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COURSE CATALOG Edition 1: 11/29/2016

2016/2017


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


FRANKLIN TECHNOLOGY COURSES HEALTH SCIENCE COURSE OFFERINGS INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCE (11) 2 Units Prerequisite: Minimum overall GPA of 2.0. Students taking Health Science classes are required to join SkillsUSA*, dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset costs of requirements for courses.

Introduction to Medical Science is a program for juniors interested in pursuing a career in a health care field. The curriculum is designed to introduce students to the health care delivery system and to provide academic knowledge in anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, communication, infection control, safety, CPR, first aid, vital signs, and a wide range of health career opportunities. Upon successful completion of the junior program, the student will be able to make an informed choice as to the health career pathway they want to pursue their senior year. Scrubs and proper shoes are required for the program, which will be the responsibility of the student.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 5 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: Introduction to Medical Science preferred but not required.

Students taking Health Science classes are required to join SkillsUSA*, dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset FTC Course Catalog 2016/2017

costs of requirements for courses. Certified Nurse Assistant, a class for high school seniors, guides the student in building a foundation of knowledge for the health care profession. Basic care and communication skills are developed and practiced in theory and in the skills lab. These skills are then applied with elderly adults in the clinical setting. The program focuses on preparing the student for a career in the health care through theory and clinicals, which will allow them to challenge the Certified Nurse Aide Examination. Students must have a “C in the course and 90% attendance rate to participate in clinicals. Students explore the various areas of the health care field by job shadowing and can qualify for an internship in a health care facility. Hepatitis B and TB tests are required. Hepatitis B vaccines are provided by the Health Department. Scrubs and proper shoes are required for the program, which will be the responsibility of the student.

CNA CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE 2 CREDIT HOURS) 1 Unit Prerequisite: None

This course is a clinical preparatory course to enable the student to gain experience in a hospital, clinic, nursing home, or home health care setting providing basic nursing care. This course requires 100 hours of clinical experience in a long term care facility. Students will learn variety of skills such as how the healthcare team operates, medical observation, documentation and reporting techniques, and patient assessment. Once this class is completed student will have the opportunity to take the State Certified Nurse Assistant Exam. Scrubs and proper shoes are required for this program, which is the responsibility of the students.

CNA TECHNIQUES (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE 5 CREDIT HOURS) 2 Unit Prerequisite: Students are required to complete the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Family Care and Safety Registry and receive TB skin test before starting the clinical experience. ALSO A “C” AVERAGE AND 90%

ATTENDANCE MUST BE MAINTAINED TO BE ELIGIBLE TO ATTEND CLINICALS.

This course is a preparatory course to enable the student to work in a hospital, clinic, nursing home, or home health care setting, providing basic nursing care. This course will introduce the student to the health care delivery system, the health care team, medical observation, documentation and reporting techniques, and patient assessment techniques. Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA), also known as nurse’s aides, orderlies, patient care technicians, and home health aides, work under the supervision of a nurse and provide assistance to patients delivering task of activities of daily living. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA and must purchase two sets of scrubs to be worn in the clinical setting. Dues and uniforms will be the responsibility of the student.

DIVERSIFIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS (12)  3 Units Prerequisite: Introduction to Medical Science or Diversified Health Occupations instructor’s permission. Students taking Health Science classes are required to join SkillsUSA*, dues will be the responsibility of the student. Students taking Health Science classes are required to join SkillsUSA*, dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset costs of requirements for courses.

Diversified Health Occupations is designed for high school seniors who have completed Introduction to Medical Science, and/or have an interest in working in a health career. The major areas of study include: career exploration in health care medical law and ethics, medical terminology, safety and infection control, anatomy and physiology, and communication and job-seeking skills. The student will learn basic job skills required in a clinical area of study, which is individualized by student interest. Clinical training sites may include: Pharmacy Aide, Physical Therapy Aide, Radiology Aide, Dental Aide, Activi3


ties Director Aide, Animal Care Aide, Respiratory Therapy Aide, Administrative Medical Aide, and Sports Trainer Aide. The Diversified Health Occupations student will spend approximately one-half of the school year in general classroom activities, one-fourth in career exploration at various clinical sites, and the last one-fourth in mentor training at a clinical site in their specified area. Upon completion of the program, the student is prepared for an entry-level job in the health care field. To attend clinicals students are responsible for having two pair of approved scrubs, name tag, proper shoes, TB (tuberculosis) test, Hepatitis B vaccination, transportation to and from clinical sites, being placed on the Missouri Department of Health And Senior Services Family Care Safety Registry, maintaining a “C” average, and having a 90% attendance in Health Science II.

skills, transcriptions, and telephone skills. Students will also learn office management techniques, office safety and be introduced to medical records. Appropriate written oral communications skills in a professional setting will be emphasized. Students will apply business technology skills to today’s medical office environment.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (11-12) (OPTIONAL DUAL CREDIT) (MSSU/ HS111 - 3 CREDIT HOURS) 1/2 Unit Prerequisite: None

The language of medicine, especially as related to Health Sciences, through a comprehensive study of the more common medical roots, prefixes and suffixes. Relates medical roots to everyday English words. A survey of medical diseases and surgical terms is included. This particular course is recommended for Health Sciences students. Online format.

INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY NUTRITION (11-12)  1 Unit MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) (11-12) 1 Unit Prerequisite: Successful completion of a Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with a C or higher or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. In addition, recommended for this course are any of the following: pathophysiology, chemistry, bio-medical systems (PLTW) and/or anatomy and physiology. This course is organized to provide the student with an introduction ​to a​ nd workable knowledge of​the physiology, pathophysiology, ​and​clinical symptoms, of the pre-hospital emergency medical patient. The student will have an opportunity to experience pre-hospital transport and treatment of the acutely injured or clinical patient. This course would be beneficial for the student interested in a career in Public Safety or a pre-medical post secondary area of study.

MEDICAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY (11-12)  1/2 Unit Prerequisite: Enrolled in or completed Intro To Medical Science. Students that are enrolled in Intro To Medical Science or have taken Intro To Medical Science may take this course. Students will be introduced to medical office skills including filing, computer 4

science class, 2.0 GPA and 90 % attendance. The basic principles of human nutrition are investigated, emphasizing the nutrients, food sources, and their utilization in the body for growth and overall health throughout life. This course also assesses contemporary nutrition issues along with medical diets for specific diseases.

NATURAL RESOURCES COURSE OFFERINGS

evaluation of team/organizational actions.

AGRIBUSINESS SALES, MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT (10-11-12) 1/2 Unit Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources This course includes human relations, personal inventory, careers in selling, and other experiences necessary for employment in agribusiness engaged in marketing, purchasing, storing, grading, and transporting supplies and products. Agriculture encompasses the food, fiber, conservation and natural resource systems, employing over 20% of the nation’s workforce. Application of economics, sales, marketing. Students taking Natural Resources classes are required to join FFA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES (10-11-12) 

1/2 Unit

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources, Small Engine Repair

This course includes electrical wiring, electrical motors, concrete masonry, plumbing and sewage disposal, farm fences, product handling and processing equipment, and outside storage buildings. Agriculture encompasses the food, fiber, conservation and natural resource systems, employing over 20% of the nation’s workforce. Basic construction skills and knowledge in electricity, plumbing, concrete, and masonry are necessary for the building of agricultural structures.

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATIONS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY AND LEADERSHIP (10-11-12) 1/2 Unit (10-11-12) 1 Unit Prerequisite: Agribusiness Sales, Marketing and Management, Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources This course will enable students to develop the knowledge, attitudes and skills to demonstrate positive leadership for agriculture. Areas of focus include public speaking, extemporaneous speaking, impromptu speaking, written communication, meeting people, good first impressions, personal goals, teamwork, team/organizational goals, organizing groups to take action, and

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

A two semester, one credit, (Life Science Credit) one hour 11th or 12th grade course that will increase the understanding of the uses of biotechnology for plant and animal agriculture, the environment and food science. The course will acquaint students with occupational skills in agricultural biotechnology and provide practice in the concepts and skills needed for careers while providing enough information to make a balanced judgment www.ftcjoplin.org


regarding the benefits and concerns posed by biotechnology. The curriculum is based upon the Vocational Instructional Management System (VIMS), established by DESE.

Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset costs of requirements for courses.

CERTIFIED VETERINARY ASSISTANT (12 )  1 Unit

Greenhouse/Landscape Management is a two-hour, two-year course. Course work alternates every other year, even years-landscape, odd years-greenhouse. Students in the greenhouse rotation develop the basic understanding of plant science, production of plants, identification of plants as well as greenhouse management techniques including energy management, construction, asexual and sexual propagation, growing of and marketing of the product. In the Landscape rotation students apply theory of landscape design to actual projects. Site analysis, design, plant selection and installation of new landscapes and turf are covered. This course prepares the student for a career pathway into horticulture or continuing education. The Joplin FFA is an Associate member of Missouri Nursery and Landscape Association.

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

This course covers basic veterinary knowledge with a skill set that prepares the student to assist a veterinarian. The course covers basic terminology, Zoonotic diseases, lab skills, sample collection, basic care for animals, breed identification (small and large), surgical instrument identification, surgical prep, drug administration, and professional conduct.

CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES (10-11-12)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

Students taking Natural Resource Classes are required to join FFA; dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset costs of requirements for courses. Conservation of Natural Resources is a one-year course that meets one hour per day. This course prepares the student for activities in the conservation and or improvement of natural resources such as soil, water, air, forest, fish and wildlife for economic and recreational purposes. An advanced activity in FFA, leadership and supervised agricultural experience related to conservation is also discussed here.

GREENHOUSE/LANDSCAPE I & II (11-12) 2 Units Prerequisite: Natural Resources Technology or Instructor Approval. Articulated College Credit – Crowder College-6 hours and Ozarks Technical Community College-8 hours

Students taking Natural Resource Classes are required to join FFA; dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student FTC Course Catalog 2016/2017

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE, FOOD, & NATURAL RESOURCES (9) or 1st year Ag Members 1 Unit Prerequisite: None

Students participating in this course will experience exciting “hands-on” activities, projects, and problems. Student experiences will involve the study of communication, the science of agriculture, plants, animals, natural resources, and agricultural mechanics. While surveying the opportunities available in agriculture and natural resources, student swill learn to solve problems, conduct research, analyze data, work in teams, and take responsibility for their work, actions, and learning. For example, students will work in groups to determine the efficiency and environmental impacts of fuel sources in a practical learning exercise.

PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE: ANIMAL (10-11-12)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources This course is intended to serve as one of two foundational courses within the

CASE™ sequence. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a foundation in animal science so that students may continue through a sequence of courses through high school. Students will explore hands-on projects and activities to learn the characteristics of animal science and work on major projects and problems similar to those that animal science specialists, such as veterinarians, zoologists, livestock producers, or industry personnel face in their respective careers. The knowledge and skills students develop will be used in future courses within the CASE™ program

PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE: PLANT (10-11-12)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

This course is intended to serve as a foundation course within the CASE™ sequence. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a foundation in plant science so that students may continue through a sequence of courses through high school. Students will work in teams, exploring hands-on projects and activities, to learn the characteristics of plant science and work on major projects and problems similar to those that plant science specialists, such as horticulturalists, agronomists, greenhouse and nursery mangers and producers, and plant research specialists face in their respective careers. This knowledge and skills will be used in future courses within the CASE™ program.

SMALL ENGINE REPAIR: AGRICULTURAL POWER I (10-11-12) 1/2 Unit Prerequisite: Introduction To Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

This course develops skills in the maintenance, repair, adjustment, and overhaul of small engines. Agriculture encompasses the food, fiber, conservation and natural resource systems, employing over 20% 5


of the nation’s workforce. Small engines provide development of mechanical skills and principles needed to pursue a career in agricultural, automotive, or diesel mechanics.

SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE/AGRI-BUSINESS ED (12)  1 or 2 Units Prerequisite: None

Students taking Natural Resource Classes are required to join FFA; dues will be the responsibility of the student. Student Organizations are intra-curricular and are required by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Programs have fundraisers to help offset costs of requirements for courses. This work experience program is designed to meet the needs of students with career goals in the occupational areas of agricultural, technical, trade and industrial education. The co-op program is an arrangement between the school hours to earn up to 2 credits for their on the job experience. Admission Requirements: Student application, instructor approval along with a one hour Natural Resources class. No more than 3 credits can be issued per year including related class.

TRADE AND TECHNICAL COURSE OFFERINGS The section headings below represent FTC standard programs which will be offered as an Introduction at the 11th grade level and Advanced at the 12th grade level. Course descriptions below reflect additional Dual Credit options that are offered within these programs.

AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING

AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING AUTO TECH II (11-12) (DUAL CREDIT) (11/12) (CROWDER COLLEGE (CROWDER COLLEGE - 9 CREDIT PROGRAM @ FTC) 3 Units HOURS)  3 Units Prerequisite: None

This program is directed towards an AAS degree in Automated Manufacturing at Crowder College. Courses include but are not limited to Programmable Logic Controller Operation, Robotics, Precision Milling and Lathe Operations, Computer Numeric Controls, and operations in the metals, plastics, and wood technology industries. Students will receive high school and college credit in this program.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY AUTO TECH I (11-12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE 9 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None

A course designed for the automotive student or the practicing automotive technician and is NATEF certified. The first semester is a study of the Automotive Brake Systems and the principles involved in the braking systems of the modern automobile. Instruction is given in the skills needed to diagnose and repair braking systems. Special emphasis is given to hydraulic theory, computerized anti-lock systems and the use and 6

application of modern test equipment in the diagnosis and repair of these systems. Second semester is Automotive Electrical Systems, this is a concentrated course in automotive electrical systems. Included is a review of basic electrical principles. Systems studied include charging, starting, ignition, lighting, and fuel. Emphasis is given to electronic ignition and electronic fuel injection. Practice is provided with live service and repair in the automotive laboratory. Students can also earn their 10-hour OSHA safety card Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student as well as required work boots and coveralls. Students will have to opportunity to take the NATEF certification exam for these respective areas.

Prerequisite: None

A course designed for the automotive technology student or the practicing automotive technician and is NATEF certified. The first semester is a study in the Computerized Engine Control and the principles of computerized engine control, the course will help the student/technician to grasp the operation, diagnosis and repair of these complicated systems. The use and application of modern test equipment are taught in relation to their use in the diagnosis and repair of these systems. Second Semester is Automotive Suspension and Steering. This class is a study of the principles involved in the steering and suspension mechanisms of the modern automobile. Instruction is given in the skills needed to diagnose and repair steering and suspension components, replace steering and suspension system components and alignment of the wheels. The application of modern equipment is taught in relation to its use in the repair of these systems. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student as well as required work boots and coveralls. Students will have to opportunity to take the NATEF certification exam for these respective areas. www.ftcjoplin.org


SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility DIESEL TECHNOLOGY (11-12) (TAUGHT ADV PC REPAIR & MAINTENANCE (12) of the student. WITHIN AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE PROGRAM) 3 Unit ADVANCED COLLISION REPAIR (12) (DUAL - 3 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None Prerequisite: None CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE Diesel Technology is a two-year, highly 6 CREDIT HOURS)  3 Units This course addresses the software side technical program designed to prepare students to use critical thinking skills to explore basic diesel technology. Students will apply these skills in the service and maintenance of medium-and heavy-duty trucks and other diesel-powered equipment including farm and construction equipment. Students will learn how to operate various equipment including electronic diagnostic analyzers, precision measuring devices, and other equipment utilized in the Diesel Industry.

COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY INTRO TO COLLISION REPAIR (11) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE 6 CREDIT HOURS)  3 Units Prerequisite: None

This course serves as an introduction to collision repair and incorporates selected topics from each of the three broad areas of non-structural repair, structural repair, and painting/refinishing. Students become familiar with safe practices in the shop as well as the various tools and equipment used in the trade including lifting, measuring, cleaning, and finishing devices. Steel straightening, damage analysis, and the preparation of customer estimates are also covered. Second semester continues by extending damage analysis/repair coverage to frontal impact and interior damage, exterior trim/hardware repairs, use of plastic adhesives, and advanced measurement systems. Classes are built around learning modules licensed from I-CAR (Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair) which include both classroom and hands-on shop exercises with competencies cross-indexed to ASE/NATEF (Automotive Service Excellence/National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation). Students can also earn their 10-hour OSHA safety card Students taking this class will be required to join FTC Course Catalog 2016/2017

Prerequisite: Intro to Collision Repair

This course moves into the repair of bolted-on components and other areas requiring the use of gas-metal arc welding (GMAW). Additional time is also devoted to the advanced use of body fillers and repairs to both fixed and moveable glass components. Second semester covers aligning/repairing the vehicle frame, working with aluminum body parts, and the final steps in the painting/finishing process. Finding and repairing wind noise and water leaks is also addressed. Classes are built around learning modules licensed from I-CAR (Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair), which include both classroom and hands-on shop exercises with competencies cross-indexed to ASE/ NATEF (Automotive Service Excellence/National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation). Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE INTRODUCTION TO PC BASICS (11) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 3 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None

This course covers the fundamentals of the internal PC hardware and peripheral devices (PC = “Personal Computer” = Intel-based X86 architecture), and also provides an introduction to operating system concepts. Through hands-on labs, desktop learning tools, and extensive Internet-based research, students develop critical thinking and complex problem-solving skills. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

of the PC by focusing on the operating system, basic networking concepts, and PC security. The course also provides an introduction to selected additional concepts including troubleshooting methods, “help desk” or “call center” procedures, and ethical considerations in computer technology. Students will understand network design and components. The program focus will be on the PC Pro Certification. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

SUPERVISED TECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCE (12) 

Prerequisite: Computer Information Science class I & II

1 Unit

The students in this class will be second year CIS students personally selected by the instructor. This class will help students learn about tools and methodologies that computer hardware and software professionals apply to improve and maintain the IT equipment being used by companies or organizations. Students will have the opportunity for hands-on experiences by responding to “school technical assistance requests”. Students will work together in teams along with the instructor to fix problems and provide support to staff and other students. The students in this class will also be responsible for scheduling and conducting routine maintenance and cleaning of equipment. Students will be interviewed and selected for this course.

ELECTRONICS (9-10) Prerequisite: None

1 Unit

This is a two-semester course designed to give students a better understanding of electronics. With various forms of electronics evolving at rapid rates, this course will inform students of recent advances in the field of electronics and innovations. Practical applications and information concerning “Low voltage 7


wiring”, Home Theater Design, Security Systems, Network Cabling, and Fiber Optic Cabling will be covered in the course. The students will also learn how to assemble traditional electronics kits and how the various components interact with each other.

CONSTRUCTION

Internship opportunities in commercial construction may be available during the final quarter of this program. Students are required to provide their own personal protective equipment. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

CULINARY

INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION CULINARY I (11) 3 Units TRADES (11) (DUAL CREDIT) Prerequisite: None (CROWDER COLLEGE - 9 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Articulated College Credit- Ozark TechPrerequisite: None

This course is part of NCCER’s (National Center for Construction Education and Research) and provides students with the knowledge and skills needed for employment as a carpenter. Study includes residential and commercial construction, with all phases explored and applied on a job site or in the lab. Specialized coursework includes drywall installation and finishing, blueprint reading, construction estimating, concrete, and construction materials. Students can also earn their 10-hour OSHA safety card. Students are required to provide their own appropriate personal protective equipment Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 6 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None

This class is encouraged to serve as team leaders for the construction “crew” of students in the Intro class. Students taking this class are urged to work in the construction industry during the summer between classes. Also covered is an introduction to the electrical trade, safety, basic circuits/theory, plus introduction to the NEC (National Electrical Code), device boxes and conduit bending/ installation. Other topics covered in this portion include an introduction to the plumbing profession, safety practices, plumbing tools/math/drawings, and working with plastic pipe and fittings. 8

nical College

Culinary Arts I is the first of two culinary classes offered at Franklin Technology Center. The class meets in a three-hour block and offers three units of credit. Culinary Arts I is an introductory course that starts students in their pursuit of a career in the field of Culinary Arts. They receive training on commercial grade kitchen equipment. They are trained in kitchen sanitation and safety. They learn the basic techniques in both cooking and baking. The students get acquainted with working in a professional kitchen environment. The students work with the community through many community service projects that provide food for many events. After they complete Culinary Arts I they are ready to continue into Culinary Arts II to pursue their Culinary Arts Certificate. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

CULINARY II (12)

3 Units

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I or 2 years of Foods Classes

Articulated College Credit- Ozark Technical College Culinary Arts II is the second of two culinary classes offered at Franklin Technology Center. The class meets in a three - hour block and offers three units of credit. The students in Culinary Arts II take the skills they learned in Culinary Arts I and use these skills to master more challenging techniques in both the culinary and the baking areas. They work

with many different types of foods to develop the necessary skills in preparation and presentation techniques. The students also work with the community at several catering events throughout the year. Upon completion of both Culinary Arts I and Culinary Arts II the students will be able to earn a Certificate of Completion that will help them go into a introductory job in foodservice or pursue a degree in Culinary Arts or Baking. The student will obtain the necessary skills for continued growth in a world of accelerated change in a competitive world market. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (11)  2 Units Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (can be taken concurrently).

This course provides a foundation for all engineering and technical design courses. This study includes basics of freehand sketching and CAD Drafting, and print reading. This study also includes all principles using section, auxiliary and pictorial views to better describe the product. Second semester of this course is an introduction to Computer Aided Drafting. The primary focus is on entry-level AutoCAD Command usage, drawing commands, viewing commands, and modify commands. Topics include drawing layouts, 2-dimensional drawing, editing and viewing commands, drafting practices and standards, file management practices and practical uses of CAD drawings. Students taking this class are required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

ADVANCED ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (12)  2 Units Prerequisite: Intro to Engineering Graphics.

This course includes Technical Drawing and is the second introduction to drafting class. The primary focus is on entry-level Board and Auto CAD Command usage, drawing commands, viewing commands www.ftcjoplin.org


and modifying commands. Topics include drawing the different types of fasteners, springs, cams, welding symbols, steel details and basic structural drawing. Editing and viewing commands, drafting practices and standards, file management practices and practical uses of CAD drawings. Students will be exposed to 3D creation of objects in 3D parameter software. Second semester moves into Architectural Drafting, this course is an introduction to residential construction and house design. Students are required to interview prospective clients, write a project description, and draw a set of architectural plans that include floor plans, electrical plans, elevations and construction details. The course will include components from both traditional (manual) and Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD). The four areas of study will include: Architecture and Construction, Manufacturing/Mechanical systems, Civil Engineering and Surveying, and Structural Engineering drawings. Students taking this class are required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (11) (PLTW)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering. This course will be weighted: 4.5

Students learn important aspects of building and site design and development. They apply math, science, and standard engineering practices to design both residential and commercial projects and document their work using 3D architecture design software. Some students have seen these designs come to life through partnerships with local housing organizations. Note: This course is a specialization course in the pre-engineering curriculum titled Project Lead The Way. It is recommended that students continue to enroll in high level math and science college preparatory courses in conjunction with this program.

ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (12) (PLTW) FTC Course Catalog 2016/2017

1 unit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, and a Specialization Course (i.e. Civil Engineering & Architecture). Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Lab Fee: $15 dues for SkillsUSA. This course will be weighted: 4.5 In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel.

HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION INTRO TO BASIC HVAC (11) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 6 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None

Articulated College Credit – Ozarks Technical Community College This course will prepare the student to enter this occupation as a beginning service apprentice technician. Instruction will include proper use of electric drills, pipe cutters and benders, acetylene torches and testing devices such as refrigerant gauges and ammeters. Students will learn to install and repair equipment ranging in size from small window air conditioners to domestic refrigerators and commercial refrigeration systems. The program will focus on the installation of new equipment including placing motors, compressors, or absorption equipment evaporators and other components in place following blueprints and design specifications. Students also learn to recover and recycle refrigerant to meet EPA requirements. Franklin Technology Center is an approved EPA training and testing site for VGI clean air certification. Students taking Trade and Technical

classes are required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

ADVANCED HVAC (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 6 CREDIT HOURS)  3 Units Prerequisite: None

This class will allow students to master all hand tools, oxy acetylene torches, propane and testing devices utilized in the field. Students will learn to install & repair equipment ranging from window A/C units to domestic refrigerators and commercial refrigeration systems. Students will also learn to recover and recycle refrigerants to meet EPA requirements. Other electrical topics covered in this portion include raceways/ fittings, conductors/ cables, electrical drawings, residential services, and test equipment. Students can also earn their EPA Licensure during this time. Other topics covered in this portion include an introduction to the plumbing profession, safety practices, plumbing tools/math/ drawings, and working with plastic pipe and fittings. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGY ADVANCED PUBLIC SAFETY PROGRAM (11-12) (MSSU see credit hours listed below) Prerequisite: None

Public Safety courses at the advanced level for 11th and 12th graders will be taught at Missouri Southern State University. Students at the advanced level will choose between the MSSU public safety programs of Law Enforcement, Emergency Medical Technician, and Fire Fighter. College credits will be provided as shown below: Emergency Medical Technician - 9 college credit hours Fire Academy I & II - 6 college credit hours 9


Law Enforcement - 6 college credit hours including Introduction to Law Enforcement

WELDING TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION TO WELDING (11) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 6 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic operation of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (“Stick” Welding), Gas Metal Arc Welding (formerly M.I.G. Welding), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (formerly T.I.G. Welding) and Thermal Cutting. Second semester you will move into Shielded Metal Arc Welding-SMAW. This course is designed to provide the concepts, procedures, and operational hands-on practice necessary to perform shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), formerly known as “Stick” welding or traditional ARC welding. Students can also earn their 10-hour OSHA safety card Students are required to provide their own appropriate work clothes, shoes, and eye protection. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

ADVANCED WELDING (12) (DUAL CREDIT) (CROWDER COLLEGE - 6 CREDIT HOURS) 3 Units Prerequisite: Intro to Welding

This course includes Gas Metal Arc Welding-GMAW and designed to provide the concepts, procedures, and operational hands-on practice necessary to perform gas metal arc welding (GMAW), formerly known as Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding. Second Semester you will move into Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-GTAW formally known as Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding. Students are required to provide their own appropriate work clothes, shoes, and eye protection. Students taking this class will be required to join SkillsUSA; dues will be the responsibility of the student.

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PROJECT LEAD THE WAY COURSES ENGINEERING INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (9-10) (PLTW) 1 Unit Prerequisite: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I

This course is designed for 9th and 10th grade students, the major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Note: It is recommended that students continue to enroll in high level math and science college preparatory courses in conjunction with this program.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (10) (PLTW)

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (11) (PLTW)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering. This course will be weighted: 4.5 Students learn important aspects of building and site design and development. They apply math, science, and standard engineering practices to design both residential and commercial projects and document their work using 3D architecture design software. Some students have seen these designs come to life through partnerships with local housing organizations. Note: This course is a specialization course in the pre-engineering curriculum titled Project Lead The Way. It is recommended that students continue to enroll in high level math and science college preparatory courses in conjunction with this program.

1 Unit ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (12) (PLTW) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I

This course is designated for 10th and 11th grade students, this survey course exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. Note: It is recommended that students continue to enroll in high level math and science college preparatory courses in conjunction with this program.

1 Unit

1 unit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, and a Specialization Course (i.e. Civil Engineering & Architecture). Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Lab Fee: $15 dues for SkillsUSA. This course will be weighted: 4.5 In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry

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professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE (9-10) (PLTW) 1 Unit Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology and Algebra 1 or above

Students investigate various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, and research processes. This course provides an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. Note: This course is a foundation course for PLTW. It is required that students continue to enroll in college preparatory math and science in conjunction with this program.

HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS (10-11) (PLTW)

1 Unit

Prerequisite: Successful completion Principles of Biomedical Sciences

FTC Course Catalog 2016/2017

Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the roles of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Note: This course is a foundation course for PLTW. It is required that students continue to enroll in college preparatory math and science in conjunction with this program.

MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS (PLTW) (11-12) 1 Unit Prerequisites: Successful completion of Principles of Biomedical Sciences and Human Body Systems. Lab Fee: $15 dues for CTSO. This course will be weighted: 4.5

Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family. The course is a “How-To” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body. Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body

begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Students taking any PLTW course will be required to join HOSA or SkillsUSA, dues will be the responsibility of the student. Note: It is recommended that students continue to take college preparatory math and science in conjunction with this program.

BIOMEDICAL INNOVATION (12) (PLTW To be offered in 2016-17)1 Unit Prerequisite: None

Students design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century. They work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the opportunity to work on an independent project with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, research institution, or the biomedical industry. Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an audience of STEM professionals.

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FRANKLIN TECHNOLOGY CENTER

2220 Indiana Ave. Joplin, MO 64804 www.ftcjoplin.org

FTC Course Catalog 2016-17