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MACHINING AESTHETICS v3.0

FOLIE À DEUX: la ville en rose

A MADNESS SHARED BY TWO: CITY IN PINK

STUDIO E. SEMESTER 1 2015.

junhan foong


FOREWORD This journal is a intended to be a documentation and accumulation of our design process throughout this semester. Some of the thoughts shared in this journal are left intentionally for its raw quality at the time, and as such these thoughts are purely my own and are in no way associated with or reflect the beliefs of my group partner or my studio leaders.


Special thanks to:

STUDIO E. SEMESTER 1 2015

STUDIO 15 MACHINING AESTHETICS v3.0


FOLIE À DEUX junhan foong jasmine yang

STUDIO LEADERS paul loh david leggett


STUDIO E. SEMESTER 1 2015

STUDIO 15 MACHINING AESTHETICS v3.0


acknowledgements Thank you to my Machining Aesthetics v3.0 group mate, and fellow “Folie à Deux” member, Jasmine Yang for her support and work this semester. Special thanks to studio leaders Paul Loh and David Leggett for their advice, guidance and understanding throughout the semester. This semester has been extremely challenging for me personally - I hope we have done this studio justice. Lastly, all my current friends, new friends and class mates for making this semester’s studio such a close-knit group.


STUDIO E. SEMESTER 1 2015

STUDIO 15 MACHINING AESTHETICS v3.0

contents


01 ABSTRACT 02 FOLIE À DEUX 03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE 04 UTOPIC VISIONS 05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY 06 PRESTON: A PROLOGUE FOR A PROTO-CITY 07 LA VILLE EN ROSE

15 16 22 38 74 86 102

LA VILLE EN ROSE: A CITY INGRAINED IN FILM

166

FADE TO BLACK: REFLECTION

174

BIOGRAPHY

178

APPENDIX

190

CREDIT

200

REFERENCES

204


01


1.0 ABSTRACT ‘La Ville En Rose (City in Pink)’ seeks to create an urban structure which is open-ended in its syntax; the nature of the structure allows users to appropriate its use, necessary additional infrastructure, envelope and shelter depending on needs ‘at the time’. Using the tale of the fictitious 3D printing company ‘Clouseau Collectif’ as its main protagonist, the experimental nature of 3D Printing as a main driving force of making is explored. In this project, a possible urban scenario is speculated, highlighting the change in technology and construction methods over a time period of 2015 to 2050. This context creates a radically different view on architecture, where the city is built as infrastructure stripped to its bare bones, an empty shell waiting to be occupied, where programmatic spaces are yet to be inserted, and events and ‘moments’ generated by the creative potential of its inhabitants.


02


FOLIE

À DEUX introduction


It can be argued that all changes in architecture can in some manner be traced to changes in culture. Certainly the most tangible changes in architecture have been brought about by advancements in technology, the development of new conditions of use, and the change in significance of certain rituals and their domain of performance.

02 FOLIE À DEUX

- P. Eisenman

2.0 INTRODUCTION The post-industrial landscape of Melbourne is changing. Small-to-middle scale manufacturing industries are thriving as a result of giant firms moving their production operations off-shore. Similarly, the manufacturing industry no longer requires large up-front capital investment in machinery and skillset. The uprise of ‘the internet generation’ has seen a total upheaval in how knowledge is consumed and shared globally, and this too has directly impacted the manufacturing industry. Professional and enthusiast makers now have access to internet crowd funding and open source software, meaning the resources available to create a new start-up has increased exponentially. A new and exciting horizon awaits the ever-growing makers movement. “What is the future of making?” - This was the question posed and to be challenged as we saught to design and develop our own architectural language throughout this semester. Driven and influenced by a single or various methods of ‘making’, our newly formed architecture was to be distributed at an urban scale in the form of a proto-city; a living breathing system which aimed to speculate on the future benefits and implications of these methods on Melbourne’s growing manufacturing industry.

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2.1 FORMATION OF ‘FOLIE À DEUX’ Our journey began forming groups based on set precedent studies we would be interested in. Due to odd numbers within the studio, our group had the unfortunate luck of being the only group of two at the time. The pseudonym ‘Folie à Deux’ (or, ‘A Madness of Two’) represents our struggle throughout this semester as a duo, while making subtle references to ‘the folie’ from Parc de la Villette by Bernard Tschumi, which was our designated precedent study.

FOLIE À DEUX noun

a shared psychosis; delusion or mental illness shared by two people in close association. “a classic case of folie à deux”

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02 FOLIE À DEUX

2.2 LA VILLE EN ROSE Our project, titled ‘La Ville En Rose (City in Pink)’, is a word-play on ‘La Vie En Rose’ (1945), the signature song of French popular singer Édith Piaf. The song’s title can be translated as “Life in Rosy Hues” or “Life Through Rose-Tinted Glasses”; in the poetic sense, a reference to the sanguine outlook and the blush of a person in love. Conceptually, the obsessive nature of someone madly in love (or living through ‘rose-tinted glasses’) not only translates, but lends itself to the scope of our project; to design the growth of a city of radical aesthetic which helps facilitate and spread the culture of 3D printing. In this world, the seemingly cancerous growth of structure grows in parallel to its influence on its society, driving new areas for activity and sharing of knowledge and creative ideas this new symptomatic condition drives the reasoning behind how “the madness of two” becomes “madness of many”.

20

Open-ended in its syntax, an urban structure is derived using Conway’s ‘Game of Life’, or Cellular Automata, to drive its growth. Materialised as an empty structure, stripped to its bare bones, the “architecture” is then created by is by inserting program and events as needed, depending on needs at the time. This model allows for maximum potential for mass customisation, empowering the end-user to drive their own design and therefore forming a greater understanding between ‘maker’ and ‘user’.


2.3 CLOUSEAU COLLECTIF Clouseau Collectif is the main protagonist in ‘La Ville En Rose’, a fictitious 3d printing company which takes over the site currently occupied by Publi A Commercial Printers Ltd and National Metal Recyclers. Through extensive experimentation and trials they develop a methodology of 3d priting metals, initially used as a means of expanding their own operations by building a metal printing factory. As the demands for useful applications in 3d printed metals grow, so too does their influence - little do they know that they would be the catalyst in the rapid growth of ‘The City in Pink’, 3d printing culture, and a significant player in the revival of Melbourne’s declining manufacturing industry.

21


03


PREMIÈRE

GYMNOPÉDIE background music: setting the tone


3.0 PRECEDENT STUDY

PARC DE LA VILLETTE 03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE

BERNARD TSCHUMI

Each group were asked to develop their own intial design process through the analysis, deconstruction and understanding of a set precedent study. This would then formulate the basis of our ‘domino moment’ (or defining take-away) which we would later further develop into a design process.

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25


In architecture, fiction will replace function (“Form follows function�). Architecture will define the places where reality meets fantasy, reason meets madness, life meets death (Border crossing is erotic). Architecture is not about the conditions of design but about the design of conditions. Architecture is not so much a knowledge of forum, but a form of knowledge.

26


Architecture is the discourse of events as much as the discourse of spaces. Architecture is not only what it looks like but also what it does. Vectors activate, envelopes define. Architecture is the materialisation of concepts. Concept, not forum, is what distinguishes architecture from mere building. Architects don’t choose contexts; they choose concepts. -B. Tschumi 1975

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03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE

Parc de la Villette - a multiplicity of combiniations of follies

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3.1 NON-CONTEXT IS CONTEXT In Parc de la Villette, a set of repetitive buildings are organised along a regular grid. These “Follies” exist as abstract buildings, a sequence of spaces and events which are able to exist independently or become totally independent, or on the other hand, at times fully condition each other’s existence. This strategy of reciprocity in which each sequence repeatedly and infinitely reinforces the other means that it is therefore highly self-referential, thus the traditional view of “context” no longer becomes relevant as context is created by itself.

29


3.2 SYSTEMS AND SUPERIMPOSITIONS

03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE

At an urban scale, the distribution of programmatic requirements over the total site in a regular arrangement of points of follies, allows for the deconstruction of program into intense areas of activity placed accordingly to existing site characteristics and use. As a result, visitors are presented with a variety of programs and events, emphasising discovery and movement through the site.

DRAWING 01 | Urban Morphology

Superimposition: Pt-Ln-Srf The urban morphology of Parc de la Villette is established via a superimposed system of points, lines and surfaces. A regular point-grid is overlaid on the site allowing the distribution of ‘follies’ at its intersection points. An abstract system of lines is then drawn over to activate intended directional movement between follies as well as define the spatial boundaries between them, the ‘cinematic gardens’.

30


lines

points

surfaces 31


03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE

DRAWING 02 | Ground and Envelope

‘A’ = ‘Attractor for Activities’ The relationship between ground and envelope can be seen as the physical and spatial relationship around or inbetween different follies. While functional space is defined by giving ‘contextless’ follies a program, it is each independent folie’s immediate surrounding context which helps to generate and activate the activities which occur. Therefore the folie can be seen as an ‘attractor’ or ‘point of intensity’ which helps to draw visitors in, but its surroundings the ‘activator’ of activities and spatial events.

32


33


DRAWING 03 | Structure and Geometry

Deconstruction/Reconstruction Geometry of each folie is derived from a 10.8 x 10.8 x 10.8m cube, which is then split into a 3 x 3 grid on each face. Through a transformational sequence of intersection, repitition, qualification, distortion and fragmentation, this process is repeated to exhaustion. The resulting parts are then reconstructed to create each folie’s final form.

03 PREMIÈRE GYMNOPÉDIE

3.3 CINEGRAM In Parc de la Villette, comparisons to film montages and links to film analogies are made as a way to explain its ‘discontinuity’ - after all, the world of cinema was the first to introduce this concept. This conceptual thought sees ‘a segmented world’ in which each fragment maintains its own independence, therby permitting a multiplicity of combinations. Thus, movement through the park is regarded as a ‘cinegram’, whereby each frame is placed in continous succession and movement, much like in film, whereas at an urban scale the park is seen as a series of cinegrams, each of which is based on a precise set of architectonic, spatial or programmatic transformations.

34


3x3 grid cube

transformational sequence

reconstruction

final outcome

transformational sequence

reconstruction

final outcome

transformational sequence

reconstruction

final outcome

35


36


insomnia I often find myself waking up at 6am, restless and tired from the lack of sleep. I don’t know whether it is the subconscious nervous excitement and anticipation at the possible outcome, of this studio or my deep-seeded fears of our group’s lack of technical and complimentary skills. I came into this studio knowing I would be out of my element. I am, and always have been, open to learning something new, but my lack of parametric skills compared to my peers is worrying, especially when I feel the pressure of being thrust into this role, on top of carrying the weight of responsibility of how this group progresses forward. Nonetheless, I have been in this situation before - what I lack in skills I will make up in grit and determination, that has always been my redeeming quality. Now, back to that grasshopper tutorial...

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04


UTOPIC

VISIONS

initial proto-city development + process


4.0 PROTO-CITY - INFANT STAGES

04 UTOPIC VISIONS

We began by taking our outcomes and learning from our precedent study and tested it against new algorithmic processes to derive a design process which we would continue to use and develop through the semester. The main ‘essence’ taken from our study of Parc de la Villlette was the ability these structural follies were able to drive activity and use depending on needs at the time. At its initial stages, we experimented with cubic aggregation processes to create new architectural forms. This was then developed further into designing a new process in which the form generated was less cubic and more ‘distorted’ as an aesthetic.

40


4.1 CELLULAR AUTOMATA 1-2-3 2D Evolution rules: Dead cell comes to life when it has exactly 1 living neighbours. A living cell remains alive only when surrounded by 2 or 3 living neighbours. Live

Dead

41

Alive


04 UTOPIC VISIONS

4.2 INITIAL EXPLORATIONS Using our 2 dimensional evolution rules, we set to apply them using preset growth patterns. We would then evaluate them against our own adaptation of Tschumi’s Point-LineTheory, and eliminate iterations which did not full fill all three of this criteria. Our findings led us to extract ‘iteration 1’ - a cluster which satisfied all point, line and surface conditions. This model would be then used to further experiment with through 3D printing and resin casting techniques.

computational methodology 1. experiment with various combinations of ‘evolution rules’. 2. find a combination which could potentially work ‘architecturally’. 3. apply this rule-set into existing preset patterns.

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43


44

04 UTOPIC VISIONS


45


46

04 UTOPIC VISIONS


4.2.1 SUBSTITUTION METHOD By closely examining the computational model created, we began to cluster cubes into groups of 1-6, each of which would then be subsituted with a specific component inspired by Parc de la Villette.

47


04 UTOPIC VISIONS

After assembling the physical model with subsituted components, we noticed a lot of structural flaws and potential problems with assembly. Point-to-point and edgeto-edge connections became increasingly difficult to hold in place, even more so with the weight of resin parts.

48


In an attempt to address structural flaws and unique face/ edge/corner connections, we designed a set of ‘anomalies’. While this experimentation failed, little would we know this would form the precursor to the idea of creating a structure which allowed users to ‘plug-in’ newer parts and uniquely designed components.

49


04 UTOPIC VISIONS

4.2.2 DISTORTION METHOD Our second model was developed in an attempt to break out from the cube. The intention of this model was to distort the grid, creating very abstract and at time, very dense space. We would then 3d print this model to see if we could create module which was distorted, yet more structural than our initial ‘substitution’ model.

computational methodology 1. use computational logic of iteration 1 (as selected for further experimentation). 2. extract centre points. 3. connect points based on set parameters for proximity. in this case, maximum distance allowed was 12cm to confine itself to the printing limitations of the 3d printer. 4. experiment with ‘alive’ and ‘dead’ parameters to evaluate which will give a more interesting form.

50


We found that this method produced some very interesting discrete spaces which had greater potential for creating architecture. having 3d printed this model, we also found that the 3d printer was creating support material at specific poitnts in between structural spans. This would then inform the basis in which we could harness this potential in creating a new in-fill system, where structure is created and spaces are created by infilling floors, walls, and roofs as a means of creating shelter.

4.3 FABRICATION After rationalising how we would fabriate our two computer generated models, we decided on using a mix of two different model-making processes, depending on its appropriateness to the model. The ‘substitution’ model was fabricated using a mix of 3d printed parts and resin casting, while the ‘distortion’ model was fabricated as a 3d printed mass split into parts due to sizing limiations of the 3d printers available to us.

51


4.3.1 MAKING ‘THE SUBSTITUTION MODEL’ A. Mould making process Materials list 1. 3d printed object 2. Plastic Cups 3. Popsicle Sticks 4. Pinkysil Fast Setting Silicone 5. Measuring Cups Making Process 1. Obtain 3d printed object. 2. Obtain popsicle stick. 3. Glue the stick onto the 3d printed object. 4. These glued objects will now be able to be propped on the lid of a plastic cup. 5. Measure equal volumes of ‘Part A’ and ‘Part B’ as included in the Pinkysil Silicone kit. 6. Fill up a seperate plastic cup with the two measured parts. 7. Stir consistently to ensure both liquids have mixed well. 8. Pour liquid into cup propping the 3d printed object to the brim. 9. Leave for 30 minutes until the liquid has set.

04 UTOPIC VISIONS

Result: Remove the 3d printed object. A pink mould is now ready to be used for resin casting.

B. Resin casting process Materials list 1. Plastic Cup 2. Popsicle Sticks 3. Bqueen polyurethane resin 4. Measuring Cups Making Process 1. Gently shake ‘Part A’ and ‘Part B’ bottles prior to use. 2. Measure equal volumes of ‘Part A’ and ‘Part B’ as included in the kit. 3. Pour ‘Part A’ into a seperate plastic cup. 4. Add two drops of white pigment. Add more if necessary. 5. Stir ‘Part A’ and white pigment together. 6. Add ‘Part B’ into cup. 7. Mix liquid together. Ensure that it is stirred consistently. 8. Pour resin mix into mould. 9. Leave for 15 minutes until the liquid has set. Result: Remove the resin object from mould. Repeat process as many times as required depending on how many resin-cast objects are required.

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A. MOULD MAKING materials list

1

2

3

4

5

making process

1

2

5

3

6

4

7

8

9

B. RESIN CASTING materials list

1

2

3

4

making process

1

6

2

7

3

8

4

5

9 53


04 UTOPIC VISIONS

+

4.3.2 MAKING ‘THE DISTORTION MODEL’ A. Mould making process Materials list 1. 3d printer 2. White ABS Plastic Spool for 3d printing 3. 2mm MDF 4. Laser Cutting Machine Making Process 1. 3d model a basic frame. Prepare file for laser cut. 2. Laser cut 2mm MDF to into smaller components. This will form the components necessary to assemble into a frame. Assemble as illustrated. 3. Prepare ‘distortion’ model to be 3d printed. Split into fragments as necessary keeping in mind the 12cm x 12cm x 12cm limitation of the 3d printer available and how each fragment will be joined. 4. Assemble as illustrated.

54


+

55


04 UTOPIC VISIONS

Substitution Model

Distortion Model

56


04 UTOPIC VISIONS


split-personality disorder I am unhappy at the state of our physical model. After a busy week preparing files for fabrication and assembly I can see the struggle our group is facing in translating the digital to physical. Furthermore, we are struggling to find a direction at the moment - I think a lot of that is due to our models are suffering from a ‘splitpersonality disorder’, i.e. we are pulled into two different directions. I will really have to sit down and evaluate which one will help pull us further as a group with the end-goal in mind. I also think our parametric definition is lacking a lot of intelligence at the moment. This is definitely due to the lack of knowledge in this area from my part, but hopefully if I keep chipping away at it I will get it eventually.

59


4.4 ADDRESSING THE MAIN ISSUES After finding that our previous method of generating form was far too rigid and limiting, a total evaluation and revision of our definition was necessary to find a way to manipulate it to do what we want. In order to do this we first had to address the underlying primary issue - which path would we be going down? We decided on following and buidling upon the ‘distortion’ method, as this yeilded more potential as a future architectural language in which 3d printing may potentially be the evolutionary step away from traditional construction methods.

04 UTOPIC VISIONS

We then set out to illustrate the limitations of our previous models as findings to help us understand what we needed to change within our definition.

3 main issues identified were as follows: 1. Even with the addition of ‘structural’ anomalies, the model still failed to stand up. This was purely due to the nature of the cluster generated by cellular automata where it grows more top-heavy as it increases in height and number of generations. 2. The default configuration of the script we were using was rigid in the direections it could grow, i.e. it was limited to only a +XYZ direction. This did not allow for the flexibility of growth in the other direction if required. 3. The pattern system used was a set of preset patterns provided. This did not have any applicable knowledge to ourselves and any direct relevance to site should we try to apply it.

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04 UTOPIC VISIONS

Questions of scale - an initial experimentation on the possibility of ‘scaling up’

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4.4.1 QUESTIONS OF SCALE Despite experimenting with the thought of scaling up each cubic block in order for each ‘cluster’ to become its own city, we reverted back to our initial scaling system of keeping one cubic block equivalent to a 1 storey (4 metre) cubic block. This would allow us more freedom to produce more ‘generations’ within the cellular automata script, which meant more potential for more radical forms.

Scale is set to the equivalent of 4 metres - a 1 storey cubic block.

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4.4.2 UPDATED SCRIPT, UPDATED PROCESS - A QUICK SUMMARY

04 UTOPIC VISIONS

Having addressed initial concerns with our base grasshopper script, we could now see more potential in the way form is generated through a newer, more intelligent process. While it still needed a lot of work and tweaking, this was still a great leap considering the condition of the script before. Note: a more thorough, updated run through of the final design process will be illustrated in a later chapter.

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1. The base grid overlaid on site. This is configured as four equal grids which form one much larger grid. This allows for manipulation of growth in all directions, i.e. +XYZ and -XYZ. Growth in the -Z direction is especially important as it now means the structure no longer becomes top heavy, i.e. it grows downards to create a bottom heavy form.

2. A custom pattern is created by selecting cells which do not intersect with any existing buildings. This means that each site will have its own site specific pattern and therefore the form generated has a direct correlation with its site as opposed to being driven by preset patterns.

3. A form is generated, and the method used for the ‘distortion model’ is applied. Centre points of each cube are extracted and connected with lines. These lines will then be piped to form a structural framework which could be used to create architecture. 65


04 UTOPIC VISIONS


Exploring potential growth and propogation of structure on test site in Zone 2 (Preston, Victoria).

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2020

2030

2040 69


70

04 UTOPIC VISIONS


4.4.3 GROWTH POTENTIAL After updating our script to give the user more control, we found that the raw potential in this was that the user now had the ability to grow the structure how they wanted by manipulating the movement of the structure’s base grid. As each structure grew along a grid, it would eventually have to interface with each other - this could be useful as it yielded some potential in allowing the cross movement of people between each super structure. When propogated across site, this meant a series of urban super structure which could be inhabited in or built into to generate new activiy in a future post-industrial world. Growth patterns generated through the script now became ‘the blue print’ which informed the designer how to piece structure together, as well as a visualisation of how far it could grow before it no longer became useful.

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POST-MID SEMESTER REVIEW REFLECTION _FEEDBACK + Response: +Dominik: On not understanding structural issues: Have data to prove wrong. +Scott: On Parc de la Villette being a “rich project” / Not reading P Villette in our project: Refer to old readings and ‘Red is not a color’. +Tim: On looking too “regular”: Think about re-introducing an added “dimension”/system which increases complexity of geometry? May further strengthen distortion argument and also part of the reason for using 3D Printing, etc. +Alison: On not showing what is happening inside: Drawings were in progress/incomplete, but now with further thought more thought needs happen with regards to how it touches existing buildings (detailing, what gets trimmed/not, etc) _ACTION PLAN 1.0 _CONCEPT 1.1 Research + More research into 3D Printing - benefits, restrictions/limitations, etc. + Where is the technology at now, where will it be in X years? + Materials + Research into concept - what are you trying to achieve with your city? 1.2 Readings + ARUP Reading + Future of 3D Printing + Adaptive Ecologies + Utopia Forever + Red is not a color + Matter 1.3 Cellular Automata + More explanation into the explorations and concepts behind cellular automata. 1.4 Parc de la Villette + Concepts from P Villette which drive the project. Refer to ‘Red is not a color’ notes. 2.0 _DRAWINGS 2.1 Site + More detail into what you are trying to communicate. + Site Mass - show smaller details when closer up. Windows, doors, etc. + Show more transport, machinery, etc. + Why that site. 2.2 Inhabitation + Programs, people. How they interact within. + Sectional perspective. + How machinery and spaces have evolved over time. + Circulation issues. How to folies connect, intersect, etc. 3.0 _MODEL -3d + Physical 3.1 Grasshopper + Solve structural issues. + Fix overlapping members + Find out how to get rid of duplicates + Find a way to get rid of members which do not “trim” - DONT TRIM, then trim depending on situation. 3.2 Physical + Find a way to be less reliant on 3d Printing or more time efficient with it. + FInd a way which makes it much smarter and more systematic to piece things together.


depression We’ve failed. We’ve failed as individuals and failed as a team. I put my heart and soul into trying to pump out whatever I could for our midsemester presentation. Ultimately, our method of making made it extremely difficult to have enough time to go through the fine details. Doing a pure 3d printed model, especially at the scale we were working at, takes far too long to prepare and assemble. To prepare the file takes long enough, I’ve spent my nights splitting and preparing files to print, ensuring that it can be pieced together at the end, and forced myself to wake up early every morning to claim a few of the university 3d printers before other students. Ultimately this methodology comes at the expense of my own physical and mental well-being, something I have always been prepared to sacrifice. The divide of work between assembling the model and the bulk of ‘everything else’ needs to be addressed soon, or we will not succeed as a group, more so now that our mid-semester review has exposed even more holes to fill. Maybe this is just how I feel at the time. Hopefully it will get better...

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05


REVIVAL OF A FADED

FANTASY

food for the jaded mind


05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY

5.0 STATE OF THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY As we progress towards the future, the post-industrial landscape of Melbourne is changing. Small-to-middle scale manufacturing industries are thriving as a result of rapid globalisation, resulting giant firms moving their production operations off-shore. In the context of Melbourne, the construction industry is expected to continue to rise while manufacturing is seen to slowly fall in decline. However, new global trends point at potential areas which could be addressed to help revive Melbourne’s declining manufacturing industry. These emerging trends will require the attention and collboration of policy-makers, civil society and business leaders.

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Infrastructure is necessary to enable manufacturing to flourish and contribute to job growth will only continue to grow in importance. Investment in infrastructure is necessary to allow for cities to be targeted as potential locations for multinational investment and to benefit from the globalisation of manufacturing. Reinvestment in maintaining competitive infrastructure will therefore become critical in order to keep competitive with other industrial areas. A serious lack of infrastructure or a steadily decaying infrastructure will negatively impact an industrial zone’s manufacturing potential and competitiveness, especially when creating links and supply chain networks with global multinationals.

The ability to innovate, especially at an accelerated pace, will be the most important differentiating factor defining the success of companies. Companies must innovate to stay ahead of competition, and this must be further enabled and facilitated by necessary infrastructure and a policy that better supports university research lab breakthroughs in science and technology, with investment in budges that permit these pursuits. While state-of-the-art facilities and infrastructure have always been extremely important in order for innovation to flourish, so too will the access to a workforce capable of using it.

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CONSTRUCTION VS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

manufacturing industry

40% 40%

34%

partnering with additive manufacturing service providers

19%

funding research/investing in the development of additive manufacturing

funding research/investing in the development of additive manufacturing

me

v

CURRENT

CHALLENGES

FUTURE

46% 34%

39%

40%

manufacturing costs

ru

post-processing costs

high te

limited materials

stratasys, trend forecast 3d printing’s imminent impact on manufacturing (2015)

conduct

bi

MATERIALS

equipment costs

38%

58%

54%

63%

training designers and engineers specifically for additive manufacturing

ISSUES OF GREATEST FUTURE IMPACT

australian government, industry employment projection report (2014)

construction industry

THE FUTURE OF 3D PRINTING

05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY

time and series projection


THE FUTURE OF 3D PRINTING

g research/investing development of e manufacturing

16% mechanical properties

10% materials available

8% slow equipment

5% cost of materials

5% volume constraints

5% design accuracy

84% metals

61% rubber-like materials

60% high temperature plastic

52% carbon fiber

42% conductive-filled/circuitry

29% bio-based polymers

MATERIALS

19%

ISSUES OF GREATEST FUTURE IMPACT

20% cost of equipment

20% soluble materials

7% other

stratasys, trend forecast 3d printing’s imminent impact on manufacturing (2015)


05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY


5.1 THE FUTURE OF 3D PRINTING As humans continue to experiment and develop 3D printing technologies, boundaries are continually tested in order to break through all current limitations in scale and material use. Although still in its relative infancy, it is speculated that the true value of 3D printing is not as a technology, but as an enabler to derive greater business value. In today’s current state, 3D printing technology is seen more as a luxury and not viable due to its current limitations. However, as parts for 3d printing equipment becomeing cheaper and more readily available, and metals so highlycoveted across all industries, further development into 3d printing metals will potentially spark a huge growth in 3d printing’s usefulness in the manufacturing industry.

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5.2 PLUG-IN CITY: PETER COOK, ARCHIGRAM (1965)

05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY

Upon re-evaluating the current state of our project, currently manifested as a seeminly over-abundance and redundancy of structure, for reasons still unknown it reminded me of the project, ‘The Plug-in City’ by Peter Cook. Plug-in city offered a radically new approach to urbanism at the time, where it forced yourself to undergo a slight reversal or mental shift in how you viewed or perceived infrastructure’s role in the city. Perhaps this has always been my deep-seeded wish for this project, to create the seductive image of a hypothetical fantasy city, where the imagery or “moments” created, trump any form of pragmatic thoroughness. Comparisons drawn between Plug-in City and our Proto-city are uncanny; both are contantly evolving, and both are large infrastructural mega-units, waiting to be “plugged-in”. I immediately think of how our structure could potentially reveal infrastructural elements and therefore reverse traditional building hierarchies, much like the Centre Pompidou by Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano. Nonetheless, the issue I am facing at the moment is that our structure is struggling to be infilled in a completely rational and pragmatic way, and that for some reason the aesthetic of an over-abundance of raw, bare structure is deemed as ‘incomplete’. But perhaps, like in the case of Plug-in City, I must embrace and celebrate this aesthetic of incompletness, and use this to drive other agendas such as the possibility of the multiplicity of options (in terms of shelter, paneling options, etc.), fostering the integration of exposed services and new-age 3d print robots, and creating a culture where users use 3d printing ‘where needed’, therefore fostering a greater engagment between themselves (the end-user) and the design and making process. Only by doing this can we truly propel the potentials of what 3d printing can do; by spreading its use to everyone, including the every-day person.

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05 REVIVAL OF A FADED FANTASY


a new hope Finally. What a relief to feel like we are actually progressing and moving forward. It’s been such a frustrating ride seemingly moving forward in ‘first gear’ while your peers are able to progress at such an alarming rate. We are slowly piecing together our rationale for a 3d printed structure, but there is still a lot of work to do, not only in terms of updating our script and addressing glaring structural issues, but also designing how we modfiy and panelise our structure in a more clever way. I think I have an aesthetic and general direction in mind in terms of what I think and how I think our city should look and the reasons why it grows in such a way, but I guess the last few weeks have been tough not only in terms of general progress and feedback, but also loosening our hold and attachment to the Parc de la Villette precedent study. As Paul (well Freud, actually) said, “kill your father!” Onwards and upwards.

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06


PRESTON: A PROLOGUE FOR A

PROTO-CITY understanding site + urban context


06 PRESTON: A PROLOGUE FOR A PROTO-CITY

6.0 ZONE 2 FOR FOLIE À DEUX After a several weeks of experimenting on devloping a design process, we were assigned a site to apply our design on. The site, located in Preston, Victoria, is one of the last few remaining industrial zones just outside Melbourne’s urban fringe, bounded by Bell and Albert Street to its North and West, the Darebin Creek to its East, and a large residential area to its South.

6.1 CURRENT SITE CONDITIONS Being an industrial zone, the site is dominated by largespan factories and storage warehouses. Activity on the site primarily occurs during working hours, after which the site is usually quiet and empty. There is also a clear lack of any food, entertainment, recreation, and green spaces to cater for its working population.

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6.2 MEETING THE MAKERS The intention of our site visits to various businesses within our site was to illustrate the difference in how large and small-to-medium scale makers work. Large scale operations such as Tuftmaster Carpet Factory are becoming less common as larger companies continue to outsource their manufacturing. As a result, there is a thriving community of smaller-to-medium sized makers, banding together to occupy and subdivide larger spaces into smaller, more discreet work spaces. Furthermore, with the availability and ease-of-use of machines such as CNC routers improving over time, smaller makers are able to learn to use such technology to improve output and minimize error - the shift in learning to use machines means less manual labour and less time and effort needed in terms of ensuring their product is consistent.

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06 PRESTON: A PROLOGUE FOR A PROTO-CITY

6.3 CHOOSING OUR ‘STARTING POINT’ As our site was dominated by primarily large warehouse and storage spaces, we decided to place our focus on an area which held more variety in terms of program. Two main points immediately stood out from the site - Publi A Commercial Printers and National Metals Recyclers. Taking inspiration from Officeworks (a large office supply retailer) which has recently expanded its services into 3d printing, we would then use this site to speculate the possibility of a company interested in 3d printing metals. This was justifiable due to the inherent demand for metals across all industries, and according to our previous research this seemed to be a huge talking point, at least for 3d printing in the manufacturing industry.

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Area of focus.

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Diagramming and visualising an initial process from scrap metal to delivered product.

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1. Scrap metal pieces are collected. 2. Metal is melted and liquified. 3. Molten metal is cooled and turned into wire spool. 4. Spool is used for 3d print. 5. 3d printed object is ready to be transferred back to warehouse. 6. 3d printed object is transferred back to warehouse. 7. Object is packed and stored within warhouse ready for delivery. 8. Product is dispatched and delivered.

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06 PRESTON: A PROLOGUE FOR A PROTO-CITY

6.2 INITIAL URBAN PLANNING SCHEME We set out to speculate and test how we would propogate our site at an urban scale through initial sketch drawings and mass models. This scenario would then be further refined and finalised (as seen in in a later chapter) as a 1:500 drawing and urban scale model. The main things we learned through this exercise was our initial proposal, which was a linking highline bridge throughout the site was not viable. We then switched our scheme to focus on working more with existing buidlings within our site, where old factory spaces would be cleared out and structure left exposed and then re-occupied using a programmatic space of our choice.

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LA VILLE

EN ROSE

city in pink


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7.0 LA VILLE EN ROSE (AN OVERVIEW) ‘La Ville En Rose (City in Pink)’ is an urban structure which is open-ended in its syntax; the nature of the structure allows users to appropriate its use, necessary additional infrastructure, envelope and shelter depending on needs ‘at the time’. Using the tale of the fictitious 3D printing company ‘Clouseau Collectif’ as its main protagonist, the experimental nature of 3D Printing as a main driving force of making is explored. In this project, a possible urban scenario is speculated, highlighting the change in technology and construction methods over a time period of 2015 to 2050. This context creates a radically different view on architecture, where the city is built as infrastructure stripped to its bare bones, an empty shell waiting to be occupied, where programmatic spaces are yet to be inserted, and events and ‘moments’ generated by the creative potential of its inhabitants.

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7.1 CLOUSEAU COLLECTIF Clouseau Collectif is the main protagonist in ‘La Ville En Rose’, a fictitious 3d printing company which takes over the site currently occupied by Publi A Commercial Printers Ltd and National Metal Recyclers. Through extensive experimentation and trials they develop a methodology of 3d priting metals, initially used as a means of expanding their own operations by building a metal printing factory. As the demands for useful applications in 3d printed metals grow, so too does their influence - little do they know that they would be the catalyst in the rapid growth of ‘The City in Pink’, 3d printing culture, and a significant player in the revival of Melbourne’s declining manufacturing industry.

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Spool

Recycled Metal Pieces

Cooling System

Pick up the Finished Product

3D Printing

Melting Pot

Transferring the Off-Cut Material back to the Metal Recycle Factory

Transfer to the Warehouse

Shipping/ Transfer

Warehouse/Storage

Warehouse/Storage

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7.2 URBAN DISTRIBUTION A PROJECTION TO 2050 Urban distribution from 2015 to 2050 is told through the parallel tale of Clouseau Collectif - a 3d printing company whose success in 3d printig metals propells them into being an incredibly influential figure in Preston. As the firm continues to flourish, so too does the community - What started as a simple idea of 3d printing metal has now become the ethos of a new and vibrant city.

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2015 Clouseau Collectif, a 3d printing company, takes over the site previously occupied by Publi A Commercial Printers Ltd and National Metal Recyclers. Extensive experimentation in 3d printed metal columns and beams are tested in-house as a means of breaking through the printing limitations in scale and material use with current technology. A pink 3d printing factory is planned to be constructed in order to expand current operations, and also act as an example of how 3d printing technology can be useful in the construction industry. Despite still relying on traditional methods of construction at the time, Clouseau Collectif find themselves in a very interesting position - they have developed a method of printing metals, a method coveted by so many other industries. But with the construction industry only projected to rise, do they ride this wave?

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Urban Phasing Diagram

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2022 Melbourne’s population continues to grow at an alarming rate. Existing sites are scrapped in place of residential blocks to assist with the population boom. Clouseau Collectif, who now have started to move onto 3d print applications in construction, require more space to expand and grow - a second facility, known as the ‘Clouseau Industrial Zone’ is constructed. With other rival companies starting to ride the 3d printing wave, an additional facility for research and development is needed in order to continue innovating and to stay ahead of competition. This is further enabled and facilitated by the opening of an adjacent university, where the work-study links between the two adjacent structures means the opening up of access to a future workforce for years to come. Effects of the opening of an educational institution can be felt socio-culturally as well. Suddenly the general public are becoming more interested in 3d printing technology in general, and small ‘makers markets’ start to pop up. It is clear that the 3d printing trend is truly on the rise.

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Urban Phasing Diagram

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2040 Rising costs in land means that large scale manufacturing operations cannot continue to occur. The Clouseau Industrial Zone subdivides itself into smaller discreet spaces, where spaces are leased to other interested innovators aiming to take 3d printing to the next level. This move allows for a greater sharing of ideas, experiences and expertise, while allowing Clouseau Collectif to scale back their operation. As the design and construction of urban infrastructure slowly stagnates, more effort into developing 3d printing machines is emphasized. 3d printing machines, donning Clouseu Collectif’s signature pink aesthetic, are now sleeker and are able to accomodate into the urban structure, allowing for greater flexibility and more continous printing. The old factory site is no longer functional and is transformed into a scienceworks and cultural centre - a celebration of the company’s influence in revitalising the city in such a short span of time. Here, archives are stored educating the public about the city’s recent history and achievements, and a gallery of robots set up to show how the progression of technology over this time. Social infrastructure, such as retail and entertainment areas become more abundant as the city continues to populate.

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Urban Phasing Diagram

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2050 In its 35th year since the birth of the original Clouseau Print Factory, an urban aesthetic of the future has been established. The city, built as infrastructure stripped to its bare bones, allows for users to appropriate and accomodate as required. With the 3d printing market becoming more saturated and its technology more widely accepted by the average consumer, 3d printing has become the method of making of the future. Establishment of an educational institution has lead to a new generation of makers and designers who are able to design into and experiment with the infrastructure left by the city’s pioneers.

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Urban Phasing Diagram

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7.3 DESIGN PROCESS - SUMMARISED As our group set out to design infrastructure, the aesthetic and functional requirements needed to be redeveloped and pushed further in order to greater project an articulation of structure. We designed three primary elements - a vertical, horizontal and diagonal structure. This would then be referenced into a modified pattern to give the end result. A further manual process also had to be established to prevent our structure from intersecting with or puncturing through any existing building’s roofs.


7.3.1 MAKING SENSE OF NON-SENSE

07 LA VILLE EN ROSE

The overall blue-print for how each cluster of infrastructure has not changed since much. Instead of directly piping to create a very regular yet non-structural form, the previous algorithmic method was broken down to a certain point where a pattern of interseting lines (based off centre points of a cube) is created. This pattern would then form the basis for further modification.

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A01 A02 A04


A05

A06


A01

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A regular grid is created, subdivided into four parts allowing for growth in all directions in the x and y axis.

Seed points are selected based on the overlaid grid, with points only created in spaces where the grid does not intersect with existing builing structures

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A01

A02

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Cellular Automata is applied, growth occurs in the +z axis.

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Cellular Automata is applied, growth occurs in the -z axis.

Centre points from cubes are extracted, and lines are drawn joining these points based off a fixed minimum and maximum value.

Duplicate lines are removed.

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A04

A05

A06

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A03 + A04

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7.3.2 RE-TWEAKING REFERENCE LINES

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B01 ‘Problem lines’ are identified, selected and filtered for removal.

B02 New reference lines are created to address any potential structural issues which may arise

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B01

B02

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B03 Selective diagonal lines are selected, and raised to a minimum ceiling height of 2.1 to reduce amount of redundant and dead space.

B04 New reference lines are ready for re-referencing within the grasshopper script.

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B03

B04

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7.3.3 CREATING NEW ARTICULATION OF STRUCTURE

07 LA VILLE EN ROSE

C01 A vertical element is created using a graph mapper component on grasshopper, extruded and rotated to create a cruiciform profile.

C02 A cap is created using the same method and positioned to match the vertical component.

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C01

C02

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C03 A horizontal element is created using a graph mapper component on grasshopper, extruded and rotated to create a t-shaped profile.

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C04 A diagonal element is created using a graph mapper component on grasshopper, extruded and rotated to create a slim cruciform profile.

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7.3.4 APPLYING NEW COMPONENTS TO LINES

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Having created 3 different types of elements based for different line positions, the last step was re-referencing and applying these new geometry to each specific type of line (vertical, horizontal, diagonal) within grasshopper.

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VERTICAL

HORIZONTAL

DIAGONAL CORNERS RAISED TO MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHT (2.1m)

DIAGONAL

RAISED DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION RIGHT VIEW

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TOP CORNER ARTICULATION

TYPICAL FLOOR-TO-FLOOR CONNECTION

TOP CORNER ARTICULATION

TYPICAL FLOOR-TO-FLOOR CONNECTION

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TYPICAL 90 DEGREE CORNER CONNECTION

TYPICAL 90 DEGREE CORNER CONNECTION

STRUCTURAL MEMBER ASSEMBLY SIMULTANEOUS SYSTEM OF PRINTING & WELDING

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DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION

RAISED DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION

DIAGONAL CO MINIMUM CE

RAISED DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION

DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION

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RAISED DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION FRONT VIEW

DIAGONAL CORNERS RAISED TO MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHT (2.1m)

RAISED DIAGONAL MEMBER CONNECTION RIGHT VIEW

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1. The limits of 3D Print technology is pushed through the articulation of a continuous structure.

07 LA VILLE EN ROSE

2. Spaces and envelopes are definied through the in-fill of a 3d printed translucent facade or surface.

3. Structure allows for the integration of robotics - Robots which continue to print the future expansion of the structure or insitu robots which can be reversed to hang from structure to complete print jobs.

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JOB SENT

JOB DISTRIBUTED

JOB SENT

B DISTRIBUTED

JOB RECEIVED

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7.3.5 SPATIAL LOGIC

Ground Floor Plan 144


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Second Floor Plan 146


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Section

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7.4 CNTRL C + CNTRL V: PROPOGATION OVER SITE

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CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

ZONE 2 - LA VILLE EN ROSE 2050

CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

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CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

2050. The Old Clouseau Factory has been converted into a cultural museum and science centre - a tribute to the city’s achievements and a landmark marking the origin point of the city’s growth.

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07 LA VILLE EN ROSE

CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

ZONE 2 - LA VILLE EN ROSE 2050

CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

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CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

CULTURAL MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTRE

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An overall key plan showing the distribution of infrastructure and the overall planning strategy of La Ville en Rose in 2050.

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late-night ramblings: thinking-out-loud What a journey. I cannot believe we have finally finished and (almost) crossed the finish line the feeling is a little bit surreal. I feel like I have been hit by a second surge or wave of energy, perhaps it is the lack of sleep and the amount of andrenaline I have been running on this entire time. While I personally think we did not hit the full potential of our project, I go to sleep (finally!) happy - I know how much blood, sweat and tears have gone into whatever has come out. For now, whatever happens, happens.

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LA VILLE EN ROSE: A City Ingrained in Film A film is not just the tracing of space, but rather a narrative conveyed through a montage or succession of scenes and interactions between ‘characters’ and ‘setting’. But these shots are required to be made from a real location. Using our project ‘La Ville en Rose’, in addition to drawing references from the film Drive (2011), this essay seeks to explore how filmic and real-life urban spatial conditions influence each other, as well as our experiences of them.

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Urban Representation of ‘The City’ The modern city has always been an object of fascination for architects, film-makers and cinema goers alike - the sensations of ‘urban experience’ replicated through the visual, aural and emotive power of cinema. As such, film as an art form unlocks and uncovers hidden potential of urban space, overlaying new meaning onto these spaces through characters and narrative. Similarly, film provides an insight into the urban social, cultural and economic conditions of a city during that time period. Noir representations in film and literature portrays the fears of lower and middle class society hit especially hard by the Depression during the 1930s. In ‘Drive’, the city (downtown Los Angeles) is depicted as a ‘labyrinth’, claustrophobic in nature and ‘noir’ in representation. In parallel, our project ‘La Ville en Rose’ is represented as a 3D printed city of skeletal metal framework and weaving network of water pipes, inspired by the idea of a ‘post-industrial Paris’; ‘steely’ industrial in its aesthetic but romantic and amorous at its core.

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‘There are obvious overlaps between the work of film directors and that of architects. Filmmakers and architects have the same obsession with a “sense of place”. Both need small armies of collaborators to realise their visions. Both must deal with sometimes awkward and interfering patrons. Still, a “certain modesty” is required from film-makers when they compare themselves to architects. “Buildings are very real, after all, and they really determine and condition people’s lives. Films sometimes form people’s visions and dreams, but don’t have such an immediate impact on their reality. Or am I wrong?” - Wim Wnders, Via The Independent

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The Urban Experience Our experience and perception of cities, or ‘the urban’, is often a complex and difficult idea to pin down. Physical and nonphysical experiences (such as through film) continually blur the boundaries between fantasy and reality, up to a point where both can be considered the same or equally as valid. With representations and perceptions are personal and subjective, the city created by a film maker (or ’soft’ city, where the imagery and sense of illusion, aspiration, myth or nightmare are represented) is as ‘real’ as a city which we can locate on a map. Our lived space is experienced through a combination and fusion of physical and mental space, and as such the image of the city reconstructed by our imagination is just as real as a city of concrete objects and cold-steel structures. Therefore the underlying ‘grit’ of Drive’s representation of Los Angeles, despite it being ‘the City of Angels’ and a city of ‘hope’, as well as La Ville en Rose’s ‘blurring of urban boundaries’, where urban sprawl and decentralisation of Melbourne’s urban spaces are both becoming increasingly common realities in today’s world.

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Film, Space and Narrative By projecting a storyline onto a space, the filmic narrative gives space meaning and emotion, which in turn, affects our experience of that space. As such, a narrative therefore not only presumes a sequence of events but a language of design and story-telling. Furthermore, the portrayal of the city through a multiplicity of different view points and perspectives, not only can alter our perception of space, but also parallel our own lived experience of city spaces. ‘Drive’, directed by Nicolas Refn, was shot in Los Angeles towards the end of 2010 portraying the city as a backdrop for an alternative world of ‘neon-noir’ - lived through the body of a nameless stunt car driver, played by Ryan Gosling. The driver, who drives for the movies by day and offers his services for heists by night, continues to follow the tradition of the typical Hollywood ‘car movie, but the film is characterised by a minimal, realist tone and aesthetic, forcing us to acknowledge that the film is staging a series of fictional events in a very real setting. Using multiple perspectives - through the window, inside a moving vehicle, through ‘the eyes of God’, on the street, and the in and out of focus of background and foreground, are all techniques which mirror or parallel our own lived experience of urban spaces and city life. In ‘Drive’, Refn’s exaggeration of perspectives and use of dark graphic tones, creates spaces of ambiguity which relates to a vision derived from a multiplicity of view points, enriching our own city experiences. Similarly, in ‘La Ville en Rose’, the framing of views through spaces in between a naked skeletal structure, complimented with the overpassing of a vast piping network, creates new and undiscovered framed views, while the aesthetic mix or melting pot of a neon pink environment, translucent panels and steel frame provides a unique and exaggerated experience of a speculative post-industrial world.

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Through ‘God’s Eyes’: Downtown Drive begins immediately with a heist in play. As the Driver makes his getaway, our viewport immediately switches for the backseat in the Driver’s silver Chevrolet Impala. Through a series of cuts and edits, space and time is compressed, and the ‘feeling’ of the city created through various combination of visual and aural stimuli fluctuating and different speeds. Changing focus in between the car’s interior and the view through the windscreen enhances the quality of depth and realism, and only reminds and highlights to us that our experience of the film and this world is mirrored through the Driver’s experiences through driving or interactions with other characters. It is only after the Driver has been made sure of his escape that we are presented a ‘God Eye View’ of Downtown LA - an aerial and overhead view presenting itself as the traditional urban representation used in film and other arts, but a technique often used to help us understand the city as a whole. In parallel, in ‘La Ville en Rose’ it is not until you view an aerial shot or ride the ferris wheel and get up high and see the city as a whole that you can appreciate the city as its own entity.

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The Spatial ‘Other’ and ‘The Dream-like State’ Automobiles have often long been associated with the idea of social mobility and democracy, and in ‘Drive’ this is certainly no different. However, as the car slowly comes to a halt at the end of the LA river, demarcated by the division between the end of asphalt and alluring overgrown bush and thicket, the characters leave the car behind, crossing over and into an ‘other space’, a scene which marks a return to nature and our origins, a representation of the fantastical dream-like state of our everyday lived experience. This notion too was represented in ‘La Ville en Rose’, where movement through the city and towards the river represented a transversing towards a more dream-like environment. Following the trail of pipelines, and moving past thresholds and pockets of intermediary green space heading towards the river entails a crossing and succession of different images which represents the inhabitation of the city as a collective whole - as pure industrial and research zones slowly taper off into a more serene and naturalistic scene closer to the river, juxtaposed by an even greater exaggeration of this world through large water boilers and tanks, wild ferris wheel and busy market space.

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Concluding Remarks Filmic representations of urban settings through film, architecture and story telling presents new ways to help uncover and create new connections and narratives through lived space. The dreamlike atmosphere which permeates throughout ‘Drive’ – a rush of bright lights, blurred vision, sudden jumps of speed, exists in parallel to architectural narratives such as that of the postindustrial setting of ‘La Ville en Rose’, a fairy tale land based and built on complete fantasy. Set perspective views and camera angles lends for the commentary of a city whose reality is in its mythology - The Architect is its director, and the architecture its protagonists.

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FADE TO BLACK: REFLECTION


My overall experience of this studio has been incredibly bittersweet. Perhaps it is still early days and I have not allowed myself the time to soak it all in, but I feel like the ultimate potential of this project was never really realised. This, I believe, was due to our group never really working well enough in cohesion since day one. When there is great unbalance in workload - willingness to sacrifice the time to develop work, both in digital and physical, research and conceptual thinking, the group’s overall output suffers severely as a result. Especially within the context of such a high pressure and competitive studio, a group’s progress and standard can never be raised unless all members and parties have the will and drive to succeed, and are willing to fight for their place within this studio. Nonetheless, I have made many new friends in this studio who have been extremely supportive of us throughout and for me personally, have made the entire experience more enjoyable desipte our struggles and difficulties as a group. I am also extremely proud of my contribution towards our end outcome given the time frame, revisions and changes we did to our design. I am also proud of myself for finally getting a good grasp of parametric design and maintaining a positive and ‘never say die’ attitude throughout the semester. It has been extremely hard, mentally, physically and emotionally to keep up with the pace given the resources and lack of complimentary skills within my group, and also dealing with the jealousy of seeing friends and other peers fly through this semester like a breeze. However, I have learned one thing - in groupwork there will always be someone who is less skilled than another; you have to continue to fight to achieve the best you can with the cards you are dealt. Now for some sleep, and very soon, thesis. Onwards and upwards. -JH.


JUNHAN FOONG Having graduated from The University of Melbourne in 2013 with a Bachelor of Environments majoring in Architecture, Junhan is currently undertaking his Master in Architecture at Melbourne School of Design. Born in Malaysia, raised in Dubai, Junhan refers to himself as a ‘third culture kid’ whose appetite for creative work is explored across multiple avenues - including graphic design, experimenting with animation, motion graphics and film making, in addition to street photography on the side of pursuing a career in architecture. Fascinated by the impacts and implications of future technologies and interfaces on future human societies, Junhan experiments with film and 3D computer generated imagery as a storytelling medium.

For more work please visit: photography instagram: @_junstagram video vimeo: https://vimeo.com/jhfoong


STUDIO 22 FUTURE NOW

Master of Architecture STUDIO C. Semester 02 2014

FB HOME FB Home is a new-age phenomenon sweeping over the world. Built as a series of interconnected pneumatic structures placed in major cities all over the world, FB home is designed to be a ‘temporary global event’ - a shopping paradise open publicly 24 hours a day aiming to revolutionise and encourage consumerism. Items and services are purchased with ‘FB Coin’, a digital currency gained by social media activity, and thus are technically ‘free’. Coins earned are based on the quantity and quality of data shared, and can be ‘farmed’ or accumulated by playing internet games on gaming machines placed throughout every building. However, everything is not as it seems. FB is also gathering data through other means - hidden trackers and machines are embedded within its buildings, as well as other objects scattered in its surroundings. Information stored within its data centres are used in secret to continually life-log and archive people, sold to the highest bidder and used to push ads to the public. FB Home is a project which aims to bring light to the issue of surveillance in modern day society, exploring tactics used in information gathering in an age where privacy is almost nonexistent.

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TECTONIC GROUNDS

Master of Architecture. Summer FEB 2015

ONYX Onyx is a physical birthchild of data input and user interaction; a frankenstein monster of the digital and the physical. It feeds off our digital and physical inputs and in return, it gives us various forms of digital and physical response. Our interaction with Onyx keeps it alive.

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STUDIO 17 WEARABLE SPACES

Master of Architecture STUDIO D. Semester 01 2015

in:COGNITO The startling reach of surveillance capabilities in urban centres has only exponentially boomed as the wide reach of the internet continues to grow. In today’s world, ultra-modern architecture facilitates a range of security measures by design, but shrewdly conceals the full extent of its surveillance regimes. Similarly, governments and other authoritative powers use this type of technology to view or gather information from the general public, most of the time without consent. Every movement, both physically and digitally, is scrutinised and information routinely logged within a centralised database. This type of behaviour creates a false form of security, with the people never realising how trapped they are within Surveillance’s perpetual gaze. in:COGNITO (a fictional fashion label) is a project which aims to bring light to the issue of surveillance in modern day society, using fashion as a medium to create a very personal counter-surveillance or disconnect-space, giving back control and power to the people under “The Authority’s” watchful eye.

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PHOTOGRAPHY


APPENDIX

1:50 FINAL MODEL PHOTOS


APPENDIX

1:50 FINAL MODEL PHOTOS


APPENDIX

EXPERIMENTATION WITH TRANSULCUENCY


APPENDIX

CONCEPT SKETCHES


APPENDIX

CONCEPT SKETCHES


CREDITS


Junhan

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Drawing

Rendering

Post-processing

Computation

Jasmine

Model File Set Up

Model Fabrication

Model Assembly

Photography

Writing

Graphic Design


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BIBLIOGRAPHY ARUP, 2015. Rethinking the Factory. London: ARUP. Aureli, P. V., 2014. The Dom-ino Problem: Questioning the Architecture of Domestic Space. Log, (30), p. 139151. Australian Government, 2014. Industry Employment Projections 2014 Report. [PDF]. Australian Government Department of Employment. Borden, G. P. & Meredith, M., 2012. Matter: Material Processes in Architectural Production. New York, NY: Routledge. Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure, 2014. Plan Melbourne: Metropolitan Planning Strategy. [PDF]. State of Victoria. Eisenman, P., 2014. Apects of Modernism: Maison Dom-ino and the Self-Referential Sign. Log, (30), p. 139151. Feireiss, L., 2011. Utopia Forever: Visions of Architecture and Urbanism. Die Gestalten Verlag. Hahessy, E., 2014. Where to now for Australian Manufacturing>. The Age, 15, April. Spyropoulos, T., 2013. Adaptive Ecologies: Correlated Systems of Living. Architectural Association Publications. Stratasys, 2015. Trend Forecast: #D Printing’s Imminent Impact on Manufacturing. [PDF]. Stratasys Direct Manufacturing. Tschumi, B., 2012. Red is not a Color. Rizzoli. World Economic Forum, 2012. The Future of Manufacturing: Opportunities to Drive Economic Growth. [PDF]. World Economic Forum Report.

FILM Refn, 2011. ‘Drive’. [Film].


IMAGE CREDIT AND SOURCES 12 Filming Locations of Drive. [Webpage]. Available from: http://www.locationshub.com/blog/post/458/the-12-film-locations-of-drive-in-los-angeles [accessed 4 October 2015] Murray, R., Ryan Gosling Talks About ‘Drive’. [Webpage]. Available from: http://movies.about.com/od/drive/a/ryan-gosling-drive.htm [accessed 5 October 2015] Parc de la Villette Folie. [Image]. Available from: http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5037/f5a7/28ba/0d59/9b00/0690/large_jpg/ stringio.jpg?1414206271 [accessed 22 September 2015] 3d printed Pavillion. [Image]. Available from: http://3dprint.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/vulcan-worlds-largest-3d-printed-pavilionbylaboratory-for-creative-design-8.jpg [accessed 16 October 2015] Tschumi Portrait. [Image]. Available from: https://bgmagazineblog.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/bgmagazine-anima.jpg [accessed 22 September 2015] 3d printed tools. [Image]. Available from: http://cdns.nocamels.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Objet30_Vero2.jpg [accessed 16 October 2015] 3d Printed Metal Cube. [Image]. Available from: http://www.baseofengineering.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Cube.jpg [accessed 24 October 2015] Plug-in City. [Image]. Available from: https://relationalthought.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/peter-cook-plug-in-city-19652.jpg [accessed 19 October 2015] Ropes and Rules. [Image]. Available from: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/fd/1f/d0/fd1fd0dd76a17048c56fe1392fb9 d11b.jpg [accessed 22 September 2015] 3d printed Arabesque Wall. [Image]. Available from: http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55e7/1d3f/e58e/ceb7/f100/037f/large_jpg/9_ detail.jpg?1441209653 [accessed 6 October 2015] Manufacturing. [Image]. Available from: http://europesworld.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2014/04/manufacturing.jpg [accessed 14 October 2015] Pink Panther Movie Poster. [Image]. Available from: http://www.goldposter.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/The-Return-of-the-Pink-Panther_ poster_goldposter_com_7.jpg [accessed 6 October 2015] Edith Piaf. [Image]. Available from: https://rightnoise.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/edith-piaf.jpg [accessed 4 October 2015] 12 Filming Locations of Drive. [Webpage]. Available from: http://www.locationshub.com/blog/post/458/the-12-film-locations-of-drive-in-los-angeles [accessed 4 October 2015] Parc de la Villette Folie Cartoon. [Image]. Available from: http://p1.storage.canalblog.com/17/62/640452/83158042_o.jpg [accessed 22 September 2015]


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