Page 1

Jie Yang 6XULKYYOUTGR  'IGJKSOI 6UXZLUROU


JIE E YANG YANG Cell ++11 6 626 26 2 26 272 72 2 688 6888 88 Email E Em ail jjie.yang.1919@gmail.com ie.yang. g.119 g. 919@g @ ma @g ailil.c com om

EDUCATION May 2016 – Present

Architect Registration Examination

Spring 2011 – Spring 2014

Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) GPA: 3.86/4.00 960 E 3rd St., Los Angeles, CA 90013 USA

Spring 2008 – Winter 2010

Pasadena City College Major: Architecture 1570 E. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91106 USA

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE November N No ovember 2014 – P Pr Present res se en nt

Architectural Designer Foster +Partners San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA Achievement: Manage Part of Project Coordination with GC&Client Answer RFIs&Submittals Punch Listing

June – August 2013 13 3

A Architectural Intern Cube Architecture Designing Consultants LTD. Shenzhen, China Achievement: Construction Drawing

May – September Septem em em mbe ber be er 2012 2 12 20

Develop DD and CD BIM Coordination Presentation Delivery Site Observation

Competition Proposal

A Architectural Intern Oyler Wu Collaborative Los Angeles, California, USA Achievement: Physical/Digital Model Building Coordinating with Materials

May August Ma M ay – Au A gu g ust st 2011

Workshop at SCI-Arc (Grad Pavilion) Los Angeles, California, USA Achievement: Grad Pavilion Fabrication

2

Installation Fabrication Rendering

Physical modeling


SKILL Software

3D

Rhino, Maya, ZBrush, Revit, Grasshopper, MicroStation

2D

AutoCAD, MicroStation, Adobe Illustrator/ Photoshop/*O%FTJHO"GUFS&äFDU

Rendering

Maxwell, VRay, Mental Ray

CNC Milling SurfCam 3D Print

ZPrint/ MakerWare

PM

Newforma

Working with various materials (such as chipboard, museum board, styrene, acrylic, wood, steel, resin, 3D prints etc.)

Physical Modeling

Experienced with Lasercut and Makerbot 3D Printer Hand Drawing

Hand Drafting Sketching via various media (such as water color, charcoal, pen, pencil, etc.)

Language

4QFBLBOEXSJUFmVFOUMZJO&OHMJTIBOE.BOEBSJO (Nationality: America)

ACHIEVEMENT 2014

SCI-Arc Best Thesis Award & Graduation with Distinction

2014

Featured in Dwell on Design 2014 Exhibition

2014

Selected for SCI-Arc Annual Spring Show

2013

Selected for SCI-Arc Annual Spring Show/Continuing Student Scholarship

2012

Selected for SCI-Arc Annual Spring Show/Continuing Student Scholarship/ Ray & Shelly Kappe Scholarship

2012

Price for Excellence (partner with Nila Liem) in HYP Cup 2012 International Student Competition in Architectural Design: Architecture in Transformation

2010

2nd Place (partner with Anna Meloyan) in Architecture Design Charrette at Pasadena City College

PUBLICATION Magazine: UED Special Issue of 2012 HYP Competition (Issue 068)


JIE YANG 4

jie.yang.1919@gmail.com +1 626 272 6888


CONTENTS

PROFESSIONAL WORK: 002

Foster+Partners

010

Oyler Wu Collaborative

ACADEMIC WORK: 020

Mnemosyne Of A Broken Dimension Adviser: Dwayne Oyler

038

City Aperture Instructor: Russell Thomsen

058

City Ops Instructor: Dwayne Oyler

072

Field Operations Instructor: Volkan Alkanoglu

090

Design Development Instructor: Pavel Getov/Scott Uriu

102

Construction Document Instructor: Pavel Getov/Jay Vanos


© Apple


Foster + Partners Left Apple Park Facade


Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. -- Steve Jobs

Right Apple Park Master plan


© Apple

5


Š Apple

Š Apple

Apple Park Note: due to the non disclosure nature of this project. Sensitive information, image and drawing access are restricted.

The new apple campus is conceived with the inspiration of Californian spirit - pleasant climate, beautiful landscape and active outdoor lifestyle. It encourages an interactive, creative, and stimulating working environment, which is allowed by the advancing/radical design, construction methods and technology.

6


© Apple

© Apple

7


© Apple

Early sketch of the pods by Norman Foster

Note: due to the non disclosure nature of this project. Sensitive information, image and drawing access are restricted.

Like any Apple product, its form follows its function. The workplace was designed for people to open to each other and nature. Modules, known as pods, have been created. Steve Jobs’ idea was to repeat the pods over and over: QPEGPSPåDFXPSL QPEGPSUFBNXPSL QPEGPS socializing, like a piano roll playing a Philip Glass composition.

8


© Apple

© Apple

9


Š Oyler Wu Collaborative

10


Oyler Wu Collaborative Left Netscape: SCI-Arc Graduation Pavilion 2011


Oyler Wu Collaborative is an experimental architecture BOEEFTJHOlSNMPDBUFEJO-PT "OHFMFT $BMJGPSOJB5IFPĂĽDF approaches architecture and design with a critical and rigorous intent that challenges the typical vision of the built environment. Recent works encompass a variety of scales, from products and installations to residential and institutional buildings.

Right Wire-frame Drawing of Screenplay


Š Oyler Wu Collaborative

13


Netscape: SCI-Arc Graduation Pavilion 2011 Netscape utilizes a double layer of netting JOWBSZJOHDPOlHVSBUJPOTUPDSFBUFBUISFF EJNFOTJPOBMlFMEPGCJMMPXJOHTIBEFMPVWFST Based on a conventional knitting technique, like that used in the making of a sweater, the pavilion exploits the malleability of this technique as it stretches to conform to the three-dimensional shape of the structure.

Responsibility: Schematic Design Fabrication (roping/ fabric/steel work) Physical modeling

14


© Dwayne Oyler

© Dwayne Oyler

15


ScreenPlay Permanent Collection, 2012 SF MOMA Screenplay is conceived of as a ‘play’ on one’s visual perception. This twenty-one foot MPOHTDSFFOXBMMJTDPOTUSVDUFEPGGPSUZlWF thousand linear feet of rope strung through a series of lightweight steel frames. The wall is designed with the intention of provoking a sense of curiosity by slowly revealing its form and complexity through physical and visual engagement with the work.

Responsibility: Fabrication (roping/steel work) Physical modeling

© Oyler Wu Collaborative

16


© Oyler Wu Collaborative

© Oyler Wu Collaborative

17


Furniture Prototype This furniture collection has been exhibit in SF MOMA in 2012 They are currently in the prototyping stage, includes a dining chair, an armchair with ottoman, and a chaise.

Responsibility: Fabrication 3D digital modeling Rendering Autocad Drawing

Š Oyler Wu Collaborative

18


© Oyler Wu Collaborative

© Oyler Wu Collaborative

19


20


Left South Elevation Detail

Mnemosyne Of A Broken Dimension

UG Thesis

Adviser: Dwayne Oyler


At times all I need is a brief glimpse, an opening in the midst of an incongruous landscape, a glint of light in the fog, the dialogue of two passersby meeting in the crowd, and I think that, setting out from there, I will put together, piece by piece, the perfect city, made of fragments mixed with the rest, of instants separated by intervals, of signals one sends out, not knowing who receives them. If I tell you that the city toward which my journey tends is discontinuous in space and time, now scattered, now more condensed, you must not believe the search for it can stop. -- Italo Calvino, “The City Within�, Invisible Cities

Right Physical Model Detail


23


Concept This thesis raises the question: Can the bits and pieces form the perfect something or delusion of the perfection? 5IJTUIFTJTJTBQSPDFTTPGFYQMPSJOHBOESFlOJOHFYQFSJNFOUBM techniques in architectural geometry and space, which often is VOEFSTUPPEBThBDDJEFOUBM vBXLXBSEBOEJOEFUFSNJOBUF4QFDJlDBMMZ the notion of debris is drawn into the process. The notion of debris has been historically and contemporaneously an architectural element that is normally understood as a fragment of architecture’s destruction. This thesis considers debris as a vector of creation for new architectures. While some architects and artists have attempted to utilize debris, they have often done so as aggregations or assemblages of debris, which are directly related to its physical materiality. However, this thesis reconsiders the ways to extend the reading of debris in a more contemporary sense (in this case, digitally), in which it explores how “errorsâ€? of contemporary representation techniques generate forms of debris and how it will apply to architecture in terms of enclosure skin, opening, space, and texture. %FCSJTJOUIJTDBTFBDUTBTBXPSLFSPGBlFMEPGCJUTBOEQJFDFT %JäFSFOUQJFDFTPGEFCSJTJOEJWJEVBMMZDBOOPUCFEJTDFSOFECFDBVTF UIFZDBOPOMZCFVOEFSTUPPEXJUIJOUIFEFCSJTlFME BOEUBLFOEJHJUBMMZ  FEHFTPGFBDICJUCMFOENPSFSBEJDBMMZJOUPUIFEFCSJTlFME

N

Site Plan

24

Render


25


Site: Hong Kong The technique used here is 3D scanning. 10% of Kowloon Walled City, both exterior massing and interior space (see the physical model), are scanned, in which the 3D scanning computer program breaks down the two into hundreds and thousands of pieces, and then tries to put these bits and pieces back together. In this process, accidentally some information gets lost and misinterpreted, where the gap between the “repaired” and the “original,” is created.

In this process, the “error” is exaggerated steps by steps, where a “new” form is generated.

Original Exterior Mass

Step 1

Original Interior Space

Step 1

26

Step 2

Step 2


Exterior Scan Bits

Interior Scan Bits

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

27


Contour Plan Drawing

Contour Section Drawing

28


In some ways, this thesis is about organizations and parts, and is therefore akin to some of experimental work by Roland Snooks or Casey Rehm, especially in how it moves from materiality to the digital as a way of envisioning post-assemblages. Here, architectural elements such as a mullion and an I beam cannot be understood BTUIFhEFCSJTvPSUIFCJUTPGBTQFDJlDQJFDFPGBSDIJUFDUVSFCVUUIF components of the architecture, which usually are how a piece of architecture is constructed. However, this thesis reverses the engineering – it starts with a complete piece of architecture which was built from components like a mullion or an I beam, break it down into “debris,� and then try to put them back together and reconstruct something through the debris lFME5IFSFGPSF UIFCJUTBSFFWFSZUIJOHBOEFWFSZUIJOHJTUIFCJUT

Concept Drawing

29


09 Level 12 54.6m 03

Level 11 50.3m 03 Level 10 46.0m Level 09 41.8m Level 08 37.5m

Level 07 33.2m

Level 06 29.0m

Level 05 22.6m Level 04 18.3m

Level 03 12.8m 02

Level 02 8.5m

01

Level 01 4.6m

08

UG Level 01 -8.2m

UG Level 02 -12.2m

Section AA 01 Entrance 02 Mezzanine 03 Reading Room 04 Auditorium 05 Parking 06 Book Storage 07 Core of Books 08 Plaza 09 Cafe

30

10m

20m

30m

40m

50m

60m


09

03

04 04

03

03

07 03 03

03

03

01

06

06

05

70m

80m

90m

100m

110m

120m

31130m


04

04

03

07 03

03

Section BB 01 Entrance 02 Mezzanine 03 Reading Room 04 Auditorium 05 Conference Room 06 Core of Books 07 Free zone 08 Cafe 09 Mechanical Room 10 Parking

32

10


02

02

01

Plan 02

07

03

03 06

05

05

05

05

03

03 05 07

05

05

05

05

03

Plan 05

01 03 03

04 04

08

Plan 10

33


South Interior Elevation

34

East Interior Elevation


North Interior Elevation

Physical Model Exterior Elevation Detail

West Interior Elevation

35


36


3D Cut Model

37


38


Left Physical Section Model Detail

Dynamic Architecture System Anabolic, Metabolic, Catabolic

3B Studio

Instructor: Russell Thomsen Partner: Nila Liem


“Architecture is a hazardous mixture of omnipotence and impotence. It is CZEFlOJUJPOBDIBPUJDBEWFOUVSF*O other words, the utopian enterprise.� -- Rem Koolhaas, S, M, L, XL

3B Studio challenges us in many ways. One of them is group work. Two people working together requires a lot of cooperation and negociation. I have learned a lot from working wiith peole this semester. Another challenge is that we need to complete design phase in a very short period of time. 3B studio introduces us to the comprehensive development of a building, from conception to largescale detail, with an emphasis on the assimilation of building systems. Students examine interrelated systems which are able to both modify the spatial structure of a building and articulate expectations of their performance structurally, thermally, acoustically and environmentally. In this studio, along with AS3040 – Design Documentation Analysis and Development, students are expected to demonstrate how their buildings explore and resolve issues of egress, codes and life safety.

Right Physical Model


41


Site Bowery, New York

The studio project is to be located on the site of the recently completed New Museum (by SANAA) in New York. The New Museum is located on the Bowery at a pivotal geographic and cultural intersection where generations of artists have lived, worked, and contributed to the ongoing cultural dialogue of the nation. *O4P)PXBTBEFSFMJDUCSPXOlFMETJUF CVUOPXJUJTBWJCSBOU/FX York district. This paper examines how the renewal occurred so rapidly and completely. The dramatic revival has resulted in a high density environment which provides the mix of uses usually associated with urban villages. High density and mixed uses have been bound together and sustained by the catalyst of myth making. 5IFTFUISFFUFSNT NJYFEVTF EFOTJUZ BOENZUIBSFlSTUEFlOFEBOEUIFJS interaction over the last 200 years is plotted to demonstrate how these qualities provide a successful urban environment. This historical overview also shows how SoHo became a primary example of local SFTJEFOUTPWFSDPNJOHDJUZQMBOOFSTBOEIPXJUJTUIFlSTUUJNFUIBUBSUJTUT acted as urban pioneers.

Site Picture Viewing from building top across Bowery 42

Site Picture Viewing from Prince Street


nc

eS

tre

et

Bow ery

Pri

N

Site Plan The site marked in green

43


Concept This vertical contemporary art museum is located at Prince Street and Bowery in Manhattan, a pivotal geographic and cultural intersection where generations of artists have lived, worked, and contributed to the ongoing cultural dialogue of the nation. The intention of the project is to create variety of spatial/visual dialogues between visitors and the art, visitors and visitors, visitors and pedestrians, visitors and the city. The concept of “seeing and being seenâ€? manifests itself in the way of how exhibition spaces are organized – the vision is comprised of the horizontal (the vision between the visitor and the city) and the vertical (the vision between the visitors GSPNEJäFSFOUmPPST 5IFNVTFVNIPMETCPUIJOUFSJPSBOEFYUFSJPSHBMMFSZ spaces. All interior galleries are located on the very top of the building to TFQBSBUFUIFDJUZGSPNUIFBSUBOEUIFOBUVSBMFOWJSPONFOU SFmFDUJOHUIFBSU as an escape from the urban life and allowing for the enjoyment of natural sunlight.

MORPHOLOGY DIAGRAM

Diagram 1 Create 3 boxes (galleries) in the bounding box on the site.

44

Diagram 2 Extrude the 3 boxes to south, north, west from the highest window to the lowest.

Diagram 3 Extrude the 3 boxes to south, north, west from the highest window to the lowest.


View to Lower Manhattan

VIEW DIAGRAM Lower Soho

Upper Manhattan

Bowery

45


Section AA 46


From Bowery South From Bowery North To Theater

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

INNER MASSING DIAGRAM

Local Circulation Entry Elevator Emergency Stair Check Point

PROGRAM DIAGRAM Theater Storage & Machenical room Elevator Emergency Stair Exterior Gallery Interior Gallery Learning Center & Media Room Cafe

STRUCTURE DIAGRAM Vertical Support Wall Support Primary Truss Lateral Force Vertical Force

47


Section BB

48


B

B

Learning Center

Ramp to Theater

Coat room

Ticket

A

A Entry

Lobby Gift shop Exterior Gallery

A

A

B

B

Fourth Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

B

B

Interior Gallery

A

A

A

A

Interior Gallery

B

B

Seventh Floor Plan

Eighth Floor Plan

49


West Elevation

50


51


SKYLIGHT The slylights are created by the tubes extended to the ceiling of the big gallery, which provide a view to the sky and sunlight.

ENVELOPE The envelope is created by the three big “windows,” which are facing to the NYC city in different directions. The “stripes” are created around the every floor plates, providing sun light to the interior. The openings are on the top and the bottom of the floor plates, and not appear on the eye level so that the three frames will be more appreciated.

52


BIG GALLERY The entire floor, which is 116’ x 100’ x 35’, creates the overhang on the neighboring building and create an outdoor gallery. It connects to the to exterior galleries.

MATERIAL The envelope is made out of pour in concrete. The surface of pour-in place concrete may be modified to create an aesthetically pleasing color and/or texture, or to simulate tile, stone or brick. This specially finished concrete is referred to as “architectural concrete,” and it is usually permanently exposed to view. Architectural Concrete Forming is the primary method of creating architectural concrete. Form liners are typically used and are fastened to the inside of the forms, providing the desired design or texture to the concrete. Architectural concrete forming may be used for structural or non-structural building components. When using this process, special attention should be given to the uniformity of the mix, additives such as color or aggregates, placement, and finishing.

53


54


55 55


56


Section Model

Section Model

57


58


Left Concept Model

City Ops

4A Studio

Instructor: Dwayne Oyler


“But ideal cities are very much the product of their own ages. Designed as complete urban statements, they bear the unmistakable imprint of their own culture and world view in every street and building. And yet to be successful a city has to be open to continuous development, free to evolve and grow with the demands PGOFXUJNFT-JLFTDJFODFlDUJPO accounts of the future, ideal cities quickly become outmoded.� -- P.D. Smith

4A studio serves as an introduction to architecture's relationship to the city. While the studio is divided JOUPUISFFTFDUJPOT FBDIFYQMPSJOHBEJäFSFOUTDBMF in relationship to the city. The studio's aim is to establish the city as a primary area of interest central to architectural discourse and design both now and through its history. By working at various scales, the studio makes the claim that urban issues in architecture are fundamentally not about the size of its form, i.r. being "big" does not equal "urban". Instead, by presenting a range of projects originating at the scales from small, medium and large, the studio takes the position that the city is fundamentally a problem about the density of its forms, the relationships between those forms and the comparison and analysis of these forms through their mutual representations. It is through a careful study of density and its relationship to scale that we will begin to understand how architecture engages problems of the city.

Right Concept Model


61


Concept 5IFJOUFOUJPOPGUIFQSPKFDUJTUPDIBMMFOHFQFPQMFTlSTUQFSDFQUJPOPGB DJUZ XIJDIJTVTVBMMZTUBSUJOHSFNFNCFSJOHBTQFDJlDJNBHFGSPNUIFDJUZ It is a relatively unfair way to read a city. The correct way to view a city is through its plan. which reveals the overall organization of the city. The image reading is not accurate or not correct or misunderstanding. City is including various components, not only one component that people usually remember or recognize. Therefore, the project starts working with the plan of the city BUlSTUQMBDF5IFPOMZPSTQFDJlDJNBHFTPGBDJUZOFFETUPCFCMVSSFE  or make unrecognizable to the city. Hence, the pixelated is “blurring� the JNBHFDPNQPOFOUUPNBLFUIFTQFDJlDJNBHFVOSFDPHOJ[BCMF BOEJUPOMZ can be read when stay far away. The recognition of city is through the overal view of the city. The experience of this project is meant to reveal the concept above.The line to create the pixelation is pixelated again and again. Then it is layed on this TQFDJlDTJUFUIFPWFSMBQUIFMJOFTBSFDSFBUJOHHBMMFSZTQBDFWPMVNF Therefore, on the ground level, the project can not been read fully, but only can be understand for birds eyes view.

62


Site Map

Site Map Pixelation

Line Translation of Site Map

Line Translation of Site Map

63


Line Translation of Site Map Zoom-in

Concept Model

64


65


Section AA

66


The concept model presented on the previous page provides more essential moves towards the development of the next stage of line drawings. The strips is another system that developed from the zigzag volumes, and become an independent yet complementary system. This line drawing is created by shifting, rotating, lofting the existing lines, BOEQVUUJOHUIFNJOBOBYPOQPTJUJPO5IFSFGPSF UIF%FäFDUJTSFWFBMFEJO this drawing.

Concept Model

67


68 6 8


69


70


Section Model

Section Model

71


72


Instructor: Volkan Alkanoglu

2'-8" 2'-10"

3'-2

1/2"

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã

Left Interior Render

Field Operations

3A Studio

3.2¡ã


" In any architecture, there is an equity between the pragmatic function and the symbolic function. " --- Michael Graves

The studio locates the idea of architecture at the intersection of various systems of information: from technical to cultural, from visual to tactile. The uses of precedent and antecedent are considered, while the main investigation examines the impact of structure and material systems on site and building form, and the capacity to use transformation (of simple systems) as a methodological tool to guide a rigorous approach to decision making. The inspiration for creative design work is always informed by implementation of skillful techniques. A synergy of analogue and digital production techniques is required for this studio in order to exploit attributes of analysis, aesthetic, and construction. Students will CFTQFDJlDBMMZFODPVSBHFEUPFOIBODFUIFJSPWFSBMM skill level in order to develop ideas and represent project accordingly. Emphasis will be placed on techniques including sketching, physical model making, digital model making, transfer of technologies, digital fabrication and performative building technologies. These and other techniques will be used as a catalyst for project development.


Grasshopper Scripted Pattern

75


Site Exposition Park, Los Angeles

The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is a large outdoor sports stadium in the University Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, at Exposition Park, a 160 acre tract directly south of U.S.C. and it is bounded by Exposition blvd. to the north, Figueroa St. on the east, Martin Luther King Blvd. to the south, and Vermont Ave. to the west. Along with the Los Angeles Memorial $PMJTFVN UIFTQFDJlD"GPDVTUIJTTFNFTUFS UIFQBSLDPOUBJONVTFVNT  EJäFSFOUTQPSUTWFOVFT BOEEJWFSTFPUIFSGBDJMJUJFT 5IFTUBEJVNJTIPNFUPUIF1BDJlD$POGFSFODFgT6OJWFSTJUZPG4PVUIFSO California Trojans football team. The stadium is jointly owned by the State of California, Los Angeles County, and the City of Los Angeles; it is currently managed by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission. The Coliseum is the only stadium to have hosted the Olympic Games twice, in 1932 and 1984. It is also the only Olympic stadium to have hosted Supper Bowls and World Series. It was declared a National Historic Landmark on July 27, 1984.

76


Site Plan

77


Concept Considered the current situation of the Coliseum, which needs more revenue to be generated to sustain the place. The present situation of the stadium is only used for football games, and sometimes concerts events. The purpose of this project is to increase the activities of the site, bring more revenue, and create a canopy for the spectators. The concept of the project is to bring an intermedia zone between the outside of the stadium and the another outside zone (seating). At the same time, the intermedia zone could provide more programs and more revenue to the site. 2 types of organizational systems distribute other sub-systems within a project -- regular area and core area. Regular area is consist of administrative and commercial areas. The core zones are DPOTJTUPGEJäFSFOUUIFNFT XIJDIDPOUBJOlWFEJäFSFOUGVODUJPO BSFB5IJTBMMPXTGPSMPDBMJ[FEEJäFSFOUJBUJPOBOEVOJRVFNPNFOUT while preserving the consistency of a project as a whole since subsystems resonate through its internal dynamic blueprint.

78


2'-8" 2'-10"

3'-2

1/2"

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

Diagram 1 Origional ring geometry analysis

3.2¡ã 3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã

Diagram 2 Origional middle ring geometry analysis

Diagram 3 Origional inner ring geometry analysis

Diagram 5 Origional inner ring angle analysis

Diagram 6 Shade analysis of the seating

Diagram 8 Trim circles outside of ring

Diagram 9 Continue roof line

3.2¡ã

3.2¡ã

Diagram 4 Origional middle ring angle analysis

Diagram 7 Circle angle shifting according to shading

Diagram 10 Roof and seating in perspective view

Diagram 11 Roof and seating in perspective view

79


BELOW THE FABRIC: Planting a massive lFMEMJHIUTXJMMFODPVSBHFUIFHSPXUIPG population at night to come to the stadium. Sport meets sustainability; culture fused into nature. Remediation processes are not hiddenm but activated as elements of design. The site glows and shimmers resonating experiences found in sports culture.

80


81


B

A

01 02

06

03

A

05 04

Upper Concourse Plan B Legend: 01. Core Of Performance 02. Core Of Garden 03. Core Of Athletics 04. Core Of Media 05. Core Of Lounge 06. Market

Section AA

82


Exterior Rendering

ABOVE THE FABRIC: Complexity found in natural ecologies unfolds into the fabric of architectural systems. Therefore, the ground is a network of nested-systems that breed with one another. The project introduces a probabilistic program of human activities as well as tectonic behaviors on the surface they inhabit.

83


Roof Membrane

Secondary Roof Structure

Primary Roof Structure

Ring

Existing seating New seating

Seating Support Structure

Existing columns New columns

Soil

Floor Plate

Existing Stadium

Existing wall Peristyle

Old New Structure Diagram

84


Panel

Secondary Structure (Steel Rod)

Primary Structure

Secondary Structure (Steel Rod)

Structure Detail

PRIMARY STRUCTURE The primary structure is made of steel pieces, that insert into the ground and attach to existing columns.

SECONDARY STRUCTURE The secondary structure is made of steel rods, inside and outside of the large steel pieces to reinforce the primary structure. Towards the top area, the steel rods id outside of the primary structure, and as the curvatures change direction, the rods change from the outside to the inside.

PANEL The material of the panel is made of light blue translucent Fibre-reinforced plastic. It creates 25% reduction in weight 95% reduction in components by combining parts and forms into simpler moulded parts. Overall reduction in production and operational costs, economy of parts results in lower production costs and the weight. 4BWJOHTDSFBUFGVFMTBWJOHTUIBUMPXFSUIFPQFSBUJPOBMDPTUTPGmZJOH the aeroplane.

Section Detail

85


Core Of Performance Concert Hall Art Gallery VIP Box

Core Of Green Garden Green Promenade Farming Ground

Core Of Athletics Jogging Track Sports Clinics Gym

Core Of Lounge Restaurant Bookstore Cafe

Core Of Media Media Platform Conference Room

Exploded Drawing

86


87


Rendering: See from Entry

The main structure of the core is made out of steel pieces, which connect the inside of stadium and the existing columns of the existing walls. &WFSZDPSFIBTlGUZQJFDFTUIBUJThmPXFSJOHvPVU from inside. Furthermore, small steel rods inside and outside of the large steel pieces to reinforce the primary structure. Towards the top area, the steel rods id outside of the primary structure, and as the curvatures change direction, the rods change from the outside to the inside. Digital technology is applied to tailor the physical space of the exterior shell and the inside volume precisely in order to ensure the exact matches between seams. The cone-shaped shared space, which is 70 feet high, generates the chimney effect, which provides natural air ventilation to save energy during transitional seasons. In the east and west parts of the shared spaces, there are continuous steps, landscape platforms, TLZSBNQTBOEDSPTTJOHFTDBMBUPSTXIJDIlMMUIF building of energetic and dynamic spaces.

Rendering: Core Of Performance

88


89


90


Design Development

Instructor: Pavel Getov/Scott Uriu Partner: Bowen Wu, Allen Tsai, Ariel Ip


The course includes a review of basic construction methods, analysis of building codes, the design of structural and mechanical systems, the development of building materials and the integration of building components and systems. Students are given the Emerging Professional’s Companion and updated IDP materials. Students are asked to select their studio project from the previous semester to develop, focusing on a detailed design of a single component of the building and the resolution of its structural system and building envelope as a whole.


93


A

ROOF +165’

C

D

E

ROOF GALLERY

OFFICE AND ADMINS

8TH FLOOR +144’

7TH FLOOR +129’

6TH FLOOR +105’

B

GALLERY

1 A.3.3

5TH FLOOR +85’

4TH FLOOR +65’

CAFE

3RD FLOOR +45’

GALLERY

2ND FLOOR +24’

GROUND FLOOR +5’

GALLERY

ENTRANCE

LOBBY & TICKET SALES TRANVERSE SECTION SCALE: 3/64” = 1’0”

1ST UNDERGROUND -13’ 2ND UNDERGROUND -25’

Tranverse Section

94

LEARNING CENTER MEDIA LOUNGE


1

2

3

4

ROOF GALLERY

ROOF +165’

8TH FLOOR +144’

OFFICE AND ADMINS

7TH FLOOR

GALLERY

+129’ 1 A.3.4 6TH FLOOR +105’

GALLERY

5TH FLOOR +85’

GALLERY

4TH FLOOR +65’

CAFE

GALLERY

1 A.3.2 3RD FLOOR +45’

GALLERY

2ND FLOOR +24’

GALLERY

GROUND FLOOR +5’ ENTRANCE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION SCALE: 3/64” = 1’0”

1ST UNDERGROUND -13’

2ND UNDERGROUND -25’

LOBBY & TICKET SALES

LEARNING CENTER

Longitudinal Section

95


HVAC Diagram

3URJUDP&RUH 7KHFRUHLVSDFNHGZLWKSURJUDPV VXFKDVUHVWURRPPHFKDQLFDOURRP DQGHJUHVVFLUFXODWLRQ

0HWDO&ODGLQJ

$OXPLQXP&RYHU

*OD]LQJ3ULPH6WUXFWXUH *OD]LQJ6HFRQGDU\6WUXFWXUH

:;,%HDP

Structure Diagram

96


Enclosure Diagram

97


3D Chunk

98


99


 &RPSOH3UHFDVW6\VWHP  7\SLFDO)DFDGH6\VWHP 6WUXFWXUDO6WHHO &RPSOH[3UHFDVW3DQHO6\VWHPV  %HORZ*URXQG $ERYH*URXQG &RUH

7RWDO

&RPSOH[3UHFDVW3DQHO6\VWHPV 6) 6); 

&RPSOH[3UHFDVW3DQHO6\VWHPV 6) 6); 

Budget Diagram 100


7\SLFDO*OD]LQJ)DFDGH6\VWHP

6WUXFWXUDO6WHHO

6) 6); 

OI OI; 

%HORZ*URXQG

&RUH

6) 6); 

6) 6); 

$ERYH*URXQG 6) 6); 

101


102


Construction Documents

Instructor: Pavel Getov Jay Vanos


The concerns of Construction Documents are fundamentally in two areas: 1. Language. 2. Process. Language is comprised of symbols/objects, and structured by syntax which results in the capacity to communicate. In construction documentation terms this is revealed by use of MJOF UPOF TZNCPMT UFYUBOEOVNCFSJOBTQFDJlD DPEJlFETZTUFNUIBUJTTIBSFECZUIF construction community for the purpose of communicating the means of constructing complex objects. Process is the means by which the documents required to construct an object are created. Process involves the sequencing and coordination of multiple authors responsible for varying contents. Structural, Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical, Acoustic, Landscape, Civil, 4QFDJlDBUJPOT BOEOVNFSPVTPUIFSTQFDJBMUJFT require the coordination of a singular voice. This is a primary role for the architect in the creation of a set of construction documents.


N 105


106


107


108


109


110


111


112


113


6


114

eVolution V.01  

This portfolio includes part of my professional and academic works through my education and career as a designer so far.

eVolution V.01  

This portfolio includes part of my professional and academic works through my education and career as a designer so far.

Advertisement