  become  a  part  of  their  monthly  routine.     Tactics:   • Offer  monthly  prize  giveaways  from  partnering  with  local  businesses   • Only  post  pertinent  information  on  the  Facebook  wall   • Create  tabs  on  the  Facebook  page  including:   o Online  rent  paying   o Maintenance  request  and  tracker   o Event  calendar   o Apartment  ratings  for  residents  to  provide  private  feedback   • Offer  discount  on  first  month  of  rent  or  other  incentives  for  residents  who  pay  their  rent  on  the  Facebook  page  in  order  to   encourage  trial  usage   • Consistently  remind  residents  that  the  easiest  way  to  submit  maintenance  requests  is  via  the  Facebook  page  because  of  the   maintenance  request  tracker    


Lorem  Ipsum  

27  

25  

STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #2   Critical  issue  #2:  Very  few  residents  are  aware  of  their  apartment  complexes’  social  media  page.     Another  objective  that  we  plan  to  meet  is  to  have  100  percent  of  residents  aware  of  the  content  that  is  available  on  the  Facebook  page.    In   any  form  of  correspondence  between  apartment  staff  and  residents  in  which  residents  stop  by  or  call  the  office  for  help  with  routine  actions   such  as  paying  rent  or  requesting  maintenance,  staff  will  assist  the  resident  and  then  remind  them  that  they  have  access  to  easily  do  these   things  on  the  Facebook  page  as  well.    By  doing  this,  we  will  create  and  maintain  awareness  by  continuously  directing  people  back  to  the   property’s  social  media  page  and  linking  every  correspondence  back  to  the  social  media  hub.    With  continued  reminders,  residents  will  begin   to  go  to  the  Facebook  page  out  of  habit,  thereby  increasing  the  relevance  of  the  page  and  furthering  their  engagement  with  Promesa.     Tactics:   o Send  informative  emails  to  all  residents  with  screen  shots  and  step-­‐by-­‐step  instructions  of  how  to  use  the  maintenance  request   tracker  and  the  bill  payment  tab   o When  residents  submit  a  maintenance  request  via  phone  or  office  visit,  remind  them  about  the  ease  of  use  and  helpfulness  of  the   maintenance  tracker  on  the  Facebook  page   o Deliver  flyers  to  residents  reminding  them  about  upcoming  contests  and  giveaways  hosted  on  the  Facebook  page  

 


26   Ipsum    Lorem  

28  

STRATEGIES  AND  TACTICS  FOR  CRITICAL  ISSUE  #3  

 

Critical  Issue  #3:  Many  apartment  complexes’  social  media  pages  have  only  one-­‐way  communication  causing  residents  to  not  interact  with   them.     Residents  do  not  feel  compelled  to  post,  comment  and  interact  with  social  media  pages  because  the  staff  in  charge  of  the  page  is  using  social   media  as  a  form  of  advertising  for  the  apartment  rather  than  trying  to  engage  residents.    While  advertising  is  directed  towards  specific  targets,   it  is  a  one-­‐way  message  from  the  company  to  the  viewer  and  often  does  not  require  any  feedback;  consequently,  the  page  will  have  a  lot  of   posts  but  no  comments  from  followers.    Therefore,  our  goal  is  to  create  two-­‐way  communication  that  encourages  residents  to  interact  and   engage  with  the  page.         Our  objective  is  to  increase  the  amount  of  activity  and  feedback  from  residents  by  5  percent  each  month.  We  will  achieve  this  by  posting   relevant  information  that  residents  will  be  interested  in.  Once  there  is  useful  content  continuously  available  on  the  page,  residents  will  visit   more  often  and  be  more  likely  to  comment  on  posts  that  they  feel  are  directly  beneficial  to  them.    In  addition,  we  will  also  provide  relevant   functions  on  the  page  in  order  to  encourage  residents  to  interact  with  other  content.    For  example,  if  residents  pay  their  rent  on  Facebook  on   a  regular  basis,  they  will  be  more  likely  to  look  around  on  the  page  and  see  other  content  such  as  event  postings,  prize  giveaways,  photos   from  past  events  and  interesting  articles.    Ultimately,  the  more  often  residents  come  to  the  page,  the  more  likely  they  will  be  to  spend  more   time  exploring  other  content  on  the  page.     Tactics:   o Link  to  interesting  and  applicable  articles  that  residents  will  find  beneficial  (For  example,  tips  for  how  to  lower  your  energy  bill  or   fun  and  cheap  local  events)   o Posting  due  dates  for  bills   o Encourage  residents  to  respond  to  articles  and  posts  with  their  personal  feedback     Our  last  strategy  to  combat  the  lack  of  two-­‐way  communication  is  to  encourage  residents  to  post  their  own  content.    Company  pages   sometimes  have  the  connotation  of  being  owned  and  operated  by  company  staff;  therefore,  any  and  all  content  must  come  from  them.    We   believe  it  will  be  beneficial  to  inform  residents  that  their  feedback  and  unique  ideas  are  welcome,  that  this  is  their  page  as  well.    If  residents   feel  that  they  have  the  freedom  to  participate,  they  may  be  more  likely  to  engage  and  begin  making  their  own  posts  and  leaving  comments  on   others.    We  are  essentially  giving  them  the  ability  to  interact  spontaneously  with  Promesa,  similar  to  how  they  would  interact  with  a  friend.     Tactics:   o Create  forum  where  residents  can  write  about  lost  items,  private  social  events  or  community  service  opportunities   o Host  monthly  contests  based  on  content  submitted  by  residents.    For  example,  have  residents  post  interesting  articles  and  whoever   gets  the  most  comments  wins  a  prize.  


Lorem  Ipsum  

29  

27  

Logistics   TIMELINE   Below  is  a  rough  outline  of  how  La  Promesa  can  encourage  initial  usage  and  introduce  their  new  residents  to  the  Facebook  page  and  the   features  it  provides.     • Have  Facebook  up  and  running  before  the  first  move-­‐ins  so  that  it  will  immediately  be  available  for  the  residents  and  La  Promesa  can   start  to  encourage  usage  from  the  beginning.     • Upon  their  first  move-­‐in,  give  residents  a  handout  that  outlines  the  useful  features  of  La  Promesa’s  Facebook  page.  Leasing  agents   should  go  over  the  information  with  residents  and  let  them  know  about  any  current  deals,  giveaways  and  competitions  available  at  the   moment.     • Offer  a  special  deal  or  incentive  for  new  residents  who  “like”  the  Facebook  page.       • Offer  a  special  one-­‐time  incentive  for  residents  who  pay  their  first  month  of  rent  via  the  Facebook  page.  This  will  encourage  initial  trial   and  make  them  more  likely  to  pay  this  way  in  the  future.       • The  rent  paying  and  maintenance  features  will  be  the  key  draw-­‐ins  to  the  Facebook  page  but  during  the  time  of  initial  trial,  other   content  needs  to  be  available  so  that  residents  are  aware  of  the  other  features  like  the  blog.         • During  the  heaviest  move-­‐in  period,  host  some  sort  of  contest  where  people  take  a  picture  of  their  move  in  process  or  of  their  fully   decorated  new  home.  Encourage  residents  to  “like”  their  favorite  and  the  one  with  the  biggest  reaction  should  receive  a  prize.     • Host  a  “house  warming”  apartment-­‐wide  event  as  soon  as  the  apartment  reaches  around  60  percent  occupancy  so  that  people  can  get   to  know  their  new  neighbors.  After  the  event  post  pictures  and  ask  residents  to  tell  their  favorite  stories  from  the  event.  

 


28   Ipsum    Lorem  

30  

Budget   Activity  

Hours  

Billing  Rate  

Billable  

Designing  of  Facebook  

10  

$50  

$500  

Training  of  Forestar  Employees  

5  

$50  

$250  

Social  Media  Monitoring  

3  

$50  

$150  

Facebook  Promotion  

10  

$50  

$500  

Competitor  Identification  

3  

$50  

$150  

Time  Subtotal  

$1,550  

  Out  of  Pocket  Expense  

Cost  

Development  of  Facebook  

$40,000  

Monthly  Maintenance  

$1,000  

Hosting  Fee  

$500  

Out  of  Pocket  Subtotal  

$41,500  

  Total    

 

$43,050  


Lorem  Ipsum  

Conclusion  

31  

29  

It  is  our  belief  that  with  this  plan,  Forestar  will  successfully  create  and  maintain  a  social  media  presence  that  will  keep  residents  pleased  and   decrease  the  overall  turnover  rate.  Forestar  is  a  company  that  prides  itself  on  the  core  values  of  stewardship,  foresight  and  high  standards  and   this  plan  successfully  delivers  on  all  of  these  aspects.  La  Promesa’s  environmentally  friendly  design  will  ensure  a  high-­‐quality  standard  of  living   for  residents  and  the  surrounding  communities.  Elements  of  our  plan  such  as  the  rent  payment  portal  via  Facebook  and  the  maintenance   tracker  show  your  company’s  ability  to  foresee  trends  of  the  future  and  be  ahead  of  the  curve.  And  lastly,  this  plan  shows  that  you  value  your   residents  and  want  to  provide  them  with  a  high-­‐quality  living  experience.  La  Promesa  provides  an  ideal  living  experience  by  allowing  residents   to  opt-­‐in  to  any  and  all  aspects  of  the  complex’s  social  media  page.  By  giving  residents  this  opportunity  instead  of  forcing  it  upon  them,  it  will   increase  their  favorability  and  persuade  them  to  renew  their  leases  with  La  Promesa  for  years  to  come.     Forestar  can  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  this  plan  by  measuring  the  occupancy  rate  on  the  one-­‐year  anniversary  of  the  initial  wave  of  first   leases.    In  the  apartment  industry,  96  percent  occupancy  shows  that  residents  are  satisfied  and  are  renewing  their  leases,  thereby  decreasing   turnover.    Our  plan  aims  to  have  96  percent  of  the  original  occupants  re-­‐sign  their  leases  and  for  the  complex  to  reach  a  96  percent  overall   occupancy  rate  by  the  end  of  its  second  year.  

Future  Recommendations  

Although  we  focused  mainly  on  Facebook  throughout  our  presentation,  we  also  feel  that  there  are  other  strategies  and  tactics  that  could  be   implemented,  and  if  used  effectively  could  help  accomplish  our  goal  of  maintaining  residents  and  keeping  them  satisfied.  Through  our   research  the  second-­‐most  used  social  media  site  was  Twitter.  Because  we  found  that  people  did  not  like  being  spammed  on  their  Twitter   accounts,  we  recommend  that  you  create  multiple  accounts  for  specific  information.  For  example,  an  account  for  La  Promesa  maintenance   alerts,  @PromesaMaintenance,  that  would  remind  residents  to  drip  their  faucets  if  the  weather  is  going  to  freeze  or  let  them  know  that  the   elevator  was  broken  and  when  it  would  be  fixed.  You  could  create  another  account  for  La  Promesa  events,  @PromesaEvents,  which  could   alert  people  of  the  different  activities  going  on  in  the  complex.  We  recommend  this  strategy  for  Twitter  because  it  is  a  media  outlet  that  does   not  take  a  lot  of  effort  to  maintain,  and  it  allows  people  to  follow  only  what  they  want.  It  allows  the  residents  to  see  what  they  want  to  see,   and  only  what  they  want  to  see,  so  that  they  do  not  get  annoyed  or  bombarded  with  too  much  information.     To  go  along  with  the  separate  Twitter  accounts  we  recommend  having  an  email  and  text  messaging  system  that  notifies  all  residents  of  only   important  information.  This  is  not  an  outlet  that  you  want  to  use  often,  just  for  things  that  are  important  and  need  to  be  communicated  to   everyone.  The  University  of  Texas  has  a  system  like  this  that  is  already  in  place.  The  university  will  text  message  students  as  a  way  to  get   people  interested  in  your  complex  just  through  visiting  the  website  and  send  them  emails  with  alerts  about  emergency  siren  testing  or  any   urgent  information  that  needs  to  be  passed  along  to  a  large  group  of  people.     Finally,  we  feel  that  it  is  very  important  to  have  an  interactive  and  appealing  website  that  has  YouTube  videos  and  a  blog.  Both  of  these  are   ways  for  people  to  see  what  others  are  saying  about  the  La  Promesa  complex,  and  a  way  for  you  to  engage  with  prospective  residents  and   current  residents.  A  YouTube  video  posted  on  the  site  of  the  apartments  and  amenities  that  are  in  the  complex  would  also  be  useful  because     it  would  allow  people  to  get  a  feel  for  what  the  complex  is  like  without  having  to  actually  visit.  


30   Ipsum    Lorem  

Appendix  A  

32  

QUALTRICS  SURVEY   1. How  long  have  you  lived  at  your  current  apartment  complex?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Less  than  1  year   103   75%   2   Between  1  and  2  years   22   16%   3   Between  2  and  3  years   8   6%   4   Between  3  and  4  years   1   1%   5   More  than  4  years   4   3%     Total   138   100%     2. How  satisfied  are  you  with  your  current  apartment  complex?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Extremely  Satisfied   26   19%   2   Somewhat  Satisfied   70   51%   3   Neutral   15   11%   4   Somewhat  Satisfied   17   12%   5   Extremely  Satisfied   10   7%     Total   138   100%     3. How  did  you  find  out  about  your  current  apartment  complex?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Search  engine   10   7%   2   Word  of  Mouth   64   47%   3   Referral   33   24%   4   Drive-­‐by/Walk-­‐by   17   13%   5   Other  (please  specify)   11   8%     Total   135   100%   Other:   • Realtor   • Agent   • Craigslist    

4.  What  is  the  MOST  important  thing  that  you  look  for  when  deciding   which  apartment  complex  to  live  in?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Management   5   4%   2   Amenities   20   15%   3   Location   89   66%   4   Roommate  matching   9   7%   5   Customer  service   1   1%   6   Social  events   1   1%   7   Community   10   7%     Total   135   100%     5.  What  is  the  SECOND  MOST  important  thing  that  you  look  for  when   deciding  which  apartment  complex  to  live  in?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Management   22   16%   2   Amenities   61   45%   3   Location   31   23%   4   Roommate  matching   10   7%   5   Customer  service   5   4%   6   Social  events   0   0%   7   Community   6   4%     Total   135   100%    


Lorem  Ipsum   6.  Which  social  media  networks  are  you  active  on  at  least  once   a  week?  (Select  all  that  apply)   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Facebook   132   98%   2   Twitter   85   63%   3   Pinterest   37   27%   4   Foursquare   8   6%   5   LinkedIn   18   13%   6   Other  (Please  specify)   1   1%   7   None   1   1%     Total   135   100%              Other:   • Tumblr,  Goodreads     7. How  often  do  you  check  your  Facebook?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Once  a  week   1   1%   2   A  few  times  a  week   8   6%   3   Once  a  day   16   12%   4   A  few  times  a  day   78   59%   5   Almost  all  day   29   22%     Total   132   100%       8. How  often  do  you  check  your  Twitter  page?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Once  a  week   4   5%   2   A  few  times  a  week   15   18%   3   Once  a  day   15   18%   4   A  few  times  a  day   34   40%   5   Almost  all  day   17   20%     Total   85   100%          

33  

31  

9. Does  your  apartment  complex  have  a  Facebook   page?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   32   24%   2   No   23   17%   3   Unsure   80   59%     Total   135   100%     10.  Have  you  “liked”  your  apartment’s  Facebook  page?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   13   41%   2   No   19   59%     Total   32   100%     11.  Does  your  apartment  complex  have  a  Twitter  page?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   3   2%   2   No   27   20%   3   Unsure   104   78%     Total   134   100%     12.  Are  you  following  your  apartment  complex  on  Twitter?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   2   67%   2   No   1   33%     Total   3   100%     13.  Would  you  interact  with  your  apartment  on  Facebook  if  they   had  a  page?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   11   48%   2   No   12   52%     Total   23   100%    


32   Ipsum    Lorem  

   

 

14. Would  you  interact  with  your  apartment  on  Twitter  if   they  had  a  page?     #   Answer   Response   Percent     1   Yes   7   26%     2   No   20   74%       Total   27   100%     15. If  you  were  looking  for  an  apartment,  would  you  be  more  or   less  inclined  to  look  into  one  with  an  active  social  media   presence?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   33   26%   2   No   52   41%   3   Unsure   41   33%     Total   126   100%     16. What  could  your  apartment  do  to  motivate  you  to  interact   with  them  through  social  media?  (Select  all  that  apply)   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Offer  a  promotion  in   108   85%   exchange  for  liking  the   page   2   Posted  news  about   48   38%   complex   3   Hosted  monthly  prize   77   61%   giveaways   4   Posted  due  dates  for   56   44%   bills  and  rent   5   Posted  tips  for  how  to   33   26%   live  more  eco-­‐friendly   6   Announce  apartment-­‐ 49   39%   wide  social  events   7   Advertised  local  deals   74   58%   relevant  to  residence  

34   17. What  things  would  you  be  willing  to  post  on  your  apartment’s   social  media  page?  (Select  all  that  apply)   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Pictures  from   26   20%   apartment  events   2   Replies  to  messages   36   28%   posted  by  apartment   3   Invitations  to   25   20%   individually  planned   social  events   4   Complaints   58   46%   5   Maintenance  requests   69   54%   6   Other  (please  specify)   1   1%   7   Nothing   34   27%   Other:   • Pictures  of  inside/outside  apartment     18. How  often  would  you  like  to  receive  a  newsletter  from  your   apartment  complex?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Monthly   58   46%   2   Bi-­‐monthly   17   13%   3   Weekly   4   3%   4   Daily   1   1%   5   Never   47   37%     Total   23   100%     19.  Would  you  attend  a  party  hosted  by  your  apartment   complex?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   61   48%   2   No   65   52%     Total   23   100%      


Lorem  Ipsum    20. Would  you  want  your  apartment  complex  to  notify  you     about  apartment  events  though  social  media?   #   1   2      

 

Answer   Yes   No   Total  

Response   75   51   23  

Percent   60%   40%   100%  

  21. What  would  make  you  more  likely  to  attend  a  party  hosted     by  your  apartment  complex?  (Select  all  that  apply)     #   Answer   Response   Percent     1   Non-­‐tenant  friends   55   44%     welcome   2   Free  drinks  offered   96   76%     3   Free  food  offered   99   79%     4   Centered  around   33   26%     televised  event   5   Other  (please  specify)   3   2%     6   I  would  not  attend   19   15%     Other:     • Free  apartment  stuff/free  rent     • Pool  party     • T-­‐shirt         22. How  do  you  prefer  to  pay  your  bills?     #   Answer   Response   Percent     1   In  person   29   23%     2   Through  the  mail   22   17%     3   Through  apartment’s   71   56%     website   4   Other  (please  specify)   3   3%       Total   23   100%                Other:     • Automatic  bill  pay     • Online      

         

35   23. Would  you  regularly  check  the  status  of  your  bills   if  available  online?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   109   87%   2   No   17   13%     Total   126   100%    

24. What  is  your  age?     Total  responses-­‐  124     25. What  is  your  gender?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Yes   19   15%   2   No   105   85%     Total   124   100%     26. How  much  do  you  pay  for  rent  (not  including  utilities)  per   month  at  your  apartment?   #   Answer   Response   Percent   1   Less  than  $500   13   10%   2   Between  $500-­‐599   26   21%   3   Between  $600-­‐699   16   13%   4   Between  $700-­‐799   31   25%   5   Between  $800-­‐899   18   15%   6   Between  $900-­‐999   7   6%   7   Over  $1,000   9   7%   8   I’d  prefer  not  to  say   4   3%     Total   124   100%    

33  


34   Ipsum    Lorem  

Appendix  B  

36  

FOCUS  GROUP  MODERATOR  SCRIPT   Apartment  Living   1. Name,  age,  what  apartments  have  you  lived  in?   2. What  is  something  you  don’t  like  about  your  current  apartment  complex?   3. How  did  you  find  out  about  your  current  apartment  complex?   4. Why  did  you  choose  this  place  rather  than  other  places?   5. Has  anyone  resigned  a  lease  or  why  did  you  choose  to  not  resign  your  lease?   6. What  were  things  that  you  liked  about  your  apartment  complexes?   7. Did  you  feel  like  there  was  a  community  where  you  lived?  If  so,  what  made  that  feel  like  a  community  to  you?  (Ex:  You  felt  friendly   with  neighbors  etc.)   8. What  did  the  management  of  the  apartment  complex  do  to  make  it  either  a  community  feel  or  not?   9. What  is  the  most  important  thing  for  you  when  looking  for  an  apartment  complex?   10. Have  you  ever  attended  an  event  hosted  by  your  apartment  complex?   11. What  would  make  you  more  likely  to  attend  an  event  that  they  hosted?   12. Would  it  matter  to  you  if  your  apartment  complex  supported  sustainable  living  or  going  green?   13. How  do  you  not  want  your  apartment  complex  to  communicate  with  you?  What  would  be  too  far?     Social  Media   1. What  are  some  of  the  social  media  sites  you  use  and  describe  your  usage?   2. Other  than  for  social  reasons,  do  you  use  social  media  to  engage  with  businesses,  fan  pages,  organizations,  etc.?   3. If  so,  what  are  some  of  the  businesses  you  engage  with?  How  often  do  you  visit  their  page?   4. With  ones  you  are  involved  with,  what  is  it  that  they  do  to  bring  you  back  to  that  page?     Apartment  Living  and  Social  Media   1. How  does  your  apartment  complex  choose  to  communicate  with  you?   2. Do  you  feel  like  it  has  been  effective?   3. How  would  you  want  your  apartment  complex  to  communicate  with  you?   4. Which  medium  would  be  most  effective  for  you  to  interact  with  your  apartment  complex?  (Ex:  blog,  Facebook,  website,  email)   5. What  could  your  apartment  do  to  motivate  you  to  interact  with  them  through  social  media?  (Ex:  posted  bill  notices,  advertised  events)   6. What  things  would  you  be  willing  to  post  on  your  apartment’s  social  media  page?   7. What  would  deter  you  from  interacting  with  your  apartment’s  fan  page?  

 


Lorem  Ipsum  

37  

35  

FOCUS  GROUP  SCRIBE  NOTES  

 

Apartment  Living   6. Name,  age,  what  apartments  you  have  lived  in?   • Danielle,  Texan  West  Campus,  21   • Brian,  Point  South   • Destiny,  University  Village   • Chandler,  Boardwalk   • Hayden,  Block  on  25th   • Stephanie,  Block  on  25th   • All  are  college  students   7. What  is  something  you  don’t  like  about  your  apartment   complex?   • Security  issues   o Cars  getting  broken  into   o Someone  held  up  at  gunpoint   o Home  invasions   • Maintenance  issues   o Hole  in  ceiling  for  two  months   o Mold   o No  power  for  a  week,  windows  busted  out   o No  AC  in  August   o Emailed  and  called  maintenance  but  they  were   non-­‐responsive  (Block  on  25th)   • How  did  they  handle  this?   o Got  parents  involved   o E-­‐mailed  constantly   8. How  did  you  find  out  about  your  current  apartment   complex?   • In  relation  to  friends   o Freshman  roommate  wanted  to  live  at  Block   o Across  from  Sig  Ep  house   • Word  of  mouth  (two  people)   • Drive  by  and  found,  walked  in  and  asked  for  rates   • Location  in  relation  to  friends/  prices  seemed  to  be   top  two  concerns  

1. Why  did  you  choose  this  place  rather  than  other  places?   • Friends  were  living  there,  but  not  main  factor   2. Has  anyone  resigned  a  lease  or  why  did  you  choose  not  to   resign  your  lease?   • Only  one  person  stayed  in  same  complex,  but  moved   to  a  different  unit   3. What  were  things  you  liked  about  your  apartment   complexes?   • Free  stuff   o Occasionally  had  free  beer   o Apartment  employees  were  dumb  and   residents  could  talk  their  way  into  free  things   (Ex:  “So  and  so  gave  me  this  price,  so  you   should  give  me  this  price  as  well)   • Amenities   o Free  pool  to  use   o Free  copier  to  use   4. Did  you  feel  like  there  was  a  community  where  you  lived?   What  made  that  feel  like  a  community  to  you?   • Already  knew  them  before  they  moved  in   • Where  they  are  now,  keeps  to  themselves   • Pool  parties,  pizza  parties,  etc.  Most  people  would  stop   by  and  grab  food  and  leave   5. What  did  management  of  the  apartment  complex  do  to  make   it  either  a  community  feel  or  not?   • Tried  to  host  parties,  but  let  people  in  that  didn’t  live   there  and  that  made  residents  not  want  to  go   o Tailgates  for  football  games   o Free  pool  parties  with  free  BBQ  and  other  food   • Block  put  things  on  Facebook,  but  it  was  annoying   because  there  were  too  many  status  updates  and   messages   • A  lot  of  flyers  on  doors,  but  annoying  because  most  of  the   things  were  things  they  already  knew  (Ex:  rent  due)  


Lorem   36   Ipsum   9. What  is  the  most  important  thing  for  you  when  looking  for  an   apartment  complex?   • Good  management  company  that  responds  timely   and  appropriately   • Security  guard  or  cameras   • Parking/guest  parking   • Customer  reviews  would  make  them  think  that  these   things  are  happening   10. Have  you  ever  attended  an  event  hosted  by  your  apartment   complex?   • Yes,  but  not  for  a  long  time—just  got  free  food  and  left   11. What  would  make  you  more  likely  to  attend  an  event  they   hosted?   • Free  stuff  (drinks,  food)   • Didn’t  do  it  as  often,  annoying  to  have  too  many  parties   • Tailgates  for  away  games  once  a  semester   • Smaller  events  where  they  would  not  have  other  plans   (Ex:  not  for  the  Superbowl  because  they  probably  have   their  own  plans  instead)   • More  likely  to  go  after  graduating  college,  especially  if   they  are  living  in  a  new  city   12. Would  it  matter  to  you  if  your  apartment  complex  supported   sustainable  living  or  going  green?   • More  concerned  with  cost  right  now  than  to  worry  about   it   • If  it  helped  cut  costs,  then  it  would  be  a  good  thing  (Ex:   promoting  light  bulbs  that  will  reduce  energy  bill)   13. How  do  you  not  want  your  apartment  complex  to   communicate  with  you?  What  would  be  too  far?   • Email  only  for  necessary  things   • No  text  messages  because  it  is  annoying   • Facebook  is  too  much,  social  media  is  too  much  especially   for  unnecessary  events    

38   Social  Media   1. What  are  some  of  the  social  media  sites  you  use  and  describe   your  usage?   • Facebook   o To  communicate  with  friends   o Events   o Groups   o Guys  only  use  Facebook  every  now  and  then   • Twitter   o News   o Local  events,  celebrities,  etc.   o Football,  sports,  NFL  updates   2. Other  than  for  social  reasons,  do  you  use  social  media  to   engage  with  businesses,  fan  pages,  organizations,  etc.?   • Use  Twitter  to  follow  news  and  discover  local  events,   celebrities,  etc.   3. What  are  some  of  the  businesses  you  engage  with?   • Didn’t  answer  this  question,  but  rather  why  they  engage   with  businesses:  useful  information,  coupons,  giveaways   for  interacting  with  brands   4. How  often  do  you  visit  their  page?   • Only  visit  when  looking  for  something  they  need   • Not  that  frequently   5. With  ones  you  are  involved  with,  what  is  it  that  they  do  to   bring  you  back  to  that  page?   • Discounts,  coupons,  promotional  events   6. What  would  a  company  have  to  do  to  get  you  involved  with   their  social  media  page?   • Post  relevant  and  timely  posts   • Do  not  post  unnecessary  information   • Do  not  bombard  them  with  too  much  information    


Lorem  Ipsum   Apartment  Living  and  Social  Media   1. How  does  your  apartment  complex  choose  to  communicate   with  you?   • Block  used  Facebook   • Email   2. Do  you  feel  like  it  has  been  effective?   • Block  using  Facebook  was  too  excessive  and  not  effective   • Used  Facebook  in  addition  to  emails  which  made  it   excessive   3. How  would  you  want  your  apartment  complex  to   communicate  with  you?   • Rather  go  to  their  website  than  their  Facebook  page   • Discounts,  incentives  and  events  would  be  nice  on  the   Facebook  page   • Email  is  preferred  when  communicating  about  bills,  rent,   etc.   • Do  not  want  the  same  information  coming  from  two   places;  this  creates  clutter   • Be  selective   4. Which  medium  would  be  most  effective  for  you  to  interact   with  your  apartment  complex?   • Facebook  has  potential  if  it  is  used  correctly   o Could  be  effective  at  a  different  stage  of  life,  like  if   you  are  in  a  new  city  and  didn’t  know  anybody   o Ideas  for  events?-­‐  Sunday  night  football   • Blog   • Email   • Twitter   • Again,  they  must  be  used  effectively   5. What  could  your  apartment  do  to  motivate  you  to  interact   with  them  through  social  media?  (Ex:  posted  bill  notices,   advertised  apartment  events)   • Discounts  and  deals  for  places  in  the  areas   • Mention  the  apartment  complex  and  get  a  discount   • Promotional  ideas    

39  

37  

6. What  things  would  you  be  willing  to  post  on  your   apartment’s  social  media  page?   • Lost  of  stolen  things  for  the  rest  of  the  apartment   complex  to  see  and  look  out  for   • Recommendations  for  other  tenants  to  try  (Ex:   restaurants,  bars,  etc.)   • Key  would  be  getting  tenants  to  communicate  on  the   page,  not  just  for  the  apartment  complex  to  give  you   information   7. What  would  deter  you  from  interacting  with  your   apartment’s  fan  page?   • Excessive  amounts  of  information   • Unnecessary  information  

SELECT  FOCUS  GROUP  QUOTES   "It  was  really  frustrating  having  issues  in  our  apartment  and   not  knowing  when  the  issues  were  going  to  be  fixed."     "My  apartment  likes  to  post  things  on  our  doors,  and  it  just   gets  really  annoying  because  they  don't  seem  to  help  me  in   any  way."     "Last  year  my  apartment  complex  had  a  Facebook  but  I  don't   think  i  ever  looked  at  it  because  there  was  no  reason  to."     "At  our  apartment  we  had  some  security  issues,  and  the   managers  never  really  did  anything  about  them  when  we  told   them  about  the  things  that  were  going  on."  


38   Ipsum    Lorem  

40  

Appendix  C  

COMPLETE  LIST  OF  APARTMENT  COMPLEXES  WITHIN  FIVE  MILES    

 

AREA   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   FNW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW  

PROJECT   ANDERSON  OAKS   AUDOBON  SQUARE  APARTMENTS   BALCONES  CLUB  APARTMENTS   BLACONES  RANCH   CHESPEAKE   DAKOTA  SPRINGS   HIDDEN  TIMBER   HUNTER’S  CHASE  APARTMENTS   INTERNATIONAL  RESIDENCE   MARTHA’S  VINEYARD   PARK  WEST  APARTMENTS   PARKSIDE  AT  LAKE  CREEK   POLO  CLUB  APARTMENTS   SUMMER  GROVE   SUMMIT  CREEK   THE  MEADOWS   TOSCANA   WESTWOOD  APARTMENTS   ACACIA  CLIFFS   ALARA  CANYON  CREEK   ALEXAN  RIBELIN  RANCH   ALEXAN  VISTAS   AMBERLEY  RIDGE   ARBORETUM  OAKS   BALCONES  WOODS   BRIDGEHEAD  APARTMENTS   BROADSTONE  GREAT  HILLS   CANTEBREA  CROSSING   CANYON  CREEK   CANYON  SPRINGS   CG  AT  CANYON  CREEK   CHANNING’S  MARK   CIMARRON  CROSSING  

ADDRESS   9219  ANDERSON  MILL   12425  MELLOW  MEADOW   9218  BALCONES  CLUB  DRIVE   13090  POND  SPRINGS  ROAD   12300  HYMEADOW   12215  HUNTERS  CHASE  DRIVE   13359  PONDS  DPRINGS   12342  HUNTER’S  CHASE   9815  COPPER  CREEK   7920  SAN  FELIPE   106169  MELLOW  M EADOWS   10707  LAKE  CREEK  PARKWAY   8519  CAHILL  DRIVE   7905  SAN  FELIPE   7900  SAN  FELIPE   10507  MELLOW  MEADOW   13380  HWY  183   12403  MELLOW  MEADOW   7201  HART  LN   8025  FM  620  NORTH   9900  MCNEIL  DR     11908  VOLENTE  RD   9617  GREAT  HILLS  TRAIL   11215  RESEARCH  BLVD   6001  SHEPHERD  M OUNTAIN   8701  BLUFFSTONE  COVE   8021  N  FM  620   11316  JOLLYVILLE  RD   7700  CAPITAL  OF  TEXAS  HWY   9501  RR  620  N   11282  TAYLOR  DRAPER  LANE   9500  JOLLEYVILLE  RD  

YOB   1984   1986   1983   2007   1983   2006   1984   1984   1986   1986   1986   1984   1986   1985   1986   1983   2001   1984   1974   2001   2009   2008   1989   1984   1982   1986   1998   2007   1985   1997   2007   1986   1982  

OTHER  NAME                                       SAVANNAH  RIDGE   VISTAS  AT  CANYON  CREEK       VOLENTE  VILLAS         BROADSTONE  BLUFFSTONE              

UNITS   136   164   312   270   124   342   96   428   510   360   196   350   304   124   164   100   358   158   290   444   350   334   208   252   384   128   254   288   237   195   336   72   160  

 


Lorem  Ipsum  

AREA   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   NW   SW   SW  

   

41  

PROJECT   ESCALON  AT  CANYON  CREEK   FALLS  ON  BULL  CREEK   GABLES  GRANDVIEW   HARD  ROCK  CANYON   HIGH  OAKS   LAUREL  WOODS   MADISON  AT  THE  ARBORETUM   MARQUIS  AT  CAPROCK  CANYON   MARQUIS  AT  GREAT  HILLS   MARQUIS  AT  LADERA  VISTA   MARQUIS  AT  TREETOPS   MONTERONE  AT  CANYON  CREEK   MONTERONE  AT  STEINER  RANCH   MUSEO   NORTHLAND   NORTHLAND  AT  THE  ARBORETUM   POST  PARK  MESA   RANCHSTON  GARDEN  HOMES   RIVERLODGE   SHADOW  OAKS   SONTERRA  I   SONTERRA  II   SPICEWOOD  SPRINGS  APARTMENTS   TERRAZZO   THE  MCCUNTOCK   TINTARA  AT  CANYON  CREEK   TINTARA  AT  CANYON  CREEK  II   TRAMOR   TRAMOR  AT  THE  HILLS   VERANDAH  AT  GRANDVIEW  HILL   VILLAGE  OAKS   WIND  RIVER  CROSSING   WOODSTONE   GABLES  WESTLAKE   NALLE  WOODS  

ADDRESS   9715  NORTH  FM  620   8527  CAPITAL  OF  TEXAS  HWY   6500  CAPITAL  OF  TEXAS  HWY   10300  JOLLYVILLE  RD   11028  JOLLYVILLE  RD   8312  FATHOM  CIRCLE   10306  MORADO  COVE   4411  SPICEWOOD  SPRINGS   10050  GREAT  HILLS  TRAILS   11624  JOLLYVILLE  RD   5217  OLD  S PICEWOOD  SPRINGS   9009  FM  620   4500  STEINER  RANCH  BLVS   11266  TAYLOR  DRAPER  LANE   10610  MORADO  CIRCLE   11500  JOLLYBILLE  ROAD   5811  MESA  DRIVE   11602  ARGONNE  FOREST  TRAIL   10301  FM  2222   12148  JOLLYVILLE  ROAD   8901  FM  620  NORTH   10001  FM  620  NORTH   8617  SPICEWOOD  SPRINGS   8585    SPICEWOOD  SPRINGS   6804  N  CAPITAL  OF  TEXAS   7655  NORTH  FM  620   11350  FOUR  POINTS  DRIVE   9417  GREAT  HILLS  TRAIL   9009  GREAT  HILLS  TRAIL   8600  RR  620  NORTH   10929  VILLEYVILLE  RD   11411  RESEARCH  BLVD   4021  STECK  AVE   3500  CAPITOLD  OF  TEXAS  HWY   4700  N  CAPITAL  OF  TEXAS  HWY  

YOB   2003   1984   2005   1993   1984   1984   1995   1994   1995   1996   1997   2002   2003   1994   1986   1994   1991   1984   2000   1986   1999   2000   1984   1997   1995   2001   2002   1982   1982   2002   1984   1983   1979   2008   2005  

OTHER  NAME     ASPEN  HILLS             CAPROCK  CANYON   GREAT  HILLS  VILLAGE   CHEZ  MOI   CENTERGATE  TREETOPS   MANSIONS  AT  CANYON  CREEK   MANSIONS  AT  STEINER  RANCH   GABLES  AT  GREAT  HILLS   AMLI  AT  GREAT  HILLS   LA  MIRAGE,  JEFFERSON  @THE  ARBOR   GABLES  PARK  MESA               STATTON  PARK   WALDEN  OAKS  AT  BULL  CREEK   JEFFERSON  LAKES   JEFFERSON  CANYON     THE  HILLS              

39   UNITS   272   344   458   391   460   174   161   336   405   224   240   332   508   276   276   348   0   80   498   176   272   300   248   224   96   241   309   231   329   533   280   352   120   275   236  


40   Ipsum    Lorem  

Appendix  D  

42  

“Staying on the forefront of social media”

 


41  

 

•  Forestar is a real estate, mineral and fiber resource company •  La Promesa, or “promise” in Spanish, is Forestar’s newest luxury multi-family complex being built in Northwest Austin

Planbook Pg. 5  


42  

•  Problem •  Research •  Critical Issues •  Strategy •  Conclusion  


43  

 

Create a social media campaign that will increase resident retention rate by providing relevant information that creates an engaging community for residents

Planbook Pg. 5  


44  

 


45  

 

•  Age: 25-39 •  Marital Status: Single or married with kid(s) •  Education: BA or MA degree •  Employment: full-time •  Income: $35,000-$55,000 Planbook Pg. 6  


46  

Planbook Pg. 7-11  


47  

 

Planbook Pg. 7-11  


48  

Which social media sites are you active on?

Does your apartment complex have a Facebook?

150

Yes 24%

100

Unsure 59%

50 0

No 17%

How often do you check your Facebook? Once a week 1%

Almost all day 22%

Would you be more or less inclined to look into an apartment with an active social media presence?

A few times a week 6% Once a day 12%

60 A few times a day 59%

40 20 0 Yes

No

Unsure

Planbook Pg. 12  


49  

 

What could your apartment do to motivate you to interact with them through social media? 120

100

80

60

40

20

0 Offer a promotion

Post news about Hosted giveaways Post due dates for Post tips for ecoAnnounce Advertise local complex rent/bills friendly living apartment events deals

Planbook Pg. 12  


50  

•  "It was really frustrating having issues in our apartment and not knowing when the issues were going to be fixed.” •  "My apartment likes to post things on our doors, and it just gets really annoying because they don't seem to help me in any way.” •  "Last year my apartment complex had a Facebook but I don't think I ever looked at it because there was no reason to.” Planbook Pg. 13  


51  

 

Planbook Pg. 12  


52  

 


53  

 

1.  People aren’t as likely to opt-in to social media pages for apartment complexes due to negative past experiences. 2.  Very few residents are aware of their apartment complexes’ social media page. 3.  Many apartment complexes’ social media pages have only one-way communication causing residents to not interact with them. Planbook Pg. 15, 24-26  


54  

 


55  

 

•  Tabs offer visitors the chance to choose which content and features they want to view and use •  Few apartments are using tabs to their full capabilities •  For example: Delta Airlines offers a “Delta Assist” and “Ticket Counter” tab Planbook Pg. 16  


56  

Planbook(Pg.(18(  


57  

 

Planbook(Pg.(19(


58  

Planbook(Pg.(16(  


59  

Planbook(Pg.(20(  


60  

Planbook(Pg.(21(  


61  

 

Planbook(Pg.(17(  


62  

Planbook(Pg.(22(  


63  

Planbook(Pg.(23(  


64  

 


65  

 

•  Separate Twitter accounts corresponding with Facebook tabs •  E-mail and text messaging system •  YouTube videos •  Blog Planbook(Pg.(29(  


66  

Measure the occupancy rate after one year to have 96% of residents re-sign their leases and for the complex to reach 96% overall occupancy by the end of its second year

Planbook(Pg.(29(  


67  

 

Ac#vity(

Hours(

Billing(Rate(

10

$50

$500

Training of Forestar Employees

5

$50

$250

Social Media Monitoring

3

$50

$150

10

$50

$500

3

$50

$150

Time(Subtotal(

(

(

$1,550((

Out(of(Pocket(Expense(

(

(

Cost(

Designing of Facebook

Facebook Promotion Competitor identification

Development of Facebook

$40,000

Monthly Maintenance

$1,000

Hosting Fee

OOP(Subtotal( Total

Billable((

$500

(

(

$41,500(( $43,050

Planbook(Pg.(28(  


Lorem  Ipsum  

Thank  you.   Destiny  Bennett   Erin  Framel   Khrystyn  Henry   Danielle  Kaplan   Courtney  Mays   Hunter  Nevotti   Sapna  Patel  

 

 


Forestar Multifamily Campaign