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J I S . YO O N COLLECTION OF ARCHITECTURE PROJECTS M . A R C H 2 018 l U N I V E R S I T Y O F P E N N S Y L VA N I A


CONTENTS PA R A S I T I C T E T R I S

01 - 10

L A D O L C E VO LTA

11 - 20

TETRAHE-JI

21 - 26

GIGANTIC

27 - 34

U N D R E S S YA R R A

35 - 38

OVER-CAST

39 - 44

P R O T E S T I VA L

45 - 52

PA R A F I C T I O N A L O B J E C T

53 - 58

T E C H N I C A L D R AW I N G S

59 - 66


PA R A S I T I C TETRIS Site: Stuyvesant Town, NY Program: Residential Adaptive Reuse 2016 Fall l Crit : Kutan Ayata University of Pennsylvania This collective studio-wide project for Stuyvesant Town in Manhattan aims at transforming its rigid and banal characters by each student to generate an agenda for a portion of the complex to create heterogeneous urban assembly. As a collective approach, the existing cruciform tower is suggested as the formal limitation for each scheme to develop within certain reach so that the final products of the schemes are still being within the same family. The purpose of this methodology is to rather catch the nuances of the existing formal and material languages in the new addition or reduction that almost add some of subtle strangeness or uncanniness to the existing than putting something entirely alien to the site. The chosen portion of the site consists of three cruciformbased apartment blocks, the addition of a long block placed between the existing ones that is connected to the adjacent towers by its tentacle-like bridges. The overriding idea is to create diverse forms of living environments as substitute for the highly-dense living units. Its geometry strictly follows the linearity of the existing ones except for the transition moments like the bridges and some of the balconies where the geometry subtly curved to make it almost merged on to the existing blocks.


View from street

PARASITIC TETRIS

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Collective physical model


MASSING STUDIES

Aerial view

PARASITIC TETRIS

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Material articulation

Operable windows

Balconies

Fire-escape l Unit arrangement

The existing towers and the thin block of new addition are connected by tentacle-like bridges. Formally, the subtle curves in the bridges does not only make their union more seamless, but also are the devices to break the crudeness of the existing towers as they blur what is the old or the new. They are also the primary mode of circulations for the new addition. An attempt of departing from the existing match-box unit arrangement to create more diverse forms of living, an imagery of floating tetris blocks is adopted as a metaphor in unit arrangement and in designing of operable windows, and screens for the new addition.

View from street


PARASITIC TETRIS

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PLAN & SECTION


25 ft.

PARASITIC TETRIS

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Ground promenade


TYPICAL UNIT PLAN

Unit cutaway

The adoption of tetris block in the unit arrangement gives opportunity to create more diverse forms of living spaces such as duplex. Especially, the voids between the units become private balconies, which are not so affordable option in the city like New York. Ample number of screens provides privacy as well as let natural light shine through. Ground level is for commercial or communal uses, possibly small art street.

Typical unit interior

PARASITIC TETRIS

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View from Spring Garden Street


LA DOLCE V O L TA S i t e : P h i l a d e l p h i a , PA Program: Courthouse 2 016 S p r i n g l C r i t : B r e n n a n B u c k Te a m : J i Yo o n & D a n i e l l e L a n d s Un i v e r s i t y o f Pe n n s y l v a n i a

L A DOLCE VOLTA

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ROOF STUDIES

Commonly US courthouses have strong civic presence, and are designed as highly hierarchical, hyper-functional and somewhat intimidating. These aspects are inherently necessary in this architectural type because of the authority of the judiciary. This courthouse project in Philadelphia attempts to rebrand these common conceptions about courthouse by introducing secondary space to the existing courthouse typology. A space to buffer, or to refuge from the pressure and stress created during judicial process between different constituents can positively affect the constituents of different interests. Cloister is adopted as spatial metaphor for its formal expression of a contemplative space and for it to encourage reflection and mediation through the action of circumambulation. It has a central square courtyard, which is enveloped by vaulted corridors and walking around it completes the action of contemplation. Barrel vault is adopted not only because of its association with cloister, but also for its historical and formal significance in civic building. Its public presence is important, particularly for this site because of its adjacency to Spring Garden Station, which is one of main means of public arrivals at the site. Despite its flatness, the rhythm of barrel vault roof provides distinctive presence among the box-shaped buildings.

Physical model


WORM’ & BIRD’ EYE

VIEWS

L A DOLCE VOLTA

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View of courtyard from offices

L A DOLCE VOLTA

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North elevation view

West elevation view Vault is defined in three typologies according to programs. For its innate directionality, bisected vault is used to create space like corridor, and office and back of house where partitioning of space is necessary. Traditional vaults are placed up and down then carved and combined. This freely formed space serves as courtyard, metaphorically conveying it as space of staying rather than passing by. Groin vault is exclusively used for courtroom as this is the space where historical formality is to be maintained for authority and power. The ceiling profiles get more intertwined, rigid, and formal as moving into spaces, where more serious events occur.


20 ft.

L A DOLCE VOLTA

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Courtroom


Courtyard in public area

10 ft.

L A DOLCE VOLTA

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TETRAHE-JI Program: Life scale pavilion 2 017 Fa l l l C r i t : A n d r e w S a u n d e r s Te a m : J i Yo o n , C o n s t a n c e C h a n g , A n d r e S t i l e , J u l i e Pe p i t o n e & T i a n O u y a n g Un i v e r s i t y o f Pe n n s y l v a n i a

This project Tetrahe-Ji is a part of studio sequence, which experiments ‘part-to-whole’ relationship. First, single geometry is created using objects from Russel Wright’s American Modern collection. The chosen geometry is packed and aggregated to form a ‘part-to-whole relationship. For the fabrication, various materials are experimented such as rubber, wire mesh, resin, spray foam, fabric and so on. Liquid foam casting is chosen to retain the elaborate curvature of the geometry. Liquid foam is casted in CNC milled high density foam molds, then the pieces are glued before gessoing and spray painting begin. Completed pieces are then doweled to form a hexagonal unit, which are further clustered to form the final pavilion.

Casting tools: molds, clamps & Press’n Seal


Pavilion in context

TETRAHE-JI

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Liquid foam casting process

TETRAHE-JI MODULE

PITCHER

CARAFE

The form of basic module is designed with the pitcher and the carafe from Russel Wright’s American Modern Collection. Tetrahedron as basic packing geometry, the objects are placed on each angle and the seams are smoothened .

Liquid Foam Casting & Fabrication CNC milled medium density form mold is prepared. Press’n Seal and petroleum are put first for the pieces to come off easily. Liquid form compound is mixed only right before pouring. The mixture is promptly poured into the mold. The lid is quickly placed for the mold to be clamped. All the steps are to be done in a prompt manner to prevent overflow of the compound. Leave it to rise fully for few minutes. Unclamped and Press’n Seal to be come off to remove residue of petroleum. Then the pieces to be sorted according to the inventory. They are glued, gessoed and spray-painted before the assembly. Six modules to make a hexagonal cluster, which become one of eight to form the complete pavilion.


Sorting station

Inventory system

Fabrication process

TETRAHE-JI

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DIVIDING METHOD FOR CNC MILING

A S S E M B LY ST R AT E GY


Life scale Tetrahe-Ji pavilion at the exhibition

TETRAHE-JI

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GIGANTIC S i t e : Ke f l a v i c , I c e l a n d Program: Data center & Geothermal plant 2 017 Fa l l l C r i t : J a s o n Pa y n e Un i v e r s i t y o f Pe n n s y l v a n i a

GIGANTIC

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View of the data center from the main road ICELAND is a country full of mythical stories and its natural wonders, but is also a cold, isolated island in the far northern Atlantic. Despite its rich volcanic soils Iceland has always proven to be a landscape that is hard to work. But with its volcanic geography and islandic climate conditions become attractive for clean energy sources, which makes it suitable for data center. Data center generally in a form of flat box with highly and mostly only designed for its functionality and efficiency. While it is justifiable, the existing data center architecture carries almost no architectural value. This project sees it as opportunity to explore this yet-to-exist building typology. This proposal employs hexagonal grid not only as data rack arrangement but also as a tool to find its aesthetics. Departing from linear arrangement, the hexagonal grid creates plural subsets, which enable the clusters of data racks autonomous. And this strategy further enables a future extension of the data storage as need grows. The overall geometry responds to the site geography; a very flat landscape covered with rocky mounds. This disparity between the interior and the exterior nuances a rare marine creature in Icelandic folklore, its bulk body below the waterline and its visible topside as iceberg. But more importantly it solves the problem of form relative to extreme size as it almost gives permission for both interior and exterior to be autonomous. The chosen site is right off the existing roads and the rocky mounds. It is gradually undulating that can pond water. As a design approach, hexagonal grid is layered in radial arrangement on top of this natural formation of the site. The outlines of the overall design is determined by the tension between the clusters and geothermal water reservoir. Thus, the dips in the geometry is al-most like pushed inwards right before the clusters appear.

Primary grid

Secondary grid

Tertiary grid for data rack

Grid growing direction


a

FORM DEVELOPMENT a. natural formation of the site - gentle undulation with rocks and mounds b. speculated formation of the site - data center to act as artificial mounds for the geothermal water to pond c. grid adjustment according to the natural and artificial formation of the site

c

d. geothermal water reaches according to the site formation e. the satellite view of the overall data center - the dips between the clusters developed f. the possible mat erial decay over time

e

f

GIGANTIC

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S AT E L L I T E V I E W

Access to the data center is designed to via the geothermal powerplant, which is in the core of the entire complex. It is almost like an act of walking through artworks in a museum, seeing a work of, some might call it, “mechanical picturesque and sublime�. This is stimulating concept to research data farm with because it suggests that this functionality-centered building type can be architecturally reevaluated and given aesthetic values.


PLAN

200 ft.

GIGANTIC

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View of future data farm extension


View of geothermal pool with the data center

Left l ‘Formlessness’ - Instead of the form being organic to imply ‘formless’, the project attempts to let the geothermal water as part of formal language, form making device. Natural formation of the site and the dips between the hexagonal cluster enable the water to pond, and the change in water level makes the overall form change time-to-time. Furthermore, the humidity, fog and various minerals from the water make the materiality of the data center decayed, thus, over time the data center becomes part of landscape. Bottom l Future data center extension is speculated as need constantly grows. The initial formal arrangement based on hexagonal grid enables the extension to insert into the existing one, which does not make it seamless only formally, but also in terms of the operation of data center because of the physical seamlessness.

GIGANTIC

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U N D R E S S YA R R A Si te: Melbourne, VIC, Australia Program: Steadley Park Boathouse 2011 Fall l Crit : Ming Wu University of Melbourne

The project proposes a scheme for a boathouse in Richard Meier’s design manners. His works feature the sequential experiences and the clear hierarchy in program layouts. Also, he tends to utilize conditions of given sites in a way that brings nature into the interior spaces. With such manners, the project takes the natural scene of the Yarra River bank as the central driver of design process. The overall geometry responds to the strong axis of the site, the view towards the river and the meandering river stream of Yarra. The view along the site’s axis, and the direct approach to the site are manipulated for vision to gradually open as one proceeds to the boathouse. This control of vision is to celebrate Meier’s sequential spatial experiences. In terms of materiality, Meier’s curtain wall system and “whiteness” are borrowed to create the airiness and brightness of what Meier is famously known for.

Portico


View of Yarra River from the boathouse

U N D R E S S YA R R A

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Saltzman House, East Hampton, NY Douglas House, Harbor Spring, Michigan Old Westbury House, NY Richard Meire’s works feature strong zoning strategy, division between private and public spaces that is marked by main circulation system. Other elements like openings are clearly distinguished in size, and system according to the zoning. Thus, sequential spatial experiences like concealed to open, and public to private are created. Also, his design has a strong connection to surrounding natural condition.

B

Ground Level A

A

B

Analysis of Richard Meier’s work

1st Level

Reproduced model of Saltzman House

Private/Public

Site

Structure

Site approach Circulation

View towards Yarra

Sequential experience

Plan to Elevation Relationship

2nd Level


Section AA

Section BB

Physical Model

U N D R E S S YA R R A

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OVER-CAST Program: Life scale pavilion 2 016 S p r i n g l C r i t : M o h a m a d A l k h a d e r Te a m : J i Yo o n , L . C a n d e l a , C . C h a n g , M . Gregg, H. Han, J. Hein, J. Hilla, S. Li, A. L i n , Z . L u o , T. O u y a n g , A . S t i l e s , Y. We n , X . Wu , X . X u , Y. X u Over-Cast is a real scale built-pavilion project, which experiments various geometrical packing systems as well as material exploration. The primary unit with multiple connection moments is packed within boundaries of tetrahedron that enables the units to be connected to multi-directions. The use of plastic sheet and lightweight EMT conduit is to minimize the reliance on structure. The cut plastic sheets are vacuum-formed, then they are trimmed and sanded. The pieces are then revited to form a primary unit. completed units and pre-welded tripod-like structures are moved to the site then installed. No foundation work is needed because of the lightweight of elements.

Plastic scraps


Pavilion in context

OVER - CAST

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FA B R I C AT I O N P RO C E S S

CNC milled mold

Plastic sheet vacuum formed

ASSEMBLY METHOD

Vertical Connections using Revit

Space Filling Packing: Tetrahedron

Horizontal Connections using Revit

Trimmed


Basic units production

Test of light on EMT

Moved to the site

Vacuum Formed Casting, Fabrication & Construction Cut-to-size plastic sheets are vacuum formed with CNC milled mold. The sheets then trimmed with Dremel and sanded. The pieces connected with rivets to form a basic unit. The units and light then primarily installed on EMT at the warehouse. To ease transportation, EMT units are not joined at the warehouse. On site, the EMTs are erected as primary structure, and the pieces are installed using rivets.

Riveting

Pavilion installation on site

OVER - CAST

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Pavilion lit up


OVER - CAST

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P R O T E S T I VA L Si te: Philadelphia, PA Program: Art perfomring center 2016 Spring l Crit : Jonathan Scelsa University of Pennsylvania

This art performing complex project is questioned its role in this surrounding neighborhood as the site is not a part of Philadelphia’s mainstream art district. Due to this isolation, the goal of project is primarily to provide public venue that can attract people so that this fabric of the city can be redefined and revitalized as a new social and cultural hub of the city. Carnival is proposed as the conceptual framework for its implication of spontaneity and freedom. Carnival is an instrument of interconnection, a liberation from restrictions and pressures of social order, the realm of freedom, a qualified space for critique and a laboratory for the elaboration of an alternative world. The idea of blurring distinction between actor and spectator in carnival as they are the drivers of each other’s attitude. Philadelphia is the birthplace of American democracy with its history of struggles. This rich socio-political history of Philadelphia is the carnival. Considering this history of striving for hopes and wills as a form of art or sport, the proposal suggests its de-centralized outdoor plazas, underground marketplace, and the roof terraces as the venues for such social gatherings. Colosseum is used as conceptual and physical metaphor that facilitates active visual and physical engagements.


Aerial view

PROTESTIVAL

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S PAT I A L T Y P O L O G I E S

Cellular space

A type Oblique space

B type Oblique space

Light passage without view

Threshold / Passing through mask

Roof terracing method

Linear space


Main lobby / Outdoor plaza

PROTESTIVAL

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Opera theater


EXPLODED DIAGRAM

Opera theater

Art gallery

Convention center

Main lobby / Outdoor center

Entrance

Underground marketplace

Circulation Stairway Elevator

PROTESTIVAL

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PLAN & SECTION


40 ft.

PROTESTIVAL

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Parafictional object in Still Life with a Blackberry Pie on a Pewter Plate by Willem Claesz Heda


PA R A F I C T I O N A L OBJECT Program: Stress relief cuff 2018 Spring l Crit : Kutan Ayata Team: J Yoon & Joanna Ptak University of Pennsylvania

Architecture has much in common with parafictional art practices. First, parafictional art never reduces an artwork to a single medium; instead it uses multiple mediums through which to open an aesthetic investigation of realism. Second, reality does not equate with realism, which is to say that realism aesthetically regards the tensions between reality and representation. Third, it involves framing and delimitation of artwork. It is often hard to find where a parafictional artwork starts and stops. It requires one to see the reality of the world outside of the work in a different matter, making the context into which the work is inserted strange. Thus, parafictional art is not narrative driven, but scene driven. There no single story established to interpret the work. The narrative is often random and fleeting, built in multiple ways by whomever and however one chooses to engage the art. What makes parafictional art believable is the cohesion of each scene. It is how these then rub against each other and the context of “the real” that builds up the provocations of the artwork. Architecture is multi-medium, and is the most “real” of any art. It uses aesthetics towards conceptual or political effects, it is constantly engaged in questions of context, and it is a specific object or scenario that inserts itself into the constantly changing conditions of reality. Learning from parafictional art, this project investigates how architecture to be mastered not to rarify itself towards self-critical abstraction, but to proactively position itself in relation to the complex of mediated relations. This does not require an overarching narrative predetermining interpretation, but instead a cohesive and convincing scene that rubs against the multiple notions of reality.

PARAFICTIONAL OBJECT

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A pen-like object on a table full of silver plates, liquid in glasses, orange, pie, bread and table clothes gives a clue to speculate on its nature as that the object is probably very personal, and portable possession. One might see it as something quite predictable like pen, but we speculate that under the lavish skin, it disguises something that is not to be publicized, something of embarrassment for example. To make the speculation more believable, it has to be something that exists through human history until today, something like a stress relief device for the ones with anxiety disorders. It is also a jewel, in a form of cuff, not only to mask its real nature, but also for the proximity to hands. The vein-like texture gives something for press or scratch and the central gemstone give hands something to squeeze when one gets anxiety attack. The object can be seen in a display window at a high-end jewelry shop and be traded at a high expense, but it also can be seen on an arm being squeezed or pressed with a very oppressive gesture. It can be also seen in a 17th century Dutch painting, depicting scene of common dinner table with all other common everyday objects.

PARAFICTIONAL OBJECT

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E X H I B I T I O N D I S P L AY

Cuff: powder-printed, painted & spray painted l Gemstone: rubber-casted l Inner lining & leash: burgundy velvet


PARAFICTIONAL OBJECT

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T E C H N I C A L D R AW I N G S Software: AutoCAD & Revit University of Melbourne & University of Pennsylvania


TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

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A A1

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:50

A A6

SECTION AA 1:50


A A6

SECTION AA 1:50

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

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1

1

A201

A202 A301

1

2

3

1

4

5

6

A

C

A202 UP 2 A201

D

E

2

Level 4 1/16" = 1'-0"

1

1

A201

1

2

ARCH 532

2

Philadelphia Office Building

B

A202

3

4

5

6

1

A

A

Floor P

Project Number

B

B

Date Drawn By Checked By 2

C

2

A202

C

A202

2

2

A201

A201

D

E

A10

Scale

D

E

1

Level 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

2

Level 2 1/16" =


A

B 1 A202

6

Roof 101' - 0" Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 8 89' - 0"

Level 7 77' - 0" Level 5 53' - 0"

Level 5 53' - 0"

Philadelphia Office Building

Level 4 41' - 0"

Level 4 41' - 0"

Level 3 29' - 0"

Level 3 29' - 0"

Level 2 17' - 0"

Level 2 17' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

B1 -12' - 0"

B2 -24' - 0"

ARCH 532

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

B3 -36' - 0"

Detailed Build Sections

Project Number Date 1

Detailed Wall Section_b 1/8" = 1'-0"

1

Detailed Building Section_Skin to Atrium_a 1/4" = 1'-0"

Drawn By Checked By

Rya

A402 Scale

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

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TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

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