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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan


Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan


Executive Summary

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Mission & Vision

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Background & Structure

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Market Analysis

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Competitive Analysis

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Products & Services

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Marketing & Sales

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Operations 40 Evaluation & Assessments 42 Financials

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Appendix A

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Appendix B

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Appendix C

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan


Executive Summary

Executive Summary The

purpose of this document is to build a sustainable plan for Fostering Success Michigan during its Phase II directive. The work of FSM is challenging and involves many participants, thus requiring consistent, high-quality communication, activities and resources for students from foster care and for the organization’s many partners (e.g., individuals, professionals and organizations that work with students from foster care ages 12 to 25 years old). This plan will review FSM’s current mission and scope of operations, while providing strategic recommendations for strengthening its core activities and ensuring the organization’s long-term impact with revenue-generating marketing strategies. In order for FSM to build sustained impact, it will need to commoditize some of its most successful products (namely, the web site and campus readiness toolkit). FSM is uniquely positioned as an expert and the staff’s expertise should be harnessed for nationwide consulting opportunities. Additionally, local low-cost/high-yield fundraising activities in key geographic markets can provide extra revenue to support ongoing activities. There also is the potential to gain additional financial support from other national grantors with missions closely related to educational issues for underserved target audiences, such as children of foster care. These efforts to build on-going revenue will help safeguard FSM’s efforts to equip its key partners with the best practices to increase college graduation and successful career transitions for students from foster care.

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Mission & Vision Mission

Fostering Success Michigan will increase access and success in postsecondary education and post-college careers among Michigan’s students with experience in foster care through the building of a holistic network that insulates (i.e., strengthens protective factors and reduces risks) the education to career “pipeline” for students from foster care.

Vision

Engaging a diverse network to improve education and career outcomes for students with experience in foster care.


Mission & Vision

FSM Program Highlights (Milestones) Established in 2012, FSM has had significant impact in its short history including these key milestones: * Established a common agenda to focus efforts of network participants * Supported the development of a number of college support programs for other universities * Created a guide series to provide streamlined access to students and professionals on a wide range of college access and success topics * Convened 5 statewide summits and 27 regional network meetings to help statewide partners access resources, network and engage in conversations * Provided workshops, training and a campus readiness toolkit for other schools * Created a policy action network representing community and higher education stakeholders * Increased the effectiveness of campus support programs through the promotion of best practices * Increased the number of students being supported through campus support programs * Increased the number of organizations that support youth from foster care * Increased the understanding of best practices among professionals and organizations involved in the education and training of foster care youth * Provided training and resources to pre-college professionals aimed at improving college preparation among young adults with experience in foster care

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Background & Structure As

an initiative of The Center for Fostering Success (CFS), FSM is leading Michigan’s collective-impact effort to increase access and success in higher education and post-college careers for Michigan’s students with experience in foster care ages 12-25. FSM has become a state and national hub of resources and information for those who work with students, resulting in a significant increase of knowledge, skill and social capacity of network participants.

FSM is building a network to increase access and success in higher education and post-college careers for Michigan’s students with experience in foster care ages 12–25. FSM is building a statewide network by strengthening localized community efforts toward increasing access to college and success completing a degree for youth who have experienced foster care. There are five regions that the FSM targets in Michigan: Southwest, North, Central, Southeast and Northeast. FSM has been actively building an education to career pipeline by networking professionals and

organizations that touch the lives of young people from foster care. Professionals and organizations come from a variety of sectors across the state of Michigan and become network partners by participating in core FSM activities. FSM supports continuous communication through networking activities in order to ensure that its diverse group of partners maintains an awareness of successes, challenges, key issues and shared solutions. These include the FSM Google Group listserv, FSM Monthly Newsletters, FSM Student Spotlights, and in-person networking opportunities. In order to create large-scale social change, FSM has utilized the Collective Impact Framework, which employs five conditions for social change (Backbone Organization, Common Agenda, Mutually Reinforcing Activities, Shared Measurement and Continuous Communication). As a Backbone Organization, FSM performs activities through the strategies of resourcing, supporting and networking.

Center for Fostering Success The Center for Fostering Success (CFS) was established as an academic center in 2012 through the support of the WMU Board of Trustees and President John Dunn.

Resourcing Supporting Networking

Backbone Organization Strategies


Background & Structure

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Collective Impact Framework Shared Measurement

Mutually Reinforcing Activities

Backbone Organization

Continuous Communication

Common Agenda

The CFS includes three major programs: Seita Scholars: The Seita Scholars Program is dents ages 12 to 25 through the experience of WMU’s campus-based support program for stuhigher education dents with experience in foster care. The Program * Educating the community in the college-to-casupports 150 students annually through a comreer pipeline of the needs, challenges, and prehensive coach-based approach, provides a tudiscovery-driven solutions related to students ition scholarship, and offers an array of advocacy from foster care and leadership activities. * Developing leaders among alumni of foster care to enhance the greater community Fostering Success Coach Training: Is an Interand society national Coach Federation accredited program * Connecting strong and enduring networks that was developed at WMU. The training was addressing needs of youth and alumni of foster designed for professionals at universities and care in relation to higher education and career community colleges who are working with stu- * Sustaining the backbone structure of the CFS dents who have experienced foster care or have to support the above goals lived through multiple adverse childhood experiences, as defined by the Adverse Childhood Experiences study. Fostering Success Michigan: FSM is a statewide initiative that aims to improve the statewide rates of students who are looking to attend college. The goal of FSM is to increase awareness, access and success in higher education and post-college careers for Michigan youth who have experienced foster care. The three CFS programs share five common, collective goals, which include: * Creating successful transitions from foster care-to-college and college-to-career for stu-


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Organizational Fit & Support WMU provides the infrastructure and institutional support necessary which has enabled FSM to offer a depth and breadth of programming and resources. WMU is committed to supporting students from foster care and has provided top-level support for FSM. Since 2012, WMU has contributed over $150,000 in funds to support FSM as well as providing in-kind funding support which includes faculty release time and graduate assistantships. FSM is also able to leverage the years of experience and expertise of two other programs of CFS. The programs provide FSM staff access to experts in the field who directly work to understand the needs of students from foster care and the professionals who support them. This collegial support provides FSM efficient and open access to experts in the field who are carrying out best practices.

FSM is in the second phase of strategies and tactics that they will use to fortify the educational pipeline for students that have experience with foster care. In addition to the CFS as a resource, FSM is able to leverage other WMU campus departments to continue the call-to-action for individuals, institutions, and organizations to collaborate toward a greater good on behalf of Michigan’s—and America’s—students from foster care. WMU departments such as Information Technology, Human Resources, and Budget support the day-to-day operations of FSM. There are three additional departments that serve as needed resources for FSM: WMU’s Office of Development & Alumni Relations: This office was established to serve anyone who desires a deeper relationship with the university. The office works to increase pride in the University while carrying out the important task of meeting the University’s philanthropic goals. Working with the CFS staff, this office has helped to secure a total of over 2 million dollars from major funders since 2008 to support its efforts.

The Office of Government Affairs: The Office of Government Affairs works on behalf of Western Michigan University to strengthen relationships with state, federal, and local policy makers. The office works closely with the CFS to ensure that WMU is instituting best practices in higher education for foster youth by advancing innovative policy initiatives at the state and federal level. In 2013, the office’s efforts yielded a $750,000 contract from the Michigan Department of Human Services to advance innovation in the Seita Scholars Program and establish the Fostering Success Coach Training Program. Extended University Programs (EUP): EUP provides higher education and professional development opportunities beyond the main campus. EUP encompasses eight regional locations across the State of Michigan as well as online programs, lifelong learning and conferencing. FSM is able to leverage the reach of EUP to support core networking, resourcing and supporting strategies.

Phase I & II Strategies FSM is in the second phase of strategies and tactics that they will use to fortify the educational pipeline for students that have experience with foster care. During Phase I, FSM established relationships with 14 higher education institutions to foster the development of campus support programs across Michigan, and is now poised to undertake outreach efforts to 12 additional schools including 6 community colleges. The depth of FSM’s work during Phase 1 has resulted in statewide recognition of these efforts. The level of visibility and general public awareness of FSM’s work has increased access to senior management at a variety of postsecondary institutions in Michigan. In Phase II, FSM will build upon the foundation of having established a common agenda to focus efforts of network participants, mutually reinforcing activities across institutions of higher education, and reliable methods of continuous communication. Phase II seeks to establish sustainability for Michigan’s collective impact initiative and to implement best practice system-change strategies


Background & Structure

Phase I Focusing efforts of network participants towards a common agenda.

Phase II Establishing sustainability for Michigan’s collective impact initiative.

from which to monitor achievement rates of students from foster care. With these strategies that have been put into place, FSM will create the sustainable long-term support that is needed to ultimately increase access and success in postsecondary education for students from foster care.

Legal Structure and Governance

functions may include: sponsoring, coordinating, and promoting research and creative activities and teaching and service of faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate); creating a forum for discussion and innovation; and forming a locus of support for grants and projects. Centers may deal with problems and issues of concern to, and involve faculty and staff with an interest in a particular academic or research theme, and may involve individuals who come from within a department or multiple departments, schools or colleges.

Western Michigan University “Center” CFS has been designated as an official “University Center” of Western Michigan University. According to WMU’s Policies on Centers and Institutes, a center is a unit formed for purposes of linkage and visibility, focused on a theme, issue or set of skills. A Center will frequently be interdisciplinary in nature. The Center is concerned with subject matter of sufficient breadth to involve disciplines from two or more colleges and does not offer degree programs. Administration and reporting functions of a University Center may be assigned to an individual college or another administrative office, such as an Institute.

The Center is led by Dr. Yvonne Unrau, Professor of Social Work and Director of the Center for Fostering Success, who teams with Ronicka Hamilton, Director of the Seita Scholars Program and Maddy Day, Director of Outreach and Training to shape the activities and direction of the Center’s goals and activities. The Center reports to the Provost, Office of Academic Affairs, on matters related to the Seita Scholars program, and to the College of Health and Human Services for outreach and training programs.

A Center may require modest support from the academic unit or College or Office of the Vice President for Research, but is expected to generate operating funds from gifts, endowments, grants, contracts and/or participant fees. The Center’s

Under the umbrella of Western Michigan University, FSM is provided with funding toward the salaries of Dr. Unrau and two part-time graduate assistants, as well as dedicated space and other administrative costs. However, FSM is responsi-

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan


Background & Structure

ble for covering the university facilities and administration fee which is currently at 15%, and the university does not provide funding for the Program Director, travel, materials, supplies or other necessary office costs. Moving forward, there has been some discussion about FSM moving away from under the auspices of WMU. This is due partly to the fact that 15% of the Kresge grant must be applied to the Facilities and Administration costs required by WMU. It is worth exploring the advantages and disadvantages of operating apart from the university. There are 2 different options for FSM to consider. Standalone Nonprofit Organization One option for FSM to consider is operating as a nonprofit organization under the 501(c)(3) classification. There are a number of advantages to incorporation as a 501(c)(3), such as tax exemption, eligibility for public and private grants, and limited liability. However, there are some disadvantages. First, there are a number of costs associated with the formation of a nonprofit organization, which include application fees. There are also legal fees that will need to be paid to retain the services of a lawyer who will help with process of incorporation and with the preparation of a request for tax-exempt status. Additionally, if FSM decides to separate from WMU, the organization will need to find dedicated space to house FSM, and will need to consider costs for renting a new space, as well as other administrative expenses. There are also a number of administrative duties that must be undertaken when becoming a nonprofit. FSM must fill out the required paperwork needed for submission of filings to the state and the IRS, as well as being subject to various laws and regulations. The organization will also need to recruit and elect a Board of Directors, establish bylaws, recruit staff, prepare a personnel manual, establish a payroll system and procure necessary insurance coverage for the employees of FSM. Fiscal Sponsorship by Michigan College Access Network (MCAN) Another option FSM could pursue is fiscal sponsorship. Fiscal sponsorship would provide a way to fulfill FSM’s charitable goals without FSM having to undertake the steps required to form a nonprofit organization. If MCAN would be will-

ing to serve as a fiscal sponsor, then FSM would become an internal program of MCAN. There are many potential benefits to undergoing this type of relationship. FSM would not be considered a separate legal entity and would not have to attend to administrative requirements which include applying for tax-exempt status and compliance with ongoing filing and registration requirements (Bradrick, 2015). FSM would also not have to establish and elect a board of directors and create articles of incorporation and bylaws. Also, because of the over saturation of nonprofits in the last few years, there are many funders who balk at the idea of the creation of yet another nonprofit. By aligning with an established 501(c)(3), there are potential funding sources that may open up to FSM if the organization is fiscally sponsored by MCAN. However, there are also some disadvantages to fiscal sponsorship. If FSM becomes a sponsored project, MCAN would then be legally responsible for all of the activities of FSM, which would include the responsibility to comply with terms of the grants FSM has been awarded and how FSM operates (Bradrick, 2015). If there is any sort of disagreement in these areas, FSM would be forced to comply with the decisions of MCAN. Also, MCAN would retain control and discretion over all of the funds given to FSM, thereby relinquishing control from FSM in this area (Bradrick, 2015). MCAN would also most likely charge an intra-organizational administrative fee to FSM to take on administrative costs associated with FSM (Takagi, 2016). Also, according to the National College Access Network (2011), due to some of the similarities in the work done by both groups, there is a chance that FSM could compete for resources such as staffing and funding with MCAN. Each of these governance strategies has various advantages and disadvantages, as well as many legal intricacies and nuances that are beyond the scope of an average layperson. Much more time and research is needed to further explore these strategies in more depth and it would benefit FSM greatly to talk with an experienced nonprofit lawyer about the most effective approach moving forward for the organization.

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Market Analysis FSM

is an industry leader in the field of removing barriers to college access and increasing awareness about resources and support for post secondary education students who have experienced foster care. Youth in foster care are underserved when it comes to higher education, and continued effort is needed not only to increase access to colleges and universities for this population, but also to raise awareness about college readiness to professionals and organizations that serve foster care youth.

FSM is an industry leader in the field of removing barriers to college access and increasing awareness about resources and support for post-secondary education students who have experienced foster care. Current Market Situation

Involvement with foster care, regardless of the duration of time, has a substantial effect on the opportunities and educational readiness of a person. The United States now ranks 18th among the top 24 industrialized nations for high school graduation rates. The 2010 U.S. Census states that 400,000 children were living within the foster care system. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, “every year, about 20,000 young people ‘age out’ of the foster care system and are suddenly on their own. Four years after aging out of the system, 25% have been homeless, less than half have graduated from high school, 42% have become parents themselves and more than 80% are unable to support themselves.” Young adults who have experienced foster care have significantly lower college entry, retention

and completion rates compared to their peers that do not come from foster care, despite options for financial support (Day et al., 2011). Although 70% of youth aging out of foster care aspire to attend college (Courney, Terao, & Bost, 2004), only about 20% of college-qualified youth enroll in college, compared to 60% of non-foster youth (Wolanin, 2005).   There are many barriers to educational access which include lack of communication about resources between high school educators and campus support programs, isolation of resource information due to lack of communication between child welfare and education professionals, and the relative invisibility of students from foster care by educators due to the lack of a coordinated system of identification. Gaps in critical information have implications that affect the overall well-being of students that could render them unable to continue in their education journey.   There is a need for FSM to continue to address these issues and to bring together professionals, supportive adults, and organizations that touch the lives of young people from foster care. FSM is committed to increasing the number of effective on-campus support programs for students from foster care and improving graduation rates among these students, which will eventually lead to successful career transitions. FSM has amassed a number of supports that communicate important and current information about the resources available to assist students and professionals in the college application process. FSM has also been integral in raising awareness about college readiness at events across the state of Michigan. FSM has established relationships with higher education institutions and is undertaking outreach efforts to additional


Market Analysis

3 Major Customer Categories

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Category 1 Postsecondary institutions in Michigan who want to start campus support programs.

Category 2 Ones that want to reach a specific level of expertise.

Category 3 Ones that want constant up-to-date information to keep their programs on the cutting edge of success.

schools. One of the main goals of the organiza- FSM has established meaningful relationships with tion, moving forward, is to leverage existing and several organizations and professionals at the nagenerate new resources within target markets tional and state levels. These organizations include: in order to cultivate innovations that will lead to promising new approaches to help students from National–Level Relationships: foster care achieve success. * National Association for Education of Homeless Children and Youth Target Markets and Customers * Foster Care Alumni of America * FosterClub Based on the services that may be provided, FSM’s * Casey Family Programs primary customers consist of other universities as * Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative well as any community programs that wish to en- * Center for the Study of Social Policy rich their services to insulate the education-to-ca- * Alabama Reach reer pipeline for foster children. These customers * California College Pathways may be ones still within the incubation stages of * Florida Reach development, or are looking to enrich their pro- * Embark Georgia grams with additional functions and features. * Idaho Fostering Success Network * Kansas Kids @GEAR UP The three major customer categories consist of: * Muskie School of Public Service – U. of Southern Maine * Postsecondary institutions that want to initi* New York State Office of Children and ate a campus support program for youth from Family Services foster care * Children’s Aid Society * Ones that want to reach a specific level of expertise * NC Reach * Ones that want constant up-to-date information * Foster Care 2 Success * Ohio Reach to keep their programs on the cutting edge * R is for Thursday of success


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Organizational Relationships

State–Level Relationships * Michigan Department of Health and Human Services * Michigan Youth Opportunities Initiative * Michigan College Access Network * Michigan’s Children * Student Scholarships & Grants Office * Samaritas * Faith Communities Coalition on Foster Care * Park West Foundation

* * * *

Education Reach for Texans Great Expectations Passport to College Promise Program Missouri Reach

State–Level Relationships: * Michigan Department of Health and Human Services * Michigan Youth Opportunities Initiative * Michigan College Access Network * Michigan’s Children * Student Scholarships & Grants Office * Samaritas * Faith Communities Coalition on Foster Care * Park West Foundation In addition, there are seventeen (17) post-secondary institutions with campus support programs that make up the FSM Higher Education Consortium: Aquinas College, Baker College-Flint,

Delta College, Eastern Michigan University, Ferris State University, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Lake Michigan Community College, Lansing Community College, Michigan State University, Northwestern Michigan College, Saginaw Valley State University, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor and Flint campuses), Washtenaw Community College, Wayne County Community College, Wayne State University, and Western Michigan University. An additional 12 post-secondary institutions within Michigan are targeted for outreach, several of which are among the top ten schools for students receiving Education Training Voucher (ETV) awards or where FSM has already initiated engagement strategies. With specific individual federal and state funding and resources, universities and colleges that are looking to develop and implement campus sup-


Market Analysis

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National–Level Relationships * National Association for Education of Homeless Children and Youth * Foster Care Alumni of America * Foster Club * Casey Family Programs * Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative * Center for the Study of Social Policy * Alabama Reach * California College Pathways * Florida Reach * Embark Georgia * Idaho Fostering Success Network * Missouri Reach

port programs will most likely be price sensitive, that is, they may have limited resources to pay for services. Because of the nature of the programs, price may be a very important consideration on the actionability and execution of the these programs. Ultimately, the focus should remain on the end customer who are the people and students in or from foster care services. According to recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2014), there were over 14,000 children in foster care in Michigan in 2013; about 3.5% of the total number of children in foster care in the nation (approximately 402,000). Michigan is one of a handful of states that has collaborative initiatives between colleges and state foster care programs. Other similar collaborative efforts exist in the following states: California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Virginia

* Kansas Kids @GEAR UP * Muskie School of Public Service – U. of Southern Maine * New York State Office of Children and Family Services * Children’s Aid Society * NC Reach * Foster Care 2 Success * Ohio Reach * R is for Thursday * Education Reach for Texans * Great Expectations * Passport to College Promise Program

and Washington. These states account for another 41% of all foster care children in the U.S. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services also reports (2013) that White/Caucasian children make up nearly 42% of all children in foster care, followed by Black/African-American children (26%) and Hispanic children (21%). There are slightly more males (52%) than females (48%) in foster care. Transitioning out of foster care is difficult, to say the least. According the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiatives, as reported by Fosterclub.com, studies of youth who have left foster care have shown they are more likely than those in the general population to not finish high school, to be unemployed, and be too dependent on public assistance. Many find themselves in prison, homeless, or parents at an early age. According to the “Getting to Know... Child Welfare for K-12 Educators” guide published by FSM, in 2010, the average age of youth in Michigan


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

foster care was 9.8 years old and the average length of stay in foster care was 774 days. Fifty-two percent (52%) of students who were ever in foster care read below grade level, compared to 38% of the overall population (Lesnick, Gorge, Smithgall, & Gwynne, 2010). As technology advances and the need for low to no-skill jobs diminish, it is now more imperative than ever to earn a post secondary education degree or a trade degree. Statistically, earning that degree has proven to be a monumental challenge for foster youth. According to Fostering Success in Education (2014), 84% of youth ages 17-18, with experience in foster care report wanting to go to college. The Casey Family Programs estimate around 13% of all foster care youth enroll in higher education programs. Of that just 2% end up being handed their bachelor’s degree. Other research states that youth with experience in foster care are up to 8 times less likely to earn a college degree, compared to the general population (Wolanin 2005). Education has emerged as a well-being indicator within the child welfare system due to increased pressure to improve outcomes for young adults who have experienced foster care. There is an awareness that these young adults are fairing much worse than their same age peers. Also, since involvement with foster care has a substantial effect on opportunities and educational readiness of foster care youth, and because the U.S. ranks 18th among the top 24 industrialized nations for high school graduation rates, the nation is concerned about foster care youth now more than ever. While the primary responsibility for child welfare services rests with individual states, the Federal Government started providing grants for preventative and protective services and foster care payments as early as 1935. The largest federally funded programs that support State and Tribal efforts for child welfare, foster care, and adoption activities are authorized under titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Since 1974, with the passage of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), federal legislation has increased significantly with the passage of approximately 30 distinct federal acts that deal with these issues. For a summary review of the Federal legislation that has shaped the delivery of child welfare services, please see the Child Welfare Information Gateway publication “Major Federal

Legislation Concerned with Child Protection, Child Welfare and Adoption (March 2015)� available at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/majorfedlegis.pdf Most recently, beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, legislation like the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) contain key protections for students in foster care to promote school stability and success, and require collaboration with child welfare partners. This legislation works to ensure that every foster care student will have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a higher education.


Market Analysis

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Competitive Analysis One

of the difficulties with finding competition for FSM is that almost no one provides the same level of expertise as FSM. Unlike FSM, the goals of other organizations are to have as many applicants and students enrolled into their programs in order for them to receive additional funding to continue the growth of their organization. In the Michigan market, if FSM did not exist, there are many indirect competitors, but not many direct. Many of the services offered by other organizations in Michigan do not hold the same breadth and depth of services that FSM provides. Many organizations like Alabama Reach, and Embark Georgia offer somewhat similar services to FMS, but do not hold the same weight in terms of ability and expertise.

Many of the services offered in Michigan do not hold the same breadth and depth of services that FSM provides. Direct Competition Nationally: Foster Care to Success (FC2S) Foster Care to Success is the largest national nonprofit organization working with college bound youth that have been in foster care. FC2S provides financial backing for college in the form of scholarships and grants, care packages and family-like encouragement, academic and personal mentoring, and help with internships and employment readiness skills. They do not, however, offer the level of skill building/training or networking as FSM is able to provide. FC2S has built strong, trusting relationships with their target publics. Their proven results and trusting

relationships have gotten them much support from stakeholders. Foster Youth in Action (FYA) Foster Youth in Action was established in 2008 by foster youth organizers and advocates at California Youth Connection, one of the oldest independent foster youth-led organizations in the U.S. FYA’s mission is to organize grassroots networks of foster youth-led groups through training, leadership opportunities, shared learning and advocacy. FYA has 16 foster youth-driven partners in 17 states. National Foster Care Coalition (NFCC) Established in 1998, the National Foster Care Coalition (NFCC) is a broadly based national, non-partisan partnership of individuals, organizations, foundations, and associations dedicated to improving the lives of children currently in the foster care system. Its mission is to build and sustain political and public will to improve the foster care system and the lives of the children and youth in its care. The NFCC’s major initiatives include: National Foster Care Month, Emerging Youth Leaders, Voices for Reform, Training and Technical Assistance, Publications, and to act as a clearinghouse on child welfare policy and programs. Although other programs across the country do not compete with FSM in the state of Michigan, they are still directly competing from a distance. From a national view-point, California, Texas, and Ohio have the greatest number of programs in place. Many of the programs that FSM shares its knowledge with have strong marketing tactics. For example, Alabama Reach has a professional website that provides viewers with easy access to sign up for its services and donate online. That organization also keep all tabs and


Competitive Analysis

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FSM Competition Direct Competition

Statewide Support Programs

National * Foster Care to Success (FCS) * Foster Youth in Action (FYA) * National Foster Care Coalition (NFCC) * Alabama REACH * Ohio REACH * Education Reach for Texans

* Embark Georgia * California College Pathways * Virginia Great Expectations * Educate Tomorrow

Indirect Competition

Other local nonprofit organizations * Advocacy Services for Kids (ASK) * American Red Cross, Kalamazoo Chapter * Big Brothers Big Sisters, A Community of Caring * Boys and Girls Club of Greater Kalamazoo * Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo (CIS) * Drive Safe Kalamazoo * Family and Children Services * Kalamazoo Animal Rescue * Kalamazoo County Child Abuse and Neglect Council (CAN Council) * Kalamazoo Humane Society * Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundations – Southwest Michigan Affiliate

Other WMU campus-based programs * Campus Activities Board (CAB * Greek Organizations * Athletic Teams * Student Activities and Leadership Programs (SALP) * Faith–based Student Organizations * Seita Scholars


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

headlines consistent with its keyword, “Reach.� This gives Alabama Reach a competitive edge over FSM. Statewide Support Programs for Students with Experience in Foster Care One of the services FSM provides is sharing its knowledge and success strategies with other statewide support programs with the same mission as FSM. These resources are what give FSM market value, and because FSM is essentially giving them away for free to its competitors, the organization is missing out on opportunities to make profits off of its services that could help FSM fund other efforts. It can also be inferred that FSM is undervaluing itself by not placing a substantially higher value on the services it provides these other programs.

Indirect Competition Indirect competition is defined as an organization that is within the Kalamazoo area that can offer some form of support (either financial, goods, or mental) to youth and young adults, or may compete for funding resources. Other WMU Campus-Based Programs Many university programs at WMU have very high recognition in the Kalamazoo community through branding and publicity. Some of these programs serve a very different mission from FSM, but their popularity makes it easy for them to generate revenue through donations that could otherwise benefit FSM. Some of them actively fundraise and others simply receive donations based off of awareness and popularity. These organizations include the Seita Scholars program, athletic teams, Greek

Risks in Competitive Market Risk 1 Lose funding to competitors.

Risk 2 Missed opportunities for financial support due to lack of awareness.

Risk 3 Reputation and perceived value could take a large hit if FSM continues to sell their services to other organizations for low to no cost.


Competitive Analysis

organizations, faith-based student organizations, and activity or event-based student organizations including Campus Activities Board (CAB) and Student Activities and Leadership Programs (SALP). Other Local Nonprofit Organizations Although other nonprofits in the Kalamazoo community do not provide the same services as FSM, they still attract monetary and non-monetary support of the community.

Primary Risks and Opportunities in the Competitive Market An obvious risk for FSM is to continue to lose funding to its competitors. Loss of funding can make or break an organization. FSM will receive minimal support and funding without new marketing, public relations, and other strategies to differentiate itself, specifically other local nonprofits and FC2S. Without said support, FSM will be unable to provide their services to more market members. FSM lacks this financial support mainly due to lack of awareness. A big opportunity to change this would be to mirror the tactics that competitors implement to earn rapport. For example, creating a way for people to donate online through the organization’s website (which FSM has just implemented in November 2016), holding fundraising events within the community, and devising and implementing effective marketing strategies. Through such branding efforts and community outreach tactics, FSM has strong potential to build stronger relationships and increase awareness throughout the Kalamazoo community. FSM is also at risk because of how it competes with and presents itself to the competition. If FSM continue to sell its services to other organizations for minimal pricing, its reputation and perceived value will take a large hit. A big opportunity to help combat this problem is to increase the prices of services and better market FSM’s value.

Advantage/Value of Products and Services The advantage of the proposed service FSM provides is to help children and young adults who have experienced foster care complete a college education. FSM also provides services and support to teachers and caregivers who have helped children with foster care experience. A “product” FSM provides is the sharing of its tactics and knowledge with other universities so they can implement campus support programs. This is a strong advantage because others think so highly of FSM and view its services as valuable. Therefore, FSM should begin charging an acceptable price to match the perceived value of the products offered in order to reduce its reliance on grants.

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Products & Services Current Products/Services FSM Website: The FSM website is a critical communication tool that provides students and professionals with resources and information to successfully navigate the education to career pipeline. It works as a resource hub for both state and national partners. FSM Guides, e-Briefs and Webinars: These products and services are used to communicate up-to-date information and best practices. All FSM-developed resources are made available at the website in a cohesive way, ensuring participants have a common communication language. FSM Networking Activities: These networking activities include the FSM Google Group listserv, FSM Monthly Newsletters, FSM Student Spotlights, and in-person networking opportunities. They also include the FSM Facebook page and a Twitter account (@FSMichigan) which offers up-to-the-minute information about child welfare and higher education. FSM Student Leadership: FSM collaborates with students that have experienced foster care to identify key aspects of pre-college and college programming which are integral to their postsecondary education success. The student leaders will inform the campus readiness toolkit and provide opportunities to speak to education and welfare professionals as well as aid in the development of the FSM Network. FSM Annual Statewide Summit: The summit was the only event in Michigan that brought together professionals, students and supportive adults from all sectors to access resources, network and engage in conversations

about the common agenda. It was the venue to update network participants on progress made and to recruit new members. FSM Regional Network Meetings: Hosted in partnership with campus support programs across the 5 regions targeted by FSM. The meetings facilitate networking maintaining participants better informed and connected.

Positioning of Products/Services FSM’s products/services encompass three strategies: resourcing, supporting and networking. Resourcing Building the Knowledge Capacity of FSM Partners Resourcing activities provide partners with information that lead to greater knowledge or awareness about the culture of foster care and the supports available to students who have experienced foster care. The primary purpose of resourcing strategies include building the knowledge capacity via: * FSM website * Educational webinars * “Getting to Know…” series resource guides * FSM podcast series Supporting Building the Skill Capacity of FSM Partners Supporting activities provide partners with technical assistance and training that lead to increase skills on how best to work with both youth who have experiences foster care and other profession-


Products & Services

als. The primary purpose of the supporting strategies include building the skill capacity of FSM partners via: * FSM Higher Education Consortium * Offering technical assistance to network partners * Student support Networking Building the Social Capacity of FSM partners Networking activities provide spaces where partners can relate, receive information and increase their capital through meaningful connections. The primary objective of networking strategies is to build the social capacity of FSM partners via: * Annual statewide summit * Regional network meetings * Web-based communications

Future Products and Services FSM Campus Readiness Toolkit: FSM will develop a comprehensive toolkit for supporting students with a background in foster care in higher education. The toolkit will include a step-by-step institutional assessment and a Michigan-specific resource guide for postsecondary administrators and staff as they develop programs and align services on their campus to support students from foster care. FSM Higher Education Consortium Action Network: The FSM HEC will collaborate with institutions in the HEC network to develop scalable best practices in campus support programming for students

from foster care, implement a system-change strategy and cultivate sustainability strategies for the work of increasing postsecondary access and success for student from foster care. FSM Webinars: Webinars will be qualified for Continuing Education Units for social workers and educators, and in turn will be made available for a fee covering cost of CEUs and development of the webinar series. Fostering Success Coach Trainings: FSM is in the process of integrating the Fostering Success Coach Training Program into the work and service array of FSM. In 2017, FSM will integrate the forthcoming FS Coaching web-based training series in partnership through WMU Extended University Programs. FSM will also integrate the Fostering Success Youth Leadership trainings. These trainings will be available on a fee-for-service basis and will provide revenue to FSM. FSM Policy Action Network: FSM will convene with organizations to develop a policy agenda and call to action urging legislative support for students from foster care. FSM Collective Impact Toolkit: The toolkit will provide resources to increase sustainability of the collective impact initiative.

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FSM Products and Services

Current Products & Services

* FSM Website * Educational Webinars * “Getting to Know...� Series Resource Guides * FSM Podcast series

* FSM Higher Education Consortium * Student Support * Offering Technical Assistance to Network Partners

* Annual Statewide Summit * Regional Network Meetings * Web-Based Communications


Products & Services

Future Products & Services

* FSM Campus Readiness Toolkit * FSM Collective Impact Toolkit * FSM Webinars (CEUs Qualified) * FSM Policy Action Network * FSM Higher Education Consortium Action Network * Fostering Success Coach Training

Resourcing

Supporting

Networking

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Marketing & Sales FSM

has a multitude of resources available ranging from webinars, podcasts, videos, toolkits, and e-newsletter delivery options for clients and foster care youth alike. Understanding each target audience is key to knowing who has the expendable income for this content and who needs it for free. Due to the various audiences served, a content-specific segmentation marketing structure is recommended for FSM resources. In this content-specific structure, recommendations will be given on what content should be free for end users, and what content should be offered for a premium (e.g. for a cost). One of the ways to determine which users get “basic” versus “premium” membership content is through a screening process that utilizes the sign-in function on the website. By asking a few questions during the account setup process, FSM will have analytic points to segment its audience for available web-based resources. This segmentation strategy also will help in FSM fundraising activities and for providing feedback on the different types of content different audiences are looking to access.

A content–specific segmentation marketing structure is recommended for FSM. In this structure, content is free for certain target audiences and costs money for others. This segmentation strategy is aligned with the findings of the user experience research conducted by FSM’s website developer, Mighty in the Midwest. Based on Mighty’s research, a new information architecture strategy is recommended along with new layout, design and filter controls for the library section of the website. Overall, the website should be designed with the user in mind.

Website Content Segmentation Webinars: (Premium) The webinars that FSM offers are full of rich content that advisors and supportive adults find imperative for foster youth transitioning from high school to college. Because of the audience being targeted and the intellectual property that is involved in this subsection of content offered, it is worth a premium price. The webinars can occur as frequently as FSM feels necessary. A new post once per month or per quarter is recommended. Newsletters: (Basic) FSM’s newsletter acts as a sound bite of what content is to come from the organization. It functions as both a reminder and an enticer to have content users visit more often. It is recommended that newsletters are offered as a basic feature offered for free because it acts as a medium that directly connects the user and multiple content sources. Guides Series: (Premium / Basic) Much like the Webinar series, the Guides series is packed with intellectual property and robust knowledge. Because so much work has gone into creating the series, the guides should be offered at a premium. However, due to the subject matter of some of the guides, some segmentation should be done. The end user would ultimately help FSM determine which is basic versus premium content. An example found in the library is “Supporting Transgendered Youth in the Workforce.” This material should be offered at a premium because an advisor or employer would serve as the end user. However, “Affording College in Michigan: Guide for Students” should be offered as basic or free content because the end user is the student/foster youth accessing the content.


Marketing & Sales

Content Segmentation Basic

Newsletter

Premium

Guides

Podcasts

FSM Toolkit

Social Media Channels

Webinars

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Podcasts: (Premium / Basic) Due to the content of FSM’s podcasts, it is recommended that they be offered in the basic plan. Much of the material in the podcasts are targeted towards foster youth and therefore should be offered for free so that they can easily access it. However, some premium content could be added. A follow-up podcast with extra information, or longer, more comprehensive interviews can be created after free episodes so that premium users can have access to more extensive information. FSM Campus Readiness Toolkit: (Premium) The toolkit includes a step-by-step institutional assessment and resource guide for postsecondary administrators and staff to use as they develop programs and align services on their campus to support students from foster care. Due to the development of this unique toolkit in direct response to input from postsecondary institutions asking for such a resource, the toolkit should be worth a premium price. The toolkit could be offered both regionally and nationally. Potentially, FSM could ask for sponsors of its Campus Readiness Toolkit. These sponsors could be businesses or other agencies that would want to be associated with the name and expertise of FSM.

Additional Marketing & Sales Efforts Social Media Channels: (Facebook, YouTube) FSM is currently involved in reaching current and potential clients through multiple channels of social media. Out of the 4 current channels in use: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube, it is recommended that FSM focus their efforts on Facebook and YouTube. It can be difficult to connect with users on Twitter and Instagram due to the limited amount of space to launch or promote products, express your brand’s personality, monitor feedback, and provide customer service. The trend in social media that users are moving towards is an increase in video content. Focusing on Facebook and YouTube is the perfect combination to take hold of this trend. Facebook is the #1 social media channel to date by far, grabbing the attention of more than 1 billion users per month. No other channel even comes close to those numbers. YouTube is the most popular video hosting service and can be very useful in the marketing of FSM and its services. FSM should focus on sharing content between these channels by posting videos from their YouTube channel to their Facebook page and adding in links to their Facebook page on their YouTube content.


Marketing & Sales

Outside Consulting When it comes to problem solving, FSM offers best in practice consulting to clients. Clients will form a direct line of contact with FSM’s Director of Outreach and Training for the Center for Fostering Success at Western Michigan University, Maddy Day. FSM will work to facilitate client learning, assist with the implementation of the same best practices that FSM currently uses, provide strategic recommendations, and work towards the improvement of the client’s overall effectiveness for their organization.

X, between a decided upon time frame, % of the profits Restaurant X made would be donated to FSM. This would be mutually beneficial for both parties because FSM would get a sizable donation at no cost and make a connection with a nearby business and its customers, while Restaurant X would get the traffic and positive word of mouth. (See Appendix C) Businesses

*Estimate an average of 60 hours for consulting with an institution.*

Sponsorships: Partnership with Southwest and Southeast Michigan businesses would be mutually beneficial for all parties. FSM should solicit sponsorships from these companies in order to get additional funding. Sponsorship terms can include inclusion of the sponsor’s logo on FSM written materials, website, and other branded items. Businesses could also sponsor FSM’s webinars and podcasts in order to increase awareness not only regionally, but nationally. Increased branding for the sponsors would be offered if they were to provide additional financial support for FSM events or materials.

Option B Charge a Premium Flat Rate of $10,000 total per school or organization

Some examples of potential sponsoring businesses in Kalamazoo, Lansing, and Southeast Michigan include: Meijer, Target, Kohl’s, and Biggby Coffee.

Option A Premium hourly rate of $125 * Sharing of best practices * Sharing of components of the Campus Readiness Toolkit (which include an institutional self assessment, identification of other campuses that might have interest, etc.) * Travel is negotiated

* * * *

Set number of hours (60) Includes Travel Sharing of best practices Sharing of components of the Campus Readiness Toolkit (which include an institutional self assessment, identification of other campuses that might have interest, etc.)

New Fundraising Ideas Developing a combination of low-cost outreach activities can assist FSM on two fronts: (1) increasing awareness of the organization and (2) generating additional funds for ongoing operating expenses. The following are potential outreach activities with restaurants, businesses and other nonprofit organizations.

Some businesses that are local to the Kalamazoo, Lansing, and Southeast Michigan areas include: Kalamazoo: Bronson Health Foundation, Climb Kalamazoo, Discover Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Seelye Automotive Group, and Sweetwater’s Donut Mill. Lansing: Lafontaine Automotive Group, Michigan State University Federal Credit Union, Consumers Energy. SE Michigan: St. John Providence Hospital Foundations, Beaumont Health Systems, Southeast Michigan Ford Dealers, Michigan First Credit Union, Whirlpool Corporation - Whirlpool Foundation

Restaurants

Nonprofit Organizations

Fundraising Nights: An easy way to fundraise is to have a fundraising night at a nearby restaurant. For instance, if FSM partnered with Restaurant

Mirroring Proven Tactics: Studying best practices of other nonprofit organizations and how they effectively fundraise can contribute to an increase

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in fundraising for FSM. The first step is selecting nonprofits that have a similar mission to FSM. Then, determine their target markets and how the nonprofit is effectively targeting them. FSM can work on developing similar fundraising strategies by utilizing these best practices. Some of the highest profile nonprofit organizations are the Kalamazoo Community Foundation and Volunteer Kalamazoo. These organizations do a good amount of their fundraising by putting their name out in the community and recruiting volunteers. Mirroring their outreach techniques and campaign structures can communicate a similar call-to-action. Examples include hosting fundraising and entertaining events and sharing success stories on their website and social media accounts. Implementing tactics that have been proven successful can bring in donations while also being a low-risk tactic. Western Michigan University

ample, Greek organizations are required to hold philanthropy events throughout the academic year. If FSM were to partner with one or more Greek organizations, they could put on the event and raise funds. The students get to fulfill their purpose as members of the Greek community and FSM gets the donations and free publicity it needs. Student Activities and Leadership Program Chris Sligh - Director chris.sligh@wmich.edu (269) 387-2117 Recruiting WMU Volunteers: Many WMU students enjoy volunteering or need volunteer hours for their academic programs or student organizations. Recruiting student volunteers to help out with campaigns, events, or anything else FSM needs is a cost-effective way to find them. WMU also has a nonprofit leadership minor that FSM could seek volunteers from since they are already passionate about nonprofit organizations.

Campus Outreach: Holding fundraising events on WMU’s campus can inform students of FSM’s existence while also raising money. Informational handouts and branded items (pens, keychains, etc.) can engage students with FSM at various WMU events and keep FSM in their minds. Event ideas include bake sales, an interactive trivia booth relating to foster care and education, or simply handing out materials to students as they walk by on campus. The increase in awareness has the potential to influence WMU students to attend other FSM events, specifically restaurant fundraisers in the Kalamazoo area.

WMU Undergraduate Nonprofit Programs Dr. Janice Maatman – Director janice.maatman@wmich.edu 269-387-8945 Traditional Public Relations Activities

Bronco Bash https://wmich.edu/broncobash/boothApplications. html (269) 387-0083 First Year Experience Program Maleeka Love – First-Year Experience Program Manager Maleeka.love@wmich.edu 269-387-2387

WMUK FM 102.1 1903 West Michigan Avenue Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5351 (269) 387-5715

Partnering with WMU Student Organizations: Involving WMU campus organizations that can also benefit from fundraising for FSM make this strategy cost efficient and mutually beneficial. There are many campus organizations at Western Michigan University whose purpose is to give back. For ex-

Public Service Announcements (PSAs): Running a PSA on local radio to spread awareness of FSM and the importance of what they do would motivate listeners to donate. Different versions can be made to fit different time frames and communicate different key messages, all while sharing call-to-action messaging.

WZOX FM 96.5 4200 W. Main St. Kalamazoo , MI 49006 Studio Line: 269-327-9965 Business Lines: 269-345-7121 WKFR - HD2 102.5, WKFR 103.3 FM 4154 Jennings Dr. Kalamazoo, MI 49048 269-344-0111


Marketing & Sales

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

WBCK FM 95.3 390 Golden Avenue Battle Creek, MI 49015 269-963-5555 Local Media Coverage: Publishing feature stories in local and campus newspapers including the Western Herald and The Kalamazoo Gazette. This often has little to no cost, making it a low-risk tactic for FSM. Getting paid advertisements published in local media can also spread awareness, peak interest, and can be fairly inexpensive. FSM could also participate in radio interviews on Kalamazoo radio stations (such as WMUK) at popular listening times to speak to target audiences on a conversational and personal level. Building awareness can influence audiences to recognize FSM and attend fundraising events. Western Herald 1903 W. Michigan Ave. 1517 Faunce Student Services Building Mail Stop: 5363 Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5363 The Kalamazoo Gazette (MLive) 300 South Kalamazoo Mall Kalamazoo MI 49007 (269) 903-3640 WWMT TV 590 West Maple St. Kalamazoo MI 49008 (269) 388-3333 WOOD TV 120 College Ave. SE Grand Rapids MI 49503 (616) 456-8888 Building Relationships: Gaining support of organizations that could provide financial assistance to FSM is a mutually beneficial tactic. FSM can publicly show support to local organizations, and they may donate to FSM in return. Organizations to target should be child or education advocacy programs, social justice programs or volunteer organizations. These organizations could start out just as supporters of FSM, but the consistent development of those relationships can lead to sponsorships or other forms of financial support. For example, if FSM were to partner with a Noodles & Co., the

restaurant could continue to sponsor events, while FSM could consistently cater their events with Noodles & Co. Both parties develop mutual trust and a good relationship through consistently supporting one another over time. This way, FSM can rely on the restaurant to sponsor them when needed just by choosing to cater with them. Another example could be something as simple as FSM handing out coupons for Tropical Smoothie in their office or with handouts after a fundraising event. This will show the restaurant that FSM appreciates their support and is returning the favor by giving them free publicity in a simple way. This will persuade them to help FSM again in the future. Grant Opportunities There are several potential opportunities to gain additional resources from other grantors who have missions that align with either the specific issue (e.g., education, pathways to success, etc.) or target audience (e.g., children in foster care, etc.). Although some grantors are well aligned with FSM’s mission, they do not seek, accept or fund unsolicited proposals, such as the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, or the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation. Establishing personal relationships with foundation program officers will be the strategy for securing consideration from these organizations. In some other cases where FSM’s mission aligns with grantors, the grantor is limited in geographic scope, such as the Jayson Hayes Foundation in Maryland or the Sherwood Foundation in Nebraska. However, the following two foundations have been identified as possible leads that would require minimal effort. Charles Stewart Mott Foundation: The Mott Foundation supports efforts that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society. There are four primary areas that the Mott Foundation focuses on: Civil Society, Education, Environment and Flint. FSM’s goal to serve foster care children aligns well with Mott’s Education-related initiatives. Specially, Mott makes “grants to help all children, especially those in underserved communities, acquire the knowledge, skills and be-


Marketing & Sales

haviors they need to succeed in college, career pathways and life.” The first step to secure a grant from Mott is to complete a Letter of Inquiry (LOI). The letter of inquiry can be found at: https://www.mott.org/letter-of-inquiry/ Ford Foundation: For eight decades, the Ford Foundation’s mission has been to reduce poverty and injustice, strengthen democratic values, promote international cooperation, and advance human achievement. There are seven (7) key areas of focus for the foundation, and its “Youth Opportunity and Learning” is likely the best aligned with FSM’s mission. While the foundation states that less than one percent of unsolicited grant ideas result in funding, it costs little for FSM to fill out the online submission form that can be found here: ht tps://w w w.fordfoundation.org /work /our grants/idea-submission/ John Risley, Research Program Officer in WMU’s Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR), may be the best contact for identifying other relevant external funding opportunities from national, regional or local corporate or nonprofit foundations and/or government agencies. John has access to various grant databases could prove to be very beneficial to FSM.

John Risley Research Program Officer Office of the Vice President for Research Western Michigan University 1903 W Michigan Ave Kalamazoo MI 49008-5456 USA Office: (269) 387-8204 john.risley@wmich.edu

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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

New Fundraising Ideas Nonprofit Organizations

* Blaze Pizza * Steak N Shake * Noodles and Company * Applebee’s * Tropical Smoothie Cafe * Arby’s * Chili’s

Mirroring: * Picking out nonprofits with similar missions to FSM * Taking note of who they target and how they effectively target them to get results.

Fundraising: % of profits made during decided time frame donated to FSM.

Restaurants

Grant Opportunities

* Charles Stewart Mott Foundation * Ford Foundation * John Risley, Research Program Officer

Lansing: * Lafontaine Automotive Group * Michigan State University Federal Credit Union * Consumers Energy

Kalamazoo: * Bronson Health Foundation * Climb Kalamazoo * Discover Kalamazoo * Kalamazoo Institute of Arts * Sweetwater’s Donut Mill * Seelye Automotive Group

SE Michigan: * St. John Providence Hospital Foundations * Beaumont Health Systems * Southeast Michigan Ford Dealers * Michigan First Credit Union * Whirlpool Corporation * Whirlpool Foundation

* WMUK FM 102.1 * WZOX FM 96.5, WKFR - HD2 102.5 * WKFR 103.3 FM * WBCK FM 95.3

* Western Herald * The Kalamazoo Gazette (MLive) * WWMT TV * WOOD TV


Marketing & Sales

39

Western Michigan University

Campus Outreach: Holding fundraising events on WMU’s campus.

Businesses

Sponsorship: * Inclusion of the sponsor’s logo on FSM materials. * Increased sponsor’s branding offered if they provide financial support for FSM events or campaign.

* First Year Experience Program * Bronco Bash

Partner with Student Organizations: Involve student organizations thats can benefit from fundraising FSM.

* Student Activities and Leadership Program

Traditional Public Relations

Public Service Announcement Getting a Kalamazoo area based radio station to run a PSA.

Local Media Coverage: FSM can have informative feature stories published in local and campus newspapers.

Recruiting Volunteers: Recruiting student volunteers to help out with campaigns, events, or anything else FSM needs.

WMU Undergraduate Nonprofit Programs

Building Relationships: Gaining support of organizations that could provide financial support to FSM.


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Operations Key Personnel Yvonne Unrau, Ph.D. LMSW, is a Professor of Social Work and Director of the Center for Fostering Success at Western Michigan University. Her work is dedicated to improving both service experiences and client outcomes for vulnerable children and families, especially those whose lives have been touched by foster care. Maddy Day, LLMSW serves as the Director of Outreach and Training for the Center for Fostering Success at Western Michigan University. She oversees Fostering Success Michigan, and is passionate about engaging in systems change efforts through the development of innovative solutions. This includes creating diverse networks of individuals and organizations, making space for effective engagement between partners, and providing effective resources to the people who need them most.

Key Personnel

Karie Ward, MSW, works as the Sustainability Coordinator for FSM and focuses on long-term sustainability of the FSM Initiative through grant-writing, securing project based sponsorship, and program development. She facilitates both the FSM Webinar and Podcast series and is project lead for FSM Community Collaboratives. She began working for FSM as an MSW Intern and Graduate Assistant while attending WMU’s School of Social Work, graduating in 2015. Graduate Assistants: FSM also employs two graduate assistances.

Graduate Assistants


Operations

Yvonne Unrau

Maddy Day

41

Karie Ward


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Evaluation & Assessments In

order to determine if implemented tactics are effective or need to be modified, measurable and timely goals are needed.

Social Media: Goal: To have at least 200 Facebook followers after two months of implementing new promotional tactics. Goal: Increase social media engagement by 20% after two months of implementing new promotional tactics. Campus Readiness Toolkit: Goal: Adoption by twenty universities or colleges of the FSM Campus Readiness Toolkit after four months of implementing promotional new tactics Podcasts/Webinars: Goal: Download of podcasts/webinars at least 30 times six months after implementing new promotional tactics.

Website: Goal: A 10% increase in website views after three months of implementing new promotional tactics. An individualized goal, similar to this one, can also be set for each individual page within FSM’s website. Tools including Google Analytics can be used for quick measurement. Premium Memberships: Goal: Twenty premium memberships three months after implementing promotional tactics. Media Coverage: Media coverage goals should be measured separately for every individual media outreach effort. Measurement of one tactic can determine potential changes moving forward. Sample Goal: At least X% of media outlets contacted that covered the story. Sample Goal: At least X people that reach out


Evaluation & Assessments

to FSM within two weeks of media coverage being published.

rently. This goal of 10% should increase as more tactics are implemented and improved to be more effective.

Additional ways to measure success: Participant Surveys: FSM should survey everyone who signs up for premium membership, looks into an educational toolkit, etc. ask how they heard about it and what motivated them to engage with FSM. If there is trouble getting participants to take the survey, some small incentive, such as a discount on their purchase or a small prize, can be given to attain more feedback. Involvement/Engagement Increases: FSM should keep track of how many donations or inquiries FSM receives and how much they increase over the first few months of implementing new tactics. A realistic increase for this time period, and this early in the new implementation process, would be around 10% more than FSM gets cur-

All evaluation efforts should be assessed with all outside factors considered in order to determine if tactics are effective or not. If a goal is not met, it is recommended to look into possible explanations and then adapting the tactic(s) to address the problem before implementing again.

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Financials Appendix A (page 48) contains a spreadsheet with current Year 2 and Year 3 budget figures based on current products. Additional revenue streams could be realized from four sources: the implementation of tiered access to the web site resources; the campus readiness toolkit; direct program implementation consulting; and, restaurant fundraising opportunities.

Any hours above 60 would be charged a premium ($150). The potential for one consulting project per quarter could generate an additional $40,000 in revenue. Campus Readiness Toolkit: The toolkit essentially has three components: an initial self-assessment piece, the actual toolkit, and then the opportunity to receive tailored, ongoing consulting from FSM staff. It is recommended that the toolkit be priced accordingly:

Website Access: As previously mentioned, content on the web site could be segmented behind a firewall based on * Self- assessment: $250 user needs. Premium access to certain assets * Tool Kit (including self-assessment): $1,000 that require significant content development and * On-going consulting services: $125/hour delivery (podcasts, webinars, expert guides and the toolkit) and designed for more professional or This pricing structure aligns with the outside consupport users should come at a cost; while basic sulting strategy Option B previously mentioned. information and access is provided for lower-cost There are currently 12 universities within the resources for students. A tiered approach to pric- state of Michigan that are targeted for outreach ing is recommended based on a competitive re- during Phase II. If all 12 universities adopt the view of similar service providers: toolkit it will generate approximately $12,000. However, given the demand and need for similar * $29.99 per month services in all states, and that people from high* $149.99 for 6 months er education institutions outside of MI have used * $249.99 for 1 year the FSM website resources, if one school in each state adopted the toolkit, there is the potential for The goal is to capture fifty (50), 1-year subscrib- an additional $50,000 in revenue. ers during Phase II to generate approximately $12,500. Restaurant Fundraising: The revenue potential for the restaurant fundraisFSM Outside Consulting: ing is highly variable, depending on the specific Given the success of Maddy Day’s experience in restaurant giveback, location and day of the event. Philadelphia with on-site personal consulting, it is However, typical proceeds are less than $1,000, recommended that a strategy of completing one (1) usually $500-800. Hosting one fundraising event outside consulting project per quarter be explored. per month would generate an additional $6,000Rationale for the flat fee of $10,000 includes: $9,600 per year. * 60 hours of consulting at $125/hour: $7,500 * Travel expense: $1,500 * Campus Readiness Toolkit (complete): $1,000

Collectively, these four strategies have the potential to generate approximately $70,000 for Phase II operations.


Financials

45

FSM Outside Consulting: * 60 hours of consulting at $125/hour: $7,500 * Travel expense: $1,500 * Campus Readiness Toolkit (complete): $1,000 Any hours above 60 would be charged a premium ($150).

Website Access: * $29.99 per month * $149.99 for 6 months * $249.99 for 1 year

Campus Readiness Toolkit: * Self- assessment: $250 * Toolkit (including self-assessment): $1,000 * Ongoing consulting services: $125/hour

Restaurant Fundraising: Hosting one fundraising event per month would generate an additional $6,000-$9,600 per year.


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References Bradrick, E. (2015, May). Fiscal Sponsorship: What you should know and why you should know it. American Bar Association, Retrieved at: http://www.americanbar.org/ publications/blt/2015/05/04_bradrick.html Child Welfare Information Gateway (2016) “Foster Care Statistics 2014,” available at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/foster.pdf Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2016). “Major federal legislation concerned with child protection, child welfare, and adoption,” available at: https://www.childwelfare. gov/pubPDFs/majorfedlegis.pdf Creating and Operating a Statewide, Regional or Citywide College Access and Success Network. (2011). National College Access Network, Retrieved at: http://www.collegeaccess.org/images/documents/CreatingNetworkGuidebook.pdf De las Alas, R., Hugonny, M., New, M., & Peter Opper. (2005). Starting a nonprofit: What you need to know. Virginia Commission for the Arts, Retrieved at: http://www. arts.virginia.gov/resources/pdf/HowToFormANonprofit_1st_ed.pdf Lesnick, J., Goerge, R., Smithgall, C., & Gwynne J. (2010). Reading on Grade Level in Third Grade: How Is It Related to High School Performance and College Enrollment? Chicago: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. NC Center for Nonprofits (2010) “Fundraising: Good Strategies, Best Practices, and Useful Resources,” available at http://www.handsonnwnc.org/express/Fact%20 Sheet%20by%20NC%20Center%20on%20Fundraising.pdf Takagi, G., More, & Scheelk, B. (2016). Fiscal sponsorship: A balanced overview. Nonprofit Quarterly, Retrieved at: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/01/19/ fiscal-sponsorship-a-balanced-overview/?utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=25388277&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8Cfsce5xKu1Oqc1ZsAyJuTc5SAdi0zd4FQIgFouqktx4Gu92Ot_IvS5oOwRnme78AWN1HXuW3WdiGFcpmCZq2MLv343Oo_4hNmsVi9G7NCZSL8dZ4&_hsmi=25388277 The Annie E. Casey Foundation: Kids COUNT Data Center. A Project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/tables/6538-adult-population-by-age-group?loc=1&loct=1#detailed/1/any/fal se/573,869,36,868,867/117,2801,2802,2803/13515,13516 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (July 2014) “Numbers of Children in Foster Care on September 30th, by State,” available at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/ default/files/cb/children_in_care_2013.pdf U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Sept. 2013) “Recent Demographic Trends in Foster Care,” available at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/data-brieftrends-in-foster-care-1


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Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix A Kresge: Fostering Success Michigan Phase II: Building for Sustained Impact Yvonne Unrau, PI

Senior Personnel Yvonne Unrau, PI: Class release, 1 class fall and one class spring, 0.25 FTE Maddy Day, Project Director FY Full-time Subtotal Other Personnel WMU faculty yet to be determined. Year 1: One faculty identified, provided honorarium of $2,500/ year. Year 2: Continued appointment of current faculty and seek to identify 2 additional faculty, honorariums will be $2,500/year. Graduate assistant: 2 half time in the academic year and two half-time time in summers 1 and 2. Program Assistant: Temporary hourly employee (Year 2: estimate 30 hrs/week * $20/hr * 50 wks; Year 3 estimate is 11 hrs/week, 50 weeks; $0.50 hr raise in year 3). Hours and wages may be variable dependant upon qualifying factors. Sustainability Coordinator: (estimate 30 hrs/week *$22.50/hr*50 wks in year 2. Year 3 estimate is 20 hrs/week, 40 weeks; $0.50 hr raise in year 3). Administrative Assistant: (estimate 5 hrs/week*$15/hr*48 weeks) Student/Temporary Workers: Hours and wages dependent on qualifying factors: (Year 1: estimate 10 hrs/week*$12/ hr * 47 weeks; Year 2: estimate 32 hrs/week*$15/hr * 50 weeks) Subtotal


Appendix A

The Kresge Foundation

The Kresge Foundation

Western Michigan University

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

PROPOSED Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17 -12/31/17

The Kresge Foundation Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

$26,053 $56,288

$56,288

$–

$57,977

$56,288

$56,288

$26,053

$57,977

$5,472

$7500

$21,053

$28,200

$30,000

$–

$11,275

$27,000

$33,750

$23,000

$3,600

$3,600

$3,600

$5,640

$24,000

$–

$69,912

$98,850

$21,053

$37,875

49

Western Michigan University Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18


50

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix A Kresge: Fostering Success Michigan Phase II: Building for Sustained Impact Yvonne Unrau, PI

Fringe Unrau: academic year Day: Fiscal Year (52.5%); 53% 7/1/16 WMU faculty: summer fringe Program Assistant (7.65%) Sustainability Coordinator (7.65%) Administrative Assistant Student/Temporary Workers (7.65%) Subtotal Total Salary and Fringe


Appendix A

The Kresge Foundation

The Kresge Foundation

Western Michigan University

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

PROPOSED Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17 -12/31/17

The Kresge Foundation Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

$14,147 $30,058

$30,058

$30,960

$1,362

$1,868

$–

$2,157

$2,295

$863

$2,066

$2,582

$1760

$896

$896

$896

$431

$1,836

$–

$36,971

$39,535

$14,147

$34,478

$163,172

$194,673

$61,252

$130,330

51

Western Michigan University Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18


52

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix A Kresge: Fostering Success Michigan Phase II: Building for Sustained Impact Yvonne Unrau, PI

Travel Out of state conference travel for presentation related to foster youth and higher education (all conference fees and travel) Mileage for project-related travel (in-state, out-of-state driving) estimate is approximately 700 miles per month x 0.575/mile (total includes any parking costs) Hotel estimate 5 nights x $150 per night for distance travel, or emergency stay due to weather Per Diem estimate 8 days x $71/day In-state conference registration Total Travel


Appendix A

The Kresge Foundation

The Kresge Foundation

Western Michigan University

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

PROPOSED Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17 -12/31/17

Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

$–

$–

The Kresge Foundation

$3,130 $4,830

$6,000

$750

$750

$568

$568 $1,000

$6,148

$11,448

53

Western Michigan University Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18


54

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix A Kresge: Fostering Success Michigan Phase II: Building for Sustained Impact Yvonne Unrau, PI

Other Materials and Supplies: Expense estimates for this category include: $1,200 Telecom, $1850 Cell Phone, $500 Postage, $3,050 Promotion/Swag, $1,850 Office Supplies. Amounts within subcategories may vary. Computer and software Gift card and honorarium incentives for student participants: 120 - 150 to gift cards @$20 -$25 each year of the grant Printing Costs: Includes out-sourced high volume printing as well as internal copying through WMU/ CHHS print/copy system. Consultants: Consultant(s) with specialized skills targeting (1) system change, including shared measurement, (2) business planning, and (3) evaluation. Estimate: $100 per hour x 300 hours split between years 1 and 2. Computer Services and Management tools: costs associated with website, webinars, software subscriptions (e.g., go-to-meeting, constant contact, survey monkey) includes funds for software/ management tools recommended by consultant. Incentives to network participants: $750-$1,500 per award; Year 2: Includes incentive for participation in HEC Annual Retreat (estimate $250/institution to offset travel and lodging to retreat location, estimate 16 participating institutions) Meetings: Room and equipment rental outside WMU, food, meeting incidentals, and support for meeting activities (i.e. presenter/speaker honorarium). Year 1 and 2 includes the Annual Summit. Tuition: Graduate assistant: 2 half time in the academic year and two half-time time in summers 1 and 2. Total Other


Appendix A

The Kresge Foundation

The Kresge Foundation

Western Michigan University

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

PROPOSED Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17 -12/31/17

$8,450

$10,000

$–

$425

$3,000

$3,000

$4,400

$5,000

$15,000

$15,000

$5,000

$15,000

$10,250

$10,000

$2,000

$15,000

Western Michigan University

The Kresge Foundation Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

$–

$–

$11,916 $48,100

$73,425

$11,916

55


56

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix A Kresge: Fostering Success Michigan Phase II: Building for Sustained Impact Yvonne Unrau, PI

Total Direct Cost Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC) Excludes: * Subaward amounts > $25k/per subaward * Equipment > $5,000 * Participant Support Costs * Tuition F&A on MTDC: 15% as limited by sponsor - documentation on the PAF WMU negotiated F&A: 51% Total Direct and Indirect Costs


Appendix A

The Kresge Foundation

The Kresge Foundation

Western Michigan University

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

PROPOSED Year 2 Budget 1/1/17-12/31/17

Year 2 Budget 1/1/17 -12/31/17

Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18

$217,420

$279,546

$73,168

$130,330

$217,420

$279,546

$61,252

$130,330

$32,613

$41,932

The Kresge Foundation

$19,550 $31,239

$250,000

$321,478

$104,407

$150,000

57

Western Michigan University Year 3 Budget 1/1/18-12/31/18


58

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix B

Output

Input

* Kresge Foundation * Casey Family Programs * MCAN * Michigan’s Children * MI DHHS * MYOI * MDT * MI colleges & universities * MDE * Judiciary of Michigan * MCAC * Youth in and aging out of foster care * College students emancipating from foster care * Cross-sector organizations supporting youth from higher education and career success

Activities

* Produce FSM “Getting to Know” guide series * Partner with SSG to train Financial Aid Professionals

* Host 2 statewide convenings of student leaders to identify best practices for campus support programming * Complete FSM Higher Education Consortium strategic plan * Launch 6 new campus support programs * Create FSM College Readiness Toolkit

Participation

* Middle and high schools * LCANs * Youth aged 12- 17 in foster care

* 4 year colleges & universities Community colleges * Youth aged 18–25 who aged out of foster care.

Resourcing

Supporting

Networking

FSM Regional Network Meetings and FSM Statewide Summit

Network Members


Appendix B

59

Goals: To increase college–going rates (short–term), graduation rates (medium–term), and successful career transitions (long–term) among Michigan’s youth aging out of foster care by building a statewide network through a collective impact initiative.

Outcomes

Short

Medium

Long

Increased number of organizations enhanced to support youth from foster care.

Improved college preparation among youth in foster care.

Increased number of effective on-campus support programs for students aging out of foster care.

Increased enrollment in higher educational institutions

Improved college graduation rates, leading to a successful career transition Increased understanding of best practices

Assumptions: * It will take a collaborative effort to accomplish these goals * Students from foster care will be central to the work (e.g.,informing our work toward meeting student needs; as speakers and trainers)

External Factors: * Fluctuations in financial resources (e.g., ETV, Pell, Bridge Cards) * Policy changes (e.g.,Fostering Connections, Uninterrupted Scholars Act) * Affordable housing available in local areas * Communication cultures within & between State Departments (e.g., DHHS, MDE)


60

Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan

Appendix C Restaurants Priority Chart Do they have a known, successful track record with fundraising events and reputation for being philanthropic?

High revenue potential?

Priority Ranking

Restaurants

Do their values align with FSM?

1

Blaze Pizza

Yes

Yes

Yes

2

Noodles and Company

Yes

Yes

Yes

3

Tropical Smoothie Cafe

Yes

Yes

Yes

4

Chilli’s

Yes

Yes

Maybe (depends on day and time)

5

Applebee’s

Yes

No (they do community fundraising events, but are not publicized well)

Maybe (depends on day and time)

6

Arby’s

Yes

No (they do community fundraising events, but are not publicized well)

No


Appendix C

Local restaurants that offer fundraising nights include: Blaze Pizza http://www.blazepizza.com/fundraising/ (269) 254-8081 Steak N Shake (W. Main Location) 269-349-4631 Noodles and Company (W. Main Location) http://www.noodles.com/giving-back/ (269) 382-4100 Applebee’s (W. Main Location) http://www.appleamerican.com/community/details.aspx?id=hz1KlDf4_U257f2hYgyVRg 269-382-4448 Tropical Smoothie Cafe (W. Main Location) https://www.tropicalsmoothiecafe.com/funraising 269-382-4044 Arby’s (Stadium Drive) http://www.usbeefcorp.com/giving-back/#benefit (269) 372-0802 Chili’s (Westnedge) https://www.qdi.com/Chilis/CHGiveBackOrgGuide.pdf (269) 324-0560 It is important to prioritize who FSM holds these events with based on the restaurant’s values and likelihood of success. Check the priority chart that demonstrates this on the previous page. Although it is difficult to ensure funds from this type of fundraiser, it can still benefit FSM in other ways, especially since this type of fundraiser has no cost to FSM. Simply hosting and promoting the event is great publicity for FSM. Even if the awareness that comes with a restaurant fundraiser doesn’t lead to direct support, it does make the public aware that FSM exist and need support. Just being aware that FSM exists and serves a group in need can influence how a person supports the issue.

61


Credits Dr. JoAnn Atkin, Project Leader Lisa Garcia, WMU Business Connection Jenna Giragosian, Research Assistant Spencer Birch, Research Assistant Philip Kary, Research Assistant Jhosua Rodriguez, Graphic Designer

FSM - Business plan  

Editorial design for Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan.

FSM - Business plan  

Editorial design for Fostering Success Michigan Business Plan.

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