Page 1

GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

Comenius Partnership – Polish/English Bilingual Guide 2010 – 2012

Czech Republic (Brno) Gymnázium P. Křížkovského s uměleckou profilací, s. r. o www.gymum.cz

Hungary (Sárospatak) Árpád Vezér Gimnázium és Kollégium www.avgsp.hu

Poland (Gdynia) Gimnazjum nr 4 www.gimnazjum4.gom.pl

Turkey (Gaziantep) Gaziantep Ticaret Odası Güzel Sanatlar ve Spor Lisesi www.gtoagsl.meb.k12.tr

Great Britain (Bath) Saint Gregory´s Catholic College www.st-gregorys.bathnes.sch.uk


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

Contents:

Foreword

Czech Republic

…………………………………….………..……………………………………………………... 2

In English……………....………………………………................................................................ 4 In Polish …………………………………………………………………………………………..6

Hungary

In English……………....………………………………...............................................................10 In Polish ………………………………………………………………………………………….11

Turkey

In English……………....………………………………...............................................................12 In Polish ………………………………………………………………………………………….17

United Kingdom In English……………....………………………………...............................................................20 In Polish ………………………………………………………………………………………….23

Epilogue

…………………………………….………..……………………………………………………..27

2


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

Foreword In August 2010, five schools from five countries (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Turkey and the UK) unified around a project idea of exploring and mapping partner countries to create a ”tour guide” brochure Ad fontes rerum Europae from the Pupils´ Point of View with information on the visited countries of all the host schools. As the title announces, we focused mainly on the sharp sight of the pupils´ perspective. We started in the Czech Republic in October 2010, further went to see Hungary in April 2011, flew to Turkey in June 2011, visited the United Kingdom in October 2011 and finally met in Poland in March 2012. During the meetings as well as in history classes, pupils were acquainted with important cultural achievements of each country. There were 50 teachers and 300 pupils involved in the international project. Of course, not all of us had the opportunity to explore the partner countries – and this is why those lucky ones (aged 15-18) and their teachers worked together and gathered their experiences into this brochure. Using English as the project language, the pupils shared their impressions in the guide section

displayed

on

the

project

websites

(http://afremeetings.shutterfly.com

and

http://afre.shutterfly.com). The aim of this work is to point out differences; things which are common for us but give foreigners the impression of peculiarity or simply an interesting distinction. The investigated aspects supported our cultural, social scientific, historical as well as biological/geographical European awareness.

3


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

CZECH REPUBLIC After a long journey by car we arrived in Warsaw early Monday morning. Warsaw wasn't our final destination because we still had to fly to Prague and then to Brno. The flight was a thrilling experience for all of us because we've never flown before. After arriving in Brno, we went sightseeing with one of the Czech teachers who showed us all the attractions of the city. It was very exciting and we found out many interesting facts about the historic buildings here. There are many areas in Poland which are poor economically but what we saw in the Gipsy area in Brno was an indescribable experience for all of us as we had never seen so many devastated buildings, poverty, lots of children hanging out with their peers and adults listening to loud music and smoking cigarettes in the same place. We also had an opportunity to talk to a Gipsy woman who answered our questions. Some of her answers were a surprise for us - e.g. most Gipsy children don't go to school at all because their parents don't see any point in education, as none of them will get a job in the future. We then took part in workshops led by another young woman. She is a person who wants to improve the standard of living of Romany families and wants them to believe that they can control their own lives. She and a few other Czech people received some fund from the EU to provide Gipsy kids with proper education which means that they don't spend all their time playing outdoors and beyond the control of their parents. Taking part in several different types of workshops, gave us a great opportunity to find out and enrich our knowledge of a number of European languages and our historical connections. We were divided into two groups: a history group and a literature group. The history group went to Olomouc with our history teacher, a few Turkish students and the Czech history teacher-Mr Tomasz accompanied by his assistant-one of the Czech students who was also his interpreter. Since Poland and the Czech Republic are near each other, our history is closely connected. We learnt about it during our trip to Saint Wenceslas cathedral - a fine Gothic building from the 15th century which was a fascinating experience for us even though we've got many similar buildings in Poland. We also found out that Olomouc was one of the most important settlements in Moravia and the seat of the Premyslid government, ruled by one of the princes. In 1306 King Wenceslas III stopped there on his way to Poland, where he fought Wladislaus I the Elbow-high to claim his right to the Polish crown. Before we started our trip Ms Kasia told us about the Polish king Jan III Sobieski who stopped in Olomouc on his way to Vienna in 1683 to feed the soldiers' horses. The recent history of Olomouc was also connected a bit with Poland: during 1942-1943, the remaining Jews were sent to the resienstadt and other German concentration camps in occupied Poland. John Paul II visited Olomouc several times which underlined even further Polish and Czech relations. We are glad that the Comenius trip provided us with an opportunity to extend our knowledge of Polish and Czech history. It's much more beneficial when you can experience history with your own eyes. We enjoyed our trip to Olomouc very much. The literature group worked on the origins and similarities of many different Polish, Czech, Turkish and Hungarian words. We realized that some words are so similar to Polish ones that it was even hard to distinguish which was Polish or Czech. We had to listen very carefully to tell the difference between some of them. However, it was quite challenging and funny to say Hungarian words which seem to be impossible for us to pronounce. Obviously we were not the only ones who tried very hard to pronounce words properly. The same was true for the Czech and Hungarian students who wanted to say Polish words. We all had a lot of fun during the workshops. We also went to Slavkov near Brno (in German: Austerlitz). We learnt that it is a country town east of Brno in the South Moravian Region of the Czech Republic. The town is widely known for giving its name to the Battle of Austerlitz which actually took place some kilometres to the west of the town. After the defeat of the Teutonic Order in the battle of GrĂźnwald, the town became the property of a number of noble owners until, in 1509, the local gentry family of Kaunitz assumed control for more than 400 years. We all know this place from our history classes. So it was good to see it and imagine what it would've been like at that time. 4


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Two of us worked with the Hungarian students and teachers on questionnaires concerning Czech famous people, poets and novelists. Before we came to the meeting we'd prepared a presentation about Czech history so that's why it was easy for us to design a poster and to devise questions. After drawing them up we went onto the streets of Brno to get them completed by asking, at random, Czech citizens the questions we'd prepared. Afterwards, we discussed the outcome of our survey with the Hungarian students. We have to admit that the Czech people did not disappoint us. They knew a lot about their national 'heroes' and what's more important they're genuinely friendly people. There wasn't anyone who refused to answer. We all know that Polish beer is said to be the best in the world but honestly we have to admit that Czech beer is very popular in Poland too. In fact, many people agree that Czech beer is the second best. That was the main reason we wanted to visit the Brno brewery. Our guide told us that lots of beer was exported from Brno to Poland before World War I. As souvenirs we all bought glasses with the logo of the brewery on them. On our way to the Czech capital we stopped over in a mini museum of Josef Lada who illustrated 'Good Soldier Svejk' which is a very popular novel in Poland - there's hardly anyone who hasn't heard of this character. Then we went to Václavské náměstí where we saw a statue of Saint Václav with other patrons: St Anežka, St Prokop and St Vojtěch and learnt about the legend of St Agnes. She was canonized by the Polish pope in 1989. The Charles Bridge was the next stop on our visit to Prague. It was something that we were looking forward to seeing. It's beautiful and we would've liked to have stayed there for longer but as the weather was gloomy we moved on; the National Theatre - a NeoRenaissance building which was truly impressive. On our way we passed the cafe in Prague where coffee was first served. This delicious drink was shipped to Prague from Turkey. Since we were a bit short of time we went to Hradčany. There were good views from the castle which is the biggest in the world. It reminded us of another large castle which is located not far from Gdynia - a castle in Malbork where Teutonic knights used to live in medieval times. Tired and a bit wet but happy and full of new experiences we returned to our bus. We all got together at a club where all the students had the opportunity to have a go at bowling. Since we don't do it very often, we weren't very enthusiastic about it. Finally, we were convinced by our teachers to prove to ourselves that we were good at it. While bowling we talked to many students which was great because at last we overcame our shyness in communicating with other students. We all wished we had had more opportunities to talk to them. All in all, it was great fun and again we learnt something new, not only about ourselves, but also about our peers from other countries. The last day of our meeting was full of artistic activities. All students had to collaborate with one another which was a good opportunity to get to know each other better. During the lunch break we exchanged presents that we'd brought from our countries and said ' thank you' for being with us over the six days of the meeting. Some of the students gave a final presentation showing all of the work they'd done. The presentation began and ended with a Czech student beautifully playing the piano. We had a lot of fun making pottery, especially as we have never before had any experience of doing such challenging and creative things. At our school in Gdynia we only have painting and drawing classes. That's why it was such a pleasurable activity for all of us. For sure, all participants had a wonderful time and got a lot of enjoyment. We also learnt the Czech dance called 'Polka'. It's amazing that the name of this dance means ' a Polish woman' so this is the reason that almost everyone in Poland thinks that Polka originates from Poland. Obviously only a few people know the 5


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy truth about it. We loved dancing it as it mirrors our Slavic temperament. In fact, we weren't the only students who enjoyed it. We saw that students from the other countries liked it a lot as well. During the workshops we also had to prepare collages which showed us that all our peers are very talented young people who for sure will surprise us in the future with their creativity and artistry. We found out that one of the Turkish students sings extremely well and the Hungarian one plays the piano. They showed us their special costumes that they brought with them to Brno to present their folk dances. The high point of the day came when all the students showed what they'd made or had learnt during the workshops to everyone. Our observations What was so surprising for us was the quietness in the school - every time we came to visit our teachers. Even though sometimes we turned up there in the early mornings, we still couldn't hear any noise, any unwanted sounds - the only thing we could observe were lots of young people who were hurriedly walking to be on time for their classes. It was absolutely unbelievable not only for us but for our teachers as well! They keep saying that we make a lot of noise, but most of us disagree with them. It was hard for them to get used to such quiet and well-behaved youngsters who differ so much from Polish teenagers, in our teacher's opinion ;) While we were travelling on the trams many times a day they announced the stops on the way. So we heard them lots of times every day. As a result after five days we were able to recognize familiar words that sounded like Polish ones but whose meaning was entirely different. We learned about Czech family life and their customs which seem to be quite similar in many ways to Polish ones which was a bit of a surprise for us as we'd imagined that being in a foreign country it would've been different. Another thing that was quite strange for all of us was that you couldn't get any sweet things, like cakes, in restaurants and cafes. One day we were desperate to have something sweet to eat. Unfortunately, after 'doing some research' we discovered how hard it was to buy a piece of cake in a café in Brno. As a result, we gave up and went back to our families' houses where at least we had something nice in the fridge. Surprisingly for all of us, there are still a lot of public restaurants and cafes where you are allowed to smoke. You get the impression that Czech citizens don't care about their health at all. They still smoke a lot these days whereas in other EU countries, the majority of people gave up smoking a long time ago. Even in Poland, which is considered not to be as responsible a country in that matter as, for example, Sweden or Norway, people have realized that breaking the habit of smoking is essential if you want to keep your health in good condition. At the same time you let other people who are next to you, breathe fresh air. In Poland there are only a few places where you can still smoke without punishment. It was an unforgettable visit and we are going to remember it for a long time. Especially that we met many new people, learnt a lot of new facts about the Czech Republic and gained experience not only of team-working but also of being in a foreign country - far from our families and having to rely on ourselves which was a valuable lesson in our lives. Czechy Pobyt w Czechach w ramach programu „Comenius” miał miejsce w dniach 12-16 X 2010 r. Na dwa tygodnie przed wyjazdem poproszono nas, abyśmy przygotowali prezentacje na wybrane tematy dotyczące Czech oraz obowiązkowe prezentacje o literaturze czeskiej. Oprócz tego mieliśmy przygotować dwudziestominutowe wystąpienie na temat naszego kraju ojczystego, Polski, dla innych uczestników programu, żeby czegoś się o naszym kraju dowiedzieli, tak jak i my mieliśmy się czegoś dowiedzieć o nich. Wreszcie uczniowie mieli posiadać podstawowe wiadomości o państwach, z przedstawicielami których spotkają się w Czechach, a więc: Turcji, Wielkiej Brytanii i Węgrzech. Wyjechaliśmy wcześniej, niż pozostali uczestnicy i dojechaliśmy do Brna 11 X. Grupa składała się z siedmiu osób: trzech nauczycieli i czterech uczennic. Nauczycieli zakwaterowano w bursie, a uczennice u rodzin czeskich. Powitano nas bardzo serdecznie. Okazało się, że jeden z czeskich nauczycieli, pan Tomasz Jerabek, zna język polski, więc 6


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy komunikacja była bardzo ułatwiona. Uczennice zapoznały się z czeskimi dziewczętami, u których miały nocować, a następnie pan Tomasz pojechał z nami do centrum Brna, gdzie zjedliśmy obiad. Przy okazji oprowadził nas po mieście, opowiadając różne ciekawostki o głównych zabytkach. Popołudnie spędziliśmy bardzo przyjemnie, zachwyceni miastem i gościnnością jego mieszkańców. Następny dzień upłynął nam na dalszym, tym razem samotnym zwiedzaniu miasta i oczekiwaniu na przybycie pozostałych grup. Około godziny 15 już wszyscy razem pojechaliśmy do centrum na zbiorowe zwiedzanie miasta. Byliśmy zadowoleni, że widzieliśmy je już wcześniej, bo teraz nie dowiedzielibyśmy się zbyt wiele – przeszkadzał hałas uliczny, wielkość grupy i brak zainteresowania większości uczestników, zmęczonych podróżą. O godzinie 19 rozpoczął się obiad. Przywitała nas pani dyrektor szkoły, u której gościliśmy. Zostaliśmy podzieleni na grupy, w których przez następne dwa dni mieliśmy odbywać zajęcia. Powstały grupy: geograficzna, biologiczna, socjologiczna, literacka i historyczna. W dwóch ostatnich znalazły się nasze uczennice. Zabrakło przedstawienia uczestników – nadal nie znaliśmy swoich imion, nie wiedzieliśmy ilu uczniów i w jakim wieku wchodzi w skład poszczególnych grup, czego uczą nauczyciele. Nie stworzono odpowiednich warunków do wzajemnego poznania się. Każda grupa narodowościowa siedziała we własnym składzie, nie integrując się z pozostałymi. Być może, gdyby stworzono osobny stół dla nauczycieli i osobny dla uczniów, byłoby lepiej. To był też dobry moment na pokazanie krótkich programów o krajach, z których pochodziliśmy i jakie kazano nam wcześniej przygotować. Niestety okazały się one zupełnie zbędne, ponieważ do końca pobytu nie mieliśmy możliwości zaprezentowania ich. Nasza praca okazała się bezużyteczna. Szczególnie boleśnie odczuli to Turcy, którzy przywieźli ze sobą stroje narodowe (niektórzy kupli je specjalnie na tę okazję) i bardzo sumiennie przygotowali się do prezentacji własnego kraju. Gospodarze także nie pokazali swojej szkoły, ani nie opowiedzieli o miejscowych zwyczajach. Nie przywitano nas żadnym programem artystycznym (choć to podobno szkoła o takim właśnie profilu), do końca pobytu nie zobaczyliśmy, jak funkcjonuje czeska szkoła prywatna, nie weszliśmy na żadną z lekcji, ani nie usłyszeliśmy kto i jak długo się w niej uczy. Oprowadzono chętnych po kilku salach lekcyjnych i gdyby nie informacje zdobywane prywatnie od nauczycieli, którzy pracowali z nami w grupach, niczego byśmy się nie dowiedzieli o instytucji, która nas gościła. W środę, 13 X, grupa historyczna zwiedzała Ołomuniec. Oprócz trójki Polaków, znaleźli się w niej również Turcy. Towarzyszył nam pan Tomasz Jerabek i uczeń, który tłumaczył jego słowa na język angielski. Ołomuniec, jedno z najstarszych miast czeskich. Historyczna stolica Moraw. Drugi, po Pradze, największy ośrodek miejski i największy zespół zabytkowy Czech. To tu król Jan III Sobieski zatrzymał się na popas spiesząc z odsieczą Wiedniowi w 1683 r. Posiada bardzo piękną, odrestaurowaną starówkę. Duży prostokątny rynek z eklektycznym ratuszem (można nawet na nim zobaczyć sztukę socrealistyczną w postaci ogromnego zegara astronomicznego). Stoi tam również kolumna Trójcy Przenajświętszej, która wpisana została na listę światowego dziedzictwa UNESCO. Mnóstwo zabytkowych kamienic z różnych epok. Uniwersytet - drugi w Czechach pod względem starszeństwa; powstał na trzy lata przed założeniem Uniwersytetu Wileńskiego przez Stefana Batorego (drugiego uniwersytetu w Polsce). Pałac biskupi. Kościół św. Michała z barokowym wnętrzem i ogromną kopułą oraz przepiękna gotycka katedra. To przed nią zamordowany został Wacław III z dynastii Przemyślidów, wspólny król czeski i polski. Tę katedrę odwiedził również Jan Paweł II w czasie swojej wizyty w Czechach. W muzeum katedralnym skarbiec kryjący bogactwo sztuki sakralnej – kielichy mszalne, monstrancje itp. oraz zbiór gotyckich rzeźb Madonn. Jedna z nich stanowi zapowiedź renesansu. Maryja, trzymająca małego Jezusa, wpija palce w ramię dziecka, które ugina się pod tym naciskiem jak żywe. Pełni wrażeń wróciliśmy na wspólny obiad w Brnie. W czwartek, 14 X, grupa historyczna pojechała do Slavkova. Nieopodal tej małej mieściny rozegrała się jedna z największych i najważniejszych bitew napoleońskich, która otworzyła drogę cesarzowi Francuzów na Austrię. Była to bitwa pod Austerlitz w 1805 r. My zwiedzaliśmy pałac, który należał do rodziny Kaunitzów. To tu podpisywano zawieszenie broni pomiędzy Austrią a Francją po bitwie pod Austerlitz. Podziwiać mogliśmy również m. in. kaplicę pałacową, gabinet chiński oraz salę balową. Za oknami pałacu rozpościerał się przepiękny widok na barokowy ogród z wieloma cennymi odmianami drzew. Po powrocie do Brna udaliśmy się na obiad do restauracji przy browarze brneńskim. Tu odbywało się także spotkanie koordynatorów projektu. Kilku koordynatorów nie było obecnych w Czechach, w ich zastępstwie pojawili się 7


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy oddelegowani nauczyciele. Miejsce nie nazbyt fortunnie wybrano do rozmów. Dokuczliwy chłód i hałas dobiegający z piwiarni przeszkadzały w rozmowach. W tym czasie grupa historyczna zwiedzała muzeum Mendla. Gregor Mendel, mnich augustiański, był prekursorem genetyki. Obie grupy spotkały się w browarze, który pozwolono nam zwiedzić, po czym wszyscy udaliśmy się na wspólny obiad. Miejscem biesiadowania była kręgielnia. Młodzież, po konsumpcji, mogła zagrać w bowling i to był jedyny wieczór prawdziwie integracyjny, kiedy stworzono odpowiednie warunki, aby uczniowie poznali się bliżej, uczestnicząc we wspólnej zabawie. 15 X jeden z polskich nauczycieli musiał wracać do kraju, a więc nasza grupa pomniejszyła się do sześciu osób. Tego dnia wszyscy wspólnie zwiedzaliśmy Pragę. Po drodze zatrzymaliśmy się w mini muzeum Jozefa Lady – ilustratora „Przygód dobrego wojaka Szwejka” pióra Jaroslava Haška. Pobyt w Pradze zaczęliśmy od obejrzenia dworca, zbudowanego w stylu secesyjnym, obecnie szczęśliwie odnawianego. Następie skierowaliśmy się na Plac Wacława (Václavské náměstí). Znajduje się tu pomnik, od którego wziął nazwę cały plac - pomnik św. Wacława. Towarzyszą mu inni święci patronowie Czech: Agnieszka, Ludmiła, Prokop i Wojciech. Ze św. Agnieszką wiąże się następująca legenda. Otóż bardzo długo trwał proces kanonizacyjny Agnieszki. Zaczęto mówić, że kiedy wreszcie się zakończy, w Czechach będzie lepiej. Czesi doczekają się wolności. Kanonizacji dokonał Jan Paweł II 12 listopada 1989 r., a w kilka dni po tym Czechosłowacja wyzwoliła się spod kontroli ZSRR i odzyskała niepodległość. Václavské náměstí było także świadkiem wielu demonstracji. W 1969 r. dokonał tu samospalenia Jan Palach, protestujący przeciwko interwencji zbrojnej państw Układu Warszawskiego. W 1989 r. na tym placu zaczęła się „aksamitna rewolucja”. Kolejnym przystankiem był teatr narodowy – neorenesansowa budowla imponujących rozmiarów, niezwykle bogato zdobiona wewnątrz, strojna w wiele secesyjnych motywów dekoracyjnych. Po bardzo długim pobycie w teatrze, udaliśmy się przez plac z pomnikiem Jana Husa i ratuszem staromiejskim z zegarem astronomicznym Orloj, na most Karola. Po drodze minęliśmy pierwszą kawiarnię w Czechach, gdzie podawano nieznany jeszcze nikomu napój, kawę sprowadzaną z Turcji. Most zbudowany na rozkaz cesarza Karola IV powstał w XIV w, a do XVIII w. był jedynym mostem łączącym dwie części miasta rozdzielone nurtem Wełtawy. Przeszliśmy nim na drugą stronę rzeki, po której znajduje się najsłynniejsza dzielnica Czech – Hradczany. Mieliśmy zwiedzać znajdujące się tu atrakcje, ale niestety zabrakło czasu. Zobaczyliśmy więc od zewnątrz zamek królewski, katedrę św. Wita, podziwialiśmy widoki rozciągające się ze wzgórza i trzeba było wracać do autokaru. Ostatniego dnia pobytu cały dzień pracowaliśmy w grupach. Uczniowie zostali przydzieleni według zainteresowań do grupy rzeźby, rysunku lub odbywającej zajęcia z muzyki i tańca. Przerywnikiem był wspólny lunch, na którym wymieniliśmy się prezentami i podziękowaliśmy sobie wzajemnie za towarzystwo. Nie było oficjalnej informacji, że będzie to faktyczny moment pożegnań, więc nie wszyscy się na to przygotowali i zabrali ze sobą prezenty dla innych grup. Podsumowaniem naszej pracy tego dnia była krótka prezentacja. Rozpoczął ją i zakończył piękną grą na pianinie niewidomy uczeń czeskiej szkoły. Pomiędzy jego występami uczniowie pokazywali swoje rzeźby, prace rysunkowe i śpiewali w języku czeskim piosenki do jednej z nich tańcząc polkę. W kilku słowach opowiadali też o tym, co robili w środę i czwartek, pracując w grupach. Tak naprawdę zabrakło produktu finalnego, który powinien być owocem kilkudniowego pobytu w Czechach i pracy wszystkich grup. Zabrakło jednoznacznego podsumowania, co dał nam pobyt w Brnie i spotkanie kilku narodów i kilku kultur. Dopiero sobotnie zajęcia ujawniły wiele talentów, z istnienia których nie zdawaliśmy sobie sprawy. Okazało się na przykład, że jedna z Turczynek przepięknie śpiewa, że uczeń z Węgier gra na pianinie, a dwie uczennice tureckie i nauczyciel z Wielkiej Brytanii mają niebanalny talent rysunkowy. Gdybyśmy tego wszystkiego dowiedzieli się pierwszego dnia, nawiązałyby się między nami serdeczniejsze stosunki. Bylibyśmy bardziej otwarci, chętniej i częściej rozmawialibyśmy ze sobą. Szczególnie dotyczy to grupy tureckiej, która pozostawała na uboczu przez cały pobyt w Czechach, a otworzyła się przed nami pod wpływem sztuki i okazała się być bardziej interesującą i komunikatywną, niż przypuszczaliśmy. Tylko polska grupa nawiązała z Turkami serdeczniejsze stosunki i bardzo 8


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy żałujemy, że nastąpiło to tak późno. Z góry cieszymy się jednak na kolejne spotkania. Muzyka łagodzi obyczaje; język sztuki jest językiem uniwersalnym, rozumianym przez wszystkich, łączy ludzi bez względu na wszystkie komunikacyjne trudności wynikające z różnego stopnia znajomości języka angielskiego. Udowodniono tę starą prawdę podczas sobotnich zajęć. Pozostaje żałować, że tak późno, że nie zrobiono tego pierwszego dnia. Ale jak to mówią w Polsce: „Lepiej późno, niż wcale”. Ostatni wspólny obiad jedliśmy w tej samej restauracji, w której przywitano nas pierwszego dnia. I również zabrakło wspólnego stołu dla nauczycieli, serdecznego podziękowania za spotkanie, miłego akcentu na koniec, który zachęcałby do dalszej współpracy i kolejnych spotkań. W niedzielę, 17 X, opuszczaliśmy Brno i Czechy. Spotkanie, oprócz niedociągnięć, o których byłą mowa wyżej, miało też wiele pozytywów. Uczniowie spotkali się z serdecznością rodzin, u których mieszkali; nauczycielom udzielano niezbędnych informacji i rozwiewano wątpliwości; pod względem logistycznym wszystko przebiegało sprawnie: dostarczono niezbędne faktury i rachunki, zorganizowano transport z i na lotnisko itp.; uczestnikom zapewniono wiele atrakcji i pokazano piękno Moraw, a przede wszystkim, mimo wszystkich początkowych trudności, poznaliśmy się lepiej i kolejne spotkania będą na pewno pozbawione tej rezerwy i ostrożności, które towarzyszą pierwszym. W środę, 13 X, grupa historyczna zwiedzała Ołomuniec. Ołomuniec, jedno z najstarszych miast czeskich. Historyczna stolica Moraw. Drugi, po Pradze, największy ośrodek miejski i największy zespół zabytkowy Czech. To tu król Jan III Sobieski zatrzymał się na popas spiesząc z odsieczą Wiedniowi w 1683 r. Posiada bardzo piękną, odrestaurowaną starówkę. Duży prostokątny rynek z eklektycznym ratuszem (można nawet na nim zobaczyć sztukę socrealistyczną w postaci ogromnego zegara astronomicznego). Stoi tam również kolumna Trójcy Przenajświętszej, która wpisana została na listę światowego dziedzictwa UNESCO. Mnóstwo zabytkowych kamienic z różnych epok. Uniwersytet (w którym byłyście w ubikacji) - drugi w Czechach pod względem starszeństwa; powstał na trzy lata przed założeniem Uniwersytetu Wileńskiego przez Stefana Batorego (drugiego uniwersytetu w Polsce). Pałac biskupi. Kościół św. Michała z barokowym wnętrzem i ogromną kopułą (to ten, w którym dziewczynka wypuściła balonik) oraz przepiękna gotycka katedra. To przed nią zamordowany został Wacław III z dynastii Przemyślidów, wspólny król czeski i polski. Tę katedrę odwiedził również Jan Paweł II w czasie swojej wizyty w Czechach. W muzeum katedralnym skarbiec kryjący bogactwo sztuki sakralnej – kielichy mszalne, monstrancje itp. oraz zbiór gotyckich rzeźb Madonn. Jedna z nich stanowi zapowiedź renesansu. Maryja, trzymająca małego Jezusa, wpija palce w ramię dziecka, które ugina się pod tym naciskiem jak żywe. W czwartek, 14 X, grupa historyczna pojechała do Slavkova. Nieopodal tej małej mieściny rozegrała się jedna z największych i najważniejszych bitew napoleońskich, która otworzyła drogę cesarzowi Francuzów na Austrię. Była to bitwa pod Austerlitz w 1805 r. My zwiedzaliśmy pałac, który należał do rodziny Kaunitzów. To tu podpisywano zawieszenie broni pomiędzy Austrią a Francją po bitwie pod Austerlitz. Podziwiać mogliśmy również m. in. kaplicę pałacową, gabinet chiński oraz salę balową. Za oknami pałacu rozpościerał się przepiękny widok na barokowy ogród z wieloma cennymi odmianami drzew. Grupa historyczna zwiedzała również muzeum Mendla. Gregor Mendel, mnich augustiański, był prekursorem genetyki. 15 X wszyscy wspólnie zwiedzaliśmy Pragę. Po drodze zatrzymaliśmy się w mini muzeum Jozefa Lady – ilustratora „Przygód dobrego wojaka Szwejka” pióra Jaroslava Haška. Pobyt w Pradze zaczęliśmy od obejrzenia dworca, zbudowanego w stylu secesyjnym, obecnie szczęśliwie odnawianego. Następie skierowaliśmy się na Plac Wacława (Václavské náměstí). Znajduje się tu pomnik, od którego wziął nazwę cały plac - pomnik św. Wacława. Towarzyszą mu inni święci patronowie Czech: Agnieszka, Ludmiła, Prokop i Wojciech. Ze św. Agnieszką wiąże się następująca legenda. Otóż bardzo długo trwał proces kanonizacyjny Agnieszki. Zaczęto mówić, że kiedy wreszcie się zakończy, w Czechach będzie lepiej. Czesi doczekają się wolności. Kanonizacji dokonał Jan Paweł II 12 listopada 1989 r., a w kilka dni po tym Czechosłowacja wyzwoliła się spod kontroli ZSRR i odzyskała niepodległość. Václavské náměstí było także świadkiem wielu demonstracji. W 1969 r. dokonał tu samospalenia Jan Palach, protestujący przeciwko interwencji zbrojnej państw Układu Warszawskiego. W 1989 r. na tym placu zaczęła się „aksamitna rewolucja”. 9


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Kolejnym przystankiem był teatr narodowy – neorenesansowa budowla imponujących rozmiarów, niezwykle bogato zdobiona wewnątrz, strojna w wiele secesyjnych motywów dekoracyjnych. Po bardzo długim pobycie w teatrze, udaliśmy się przez plac z pomnikiem Jana Husa (czeski reformator religijny i bohater narodowy, twórca ruchu religijnego husytyzmu) i ratuszem staromiejskim z zegarem astronomicznym Orloj (jest to najstarszy tego typu zegar w Europie; mechanizm figurynkowy zapewnia zebranemu tłumowi co godzinę krótkie przedstawienie: Śmierć jedną ręką pociąga za sznur dzwonka, drugą podnosi zegar piaskowy, Turek kręci w geście protestu kręci głową, w tym czasie w okienkach górnej części zegara odbywa się procesja 12 apostołów. A wszystkiemu przyglądają się Próżność i Chciwość), na most Karola. Po drodze minęliśmy pierwszą kawiarnię w Czechach, gdzie podawano nieznany jeszcze nikomu napój, kawę sprowadzaną z Turcji. Most zbudowany na rozkaz cesarza Karola IV powstał w XIV w, a do XVIII w. był jedynym mostem łączącym dwie części miasta rozdzielone nurtem Wełtawy. Przeszliśmy nim na drugą stronę rzeki, po której znajduje się najsłynniejsza dzielnica Czech – Hradczany. Mieliśmy zwiedzać znajdujące się tu atrakcje, ale niestety zabrakło czasu. Zobaczyliśmy więc od zewnątrz zamek królewski, katedrę św. Wita, podziwialiśmy widoki rozciągające się ze wzgórza i trzeba było wracać do autokaru.

HUNGARY

In April 2011 we were with the Comenius Project in Hungary. We were there for 7 days and we had a really good time with our new friends. We spent the first two days in Budapest. The city is so breathtaking. There were also students from Czech Republic, Turkey and England. Besides, a few students from Hungary came to the capital city too. Sara, my flatmate, was among them. After the two days in Budapest we went to Sárospatak. There we saw the school, where later we had a lot of classes. The family and the house where I lived were so amazing. I had never felt so good in someone’s house. We visited a lot places in Sárospatak. It is really a small city, but very nice also. One day, we were doing some artistic works, which later we could take home. The food there was very good but unfortunately, I cannot eat anything when I am outside my house because I feel sick. In the evening Hungarian students showed us their folk dance and next, they were teaching us it. Czardas is really a great dance because in a few minutes I knew how to dance it. After that, everyone could show us something from their countries. The girl from Turkey was singing a folk song, and I had goose-flesh, because she had an amazing voice. The students from England were also singing more commonly known songs. We did not show anything there but we showed our presentation later in the school. And there I played the flute too. I think everyone enjoyed that. I very much enjoyed the trip to Hungary and I hope I will go there again. I met a lot of friends and I amalready missing them, especially Sara. I amsure that we will keep in touch with each other for a long time. The Comenius project makes us happy because we can meet incredible people and visit lovely places. I amvery happy that I could be in this project. Klaudia Hinz, Gimnazjum no.4, Gdynia, Poland There is no other such amazing country like Hungary, there is no other city as beautiful as Budapest - anyone who has ever visited the country can admit such an opinion is really true. For many years Poles and Hungarians have been connected by links of fraternal bond. Friendship should be nurtured and cared for so that it would not disappear - it should last and be developed. The workshops in the Hungarian school were also pleasant. We could 10


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy develop our English during our mutual talks. We were very glad we could not only represent our country at the meeting and work with our partners, but also visit Sárospatak. We did not know it is such a beautiful town! We learned some Hungarian vocabulary too. The Hungarians appeared to be open and friendly. The meeting was a wonderful experience which we will never forget! Węgry W kwietniu 2011 odwiedziliśmy naszegą partnerską szkołę z Węgier. Spędziliśmy tam 7 dni wspaniałych dni z naszymi nowymi przyjaciółmi. Dwa pierwsze dni minęły nam na zwiedzaniu Budapesztu, który naszym zdaniem jest niesamowity. Byli tam także uczniowie z Czech, Turcji i Anglii. Naszej wyprawie towarzyszyli nam przyjaciele z węgierskiej szkoły. Przyjechali specjalnie do Budapesztu, aby nam pokazać jego uroki. Następnym etapem naszej podróży po Węgrzech była miejscowość, w której mieściła się szkoła naszego partnera- Sarospatak. Mieliśmy tam okazję zobaczyć nie tylko duży i piękny budynek, ale zaobserwować również lekcje tam prowadzone. Jednego dnia mogliśmy brać udział w zajęciach praktycznych polegających na wykonaniu prac artystycznych, które mogliśmy zabrać ze sobą do domu. Wieczorem zaproszono nas na pokaz tradycyjnego tańca węgierskiego, który tańczony był przez naszych kolegów z węgierskiej szkoły. Po pokazie odbyła się nauka czardasza. Na szczęście nie okazał on się zbyt trudny, gdyż po kilku minutach większość uczestników była już w stanie go zatańczyć bez problemów. Po czardaszu nastąpił czas na pokaz sztuki tańca z innych krajów. Uczniowie tureccy pochwalili się kunsztem niezwykle szybkiego i zwinnego tradycyjnego tańca pochodzącego z ich regionu. Co więcej nie tylko tańczyli, ale i śpiewali. Było to bardzo piękne widowisko, tym bardziej, że śpiew był przepiękny i robił niesamowite wrażenie. Nasi partnerzy z Anglii byli następną grupą, która pochwaliła się swoimi umiejętnościami artystycznymi. My natomiast przygotowaliśmy prezentację o naszej szkole a a ja zaprezentowałam swoje umiejętności gry na flecie. Myślę, że wszystkim się podobało. Mam nadzieję, że będę miała tam wrócić jeszcze raz, gdyż bardzo mi się tam podobało. A co więcej zaprzyjaźniłam się z koleżanką w wegierskiej szkoły. Nie ma drugiego takiego kraju jak Węgry, nie ma takiego drugiego miasta jak Budapeszt. Każdy, kto kiedykolwiek odwiedził te miejsca wie, że to prawda. Więzi historyczne pomiędzy Węgrami i Polakami od zawsze były ścisłe. Może właśnie dlatego tak bardzo lubimy wszystko, co węgierskie. Węgrzy są narodem otwartym i bardzo przyjacielskim. Nie mieliśmy żadnego problemu, żeby znaleźć wśród nich nowych przyjaciół. Powinniśmy pielęgnować i wzmacniać naszą obustronną przyjaźń. A projekty tego typu na pewno pomagają tego typu więzom. Mimo, że językiem roboczym spotkania był język angielski, nie obyło się bez prób podjęcia trudu nauczenia się choć kilku słów w języku węgierskim. A jednak udało się… ‘To spotkania na zawsze wpisało się w moją pamięć’

11


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

TURKEY We set off on 12 June 2012 heading for Gaziantep in the south of Turkey. Our trip was far too long as we had to take first a coach, which took us to the airport in Berlin. Then we took two planes: first to Istanbul and the second one flew us to our Turkish partners in Gaziantep which is situated in southeast Turkey. When we finally reached Gaziantep we were all exhausted but excited at the same time. Our friends from Turkey waited for us and they had smiles on their faces which made up for all the inconvenience we encountered during our long trip. Before we got to the hotel we had to survive the journey there with a ‘brave’ and unpredictable van driver who was driving in a crazy and not very responsible way. We were a bit terrified with all the manoeuvres he performed. Eventually, we arrived at the hotel where we stayed for almost a whole week. The accommodation was nice, clean and quite comfortable which was a bit of surprise for us (we did not expect that) as the cost of staying there was not too expensive compared to prices in Europe. However, there was one thing that surprised us a lot – the hotel receptionist could not speak English at all so communication was really difficult. He was not even able to understand numbers so when we wanted to collect our room key he did not have a clue what we were talking about. 13 June. All the project participants met up in our host’s school. The atmosphere there was friendly, warm and all the Turkish participants of the project turned out to be open, warm and hospitable people. It seemed to us that Turkish warmth is their national character trait which we were impressed by. However, if the Poles are renowned for their exceptional hospitality throughout Europe, then the Turkish should be considered as one of the most friendly and hospitable nation that ever existed as well. Spaciousness is a noticeable feature in Turkish life. We noticed that both the hotel and the school, unlike Polish schools or hotels, were spacious and airy. Also, Turkish flats are big and have at least four or more rooms, two bathrooms which is untypical for the average citizen of Poland. Huge and wide corridors, bright classrooms, and a big staff room: that is the environment in which Turkish people live and students study. There was also a great deal of student’s work on show - on the walls there were pictures painted by the students of the school - which made a big impression on us as they all were painted by amazingly talented young people.

12


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy The school we visited was for artistically talented youngsters whose passions are music, sculpture and painting. We had an opportunity to hear the Turkish students sing and play their instruments. While having a short break for coffee and cake we were accompanied by a group of boys who performed one of their folk dances. They were also playing guitars and violins. The music was lively and lovely – we liked it a lot. The music hall was the main venue for our meeting - a music concert was performed by most of the students. Their performances were so moving that we could not forget them even a long time after watching them. What we have noticed is that Turkish music is very different to the Polish traditional music that we are used to. The way of singing and dancing differs so much that we were all very impressed and touched. At moments it was breathtaking. Our hosts prepared a big surprise for us – they sang two Polish songs ‘Hej, sokoły’ and ‘My Cyganie’. We were not only surprised but also found out how many different ways there were to interpret one song. At the end of the concert our Turkish friends played a few pieces of classical music for us but, frankly speaking, they did not feel that particular kind of music in their hearts. After all the presentations and workshops in the school we saw a very impressive show prepared by a group of Turkish students who were again dancing their traditio nal Turkish dances, however this time they were wearing their folk clothes which were colourful and flouncy. They were also covered with lots of gold ribbons - they looked stunning. At the end of the dance all students from the partner’s school joined in and it started to remind us of festivals that are held in Poland. We discovered that Turkish people are spontaneous; they all love music and are incredibly good at dancing and singing. At the end of the event we met a Polish student from Gdańsk who was working as a volunteer in Turkey. She was involved in one of the educational European projects. As she had been there for over one year she knew quite a lot about the Turkish lifestyle, the language and culture. Speaking of similarities between Polish and Turkish languages, we found out that we use many of the same words e.g. kefir, jogurt, bilet, bagaż. Sightseeing On the next day we went sightseeing in Gaziantep - the city which is considered to be one of the oldest continually inhabited places. Despite the fact that it is so old we could not find many old buildings or monuments there. However, we did manage to see the oldest ones which date back to the 18th century. We also went to the Ethnography Museum in Gaziantep. The old 13


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy lifestyle decoration and collections of various weapons, documents, and instruments used in the defence of the city as well as photographs of the local resistance heroes - all of these objects were exhibited and they made a big impression on us. We were fascinated by a Turkish dance called the ‘Dervish dance’ where a dancer, by his whirling, realises the spiralling of the universe…. The most unforgettable place that we visited during our stay in Turkey was Zeugma Mosaic Museum which is the biggest mosaic museum in the world. It contains 1700 m2 of mosaics. We were a privileged group as we were permitted to see all the treasure before it was opened to the public on 9 September, 2011. We spent a wonderful time there looking at, and admiring, the treasures of the museum. All the exhibits were well-displayed and lit. In fact we were the first group allowed to see the museum before it opened to other tourists. Another interesting and exciting thing about our trip to Turkey was walking around the typical Turkish market. The whole place was a sight to behold – there we could smell various exotic scents of herbs and spices. What was amazing for us was the fact that people can still get homemade products there and can also observe craftsmen making copper plates, trays and kettles. It is still popular to buy meat which has just been prepared by butchers. We also had an opportunity to see shoemakers while they were making leather shoes. The other exciting and inspiring event was an invitation to a presentation of painting on water. Patterns are created by floating colour on either plain water or a viscous solution, and then carefully transferred to an absorbent surface, such as paper or fabric. The Castle of Gaziantep was our next destination. The moat around the castle is 30 meters long and 10 meters deep. Access to the castle is possible only via a bridge, which opens on the interior. We were all amazed by the huge size of it – it is gigantic and so impressive. We went to the Botanic Park in Gaziantep where we saw a wide range of flowers, plants typical for that region of Turkey. It is a beautiful, colourful and tranquil place located in the centre of ‘concrete’ Gaziantep. Solar heating system What created a striking impression on us was an extraordinary and efficient way of heating water – a 14


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy solar water heating system. It is possible because of the Turkish climate as it is located in an advantageous position in Europe for the purposes of solar power. At first we did not realise what the containers on the roofs were. Almost all of the buildings in Turkey use solar energy in order to heat water - a collector, often fastened to a roof or a wall facing the sun, heats working fluid that is either pumped (active system) or driven by natural convection (passive system) through it.

Mosques A mosque is a place for Islamic worship. Muslims pray at the mosques five times a day. They start their prayers early in the morning. Every single morning we heard a bell ringing – it called up all the Muslims to do their duties in the name of Allah. We saw a few mosques during our trip throughout Turkey. We noticed a great deal of similarity – they were all circular-shaped with a characteristic tower called a ‘minaret’. The inner decoration is pretty much the same – they all have floors covered with carpets. Our Turkish friends told us the appropriate way to behave in a mosque e.g. all Muslims perform their ablutions before entering a mosque - one of the Turkish students showed us how to do that. They also take their shoes off and leave them in front of the mosque. Many worshippers carry their own rug in order to kneel on it while praying. Women have to wear head-coverings during religious services. So we had to do exactly what was said in order to be allowed into the mosque. Over the next two days we visited a region of Turkey stretching along the Mediterranean coastline.

During our trip we went sightseeing in the place where St Paul was born – Tarsus. The well that he used is still there. And surprisingly, despite the long period of time since St Paul was alive, it is still being used these days. The Church of St Peter near Antakya (Antioch) is a cave carved into the mountainside on Mount Starius with a depth of 13 m, a width of 9.5 m and a height of 7 m. We learned that this cave, which is one of Christianity's oldest churches, was used by early 15


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Christians in the Antakya region. And this time we told our foreign friends about the customs of proper behaviour in a Catholic church. They were a bit shocked that we are allowed to enter church wearing shoes. It was an amazing experience to be inside one of the oldest Catholic churches, especially since we were aware that St Paul used to visit the building on a daily basis. Turkish cuisine What we particularly loved about Turkey was its cuisine. It is absolutely delicious. The very first day we tried lots of typical Turkish food. Everything was homemade and prepared by our hosts. On the following days we had breakfast in the hotel, whereas we enjoyed lunches and dinners in restaurants located in many different places. Breakfast consisted of cottage cheese with olives, tomatoes and cucumbers, Turkish bread with butter. Coffee and typical Turkish tea which is refreshing and its taste differs from the tea that we are used to. Turkish people use special a kind of small glass to drink it from. Turkish coffee was something that we enjoyed immensely maybe due to the fact that the coffee that we usually drink in Poland is very different – boiling water is just poured onto ground coffee and that is it, whereas Turkish coffee is made with a special sense of celebration. Turkish coffee is drunk in small cups so the amount of it is just enough to get a rich flavour of that delicious drink. You are supposed to wait for a short while until the coffee grounds go down. After that you can relish your coffee. Our lunches varied a lot. Every single day we had something different. To begin with, Turkish roasted omelettes – they were thin - stuffed with vegetables or meat. Another time we tried shish kebabs which were served with salad and, very popular in the Turkish kitchen, mint and parsley, lamb, grilled aubergines, courgettes or tomatoes which we had with pita. ’Pita’ is a slightly leavened wheat bread, flat, either round or oval, and variable in size and it often acts as a ‘pocket’. People fill the pita with various ingredients to form a sandwich. These are sometimes called "pita pockets" or "pocket pitas"- we liked them very much. Humus – the next dish we enjoyed was served as part of an accompaniment to falafel (a deep-fried ball made from ground chickpeas, fava beans). Garnishes include chopped tomato, cucumber, cilantro, parsley, caramelized onions, sautéed mushrooms, whole chickpeas, olive oil, hard-boiled eggs, paprika, sumac, olives, pickles and pine nuts. It is an undeniable fact that Turkish desserts are as good as they are said to be. One of the world-renowned desserts of Turkish cuisine is baklava. Baklava is made either with pistachio or walnut. Its flavour is so sweet that it is hard to eat more than just a small piece. Nevertheless it is good and tasty. What was also noticeable was that the Turkish consume a large amount of fruit: strawberries, watermelon, melon and cherries. To sum up, our trip to Turkey broadened our horizons. It was unforgettable journey. We had an opportunity to find out many different things about Turkish culture, customs and its people. We made lots of friends there who we are in touch all the time. Although we were not there for a long time – we enjoyed everything, including the weather, which was sunny and warm. 16


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy 12 czerwca 2011 r. wylądowaliśmy w Gaziantepie. Po dwudziestoczterogodzinnej podróży byliśmy bardzo zmęczeni. Ale kiedy zobaczyliśmy twarze znajome z poprzedniego pobytu w Czechach, humory nam się poprawiły. Zostaliśmy bardzo serdecznie powitani przez naszych tureckich gospodarzy i przewiezieni do hotelu. Pierwsze wrażenie – w Europie Zachodniej i Środkowowschodniej nie mielibyśmy szans na nocleg w hotelu o takim standardzie za tak niewielkie pieniądze. 13 czerwca 2011 r. wszyscy uczestnicy projektu spotkali się w szkole naszych gospodarzy. Serdeczność okazała się być cechą narodową Turków. To pierwsze porównanie jakie przyszło mi na myśl. Polacy słyną z gościnności, ale Turcy również powinni z niej słynąć w całej Europie. Przed szkołą stało popiersie Ataturka. Ten człowiek wprowadził Turcję do Europy; przeprowadził wiele reform, dzięki którym Turcja otworzyła się na Europę i stała się dla nas bardziej zrozumiała. Stanął na czele Turcji mniej więcej w tym samym okresie, kiedy o niepodległą Polskę walczył Józef Piłsudski, by potem objąć władzę tworząc ustrój autorytarny, podobnie jak Ataturk w Turcji. Nasi gospodarze o Piłsudskim jednak nie słyszeli w przeciwieństwie do Jana III Sobieskiego. Pamięć o królu-wodzu, który powstrzymał marsz Imperium Osmańskiego u wrót Wiednia w 1683 r. była ciągle żywa. Cechą wspólną między hotelem, w którym spaliśmy a szkołą, w której nas ugoszczono była przestrzeń. Turcy żyją w dużych wnętrzach. Ogromne, jasne sale lekcyjne; wielki pokój nauczycielski; szerokie, widne korytarze; niewielu uczniów jak na tak dużą placówkę – wymarzone warunki do pracy. Szkoła ma charakter artystyczny, więc podziwiać mogliśmy pracownie malarstwa, rzeźby i gry na instrumentach. Szkoła obwieszona była pracami swoich wychowanków – przepięknymi obrazami naśladującymi różne style w malarstwie. Mieliśmy też okazję posłuchać jak grają uczniowie. W czasie krótkiej przerwy na kawę towarzyszyła nam muzyka – duet skrzypcowo-gitarowy. Większą porcję muzyki przygotowano dla nas na auli. Tu miały się odbyć prezentacje poszczególnych grup, ale nim do tego doszło mogliśmy posłuchać koncertu tureckich uczniów przygotowanego pod kierunkiem ich nauczycieli. Muzyka turecka zupełnie odmienna jest od europejskiej. Sposób śpiewania i instrumenty są dla nas całkowicie oryginalne i niespotykane. Przygotowano jednak dla nas niespodziankę. Pojawiły się dwie piosenki często śpiewane w 17


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Polsce: „Hej, sokoły” oraz „My, Cyganie”. Uczniowie grali też muzykę klasyczną , ale nie czuli się w niej tak swobodnie, jak przy rodzimych utworach. Po prezentacjach i zajęciach, jakie odbyły się w szkole, na sam koniec przygotowano dla nas niespodziankę występ duetu grającego tradycyjną muzykę z tego regionu Turcji, ubranego w równie tradycyjne stroje. Skończyło się wspólnym tańcem wszystkich uczestników na dziedzińcu szkolnym. Tu nasunęło mi się kolejne porównanie: Turcy są bardzo spontaniczni, czym zdecydowanie różnią się od Polaków. Polską grupę czekała jeszcze jedna niespodzianka. Była nią wolontariuszka Polski, która znalazła się w Gaziantepie pracując w ramach jakiegoś unijnego programu. Dużo opowiedziała nam o życiu codziennym w Turcji i o tym, jak zbudowany jest język turecki, którego od roku się uczyła. Okazało się, że pewne wyrazy polskie występują także w języku tureckim jak np. bagaż, bilet, biuro. Następnego dnia zwiedzaliśmy miasto. Gaziantep jest jednym z najstarszych miejsc na świecie bez przerwy zamieszkanych przez człowieka. Jednak nie posiada wielu zabytków. Najstarsze, które mieliśmy okazję podziwiać, pochodziły z XVIII wieku. Pamiątki sprzed setek tysięcy lat znaleźliśmy w Muzeum Etnograficznym, które mieliśmy możliwość zwiedzić. Bardzo ciekawy był też pobyt w muzeum dokumentującym m.in. dokonania Mevlany, który wymyślił taniec derwiszów, tak charakterystyczny dla tradycji tureckiej. Zwiedzaliśmy również Muzeum Szkła, ale najciekawszy był pobyt w Muzeum Mozaiki. Dotarliśmy do niego w nocy, gdyż było w przebudowie, zamknięte dla zwiedzających. Zorganizowano nam specjalny wstęp – kolejny przykład tureckiej gościnności. Dla dużej międzynarodowej grupy, która pokonała tysiące kilometrów, aby dostać się do Gaziantepu, zrobiono wyjątek. Muzeum Mozaiki, największe na świecie, robiło wrażenie nie tylko ogromem, ale przede wszystkim bogactwem zbiorów, przepięknie podświetlanych i eksponowanych. Dodatkowego smaczku dodawała późna pora i fakt, że byliśmy jedynymi turystami wewnątrz. Bardzo interesujący był również pobyt na tureckim bazarze pełnym egzotycznych zapachów, wielkich worków wypełnionych przyprawami i ziołami, odgłosów pracy – tu ciągle jeszcze wykuwa się ręcznie tace, podstawki do kawy i imbryki, w których się tę kawę zaparza; zobaczyć można, jak barwi się i modeluje buty z prawdziwej skóry; zaproszono nas także na pokaz staroperskiej sztuki tworzenia obrazów malowanych na wodzie, a następnie dzięki odpowiednim substancjom używanym przy ich tworzeniu, przenoszonym na papier (właściwe przyklejających się do

18


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy tegoż).Mieliśmy też okazję posmakować prawdziwej kawy po turecku. W Polsce tak nazywamy zmieloną kawę zalewaną wrzątkiem. W Turcji kawy się nie zalewa, ale gotuje z wodą przez jakiś czas i dopiero przelewa do maleńkich filiżanek odczekując, aż osad opadnie na dno. Zwiedziliśmy również górujący nad miastem zamek. Wsławił się obroną miasta przed francuskim najeźdźcą w latach dwudziestych XX wieku. To czas, kiedy również Polska po pierwszej wojnie światowej walczyła o swoje granice. To wtedy Ataturk nie zgodził się na dyktat zwycięskiej ententy i poszerzył granice

Turcji wbrew narzuconym jej ograniczeniom. Tak samo Piłsudski nie zgodził się na kadłubowy kształt państwa polskiego po traktacie wersalskim i poszerzył jego terytorium o szeroki pas ziemi na wschodzie. Odwiedziliśmy także ogród botaniczny, bardzo piękne miejsce wypoczynku, kontaktu z naturą. Oaza zieleni w betonowym, wielkim mieście. Wiele roślin, które tam rosną, rosną również w Polsce np. róże, których bogactwo gatunków mogliśmy podziwiać. Nie byłoby Turcji bez meczetu – świątyni muzułmanów. Większość Turków to wyznawcy islamu. Zaprowadzono nas do kilku meczetów. Pouczono, jak należy się w nich zachowywać. Otóż kobietom nie wolno wejść do świątyni z odsłoniętą głową. Wszyscy muszą też przed wejściem zdjąć buty. Prawowierni muzułmanie obmywają się przed wejściem do świątyni. Pokaz, jak należy to zrobić, dał nam jeden z uczniów. Przez kolejne dwa dni zwiedzaliśmy Turcję jadąc w kierunku Morza Śródziemnego. Współczesna Europa wyrosła z chrześcijaństwa. To ono ją kształtowało, to ono nadało jej tożsamość. Miejsca będące kolebką chrześcijaństwa mogliśmy zobaczyć właśnie w Turcji. To tu narodził się i nauczał św. Paweł, tu nauczał św. Piotr. Taurus i Antakya. Niegdyś Tars i Antiochia. W Tarsie byliśmy w miejscu narodzin św. Pawła.

W Antiochii, niegdyś jednym z największych miast świata, gdzie powstało Księstwo Antiochii w czasie wypraw krzyżowych, dziś mieście, w którym nowoczesna Europa bije się o lepsze z muzułmańską Azją, znajduje się grota, w której msze odprawiał św. Piotr. Znaleźliśmy tu także katolicki kościół. Tym razem my uczyliśmy Turków, jak należy się zachować w chrześcijańskiej świątyni. Potem zwiedzaliśmy antiocheńskie Muzeum Mozaiki, gdzie znalazły się eksponaty z okresu, gdy Azja Mniejsza leżała na terenie Imperium Rzymskiego. Wszystko przypominało nam tu o tym, że 19


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy wywodzimy się z kręgu kultury śródziemnomorskiej; że daleką Polskę leżącą w sercu Europy i Turcję, której tylko dwa procent terytorium położone jest na kontynencie europejskim, wiele łączy. Nasza historia styka się w wielu punktach. Bardzo ciekawa była dla nas kuchnia turecka. Niezwykle smaczna, tłusta i tucząca. Dokładnie to samo możemy powiedzieć o kuchni polskiej. Mamy nawet wspólne potrawy np. rosół, pierogi ruskie czy chleb. Ten ostatni jest w kuchni tureckiej równie wszechobecny, jak w naszej. Towarzyszy Turkom przez cały dzień. Ale zacznijmy od początku, czyli od śniadania… Śniadanie, które podawano nam w hotelu było typowo śródziemnomorskie – biały ser z oliwkami, świeżymi pomidorami i ogórkami oraz chleb z masłem. Do tego kawa lub herbata. Taki lekki i pożywny zestaw witał nas każdego dnia. Na lunch codziennie jedliśmy coś innego w pełni poznając specjały tego regionu. Raz były to naleśniki (bardzo cieniutkie, pieczone na specjalnej gorącej płycie) z farszem mięsnym lub jarskim do wyboru; innym razem szaszłyki z kurczaka podane z surówkami, które mieszało się z dużą ilością mięty lub pietruszki i wszystko razem zawijało w małe placuszki tworząc coś rodzaju tortilli; a jeszcze kiedy indziej baranina, grillowane bakłażany, cukinie i pomidory, które wkładało się do płaskiego chleba tworząc coś w rodzaju naszych hamburgerów; jedliśmy też humus i sałatkę z mnóstwa drobno posiekanych ziół, które polewało się sosem z orzechów (chyba pistacjowych, bo Gaziantep jest największym producentem tych orzeszków i podaje się je tutaj niemal do wszystkiego). Na obiad było zawsze mięso grillowane, baranina lub kurczak, z warzywami świeżymi oraz grillowanymi, z opiekanymi ziemniakami i chlebem. Bardzo interesujący był obiad pierwszego wieczora w szkole, przygotowany przez gospodarzy na ich koszt. Mieliśmy tu prawdziwy przekrój tego co się w domach tureckich jada – od przystawek począwszy, przez dania główne, na deserach skończywszy. A więc zjedliśmy mnóstwo roladek zawijanych w liście winogronowe z farszem warzywnym lub warzywno-mięsnym, na ostro lub łagodnie; była bardzo oryginalna w smaku zupa; grillowane bakłażany w oliwie; bakława z pistacjami; owoce – arbuz, melon, truskawki, czereśnie. Równie smacznie nie jadłam w żadnym innym kraju.

UNITED KINGDOM We went to England for a meeting of our COMENIUS - AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE – project. We landed at the Heathrow airport. Mr Andrew Jackson met us there and he accompanied us on our way to Bath. For a few days we were hosted by St. George’s College in Bath where we also met our partners from Czech Republic, Hungary and Turkey. All the meeting participants learned from each other finding out more about different cultures we represented. We all were enchanted with the kindness of our English hosts who took care of us so very well. Multicultural diversity England is a multinational country. It is one of the reasons why tourists find the country so interesting. We met many people of different nationalities there. The biggest diversity of the nations we could notice in the streets of London. Many of the people we passed by must have had some connections with the old British colonies. Dark-skinned persons might have had their roots in Africa and Asians possibly in India, which had been the pearl of the British colonies. In the streets of London, Bristol, Cardiff and Bath we noticed school children who wore uniforms. In many schools in Poland, including ours, we have dress code but Polish students most often tend to dislike wearing uniforms. When in England, we could see the school kids were proud of wearing their uniform. At the beginning of our meeting its participants divided themselves into small groups connected with the cultural 20


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy differences, as we were from different countries. Some problems were also caused by language issues. We had thought we would not be able to communicate in English so at first, us Poles were sticking with the Czech. Our languages are quite similar so we could simply speak using Polish and Czech, and understand each other pretty well. The English, Turks and Hungarians were staying in their own groups at the very beginning. Later, thanks to all the project activities, we managed to break the ice and communicated with each other using English. Our prior fears disappeared and we made friends with our project partners. Places we visited London On the first day we visited London. We had known it is a very large city and during one day visit we would be able to see only some of its attractions, but we enjoyed visiting London a lot. Since the Olympics start in July in London, we began the sightseeing with visiting the Olympics’ village. We could see how much work had been done there and how modern all the area was. After that we admired the view over The River Thames, The London Eye and also some other popular tourist sights of the city such as The Parliament area, Big Ben, The Tower Bridge, the James’s Park, Buckingham Palace, Trafalgar Square and St. Paul’s Cathedral. We were quite excited when we stopped at Buckingham Palace but the mid position of the flag placed on the mast informed us that the Queen was not in her Rooms. All of us enjoyed watching the Ceremony of the Changing Guards near the palace. London is also the birthplace of the Shakespearian Theatre. The students of our group are part of the school drama programme that is why they were really interested in seeing the Globe Theatre. Besides, we could see in our own eyes the famous London double-deckers and London cabs. At first, we found difficult to get used to the left sided traffic and what also was rather strange to us, that the coach door was at the other – ‘wrong’ - side. A very nice surprise was an opportunity of watching the view over the city from the top floor of the highest building of London. A lift took us to the 44th floor – the view was breathtaking indeed. Bristol First we went to the Bristol bridge situated over the River Avon. The view from the bridge was quite amazing. Later we admired the modern and historical parts of Bristol: we were amazed at its medieval cathedral, we also enjoyed the cruise by a river cab. It reminded us our sea trams of the Baltic Bay region. One of the most interesting activities when in Bristol was visiting the Great Britain ship. We spent almost three hours watching its details and learning about the way people had travelled overseas by that ship. It was fun. Bristol surprised us with some architectural attractions such as the stairs – fountain and a big glass ball. While flying to England by plane we could mostly see sea waters below us. Of course England is situated on an island. Poland is also located by the sea but our country is on the mainland. While visiting England we could notice some differences in the landscape (comparing to our home region). We were struck with the view of some kind of monotony of the flat and little afforested landscape. We had learned in history classes about 21


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy the industrial revolution in England and the intensive logging which results we could apparently see. We found it strange as in Poland we have lots of forests and what is more, our home city Gdynia is surrounded by woods and the post moraine hills. When we reached Wales we could finally see some uneven ground. Coal mine – museum in Wales and open air museum of wooden architecture All of us enjoyed visiting the old coal mine and going so far below the ground level. It was an exciting adventure. In southern Poland there are also many coal mines but they are about 700 km far from our city. Most of us had never been to a coal mine before. Meeting a virtual retired miner who was our guide in the mine was fun too. In the open air museum we expected to see some wooden huts similar to the ones we had seen in the museum in the north of Poland. We were really surprised when we reached a kind of a western shop with so many goods that we found it as an early kind of a supermarket. Our history teachers were very much interested in the history of housing construction – from the medieval ages up to the modern times. They also imagined all the interesting classes they could run in the Welsh museum. Cardiff – capital of Wales In Cardiff we had some free time and an opportunity to choose our own sightseeing route using the map prepared by our hosts. Our teachers found all the monuments of the city very attractive. Frankly speaking, us – students – enjoyed shopping that much. ☺ Bath Bath appeared to be a charming and hospitable city. All the buildings in Bath were built In so called King George IV style. The hotel where we were accommodated reminded us Harry Potter’s school of magic that was why we called it Hogwarts. Walking along the halls of the hotel, trying to find the ways to our rooms and the showers we made friends with our Project partners. The old Roman baths are the greatest attraction of Bath. The ones who had happened to visit Rome could admit that the Bath baths are prettier than the ancient city itself. We listened to the recordings in English which told us the story of the baths: The baths were founded by the Roman colonizers who also built the temple of Aqua Sulis there. The ancient remains are accompanied by contemporary spas where where Bath visitors can enjoy relaxing and therapeutic treatments. We very much appreciated our English guides who were doing their best speaking to us as clearly as possible, it helped a lot and thanks to their effort we could truly enjoy the walk around the city. We Saw the Bath Abbey, the Royal Crescent building, (it is so large it was not possible to take a picture of the entire structure), the Pulteney Bridge, The Cirrus building, the Assembly Rooms and the Prior Park Landscape Garden designed by poet Alexander Pope. We also found out that Jane Austin had been a citizen of Bath - she lived there in the 19 century. Bath was also visited by Queen Victoria. A nice surprise was the meeting with the city Mayor. We had a short talk – the Mayor told us he had visited Poland a few times and he enjoyed Polish hospitality and tasty food. His son lives in Cracow with his family! Next day the Mayor honoured us with his presence at our Project activities at St. George’s College. We were a bit stressed as we were to make a traditional Polish dish – sauerkraut and mushroom dumplings and present our version of ‘Suitcase Story’ – our project task – to other project partners. All went well! 22


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy All the dishes made by our friends were really tasty. The Czech pancakes tasted almost like Polish potato pancakes. We are quite familiar with the dish made by our Hungarian partners as we happen to make it at home too, but the spicy plate by the Turks was quite a surprise to us. We hope they enjoyed our dumplings too. The final evening of the meeting was quite an unforgettable experience. All the groups had their presentations but the most memorable to us was the performance by the English students. The hospitality and kindness of the students’ parents were quite impressive also. The play presented by the students of St. George’s College was set in the times of WWII – it was all about patriotism but also about great love and partings. The performance had been prepared very carefully – perfectly. The set design, costumes combined with some modern music resulted in a terrific effect. It was great! We also appreciated the acting by the students. It was all like in a real theatre not in a school drama performance. We enjoyed both the technical and the acting side of it. Congratulations to our English friends on such a great achievement. ☺ Poles in England When in England we often met our fellow country men who had started their personal and professional lives there. One day, when we were getting on a bus we heard words spoken in Polish (‘you can speak Polish’) by the bus driver. He was Polish of course. He told us there were many Poles in Bath and also quite a few Polish children studied at the school we were hosted by. We met them of course. In Bristol, while visiting the cathedral, a few little kids came to us when they heard we spoke Polish. They were having an active history class then. They spoke very nice and correct Polish though some of them had been born in England. Talking to our teachers, the boys (apparently football fans) mentioned Jerzy Dudek, a goal keeper of Liverpool football team. The teachers recalled the famous match played by the Polish and English national teams at the Wembley stadium in 1973. The match resulted with a draw – which prevented the English from winning the world cup. Our history teachers reminded us about the Polish pilots and sailors who served in the RAF and Royal Navy troops during WWII. Also, long ago some Polish kings were trying to marry princesses of the Tudor and Stuart dynasties. We will be glad if can continue the tradition of Polish – English connections. All the project participants were really great, so nice and friendly. We got on well, that was why it was so hard to say ‘goodbye’ on the last day of our meeting. Luckily technology lets us stay in touch and meet our friends online. Our visit in Great Britain was a great experience. We enjoyed all the programme activities scheduled by our hosts and meeting the people as well. We appreciate their sympathy, understanding, dedication and hard work. Thank you! WIELKA BRYTANIA Wyruszyliśmy do Anglii w ramach projektu COMENIUS – AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE. Wylądowaliśmy na lotnisku Heathrow, gdzie spotkaliśmy sie z Andrew Jacksonem, który towarzyszył nam w drodze do Bath. Przez kilka dni goszczeni byliśmy przez szkołę w Bath – St. Gregory’s Catholic College. Tam też spotkaliśmy się z pozostałymi partnerami projektu z Czech, Węgier i Turcji. Wszyscy uczestnicy spotkania uczyli się od siebie na wzajem i dowiadywali o różnicach i podobieństwach prezentowanych kultur. Ponadto, byliśmy zachwyceni uprzejmością naszych gospodarzy, którzy zajęli się nami doskonale. Wielokulturowa różnorodność Anglia jest krajem wielonarodowościowym. Jest to jeden z powodów, dla którego turyści uważają ten kraj za tak interesujący. Spotkaliśmy tam wielu ludzi pochodzących z różnych państw. Największą różnorodność kulturową zuważyliśmy jednak w Londynie. Wiele osób, które mijaliśmy na ulicach musieli pochodzić z byłych brytyjskich kolonii. Ciemnoskórzy ludzie musieli wywodzić się z Afryki jak i z Azji. 23


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Na ulicach Londynu, Bristolu, Cardiff i Bath zauważyliśmy dzieci w wieku szkolnym, noszące mundurki. W wielu szkołach w Polsce, w tym i w naszej, uczniowie muszą przestrzegać noszenia stroju szkolnego, jednakże większość polskich uczniów nie lubi noszenia mundurków. Podczas pobytu w Anglii, zauważyliśmy, że angielscy uczniowie są dumni z noszenia swoich mundurków. Na początku naszego spotkania, uczestnicy podzielili się na małe gupy bazując na podobieństwach kulturowych. Również bariera językowa stanowiła mały problem na poczatku. Dla przykładu, Polacy trzymali się z Czechami, jako że, nasze języki są podobne i mogliśmy z łatwością się porozumieć używając naszych ojczystych mów. Anglicy, Turcy i Węgrzy trzymali się w swoich własnych małych grupkach. Z upływem czasu, dzięki zajęciom projektowym zaczęliśmy przełamywać lody i po chwili wszyscy komunikowali się po angielsku. Nasze początkowe obawy zniknęły i mogliśmy z łatwością poznawać naszych nowych przyjaciół. Miejsca, które zwiedziliśmy Londyn Pierwszego dnia odwiedziliśmy Londyn. Wiedzieliśmy, że jest to ogromne miasto i że w ciągu jednego dnia uda nam się zwiedzić tylko kilka londyńskich atrakcji ale i tak zwiedzanie bardzo nam się podobało. Jako że, Olimpiada miała zacząć się w lipcu, zwiedzanie rozpoczęliśmy od odwiedzenia wioski olimpijskiej, która była bardzo nowoczesna i wiele pracy zostało włożone w utworzenie jej. Później, podziwialiśmy widoki nad Tamizą, ‘Londyńskie Oko’ jak i inne popularne miejsca, takie jak: Parlament, Big Ben, Tower Bridge, Park Świętego Jakuba, Pałac Buckingham, Skwer Trafalgar oraz Katedrę Świętego Pawła. Byliśmy bardzo podekscytowani, gdy zatrzymaliśmy się przy Pałacu Backingham, jednakże flaga opuszczona do połowy masztu sygnalizowała, że Królowa nie przebywa na terenie Pałacu. Wszystkich bardzo podobała sie Zmiana Warty przed Pałacem. Londyn jest również miejscem narodzin teatru szekspirowskiego.Uczniowie naszej grupy należą do grupy teatralnej w naszej szkole, i z tego powodu byliśmy bardzo zainteresowani obejrzeniem Teatru The Globe. Oprócz tego, na własne oczy mogliśmy zobaczyć londyńskie dwupoziomowe autobusy i czarne taksówki. Z początku trudno nam było przyzwyczaić się do lewostronnego ruchu ulicznego, również, że drzwi do autokaru są po ‘niewłaściwej’ stronie. Miłą niespodzianką była możliwość podziwiania panoramy Londynu ze szczytu najwyższego budynku. Windą wjechaliśmy na 44 piętro – widok zapierał dech w piersiach. Bristol Najpier udaliśmy się na most bristolski nad rzeką Avon. Widok z mostu był niesamowity. Później podziwialiśmy nowoczesne i historyczne części Bristolu. Zachwyciła nas średniowieczna katedra. Wielką radość sprawił nam rejs taksówką wodną, która przypominała morskie tramwaje pływające po naszym Bałtyku. Najciekawszym wydarzeniem w Bristolu, było zwiedzanie statku Wielkiej Brytanii. Spędziliśmy ponad trzy godziny oglądając szczegółowo statek i dowiedzielismy się w jaki sposób ludzie przemierzali morza i oceany tym statkiem. Bristol zaskoczył nas takimi architektonicznymi atrakcjami jak fontanna na schodach oraz wielka szklana kula. Podczas lotu samolotem do Anglii obserwowaliśmy wody morskie pod nami. Oczywiście Anglia usytuowana jest na wyspie. Polska również leży nad morzem ale nasz kraj jest na lądzie stałym. Podczas pobytu mogliśmy zaobserwować różnice w krajobrazie w porównaniu do naszego regionu. Zaskoczył nas dość monotonny widok płaskiego i mało zalesionego terenu. Na lekcjach historii uczyliśmy się na temat rewolucji przemysłowej w Anglii oraz o intensywnym wyrębie lasów, którego rezultaty najwyraźniej widzieliśmy. Widok ten był dla nas dziwny, jako że, w Polsce mamy mnóstwo lasów. Co więcej, nasze miasto Gdynia jest otoczone lasami i wzgórzami morenowymi. Gdy dotarliśmy do Walii, nareszcie ujrzeliśmy nierówny teren. Kopalnia węgla – muzeum w Walii oraz Muzeum Architektury Drewnianej skansen Wszystkich ucieszyła wizyta w kopalni i zejście tak głęboko pod ziemię. Była to ekscytujaca przygoda. W południowej Polsce również jest dużo kopalń ale oddalone są od naszego miasta około 700 km. Większość z nas nigdy nie była w kopalni wcześniej. Spotkanie z emerytowanym górnikiem, który był naszym przewodnikiem było również niesamowite. 24


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

W skansenie spodziewaliśmy się zobaczyć drewniane chatki podobne do tych, które widzieliśmy w muzeum na północy Polski. Byliśmy zaskoczeni kiedy dotarliśmy do czegoś w rodzaju zachodniego sklepu z mnóstwem towaru, i pomysleliśmy, że musiał to być rodzaj wczesnego supermarketu. Nasze nauczycielki historii zainteresowane były historią budowy domów od średniowiecza do współczesności. Wyobrażały sobie również różnego rodzaju interesujące lekcje , które mogłyby prowadzić w walijskim muzeum. Cardiff – stolica Walii W Cardiff mieliśmy trochę wolnego czasu i możliwość zwiedzania miasta na własną rękę, korzystając z mapy przygotowanej przez naszych gospodarzy. Naszym nauczycielom bardzo podobały się wszystkie pomniki w mieście. My, uczniowie świetnie bawiliśmy się na zakupach. Bath Bath okazało się czarującym i gościnnym miastem. Wszystkie budynki w Bath zostały wybudowane w stylu gregoriańskim. Hotel, w którym kwaterowaliśmy przypominał nam szkołę magii Harrego Pottera, dlatego nazwaliśmy go Hogwarts. Spacerując wzdłuż korytarzy, próbując znaleźć drogę do naszych pokoi i pryszniców zawieraliśmy bliższe znajomości z naszymi partnerami projektu. Łaźnie Rzymskie są największą atrakcją Bath. Ci, którzy mieli okazję zwiedzić Rzym przyznali, że Łaźnie w Bath są ładniejsze. Wysłuchaliśmy nagrań w języku angielskim o historii łaźnii. Łaźnie zostały założone przez rzymskich kolonizatorów, którzy zbudowali tam również Świątynię Aqua Sulis. Obok starożytnych ruin powstały współczesne spa, w których odwiedzający Bath mogą zrelaksować się jak i zażyć leczniczych kuracji. Bardzo docenialiśmy wysiłek naszych angielskich przewodników, którzy starali się mówić do nas jak najwolniej i najwyraźniej, co bardzo nam pomogło i dzięki temu mogliśmy szczerze cieszyć się zwiedzaniem miasta. Zobaczyliśmy: Opactwo w Bath, budowlę zwaną Królewskim Księżycem, Most Pulteney, budynek The Cirrus, the Assembly Rooms oraz Prior Park Landscape Garden – ogrody zaprojektowane przez poetę Alexandra Pope’a. Również dowiedzieliśmy się, że Jane Austin była mieszkanką Bath – mieszkała tam w XIX wieku. Bath było również odwiedzane przez Królową Victorię. Miłą niespodzianką było spotkanie z burmistrzem miasta. Mielismy okazję chwilę porozmawiać – burmistrz powiedział nam, że kilka razy odwiedził już Polskę i bardzo mu się spodobała polska gościnność i polskie jedzenie. Okazało się, że syn burmistrza mieszka wraz z rodziną w Krakowie. Następnego dnia, burmistrz zaszczycił nas swoją obecnością w szkole St. Gregory’s Catholic College podczas naszych zajęć projektowych. Byliśmy lekko zestresowani jako że, mieliśmy za zadanie przygotować tradycyjne polskie danie – pierogi z kapustą i grzybami, oraz zaprezentować naszą wersję ‘Opowieści Walizkowej’ innym uczestnikom projektu. Wszystko udało się wyśmienicie!!! Wszystkie potrawy, przygotowane przez naszych partnerów były naprawdę smaczne. Czeskie placki smakowały prawie jak polskie placki ziemniaczane. Danie przygotowane przez Węgrów również wydawało nam się znajome. Jednakże, ostre danie tureckie było dla nas czymś zupełnie nowym. Mamy nadzieję, że wszystkim smakowały nasze pierogi. Ostatni wieczór spotkania był dla nas niezapomnianym przeżyciem. Każda grupa musiała się zaprezentować. Najbardziej utkwiło nam w pamięci przedstawienie przygotowane przez Anglików. Gościnność i uprzejmość uczniów i ich rodziców były zdumiewające. Przedstawienie było osadzone w realich II 25


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy Wojny Światowej – poruszało kwestie patriotyzmu, wielkiej miłości i rozłąki. Przygotowanie było perfekcyjne – scenografia, kostiumy w połączeniu ze współczesną muzyką dały fantastyczny efekt. Gra uczniów była na wysokim poziomie. Czuliśmy się jak w prawdziwym teatrze a nie jak na szkolnym występie teatralnym. Byliśmy pod wrażeniem technicznej i aktorskiej strony przedstawienia. Gratulacje dla naszych angielskich kolegów za tak wspaniałe osiągnięcie. Polacy w Anglii Podczas pobytu w Anglii, często spotykaliśmy naszych rodaków, którzy zaczęli tam swoje osobiste i zawodowe życie. Pewnego dnia, gdy wsiadaliśmy do autobusu, kierowca zaczął mówić do nas po polsku. Okazało się, że jest Polakiem. Powiedział nam, że w Bath mieszka wielu Polaków i całkiem sporo polskich dzieci uczęszcza do szkoły naszych gospodarzy. Oczywiście, spotkaliśmy się z polskimi uczniami. W Bristolu, podczas zwiedzania katedry, kilkoro małych dzieci podeszło do nas gdy usłyszeli jak mówimy po polsku. Dzieci miały lekcję historii w katedrze, mówiły po polsku dobrze i poprawnie pomimo tego że, niektóre z nich urodziły się juz w Anglii. Rozmawiając z naszymi nauczycielami, chłopcy (najwyraźniej fani piłki nożnej) wspomnieli Jerzego Dudka – bramkarza klubu Liverpool. Nauczyciele wspominali pamiętny mecz pomiędzy Polską a Anglią na Stadionie Wembley z 1973 roku. Mecz zakończył się remisem, co uniemożliwiło Anglikom zdobycie pucharu. Nasi nauczyciele przypomnieli nam o polskich pilotach i marynarzach, którzy służyli w RAF i Royal Navy podczas II Wojny Światowej. Również, dawno temu niektórzy polscy królowie próbowali poślubić księżniczki z dynastii Tudorów i Stuartów. Będziemy bardzo szczęsliwi jeśli będziemy mogli kontynuować polsko – angielskie stosunki. Wszyscy uczestnicy projektu byli wspaniali, uprzejmi i przyjacielscy. Świetnie się rozumieliśmy i zżyliśmy, dlatego tak ciężko było pożegnać się ostatniego dnia. Na szczęście, technologia pozwala nam być w kontakcie i spotykać się online. Nasza wizyta w Anglii była wspaniałym przeżyciem. Świetnie bawiliśmy się podczas całego programu przygotowanego przez naszych gospodarzy i wspaniale było poznać tak wiele ciekawych osób. Jesteśmy wdzięzni za okazaną sympatię, zrozumienie, poświęcenie i ciężką pracę. Dziękujemy!

26


GUIDE AD FONTES RERUM EUROPAE from the Pupils´Point of View or Following the Cultural Footsteps of Middle Eastern Europe and the Cradle of Parliamentary Democracy

Epilogue

…The international project was meant to be creative since its very beginning. This is why each participant should think of his/her own epilogue themselves and remember their experiences gained within the duration of the project… However, it is necessary to say that we all had a wonderful time full of new experiences and impulses that will push us forward knowing more than we had done before the project was launched. Many heartfelt thanks have to be expressed to the teachers who looked after the international Comenius project (especially the coordinators: Aleksandra Blalteberg, Mária Bujdos, Şebnem Haydargil, Andrew Jackson and Dagmar Vejchodová), their head teachers for the support we got as well as the students for whom we all did it. We hope our friendship will not end with the end of the project.

Comenius Partnership 2010 – 2012 Coordinating school:

Gymnázium P. Křížkovského s uměleckou profilací, s. r. o

Project websites:

Gimnazjum nr 4

Language supervision:

Saint Gregory´s Catholic College

Information:

Ad Fontes Rerum Europae participants

Photographs:

Ad Fontes Rerum Europae participants

Video:

Árpád Vezér Gimnázium és Kollégium

Background of the project video: Gaziantep Ticaret Odası Güzel Sanatlar ve Spor Lisesi

27

Polish Guide  
Advertisement