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urban art and the creators behind the nozzle


contents April 2010 7-16 Os Gemeos 17 artist watch 19-24 FAKE stencils 25 events 27-36 Pixnit was here 37 spotted 39-46 Latin Art 47 tools 49 old school


we’ve got it covered. 3-4


we’ve got it covered. 5-6


os


s gemeos a world springs to life on an urban wall.


s


“Graffiti is one of the few tools you have if you have almost nothing. And even if you don’t come up with a picture to cure world poverty you can make someone smile while they’re having a piss.” c artwork With their first publi nt up at the in Manhattan, which we uston Street Ho of r northwest corne 17, the Bray Jul on and the Bowery and Gustavo zilian brothers Otavio mselves Os Pandolfo, who call the to its Roart i ffit gra Gêmeos, bring say that their coco phase. Which is to a concrete fantastic, epic mural, on and about 51 wall about 17 feet high thy, a dream feet long, is light and fro underlying of happiness with an d everything chord of melancholy. An

in it is exquisitely fine-tuned and detailed, a dazzlement of effortless technique that sustains long bouts of close looking. It will remain up until March. The delicate black lines that thread throughout the entire image like drizzled charcoal dust are feats of spraycan painting. The prismatic color of everything else has a saturation unusual in graffiti art. The sky alone is half a spectrum. It begins with deep blue green at the top and descends through green and chartreuse to a

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golden, sunbathed yellow that serves as land, water, light, human skin and more. And the storybook imagery is out of this world, yet not. Sure, people and things often levitate or are impossibly stacked, and the setting is a tad unreal — simultaneously wet and dry, or hard and spongy. But both the subways of New York and the favelas of São Paulo are here, and the figures wear brightly patterned garments (thanks to ingenious small-bore stenciling) that seem truly Brazilian. Plus, there are enough fish to placate the fish lovers of both cities. Sometimes these creatures have scales of many colors. Often they carry something in their mouths, like the bringers of good luck they are supposed to be: radiant little shacks, people or heads, whole figures. It’s magical realism with a touch of grit. While the onslaught of figures, episodes and colors is at first overwhelming, a casual left-to-right reading suggests some narrative pos-

sibilities. Basically what we have here is a tale of escape and growth that begins in darkness and — after taking a few tips from the Bible, Hieronymus Bosch and M. C. Escher — ends in a stunning vortex of brilliant color. At far left, in the gray dimness of a narrow, cell-like space, a small figure strains toward the golden light seeping through a chink in the wall. Wearing pants, a jacket and a girlish scalloped bonnet and shouldering a bag, she’s leaving home, as the song says. A small spotted dog watches from the safety of a tenderly, elaborately woodgrained floor. Through the chink the golden world awaits, arrayed around and above what seems to be a nearly circular waterfall; it’s a world populated by spirit guides, with or without gills. And it all adds up, or at least it is all visibly linked. You’re supposed to keep going, from one thing to the next, gaining wisdom along the way. To sketch in some of the action, the


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“Artwork that is only about wanting to be famous will never make you famous. Any fame is a by-product of making something that means something. You don’t go to a restaurant and order a meal because you want to have a shit.”


gray dimness of a narrow, celllike space, a small figure strains toward the golden light seeping through a chink in the wall. Wearing pants, a jacket and a girlish scalloped bonnet and shouldering a bag, she’s leaving home, as the song says. A small spotted dog watches from the safety of a tenderly, elaborately wood-grained floor. Through the chink the golden world awaits, arrayed around and above what seems to be a nearly circular waterfall; it’s a world populated by spirit guides, with or without gills. And it all adds up, or at least it is all visibly linked. You’re supposed to keep going, from one thing to the next, gaining wisdom along the way. To sketch in some of the action, the connections begin with a boy on a four-poster bed (Dreamland’s point of origin)

with a peacock on his back, using a second peacock as an ear trumpet. He listens to a whale whose skin, a mosaic of blues, is dotted with extra eyes. Atop the whale lies a girl (maybe our heroine, but older) so relaxed that the dots on her lavenderpink blouse are rising into the atmosphere like bubbles. The whale’s tail hooks over the rail of a snaking subway track, while the beast itself balances on a stack of three figures teetering on a rope bridge with iffy wood slats (San Luis Rey, anyone?) extending from one side of the waterfall¬¬ to the other. (Don’t ask.) Back on the tracks a subway car — the N train — is straddled by a large boy, who has human heads gathered around him like the day’s catch and a galleon on his head. A fish that is also a dirigible on its side is anchored

to his hand. (Behind all this stretches a yellow out-of-focus landscape where the hills are faces.) Next we are in the city where two boys who could be Os Gêmeos (Portuguese for the Twins, which the 35-yearold Pandolfo brothers are) are cramped inside a twostory, two-room house. The tracks continue into a station with an Escher-like mural of bright checkerboards receding to a vanishing point, and also the tag of Dash Snow, a New York graffiti artist who died last month and to whom the mural is dedicated. The station is also part of a boat (touring the waterfalls?), with plush red seats tufted with yellow faces. At the front of the boat, next to a protective figurehead, sits a knowing young woman look-

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ing out at us amid bundles of patterned fabric. She has little houses in her green-and-black hair and wears a blouse whose planetlike dots are, this time, staying put. The final third of the mural explodes in the rainbow vortex that is fabulously explicit in color but physically indeterminate. Sometimes it is a beach at low tide, sometimes a prison wall, sometimes quicksand,

at least for a figure carrying a grandfather clock. Also here is a small Trojan horse (or maybe a mule), which brings back the lovely wood grain in warmer colors. Its neck is open and forms a double cameo for the faces of a boy and girl. This telling omits many wonderful details. One of the best is front and nearly center in the image: a boy who seems to sit on a waterspout, wearing a fish

mask and a T-shirt that is one of the painting’s best mom ents. It depicts a landscape: no te the white stenciled stone wa ll, the changing greens of th e tiny stenciled trees, the golde n setting sun. It is an idyll of pastoral, escape-from-the-city living, cottage and all. story by Roberta Smith photos provided by Os Gemeos


Artist Watch artists we love:

45RPM

HUCK talks to the Avalaan Familia artist, 45RPM, about collage, taxidermy and going big on walls. interview by Shelley Lee Jones HUCK: Birds feature quite a lot in your work. What is it you like about them? 45RPM: I like the fact that old people collect ornaments of them. Old people then die, give there whole collections to charity shops where I get them for a quarter of the price. Give me a ceramic owl money box any day over the real thing, you cant put money in the real ones, it makes them clingy. Also, my lass brought me some real Jay’s feet from a taxidermists for my birthday this year, I’ve mostly enjoyed leaving them sticking out of things, the top three things would be: 1. My nose 2. A mate’s sandwich 3. An egg So yeah birds rock... What is your favourite type of commission, a big installation or project, or something that will go viral like a screenprint or a t-shirt design? As an artist, when you draw a picture on an A4 page it looks good. Draw it on an A3 page and it looks better. Big is better, fact! There is nothing better then staring at a massive wall that makes you feel tiny and insignificant like an ant and then painting a beaut of a piece on it. 45rpm 1 - wall 0. As much as t-shirts, etc are great, painting a wall that makes you feel emotionally and physically drained. That it probably cost you 40 quid and that you did for free, and knowing it could get painted over a hour later is a great feeling, so give me a great big wall any day.


we’ve got it covered. 17-18


Fake stencils

The ephemeral rebellion of a graffiti artist.


e

lland, and FAKE paints out of Ho esome. He’s his stencil art looks aw ing too, we built up a pretty big follow … had a few questions for him do you paint WG – What materials with? paint, BelFAKE – I only use spray 2G MTN (its ton. And My fave black s, to I fill a unbeatable). On the street use house s whole wall in I sometime nd rou s other paint to do the backg ly. than that spray paint on t get involved firs you did w Ho WG – What was in stencil art specifically? your first stencil? doing graff FAKE – Well, I started g my home around 14 years old, taggin r bridges de town, making pieces un d makrte sta etc… and 4 years ago I way to a for g ing stencils, I was lookin streets the on make a face or a person s imthi il, nc very fast and tried a ste it! on mediately got me hooked ture of my My first stencil was a pic sing posimi girlfriend (in a compro r town ove tion) that I sprayed all

“I used to stencil images of my girlfriend in compromising positions haha… she did not like that but she is around the still with me. WG – Where do you draw influence city.” from? FAKE – I get my influence from many places, mainly music and my own life, and the life of the street artist. In many of my pieces I refer to paint and painting. At the moment I am working on a series that has to do with my past/upbringing and my life now as a stencil artist. FAKE – Pfff… I like a lot of different stuff, ok, my last 2 downloads where Kingstonlogic 2.0 and a classic electro song called Space invaders are smoking grass. WG – I watched some of your vids, do you do most of your spraying in daylight or at night? Ever had trouble from police? FAKE – I do most of my painting in


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daylight, this is also why a stencil appeals to me, I can do a very big and effective image on any medium and do it is 1 or 2 minutes. So I am done fast and have less chance of the police catching me. I did not have any big problems with the cops, they are pretty easy going in Amsterdam. And if they like the image they sometimes make a little chat haha… I did get caught for tagging my old school years back and had to do some community service haha… that sucked! WG – What are the Dutch police like generally, when it comes to street art/graffiti? I’ve visited Amsterdam a few times and found that there was loads of awesome art everywhere, are they relaxed? FAKE – They are relaxed but, in Amsterdam there are a lot of places that are semi-legal to paint, I paint a lot on construction sites, and you can do it with or without permission, If the cops get you they will only fine you. But if you paint on government property (which I do a lot) they will not be so easy going. WG – What’s next for FAKE? FAKE – I am working on a series of 10 to 15 works for a big solo show and I am hitting the street more and more. WG – Banksy has had a lot of press recently due to his Bristol Exhibition in the UK, you reckon street art becoming more mainstream is generally positive? FAKE – Street art is popular already, people

from all over the world contact me or buy my stuff, this is an evolution of street art. And it’s something that can’t be stopped. It’s evolving from the wall to the canvas. Art used to be for boring old people with a lot of cash, now you can buy cool stuff at a young age for not too much money. A very nice by-product is that the streets are now more colourful than they have EVER been. WG – What artists do you admire at the moment? FAKE – Dolk is an artist I admire a lot! He has always great works with great execution and they are always funny! They make me laugh every time. And I love the work of Eelus, his work is dark and has some of the best execution in stencils I have ever seen. WG – Where is your favourite place to paint? FAKE – The UK, the artists I have met there and the people in the scene are the nicest people. I will be painting a 9 meter high piece next week in Bristol, that will be a nightmare to do, but will be a hell of a blast as well I will be posting a little vid of it once its done!

interview by world-graffiti.com photos by Jennifer Griner

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events out and about: summer events June 6- 5th Annual Graffiti Classic Car Show Los Angeles, CA June 11, 12, 13th - American Graffiti Car Show and Festival Car Show Austin, TX June 12- Summer Graffiti Beach Party Miami, FL June 18- Modern Nuts Graffiti Night New York City, NY

Summer Must: the Paper Girl Project Papergirl is an art project which, in the style of american paperboys, distributes rolled art pieces by bicycle to random passers-by in the streets. It consists of an exhibition, the action (distribution of the art) and a party. The project was founded in Berlin by Aisha Ronniger and has been carried out once a year in summer since 2006. Now Papergirl has spread and will also take place in our City, Cape Town, this summer 2010. The basic idea with the project is to bring art to the public in a different way than normal; to surprise people and bring them into contact with art in their everyday life. The idea of distributing art by bike came from the search for new ways to bring art straight to society, and have fun doing so! Papergirl is, in short: participatory, analogue, non-commercial and impulsive.


we’ve got it covered. 25-26


Pixnit was here Her

urban-art spores adorn

public and private property. But some see her as a menace.


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a.m. on a Monday CAMBRIDGE -- At 2 of Massachusetts Avein November, this stretch to Harvard Square, is nue, from Plympton Street ll machine. So it’s testalit up like a vintage pinba ce that even in the neon ment to Pixnit’s experien refronts she can vanish, glow cast by nearby sto smallest of shadows. almost completely, into the

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“Why are we so afraid of paint on walls? What is it, exactly, that we’re afraid of?” ce to every motion: the There’s a practiced gra slice of pavement, the stencil fitted to the dark ck backpack, and then aerosol yanked from a bla e paint. By the time a three passes with the blu ne the art -- a small, passerby kneels to exami a “spore” -- Pixnit is pastel flower Pixnit calls her hands, covered in halfway down the block, her pockets. black fingerless gloves, in paint on walls?” she of aid afr “Why are we so “What is it, exactly, that says, later that morning. we’re afraid of ?” s been plaguing Pixnit, This is a question that ha real name publicly, her who refuses to reveal her lls as a kid in the Southentire life. She tagged wa the time she came east west, and says that by e from Tufts University to get her master’s degre Museum of Fine Arts , and the School of the s of pieces of urban she had created hundred Pixnit has achieved her art. But its in Boston that


greatest -- and what she hopes will be her lasting -- fame. After seeing her graffiti around Boston, the Globe attempted to find Pixnit. A reporter eventually tracked her down through her MySpace page , and she e-mailed back from an anonymous address. She agreed to meet in person but would be photographed only with her face partially disguised. The Globe does not know her real name. In just more than a year, Pixnit has populated every neighborhood from Jamaica Plain to Somerville with her spores, which can be red, white, blue, or green. She’s painted the tops of buildings in the Back Bay, alleys in Allston, bridges in Fort Point, and dumpsters in the South End. She’s shown at a handful of local galleries, including the Rhys Gallery . A sticker campaign is in the works, along with a plan to sell her stencils around town , so the spores can “reproduce.” And the police have never apprehended her. All of which has made Pixnit one of Boston’s most polarizing alt-art

31-32 outlaws. “A lot of artists I know are interested in street art -- it’s an inspiration for them,” says artist James Manning , assistant director of exhibitions at the New England School of Art & Design at Suffolk University, who is acquainted with Pixnit. “Pixnit takes it much further. “ “She’s one of the few stencilers out there who are actually carving out a name,” says Kerry Simon of Allston, a local urban artist and clothing designer who does not know Pixnit personally. “And there is no one out there who is going for the coverage she’s going for.” But Pixnit’s prolific street profile has also made her a target of local residents, who say they spend thousands of dollars each year to remove graffiti. In neighborhoods such as the Back Bay and the South End -- where Pixnit has left a series of bright spores, sometimes atop hard-to-reach four - and five - story buildings -- a collision with police and graffiti-removal groups seems inevitable.


Repeated requests for comment from police in Boston and Cambridge went unanswered. Anne Swanson , the chairwoman of a local group called Graffiti NABBers , a part of the Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay’s crime committee, says she is very familiar with Pixnit’s work and would “love to know the identity of this tagger.” “A real artist would come forward and acknowledge the ‘art,’ “ she added. “This is graffiti vandalism like any other.” Swanson says the members of Graffiti NABBers devote an incredible amount of time and energy to halting the spread of graffiti , which they see as destructive to the area’s architectural fabric. “Everything in this neighborhood has to be micromanaged. Unbelievable care goes into every sign, every step, down, even, to the type of material used for windows,” said Meg MainzerCohen , president of the Back Bay Association . “People go through a lot of hoops, so to have someone come in,

considering themselves an artist, and putting their graffiti everywhere -- it’s just downright wrong.” Pixnit launched her Boston campaign in the spring of 2005, shortly after she says she earned her master’s of fine arts. Initial spores were small, and often imprecisely executed. But many of the pieces were not painted over by residents and business owners who like her work, so Pixnit says she began to work bigger, experimenting with different colors and shapes, and with different locations -- crosswalks, hardto-reach walls, manhole covers. “Her work began to really blossom,” says Maryellen Latas , a sculptor who is represented by the Barbara Krakow Gallery on Newbury Street. “On a formal level it’s become more and more highly developed. It portrays a real sense of beauty.” Pixnit has become an anomaly on the local graffiti circuit, which is composed largely of younger, lone - wolf taggers. Bubble letters and sprawling, shapeless designs dominate most walls here. Since there is no community

among area taggers, the art tends to be less refined than larger operations in cities like New York. In fact, Pixnit, who is 33, bears little resemblance to the popular image of a tagger. She is a well-educated artist -- not a rough-around-the-edges highschool dropout -- and her work is nuanced and dynamic. In person, she is articulate, often launching into long diatribes on the state of modern street art, and is astonishingly pretty, with a wide, off-kilter smile. “There’s a certain mold that Pixnit is shattering, definitely,” says Latas, who has met her. “Graffiti, as a form, is typically perceived as being made by a less-educated teenager. It’s exciting to see her doing this.” This willingness to see Pixnit’s work as revolutionary, though, is not shared by everyone on the local art scene. Rhys Gallery director Lydia Ruby , who helped bring Pixnit’s art to the Rhys in 2005, confessed she was “unsure, really, how to feel about it.” “I live in the South End, and I see [graffiti] on a regular basis. It can be


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gratuitous and really obnoxious,” Ruby said. “But there’s obviously an allure to her art.” For business owners and managers in areas that Pixnit frequents, a similar sort of uneasiness prevails. Erin Scott , the manager of New England Comics in Allston and a member of the nonprofit Allston Village Main Streets program, said she was split between her fondness for urban art and the mission statement of the AVMS, which promotes “ongoing graffiti removal.” “One of [Pixnit’s] pieces was left up above Steve’s Kitchen , because it looks pretty awesome,” Scott said, referring to the popular diner on Harvard Avenue . “She does seem respectful.” Scott added, however, that she has “no tolerance for people who tag up my windows. Sometimes graffiti is graffiti.” Chris Giroux , who manages the Seven Stars shop in Cambridge, says he knows Pixnit; he was hesitant, however, to endorse her work. “In [Jamaica Plain] there are lots of people who commission artists to legally do graffiti -- they’ll give you a big, blank wall,” Giroux said. “But to destroy the property of someone else without consulting them first? That’s not good.” The divisive feelings her art can inspire are not lost on Pixnit. “My work is illegal,” she says. “I’m not an advo-

cate for graffiti being leg alized -- the illegality is what gives it its bite. I’m just most interested in creating and sustaining a kind of culture.” If caught, Pixnit would like ly face large fines and an order to make restitutio n; jail time would be a worst-case scenario. But for now, she has showed no signs of slowing down . She has new stencils in the works -- with pla ns to sell them through local galleries -- and has signed on with Gallery Revisited in Los Angeles for an upcoming show. “I do worry about Pixnit on a personal level, because there is so much risk with urban artists. I wouldn’t want her to get arrested,” said Leora Lutz , the owner of Ga llery Revis i ted. “But what she’s doing is so fas cinating -- this juxtaposition of high art and urban art. Besides, with anything you do in life, the re’s a risk, right?” Asked whether property owners in Boston had a right to be angry abou t graffiti, artist Simon said , “ No matter how ma ny laws people make, people are going to pu t this stuff where they want, and how they want. You’re never going to stop graffiti.” He laughed, then adde d: “I understand their annoyance. If my stuff go t tagged, I’d probably pretty angry, too.”

interview by Matthew Shaer photos provided by Jennifer Griner

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spotted found art:

The Bubble Project


we’ve got it covered. 37-38


Latin art Although its United States

modern incarnation originated in

three decades ago, graffiti art can

be found in the urban areas of almost every country.

By

now, the drawings and messages sprayed

on walls, murals, and other spaces have been wide-

ly covered by both citizen and traditional media.

They are also slowly gaining recognition as a controversial art, along with the rise of other urban expressions like stencils, posters, stickers, and mixed techniques. In public spaces, street art (or urban art) represents the voice of the community, marginal groups, and young people that strive to be heard, often defying the notion of private property. Latin America is not an exception for this. Some of Latin American street art is distinct from what is created by the hip-hop movement, focusing on political messages and stories of struggle that speak directly to the viewer.


peru ve art Internet users preser lls neither because photographed wa h time. wash away, nor decay wit ormation of They can also provide inf onym, locathe artist’s name or pseud t the art into tion, description, and pu t Peruvian context. In a group abou cussion art on Flickr, there is a dis the artists, about the short careers of ed out some user DeCe-RTOR point s of the of the social responsibilitie street art in Perú: to be “Street art in Peru needs always been reformed, because it has corruption, a torn apart by terrorism, , and overall faulty educational system es, it is difparty. With all of those issu any direcficult to move forward in this country tion. That is no way for es by the to develop, and the art go it is not cultiway of development. If be any high vated, then there cannot o clearly expectations. For those wh ctices pra d know what graffiti is, an


“Street art in Peru needs to be reformed, because it has always been torn apart by ing compared to others who spend more time sunk in problems, than it, I hope that they are aware of the terrorism, living in peace. power of being on the streets. It must Sometimes the communication is be handled with responsibility, and corruption, a even more direct: graffiti artists like sometimes one must sacrifice and do Faber take advantage of the anowhat is best. This sometimes means faulty nymity the electronic media grants to refrain from painting egocentrito promote their work, to show cally and paint only what one wants, educational by themselves and their portfolio and what only one can understand. without any risk of being prosecuted. They must be strong-willed to repsystem, and With minimal commentaries (“look resent what the community wants to for the simplicity in things”), Faber see and needs know. To look for the overall shares online his colorful portraits way to make what everybody likes of sad characters, some of them in what you like, that is the hard part.” party.” poverty, without revealing much of On a more personal level, blogger Luis Fonseca wanders through the streets of Lima taking pictures of urban art, which he shares in his blog with songs, poetry, and reflections of his work. I was on the bus not feeling well because of life and thinking that nobody could be having a rougher time than me. I looked up and saw this picture on a wall, and I quickly thought that my problem was noth-

himself except his incredible abilities to create.

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Colombia ence, then walls should “If the press makes sil speak.” ’: own for being a ‘code Common graffiti is kn un can s neighborhood only members of the the hy, rap lig ces and cal derstand the intricate tra numbers used to repree cod “wild style”, or the wever, along with these sent names and places. Ho t messages can also be obscure messages, explici clear and spaced letters, found on the streets, using o On his blog Globalizad leaning towards protest. s oto ph res sha n Arellano [es], Peruvian blogger Jua he d an , bia Pasto, Colom of the graffiti he found in times he does not unthe of st concedes that mo derstand it: fan of graffiti, most of “Actually I am not a big derstand what they say the times I don’t even un tracing used by most of because of the complex en the message goes clear the graffiti artists, but wh I do.” and direct, then of course explicit graffiti can be of y ler An extensive gal where El Reticente and found on El Blog Canalla ly oriented street art on Alejandro collect political hough they barely comthe streets of Medellín. Alt their slogan holds a mesment on their collection, sage of protest: the State, the walls are “If the media belongs to Ours.”


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Guatemala ti artists “Writers” is how graffi of their use call themselves because tags) and lled (ca es of quick signatur as bombs). In bombed letters (known is a grafitti the case of Ricardo, he r, he shares writer, and also a blogge graffiti artists, events, profiles of other of the movegathers media coverage the feeling of ment, and also sums up community. his graffiti crews and the the situaIn 2007, he documented atemala, and tion of graffiti in Gu n coverage criticized how televisio tistic” graffiti does not differentiate “ar latter comfrom “vandal” graffiti, the gal tags and monly associated with ille bombs: other places Sadly here, and I think in associated too, graffiti is commonly le of this is a with gangs, a clear examp

recent documentary made by Noti7, a local news show, where the video was edited in a way that left the audience in confusion and holding the same idea that the graffiti is for vandals. In the documentary, some appeared that really do belong to the artistic movement, the bad thing is that the pictures of the [graffiti] pieces and the interviews they did were mixed with the images of the graffiti vandalism, something that left a bitter taste for us, who belong to the real community of graffiti. Nonetheless, both artistic and “nonartistic” graffiti share walls and prolonged murals of some streets in Guatemala City. story by Issa Villarreal photos provided by Global Voices

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tools supplies: green graffiti Refillable CMYk Spray Can Wins 2009 Red Dot Award for Green Design The refillable Color Dial Spray is a novel design for a spray can that contains four colour cartridges (CMYK) in the one can. Two dials (for hue and brightness) help the painter achieve the exact colour required. Generally, spray cans contain only one colour. If only a small amount of paint is required, there will be considerable wastage. Color Dial Spray is a new type of spray can that contains CMYK colour cartridges in the one can. The user can immediately change the colour by turning the colour dials near the top of the can. There are two dials: one for hue and one for brightness. These allow for precise mixing of the particular colour desired. The colour cartridges can be refilled many times over. This helps with the reduction of waste. The compact form of Color Dial Spray is convenient and portable.


we’ve got it covered. 47-48


tools supplies: green graffiti Refillable CMYk Spray Can Wins 2009 Red Dot Award for Green Design The refillable Color Dial Spray is a novel design for a spray can that contains four colour cartridges (CMYK) in the one can. Two dials (for hue and brightness) help the painter achieve the exact colour required. Generally, spray cans contain only one colour. If only a small amount of paint is required, there will be considerable wastage. Color Dial Spray is a new type of spray can that contains CMYK colour cartridges in the one can. The user can immediately change the colour by turning the colour dials near the top of the can. There are two dials: one for hue and one for brightness. These allow for precise mixing of the particular colour desired. The colour cartridges can be refilled many times over. This helps with the reduction of waste. The compact form of Color Dial Spray is convenient and portable.


we’ve got it covered. 47-48


old school origins of street art: part GROUND WORK 1966-71

1

Graffiti was used primarily by political activists to make statements and street gangs to mark territory. It wasn’t till the late 1960s that writing’s current identity started to form.The history of the underground art movement known by many names, most commonly termed graffiti begins in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the mid to late ‘60s and is rooted in bombing. The writers who are credited with the first conscious bombing effort are CORNBREAD and COOL EARL. They wrote their names all over the city gaining attention from the community and local press. It is unclear whether this concept made its way to New York City via deliberate efforts or if was a spontaneous occurrence.


we’ve got it covered. 49-50


magazine design by Jennifer Griner


In Revolt