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Fuels Fix SOUTHEASTERN

SPRING 2010 - FuelsFix.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE OF THE FIX

Gettin’ Gaseous in Asheville Hybrid Horsepower for Kentucky Schools A Review of the Greenhouse Gas-Reducing Capabilities of Alt Fuels Communities Start Down the Path to EV Readiness FlexFuel U.S. Hits the Road

Zeus is In The House


FUELS FIX

INNARDS

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CHARLOTTE MOVES ON ELECTRIC VEHICLES Centralina Clean Fuels forms an EV Subcommittee to help the region progress on electric vehicles. BY JASON WAGER & SARAH NEISS

ALT FUELS GENESIS South Carolina has it going on with a big announcement from Gamecock land to the Carolina Blue Skies and Green Jobs Initiative. BY ERIKA MYERS

BITS FROM THE BLUEGRASS The Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition’s ARRA hybrid bus project gets started and truck electrification is old-hat in “Mercertown.” BY MELISSA HOWELL

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DON “ZEUS” FRANCIS KNOWS ELECTRIC CARS It is nice to know we have a fellow coordinator to lean on for all--and I mean all--our electric vehicle questions. BY JONATHAN OVERLY

GREEN LUNCHES IN GEORGIA Using lunchtime to educate regional city employees about smarter fuels and efficient vehicles. BY BILL YOUNG

CITY OF DURHAM & TOWN OF CARY HONORED FOR GREEN FLEETS These fleets are doin’ it right, and getting some kudos. BY KATHY BOYER

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8 FUEL EFFICIENCY GAINS AT PALM TRANS Increasing city bus miles-per-gallon by using the mini-HYBRID thermal management system is showing dollar and fuel savings. BY LARRY ALLEN

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GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE FUELS What are the best data for using today to calculate GHG reductions from alt-fuel projects? Find out here. BY WENNY NG

E85 CERTIFIED CONVERSION SYSTEMS COME TO MARKET FlexFuel U.S. can help you turn your current non-FFV fleet into american fuel users, and at a reasonable cost. BY CHRIS DISHER

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SKYTRAIN Can a Florida company put GETTIN’ GASEOUS IN ASHEVILLE All together mass transit, overhead operation and kinds of alt-fuel activity is happening in free energy propulsion to create a first in the Asheville but propane is high on the list with a U.S.? Tough, but possible. recent road show and first public LPG station. BY BILL YOUNG BY BILL EAKER

10 STARTUP LOWERING PRICE OF BIOFUELS AT THE PUMPS AND REDUCING DIESEL EMISSIONS Pioneering Michigan firm is helping biofuels “Go to Market” using their onsite biofuel mixing stations. BY OLIVER BAER

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2009 NATIONAL CLEAN CITIES COORDINATORS OF THE YEAR One of our own shares the award with a working partner from the Lone Star State.

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SOUTHEAST WINTER ALTERNATIVE NAFTC WORKS ON OUTREACH & FUELS INDUSTRY GATHERINGS Want to EDUCATION The National Alternative Fuels know the current state of affairs for public alt Training Consortium is helping Clean Cities fuel market growth in the southeast? Here ‘tis. coalitions get the word out and get in-the-know. BY JUDY MOORE 28 COUNCIL INTRODUCTION & CLEAN CITIES MAP UPDATED Learn about the 18 NATIONAL RETREAT PICTURES We came, coordinator leadership group that Clean Cities has and see the revised national coalition map. we worked, we networked, we partied.

ETHANOL, BIODIESEL REIGN IN ET Biofuel projects range from Genera Energy’s 29 21 grand opening to new public biofuel pumps to DOE REGIONAL CENTERS EXPAND They THE FIX PIX PAGES Alabama holds its cities progressing making their own biodiesel. replicated... err, duplicated... uh, let’s just go designation ceremony, biofuels expand in NC, BY JONATHAN OVERLY with added some cool staff - everybody wins. and more... we really do work hard! BY STEVEN RICHARDSON

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Cover art credit: Argentinian artist German Nobile.


editors’ notes Around this time last year, many of us were in the middle of responding to the opportunities that resulted from the signing of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on February 17, 2009. During the months, which often seemed like years, that ensued after this historic Act was signed, we built coalitions of dedicated and knowledgeable people. We created plans for increasing use of alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies. We typed until we thought we had severe carpel tunnel syndrome. We opened email boxes and listened to voicemails that seemed to quadruple over night. And now, about one year later, many of us are just beginning to implement these incredible and momentous projects. Recently I’ve been slightly frustrated with the rhetoric related to ARRA spending. Yes, it is a lot of money that we don’t have. Yes, a little strategy never hurt anyone. Yes, there are many administrative bottlenecks that are holding up spending. And yes, I’m sure there are many people that have ideas on how such sums of money could have been spent more wisely. However, let’s think about this in a different light Since every leader for over 30 years has preached of the importance of energy independence, and we continue to import more and more oil, it might be time for a change in strategy. The investment that will be made in the coming years in alternative energies is exhilarating. Our Southeast Propane Corridor Program alone will convert almost 1,200 vehicles to propane, install public propane refueling stations in at least 9 southeastern states, and provide the training necessary to first responders, code officials, and other key local decision makers. Over 15 million GGEs of petroleum will be displaced in 4 years, and 16,000 tons of air pollutants will be averted. Our coalition has been

working for almost 16 years on petroleum displacement activities, and we’re not even close to touching that 1,200 number when you add up ALL of the alt fuel projects that provided direct funding to stakeholders. With this funding, we were able to bring all the necessary people to the table to create a comprehensive program that is sure to surprise even us. The critical mass that is needed to stump that “chicken and egg” argument is finally within reach for many of us. Our projects are where the rubber meets the road. They will transform energy use for many fleets and consumers across this nation. And yes, this is just the beginning. Enjoy reading about what the tireless and transformative Clean Cities energy leaders are doing in their regions and states. - Chelsea Last November, all the Clean Cities coordinators gathered in my backyard in the Smoky Mountains in Gatlinburg, Tennessee for our annual retreat. One of the highlights was having a Cades Cove hayride tour guide named Pork Chop who was half Appalachian, half comedian. He was a hoot as a guide! The point of our getting together is to connect in person with each other and our leadership at DOE. While the time with DOE is important and necessary, the time with other coordinators is invaluable. The drive, spirit, ingenuity and achievements of our brethern constantly amazes me. Thus, the Fuels Fix. In the next edition, we will begin showcasing coordinators from our region and from other regions so that we can show you what I’m talking about. Here’s to spreading the clean-fueled word about not being “fuelish.” - Jonathan

Chelsea and Jonathan started the Southeastern Fuels Fix on zero budget with a desire to make a useful communication tool for Clean Cities coalitions in the southeast. We are a long way from where we want it to be, but we’ve made significant steps in the last year. Through expanding our readership, advertising, and the breadth and depth of the content, we hope to reach more Americans with useful information about alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

(For those interested, Pork Chop is the cowboy on the middle left of page 18.)

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CHARLOTTE MOVES ON ELECTRIC VEHICLES jason wager & sarah niess greater charlotte area

po box 35008, charlotte nc 28235 cleanfuels@centralina.org - 704-372-2416 www.4cleanfuels.com

With several electric vehicles (EVs) coming to market in 2010 and 2011, interest in EVs and the related infrastructure grew by leaps and bounds in the Charlotte region in 2009. To help stakeholders measure and prepare for the impact of EVs, the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition (CCFC) formed an Electric Vehicle Subcommittee in the fall of 2009. This diverse group is made up of CCFC stakeholders who have an active interest in EVs, related technologies and infrastructure, and how this advanced technology can positively and progressively impact Charlotte and the 9-county Centralina region.

educational program on green mobility in Mecklenburg County [Charlotte’s county] and assess the feasibility of designing, manufacturing and selling electric vehicles in the Charlotte region.”

In other exciting news, the City of Charlotte, an EV Subcommittee member, is seeking Energy Efficiency and Community Block Grant funding from the U.S. Department of Energy for EV charging stations in Uptown Charlotte. This project would provide public charging stations in visible locations within the City’s densely populated urban core and presents an opportunity for public education and outreach. This subcommittee has several objectives. One is Stakeholders have also been in communication with to provide and promote EV and EV infrastructure an electric vehicle original equipment manufacturer education for fleet managers, local government (OEM) to make Charlotte an early launch city for officials, and the public in the Centralina region, while their vehicles. Visit www.4cleanfuels.com for more another is to seek opportunities to develop high profile information. electric charging stations in the region. A third (and perhaps the most important) goal of this subcommittee is to participate in statewide EV initiatives. This group The plug-in vehicle on hand for a Fleet Manager’s Workshop put on by the Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition. has connected with Advanced Energy to learn more about the Project Get Ready program in Raleigh, NC, and there has been discussion of hosting a collaborative EV workshop in 2010. As an example of EV education in the community, on November 7, 2009, CCFC’s own Jason Wager was the lead-off guest speaker at The Charlotte Electric Vehicle Symposium. This program was sponsored by Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) and Get Tech and was held at CPCC’s Main Campus. The aim of this EV symposium was to have a “comprehensive

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Don “Zeus” Francis Knows Electric Cars

The Fix got a chance to sit down with the South’s very own ‘electric car guy’ - Don Francis - and we got a real charge out of the discussion. We picked his brain about all things vehicularly electric. We decided to let Don introduce himself before we went high voltage through a Q & A session. Francis became the Executive Director of Clean Cities-Atlanta in April 2009. Don sez...

and received a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical Engineering from General Motors Institute. I first moved to Atlanta in 1973 and since 1978 have lived and worked in the metro area full time. I currently reside in DeKalb County.

Electrifying Q & A I have been a car guy all my life. I was a third generation Oldsmobile employee following both my father and his step- Fix: So where do you keep your quiver, Zeus? father as employees in the Oldsmobile Service Department. Francis: Ha, ha. You only find out if you get hit by a fresh My maternal grandfather was a service representative for bolt, so be nice. Oakland Car Company, the predecessor to Pontiac Motor Company. My sister still works for General Motors and my Fix: We don’t like scars and are just not into that fried look, uncles and cousins were employees of one or more of the so don’t worry. What is it that gets you all excited about various General Motors Divisions. electrified transportation? Francis: It is a significant paradigm shift from the perspective I have forty years experience in automotive engineering, of where the energy comes from. It’s not one resource like sales and marketing activities. Employed by Georgia Power oil, it is a ubiquitous form of energy that can come from for 31 years, 13 of those years years I was assigned to the multiple sources, many of which can be renewable and company’s electric transportation program where my primary decentralized as we move forward. I’ve often described it as responsibility was business unit manager for the sale, reinventing the automobile because it is such a mental shift installation and service of electric vehicle chargers to internal in terms of how we refuel. The transition touches emissions and external customers. During this time, I served on many issues and energy security issues, but at the top it will local community and industry committees working on electric change how many view personal transportation. As you’ve vehicle infrastructure and market development. seen for me, working on personal transportation goes back in my family so this is personally a very exciting adventure. During my EV years, I have driven many different electric vehicles from the Griffon (English GM product) electric vans Fix: You touched on the mental shift for driving Americans. brought into the U.S. in the late 80’s through the Tesla. From Would you expound on that thought... 1998 through 2004, my primary vehicles were a collection of Francis: Today, many Americans would buy a large SUV GM EV1’s, Chevrolet S-10E, Ford Ranger EV’s and Toyota because they need to tow the boat twice a year. It’s that RAV4-EV’s. I averaged about 25,000 miles per year driving thinking that we buy an automobile for the all the uses battery electric vehicles back and forth to work and on all we need for transport, no matter how substantially that of my personal trips except those out of the Atlanta metro impacts the entire rest of our driving time and wallet. I like area. In one of those years, my other personal vehicle used to think that type of thinking harks back to a time when only three tanks of gas in the entire year. To say I’ve been air was clean and sex was dirty, But that is changing. I’ve involved in and with electric vehicles is an understatement. recently heard from some Ford groups that they think the private personal ownership of vehicles will disappear in the After early retirement from Georgia Power, I took on the coming decades, because it just is not sustainable. Think challenge of Coordinator for Clean Cities-Atlanta. Although of the over 1 billion people in China that are desiring their just becoming Coordinator, I’m far from new to Clean Cities- own transportation. Can you imagine a billion Impalas or Atlanta as I was at the ceremony at the Georgia Dome in Explorers driving around China? Remember that America 1993 when Clean Cities-Atlanta was designated as the first now has over 300 million people and we had half that during Clean Cities coalition in the nation. Prior to being elected as Kennedy’s presidency. The scenario just doesn’t work the coalition leader, I served on the Board of Directors and well into this century. Here’s the bottom line. We cannot was the coalition Treasurer from 2000 to 2005. I continue to wait any longer to diversify our primary refueling resource be active in the electric vehicle community and am a member away from petroleum-based products. And looking at all of the Board of Directors of the Electric Auto Association. I these alternatives - I’d pick electric vehicles, but there’s am also a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers no question that in certain applications, other fuels will be

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the optimum choice. Honestly, we need to preserve the oil for where it’s needed most, and that is not gas or diesel. Fix: Wow... that population concept hurt my head but I think I get it. With the idea that a shift is needed, it is kind of amazing to look at the last handful of years and see how far EVs have come with a growing body of both lower-speed and highspeed vehicles coming to the market. From, Aptera, Sparrow and Tesla to the Volt and the LEAF, the options just seem to keep growing. What do you think are the key steps we here in the U.S. need to make to have the kind of expansion EV use? Francis: Infrastructure deployment is the key critical item (Clean Cities people know this), and that includes at home, at work, and at play. Technology issues surround energy storage are maturing at a rapid pace. We’ve got 100 years of refueling network that we need to duplicate in a handful of years, perhaps 5-10. And this has to work in terms of the infrastructure. We don’t go out of the way to refuel today, and it needs to be that way for electric vehicles. Fix: Let’s skip to the topic of consumer acceptance - what roadblocks are in the way of consumers being really comfortable about electric vehicle safety and performance? Francis: First and foremost, range and range that meets the mission. The average car in Atlanta is driven 40 miles in a day. So vehicles such as the LEAF that are “restricted” to 100 miles are way more than enough for the vast majority of Americans. This is one of the critical paradigm shifts that needs to take place and education is a key piece of how we help make this change. We don’t need to buy a vehicle anymore for the uses it provides that you will use twice a year. Second, EVs perform better than today’s car because of torque characteristics of electric motors. EVs have maximum torque at zero RPM, so in terms of acceleration, Americans will love them. But that

can top out in certain cars at certain speeds whereas an ICE can still feed more fuel. However, this won’t apply to most vehicles and the vast majority of American drivers. Third, consider that the insurance industry likes EVs! There are no flammable fuels or hot liquids on board. Imagine for a moment flipping this scenario: 100 years ago electric vehicles became the standard and everybody was driving them. Then along comes this idea for everyone to drive around with an explosive liquid in their auto. How would that go over? Exposure is risk. Certainly last but not least, cost. The total cost of ownership for a car - the average customer today does not act on that concept. There thought is “what will my car payment be?” This is one area where we have some work to do, but some great tools like FuelEconomy. gov have come along and are helping. The thinking with EV pricing is the vehicle and fuel cost over the period of ownership would be the same before the federal and state tax credits. We will clearly have some work to do in winning over consumers but there are some really attractive parts to EVs that will help in that process. Fix: OK, we are out of space, but I have to ask... what’s your favorite electric car that is coming out, and why? Francis: I have 2 favorites. While electric drive, I can take off in the extended range Volt and drive to Birmingham and not worry - just go. Simultaneously I look at a vehicle like the LEAF and it is a great product. Those that need to or at least cling to their need to infrequently in their own car go some longer distance, will likely buy the Volt. But I am the example of the perfect candidate for the LEAF because I just don’t drive my own car a long way. I made a commitment some years back that I wasn’t going to buy a new car until I can plug it in, so I could end up in either.

Francis enjoys driving his friends’ EVs, especially when that is a Tesla Roadster. Here he is with a “friend’s’”Tesla - it belongs to Georgia Power.

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FUEL EFFICIENCY GAINS AT PALM TRAN larry allen florida - gold coast

3440 hollywood boulevard, suite 140, hollywood fl 33021 lallen@sfrpc.com - 954-985-4416 sfrpc.com/fgcccc.htm

Palm Tran is the public transit agency for Palm Beach County. Palm Tran has made significant improvements over the years in the areas of environmental stewardship, operational efficiency and fiscal responsibility. At public transit agencies, an effective fuel management program is central to operational success. Palm Tran’s use of the miniHYBRID thermal system manufactured by Engineered Machine Products (EMP) has led to an increase in average miles per gallon achieved by transit buses, which translates to a decrease in company fuel costs. Fuel conservation is of the utmost importance to transit agencies when considering environmental and financial resources. In the fall of 2007, Palm Tran was approached by EMP representatives with an innovative idea that had the potential to bring significant cost savings to the company in the form of lower fuel consumption. The idea was to replace the existing hydraulic fan systems in Palm Tran’s buses with EMP’s mini-HYBRID thermal systems. EMP presented statistical evidence from other transit systems in the U.S. demonstrating the effectiveness of the mini-HYBRID system. Intrigued by the potential offered by the EMP system, Palm Tran officials decided to explore the possibility of incorporating the system into existing operations. Each mini-HYBRID thermal system cost $20,000. Palm Tran decided to proceed with two installations to allow for testing of the EMP technology prior to making additional investments. The mini-HYBRID thermal systems were purchased and installed on two-2006 Gillig 40foot low floor buses—typical representatives of the buses found in Palm Tran’s fleet. Palm Tran designed a test to monitor the average miles per gallon achieved by the two selected buses in the six months preceding the installation and the six months after the work to retrofit the buses was completed. The test conducted on the two

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retrofitted buses showed positive results. The buses had improved average miles per gallon measurements of .5 and .6 additional miles. This improved fuel efficiency has the potential to save the agency more than $5,000 per retrofitted bus per year. Within three years of operation, the cost of installing the new miniHYBRID thermal system will be outweighed by the savings in fuel costs. The investment could show returns sooner, given that this cost estimation is based on a fuel price of $3.00 per gallon. Palm Tran used these results to apply for grant funds geared toward energy efficiency and reduction of fuel emissions. Demonstrating the successfulness of the testing period earned Palm Tran economic stimulus funding from both the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and the Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) program, enabling the agency to purchase an additional 50 systems. To date, 21 additional buses have been retrofitted with the miniHYBRID thermal system. Going forward, all new buses purchased by Palm Tran will come with the system as standard equipment.

The EMP mini-HYBRID system is shown being installed on one of the city’s buses.


GETTIN’ GASEOUS IN ASHEVILLE bill eaker north carolina - asheville

339 new leicester highway, suite 140, asheville nc 28806 bill@landofsky.org - 828-251-6622 x142 landofsky.org/planning/p_cvc_home.html

The Asheville, North Carolina region is making great progress converting to alternative fueled and advanced technology vehicles. In December, Blue Ridge Biofuels opened its eleventh biodiesel pump at the Eblen Short Stop Station on Amboy Road in Asheville (see Pix Pages). Funding for the infrastructure project came in part from the US Department of Energy (Southeast Ethanol and Biofuels Infrastructure Corridor Project grant), NC Division of Air Quality, NC Biofuels Center, Eblen Oil and Progress Energy. Progress Energy will fuel its diesel vehicles with B20 at the station. Blue Ridge Biofuels is an Asheville biodiesel producer and distributor and uses recycled waste-vegetable oil from area restaurants as their feedstock.

chance to test drive the Roush F-250 propane pickup and the AutoGas Ford Crown Victoria sedan and to check out an EnviroGard Propane Mower. Following the Show, stakeholders visited the region’s first public access propane vehicle fueling system installed recently by Alliance AutoGas at the German Motor Werks facility in south Asheville.

AltechEco Energy of Asheville has received its EPA Certifications for several Ford vehicles including the Focus and Fusion. They offer both dedicated and bi-fuel options. AltechEco does CNG conversions and owns a public access CNG station in south Asheville.

Clockwise from top right, pictures for our February 1 coalition meeting and Propane Roadshow event. 1 - Ford F-250 Propane Truck behind Jason Culler of Ferrellgas in a WLOS-TV interview. 2 - The Alliance AutoGas propane Crown Vic and our new public access propane fueling system at German Motor Werks facility on Sweeten Creek Road in Asheville. 3 - EnviroGard Propane Mower. 4 - John Mitchell, WNC representative for Senator Richard Burr, and Lee McElrath of PSNC Energy talk at the coalition meeting.

Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock has joined the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) and is beginning its training program with a continuing education course “Introduction to Alternative Fueled Vehicles” that started February 9. The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition organized a January 11 meeting of colleges and the region’s alternative fuel and vehicle providers to discuss the region’s training needs and assist in developing the college’s curriculum. The region held a Propane Road Show event on February 1 in Asheville to explain the benefits of using this clean, domestic fuel and to showcase propane vehicles and equipment. Speakers included representatives from Ferrellgas, Alliance AutoGas, Roush, and CleanFUEL USA. Fleet managers and other coalition stakeholders got a

For more information on these activities or the Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition, contact Bill Eaker at 828-2516622 or bill@ landofsky.org.

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BIOFUELS FOCUS Startup Lowering the Price of Biofuels At-the-Pump AND Reducing Diesel Emissions Pioneering Michigan Firm is Helping Biofuels “Go To Market” Using their patent pending FAST™ on-site Biofuel Mixing & Clean Transportation Stations. Detroit, Mich. – The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards and biofuel mandates are necessitating that fueling centers and fleet operators consider new infrastructure to store and dispense multiple fuels, fluids and concentrations. Reducing tailpipe emissions and increasing the use of renewable fuels are driving these new types of legislation. The added cost for new equipment, plus installation expenses and lack of available options, is hampering the market’s ability to carry the multitude of new fuels and fluids. Clean Emission Fluids, Inc. (CEF) is a high-tech startup with patented technology that solves the infrastructure challenge for truck stops, gas stations and fleet centers. The company’s FAST™ systems are rapidly deployable, mobile and permanent, Biofuel Blending and Clean Transportation Stations. FAST stations are self-contained, or integrate with existing tanks, and offer any blend or combination of fuel, fluid or additive directly at the dispense point. Mobile CEF FAST TM Biofuel Blending Station.

Clean Emission Fluids’ FAST system is 100 percent proven with high value incentives for customers, according to company President, CEO and Cofounder, Oliver Baer. “FAST has been supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated Next Energy Center and National Biofuels Energy Laboratory in Detroit, Michigan by blending on-site, on-demand biodiesel to area fleets including, Art Van Furniture, a large Michigan based furniture retailer”, according to Baer. Intelligence built-in to each FAST system tracks the inventories and performance of every gallon of biofuel or other fluid dispensed. Baer adds, “Consumption and inventory data is automatically sent to CEF’s iFAST Network™ where customers and stakeholders have direct Web access.”

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Remote tracking of inventory combined with the company’s patent pending fuel blending techniques, termed “micro-blending”, is helping to lower Biofuel prices at the pump. 100% Biodiesel, or other renewable fuels, may be shipped directly from the producer into marketplace, streamlining distribution and lowering transport costs. The end result is a lowered biofuel price at the pump with the added ability to vary concentrations based on a number of factors, including truck type, temperature and commodity prices. iFAST also offers its blend-of-choice, according to Baer, whereby users can “ask the system” to recommend a fuel blend based on their requirements. This custom blend can be based on lowering the per gallon price, fuel economy, emission level and even maintaining compliance with their manufacturer’s warranty. According to Chris Channell, the company’s Director of Engineering, “FAST Technology revolutionizes the way truck operators manage their fuel consumption to maximize their efficiency for long-term savings.” CEF DEF “Mini” FAST™ Unit. The company is supporting Clean Cities programs around the country, including the I-75 Biofuel Corridor Program, in addition to direct commercial sales.

On the Clean Diesel side, FAST is being used to store and dispense urea-based Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) which is necessary for most new 2010 trucks to meet the EPA’s new Tier 2 Bin 5 tailpipe emission standards. Recently, FAST systems were installed at Midwest grocery and merchandise chain, Meijer, Inc.’s, fleet center in Lansing, Michigan.

FAST™ Biofuel Blending Station at Next Energy Center in Detroit, MI. Art Van Furniture fleet vehicles shown.

The result of FAST’s multi-fluid and fuel blending capability is the ability to offer practical infrastructure for any type of fueling center, while offering any concentration to increase bottom line revenues. Additional information on Clean Emission Fluids, Inc. and their FAST technology may be found at www.cleanemsisionfluids.com. Oliver Baer may also be contacted at (888) WOW-DIESEL or by email at obaer@cleanemissionfluids.com.


ETHANOL, BIODIESEL REIGN IN ET jonathan overly east tennessee

311 conference center bldg, knoxville tn 37996-4134 jgoverly@utk.edu - 865-974-3625 www.etcleanfuels.org

Genera Energy Grand Opening Genera Energy, a partnership between the University of Tennessee, the state of Tennessee and DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC, held its grand opening on January 29 of this year. Over 500 people attended to hear about the plans for the plant and the region, and get a peek inside the plant via a guided tour. The facility will ramp up to it’s capacity of 250,000 gallons per year this year, but its primary focus is not ethanol production but ethanol research. The steps needed to make cellulosic ethanol a mainstay on the American fuel horizon are many, and this plant and community will be a testing area for both finding efficiencies in the fuel production process as well as in the field. The end game is to create a market for energy crops, specifically switchgrass in Tennessee, and to be able to produce cost competitive “Grassoline” (trademarked by UT) while generating a respectable income for farmers. This team and project is working to make the system work all the way from planting the seeds to refueling your car on renewable, Tennessee-grown fuel. ETCleanFuels is working with the team on outreach and education. Part of the collaboration is focused on K-12 students in the main three counties that are growing the swtichgrass (Loudon, Monroe and McMinn) where presentations are educating the students on what is going on locally and how their future choices and actions will have an impact on their planet and community. See pictures from the event here (ETCleanFuels Flickr channel) and see a recent video discussion with Sam Jackson, the VP of Feedstock Operations here (ETCleanFuels YouTube channel). [Background picture above photo credit - Sam Jackson, Genera Energy. Picture is of round bales of harvested switchgrass on the Stokley Farm in Tellico Plains, TN.]

East Ridge Gets its Green Groove On Over the past few months, the City of East Ridge (a member of ETCleanFuels) has been quietly building a high-profile, lowbudget municipal biodiesel production program. Last August, City Manager William Whitson hired Kevin Verro—a sharp and enthusiastic young professional—to serve as the city’s new Fleet Services and Biodiesel Coordinator. Quietly, this dynamic duo has been building a local resource-based biodiesel production program that will include citizen participation and will pull on the entire East Ridge community to provide used cooking oil for the project. Modeled off of successful programs in several other southeastern cities including Hoover, Alabama and Panama City, Florida, East Ridge looks to be the first East Tennessee municipal program (and the second in Tennessee) for producing their own biodiesel. Adopting many of the successful aspects of these programs, East Ridge is currently on track to be fully operational in April and is projected to be completed under the designated $18,000 budget. Often, it is not easy to truly go green, but when all the kinks are worked out of the system, the city council expects to use the biodiesel program as an educational tool and starting block for other community-based environmental programs.

Rogers Oil Completes Four New Combined E85/B20 Stations ETCleanFuels partner Rogers Oil of Morristown recently completed opening its fourth combined B20 and E85 station in our region thanks to funding from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT). Now the cities of Kingsport, Kingston, Bulls Gap and Newport all have public access to both fuels. This is the first for both Kingston and Bulls Gap for both fuels, and the first availability for B20 for Kingsport and the first E85 for Newport. All of these locations are also on major thoroughfares through East Tennessee: Kingston and Newport are on I-40, Bulls Gap is on I-81, and the Kingsport station is immediately off of I-26 which has its northern terminus in Kingsport and connects to Charleston, SC, through Asheville, NC and Spartanburg and Columbia in SC. Rogers has put the fuels availability and/or price on their readerboards, and placed above ground tanks in Bulls Gap to create a visual attraction at the site (see below). Additionally, thanks to a great team at TDOT, Rogers has some added bonuses next to their blue highways signs that denote E85 and B20 availability: a large additional sign that says “biofuel.” TDOT will hoist the additional sign into place if the station denotes their biofuels availability in their logo’ed space. These signs are helping raise awareness that the fuel is at-hand locally as well as bring customers to the door. Top - The above ground tanks at Bulls Gap with Rogers’ own designs for the E85 and B20. Nice job! Bottom - One of the Rogers logo’ed blue highway signs with the TDOT-supplied additional “biofuel” sign on top. TDOT places the sign on the inside towards the driver to make them as noticeable as possible. Also, there are four signs for each exit in non-urban areas, so as long as the station owner puts the fuels availability on each sign, four of the extra blue signs are added. The picture shows one of the signs that is on the exit which also shows the distance and direction to the station.

SPRING FIX 2010

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ALT FUELS GENESIS erika h. myers south carolina

1200 senate street, 408 wade hampton bldg, columbia sc 29201 emyers@energy.sc.gov - 803-737-7951 palmettocleanfuels.org

A Genesis at USC On December 1, the University of South Carolina announced its latest sustainability iniative, Genesis 2015. This campaign aims to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions from its fleet of vehicles by 90 percent within five years. This iniative will put the University first in the state for committing to operate all of its vehicles on an alternative fuel. The comprehensive plan will power all vehicles on

John F. Clarke, Director of the South Carolina Energy Office, commends USC for their efforts at the public announcement of Genesis 2015.

the Columbia campus with ethanol, biodiesel, propane, electricity or hydrogen fuel cells. Currently the university has about 400 vehicles in its fleet, 156 of which could be converted right now. USC is a partner in the Carolina Blue Skies and Green Jobs initiative. With this grant, they anticipate being able to convert 13 vehicles to propane and install propane fueling infrastructure. “Today, we are making a commitment that will drive Carolina into a new era of environmental responsibility,” President Pastides said.” “This is another important initiative supported by our faculty, staff and students 3 to create a campus that will be climate neutral.” Michael Komman, director of sustainability for USC, estimates that this iniative will reduce USC’s carbon footprint by more than 2,000 tons.

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Andrew Epting Andrew Epting has been working in the alternative energy and sustainability sector for four years. His first official role in advocating for a sustainable community was as Secretary of Environmental Affairs in Student Government at the University of South Carolina. There he promoted recycling, waste reduction among the university’s faculty, staff and students, as well as assisted the university in developing a bike/pedestrian master plan. In 2007, Andrew started a small photovoltaic and solar thermal company in the USC/ Columbia Technology Incubator. His company, Palmetto Solar focused on small residential solar installations. Andrew competed in the New Ideas/New Carolina competition and in Fall 2007 and won Runner-Up for Palmetto Solar. He also won the Environmental Category and a grant in Spring of 2008 for his Photon Turbine, based upon the Crooke’s Radiometer. Andrew graduated from the University of South Carolina in May of 2009 with a degree in History. In November of 2007, Andrew was offered a position at the South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Alliance as Staff Specialist. While at the Alliance, Andrew conducted nichemarket research regarding applications for the material handling and remote telecommunications industries, as well as end-user risk perceptions of hydrogen and fuel cell technology in the workplace. He worked directly with the South Carolina Science Education Leaders Association and the National Energy Education Development Program to implement multi-disciplinary activities regarding hydrogen and fuel cells into K-12 educational programs. In February of 2010, Andrew was offered a position at the South Carolina State Energy Office as Grants Coordinator for the Palmetto State Clean Fuels Coalition. He will manage a variety of Clean Cities duties and will provide assistance to existing and new alternative fuel programs. Andrew looks forward to working with the Clean Cities Team and will be attending the Clean Cities Eastern States Peer Exchange meeting in June.


Are you ready to navigate ... - carbon cap and trade, - higher conventional fuel prices, or - Katrina II? Let Clean Cities be your guide.

Fuels diversity can be a fleet’s best friend. Your local Clean Cities coordinator and coalition have the experience to help you find the information and resources you need to feel confident with a transition to alternative fuels use. You just have to ask. Visit www.CleanCities.info to find contact information for your nearby coalition.

Clean Transportation for Energy Independence!


GREEN LUNCHES IN GEORGIA charise stephens middle, southern and northern georgia 200 cherry street, macon, ga 31201 stephens,charise@macon.ga.us - 478-803-2506 www.mga-cleancities.com

Southeastern Transformers (Clean Cities coordinators that is)

for change! Here’s where you can find us online!

It’s the start of a New Year and the future looks bright in Georgia! In partnership with the City of Macon, the Middle Georgia Clean Cities Coalition hosted a “Green Lunch” with city employees recently. This is a kick-off for a year long push to educate employees of all the middle Georgia region on alternative fuels, energy efficiency, and being good stewards of our community. We believe in empowering employees to affect real change

in reducing our petroleum dependence, and energy security. Charise Stephens gave a class on anti-idling, alternative fuels 101 and What is Clean Cities? There were additional classes on tire pressure and car maintenance. Lunch was sponsored by CleanFuel USA -- thank you April Dent!! The North Georgia satellite office of MGCCC is working on their “Green Lunch” series and will work with counties there to complete by 2011.

Alabama Alabama Clean Fuels Coalition http://www.AlabamaCleanFuels.org Arkansas Arkansas Clean Cities Coalition http://www.ARCleanCities.org Florida Space Coast Clean Cities http://www.clean-cities.org Gold Coast Clean Cities Coalition http://www.sfrpc.com/fgcccc.htm Georgia Clean Cities-Atlanta http://www.CleanCitiesAtlanta.net Middle Georgia Clean Cities http://www.mga-cleancities.com Kentucky Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition http://www.kentuckycleanfuels.org North Carolina Triangle Clean Cities http://www.TriangleCleanCities.org Centralina Clean Fuels Coalition http://www.4cleanfuels.com Land-of-Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition http://www.landofsky.org/planning/p_cvc_home.html

South Carolina Palmetto State Clean Fuels Coalition http://www.PalmettoCleanFuels.org Tennessee East Tennessee Clean Fuels http://www.ETCleanFuels.org Clean Cities of Middle Tennessee http://www.tennesseecleanfuels.org Virginia Virginia Clean Cities http://www.hrccc.org

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GHG Reductions - Alternative Fuels Contributed by Wenny Ng, East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition With so many numbers floating around regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, we wanted to compile widely accepted, alternative-fuel GHG reduction rates into one location. Sometimes, articles refer to GHG reductions but do not specify tailpipe or life-cycle emissions, and there have also been debates regarding the inclusion of indirect land use. Although GHG emissions are directly correlated to the amount of fuel consumed in the fuel use cycle, remember that fuel efficiency in vehicles varies based on a multitude of different criteria including but not limited to a driver’s driving style, routes and traffic. This data sheet will hopefully provide some clarity to average alternative fuels’ GHG reductions for each fuel. (And we are just going to break the rules and put “%”s in here, OK?)

19% electricity Electric vehicles have no tailpipe emissions. However, since electric power is often generated by fossil fuels, GHGs are still emitted. According to an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) report, there is a 19% reduction of GHGs when using electric vehicles as compared to gasoline-powered vehicles uaing average grid data. Furthermore, as solar and other more environmentally friendly electricity generating technologies become more widespread, the life cycle emissions will only improve.

23% natural gas (cng) Natural gas is stored on vehicles as a gas (CNG, compressed natural gas) or as a liquid (LNG, liquefied natural gas). While both reduce GHG emissions, LNG has a lower reduction since it must be processed into liquid form, and that takes more energy. ANL reports a 21-26% decrease in GHGs when CNG is used, and according to a study conducted by the California Energy Commission, CNG reduced GHG emissions by 30% in cars and 23% in buses.

78% biodiesel (B100) This number comes from the widely accepted combined DOE/USDA study from 1999 that is based on soybean oil, which still accounts for roughly 70% of biodiesel raw material use in the U.S. New EPA life-cycle analyses based on soy that include indirect land use suggest that the number is 57% but could be as high as 85%, so considering yellow greases and animal fats make up the remainder, it is quite possible that the original DOE/USDA number hits the mark today if you are including all raw materials.

22% propane (lpg) LPG, more commonly known as propane, can be used to replace gasoline in light-duty vehicles or diesel in heavy-duty vehicles. ANL completed a full life-cycle analysis of propane used in lightduty vehicles and found that propane reduced GHG emissions by 21%-24%. The Propane Education and Research Council compared GHG emissions in forklifts, buses, and lightduty trucks and found similar emissions reductions as compared to gasoline.

21% ethanol (e85) Multiple studies point to E85 life-cycle GHG emissions reductions of about 21%. Studies have even shown that ethanol’s GHG emissions can be reduced up to 86%. The life-cycle GHG emissions reduction varies depending on what type of raw material and fuel is used in the production process. If a corn ethanol plant is fueled primarily by coal, GHG emissions may even increase, but using natural gas or biomass as fuel can greatly decrease emissions. However, the RFS II will push cellulosic crops to the forefront by 2022, and cellulosic GHG reductions are forecasted to be much greater.

SPRING FIX 2010

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SKY TRAIN bill young florida - space coast

1679 clearlake road, cocoa fl 32922-5703 young@fsec.ucf.edu - 321-638-1443 www.clean-cities.org

Electric Vehicle technology is advancing in mass transportation with the development of an Automoted People Mover (APM) in Florida. A Florida company, Sky Train Corporation (STC), has developed a solution to help mitigate traffic congestion in the Orlando area with a high speed rail passenger vehicle and a solar-powered charging station. Their two part system consists of an Overhead Suspended Light Rail (OSLR) monorail, the Sky Train, and an Alternative Energy Collection, Storage and Transfer mechanism that moves people and freight in an efficient manner while reducing fuel consumption, pollution and congestion. The Sky Train re-arranged rail system carries passengers and/or freight through the use of interchangeable vehicles suspended from an overhead structure reducing ground level congestion and traffic backups, while increasing safety and comfort. Because the Sky Train rides hanging from support structures the system pathways can be configured to fit into an existing facility layout and maneuver through a congested area with ease. Construction of the system is cost effective and quicker to assemble, so there is less disruption

to traffic patterns, ecosystems or local businesses during the installation stage. Once in operation it will eliminate much of the pollution attributed to conventional vehicle passenger transport by replacing the diesel consuming busses with the electrified Sky Train. The system conserves energy, but also allows use of renewables to further reduce demands on the grid and energy costs for local transit. The Energy Transfer Station will use photovoltaics to generate power and ultra capacitors for storage along with other power devices to generate the cleanest renewable energy for this new modern transportation system. At present, Sky Train only has a demonstration model of the APM vehicle. There are plans to construct a one-kilometer track with vehicle and Energy Transfer station to circulate throughout the greater Orlando area and providing connectivity with the city center, universities, airports, seaports, theme parks and International Drive area. When the program is fully funded and constructed, alternative energy transportation will have a new modern look.

Clean Transportation for Energy Independence!

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OUTREACH FOCUSGAS REVIVAL FLORIDA’S NATURAL NAFTC Works On Outreach & Education

Contributed by Judy Moore, National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium

2010 National AFV Day Odyssey Mark your calendars, the date has been set! National AFV Day Odyssey 2010 will be held nationwide on Friday, October, 15, 2010. Since Odyssey’s beginning in 2002, U.S. DOE Clean Cities Coalitions across the nation have participated in the conduct of this incredible event, significantly contributing to the recordbreaking crowds. If you aren’t familiar with National AFV Day Odyssey, it is the largest one-day event dedicated to promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and advanced technology vehicles. Coordinated nationally by the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), and partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy, the biennial event endorses AFVs and advanced technology vehicles as the best choice for the future of America. In 2008 there were 90 different Odyssey events hosted across the U.S., with nearly 200,000 individuals in attendance, and over 50 million individuals reached through media outlets. Over 900 organizations and companies participated, including 53 Clean Cities Coalitions! Al Ebron, Executive Director of the NAFTC said, “We strive to increase the impact of Odyssey every year. For the 2010 event, we hope to recruit 125 sites across the U.S. and attract well over 200,000 attendees.” Other goals for Odyssey 2010 include reaching out to new organizations,

such as secondary schools, increasing participation by other green-focused businesses and reaching over 75 million individuals through media coverage. Additional information on National AFV Day Odyssey can be found at www.nationalafvdayodyssey.org. Clean Cities Learning Program The National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) is working in partnership with the U.S. DOE Clean Cities Program to develop a turn-key Clean Cities Learning Program. This program will include curricula and training programs that will be utilized, to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of alternative fuels, alternative fuel vehicles, and advanced vehicle technologies, for a targeted outreach and education effort. This program will enable Clean Cities Coalitions, and other stakeholders, to better implement petroleum reduction technologies by advancing the use of alternative fuels, alternative fuel vehicles, advanced vehicle technologies, and idle reduction technologies, through state-ofthe-art curricula, training, outreach and education materials which will be disseminated by the NAFTC and U.S. DOE Clean Cities. There will be two different training programs developed, First Responder Safety Training and Petroleum Reduction Technologies Training. Each will consist of numerous modules and will be customizable to meet the needs of many different audiences. The First Responder Safety Training will include modules on Biofuels and Biofueled Vehicles, Gaseous Fuels and Gaseous Fueled Vehicles, Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles. The Petroleum Reduction Technologies Training will include modules on Biodiesel; Ethanol; Natural Gas; Propane; Hybrid Electric Vehicles (including plug-in hybrids); Hydrogen; and Fuel Economy and Idle Reduction. For additional information on the Clean Cities Learning Program, please contact Judy Moore at judy.moore@mail.wvu.edu or Cathy Mezera at Catherine.mezera@mail.wvu.edu, or by phone at 304293-7882.

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2009 National Coordinators Leadership Retreat Great Smoky Mountains national park The Clean Cites’ coordinators get together annually with DOE and other contractors to get directly connected and keep one another abreast of what is going on across America. It is definitely a renewal time for coordinators, and starting 3 years ago we decided to begin meeting at national parks. Mammoth Cave, Yellowstone... then the Smokies. Here are a few pictures from this year’s adventures in Gatlinburg and the Great Smoky Mountains.

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2009 National Coordinators Leadership Retreat Great Smoky Mountains national park

SPRING FIX 2010

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A BIG “THANK YOU!” to all our 2009 National Clean Cities Coordinators Retreat sponsors!!

THE MATRIX - PUBLIC ALT FUELS STATIONS IN THE SOUTHEAST State

\

Fuel

B20

B-other1

CNG

E85

H2

LNG

LPG

Alabama

33

7

3

14

0

0

159

216

Florida

15

0

17

20

2

0

49

103

Georgia

28

1

19

32

0

0

39

119

Kentucky

0

6

0

10

0

0

16

32

Mississippi

5

0

1

0

0

36

42

North Carolina

24

9

12

0

0

50

112

2

2

0 3

17

3

Total

South Carolina

9

28

1

68

2

0

27

135

Tennessee

32

6

0

33

0

0

53

124

Virginia

21

19

4

3

1

0

21

69

Totals

167

84

53

193

5

0

450

952

NOTES FOR THE SPRING 2010 MATRIX: This is a listing of public stations only! It is our best effort to quarterly aggregate accurate information on public alt fuel stations in our states. Changes from quarter to quarter are noted in parentheses. The data was compiled using information directly from Clean Cities coordinators and their working partners in each state, and the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) Website at www.eere.energy.gov/afdc/. The partners who helped us with some of the numbers include: GA - Jennifer Wilson, Georgia Energy Innovations Center; TN - Linda Tidwell, Tennessee Department of Transportation. In some cases, the number provided is just the AFDC number because we do not have any more accurate information. 1. “B-other” is public stations for any blend other than B20, and that includes lower and higher blends. 2. Uncertain of split between B20 and B-other in Alabama. This is a best guesstimate. 3. NC has three stations that sell B20 and at least one other blend; they are counted in both columns.

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DOE REGIONAL STAFF EXPANDS steven richardson southeast DOE program leader

po box 880, morgantown wv 26507-0880 steven.richardson@netl.doe.gov - 304-285-4185 www1.eere.energy.gov/cleancities/

DOE is pleased to announce they have recently added two new persons to their regional management staff, Brad Beauchamp and Erin Russel-Story. Brad Beauchamp is the regional Clean Cities project manager for the Midwest region and is the point of contact for Clean Cities’ coalitions in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin. Erin Russell-Story is the regional Clean Cities project manager for the Mid-Atlantic region and is the point of contact for Clean Cities’ coalitions in the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Their responsibilities include facilitating the efforts of the Clean Cities coalitions to increase the use of alternative fuels and vehicles through the development of publicprivate partnerships. Along with traditional project management duties, they facilitate technology deployment strategies, evaluate proper alternative fuel technologies, determine resource availability, provide technical assistance, contribute areas of expertise, and support transportation market transformation activities. Their addition has also allowed for the realignment of some states into different regions. Arkansas is now formally in the Southeast Region, while Virginia has moved to the Mid-Atlantic Region.

public deployment of fuel cell vehicles through Project Driveway. Brad also served on the Philadelphia Clean Cities Board, presented at various conferences, and helped educate fleets about alternative transportation solutions. Russell-Story joined Clean Cities in late 2009. She has worked in the fields of alternative fuels, energy efficiency, and renewable energy for over a dozen years, including as a Clean Cities coordinator. Russell-Story initiated the Northeast Ohio coalition and then served as the coordinator

for Vermont Clean Cities. In that role she also served as executive director of EVermont, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the testing, research, and demonstration Before joining the team at Clean Cities, Beauchamp worked of alternative fuel vehicles, particularly electric drive for General Motors for over 20 years. He has been involved technology. She has extensive experience as an consistently with managing vehicle and energy-related independent contractor and consultant, having supported projects throughout his career and has a vast knowledge of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy, Renewable energy efficient vehicle technologies, alternative fuels, and Energy Vermont, the Vermont Biofuels Association and the fueling infrastructure. Beauchamp has put in thousands of Greater New Haven Hydrogen Transit Bus Development miles of real world use into alternative fuel and advanced Project. In addition to her knowledge of Clean Cities technology vehicles, as well using their supporting and advanced technology vehicles, Russell-Story has infrastructure. This included work with the world’s first large experience in fundraising, marketing, and media relations.

SPRING FIX 2010

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BITS FROM THE BLUEGRASS melissa howell kentucky

po box 5174, lexington ky 40255 kycleanfuels@insightbb.com - 502-452-9152 www.kentuckycleanfuels.org

More E85 Comin’ Kentucky’s E85 public refueling system continues to grow, thanks in great part to Thorntons! Three additional E85 retail sites will be open before April 1st, all in Louisville. This brings to five the number of E85 locations for Thorntons. Hybrid Buses Almost Rolling The Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus project is rolling right along. Applications from school district across the state are already coming in, with the selection process complete by the end of February. Below is the print and electronic logo for the project that will see placement of 215 diesel hybrid electric school buses in Kentucky public school bus fleets. In addition, each bus will have back bumper and dual body side signage provided by the manufacturers.

Mercertown - Idle Reduction in Downtown Louisville Mercertown, as it has come to be known, is located on 14 acres in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. The corporate headquarters for Mercer Transportation was founded in 1977 and today operates a network of over 90 field offices across the country. Mercer is a 100 percent owner operator trucking company that did not wait for the “green” movement to begin, they lead the way in Kentucky with Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) hookups for drivers. Fifty spaces have been equipped with APU power for several years. Mercer is now a member of the Smartway Program and began working with the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition late last year on expansion of the APU system at the Louisville location.

Thomas Built Buses and International are the two manufacturers supplying buses to Kentucky for the project. Below are the logos that will identify the buses as “hybrid” to the general public. Over 400 trucks move through Mercertown each week. Saving a gallon of fuel per hour as they shut down and plug up nets financial gains for drivers. Reduction of harmful air emissions provides gains for the entire city - Mercertown/ Louisville.

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CITY OF DURHAM AND TOWN OF CARY HONORED FOR GREEN FLEETS kathy boyer central north carolina

Below are resources that can make your alternative fuels work easier, and faster. Just click on any of the boxes or links to visit these resrouces online.

po box 12276, research triangle park nc 27709 kboyer@tjcog.org - 919-558-9400 trianglecleancities.org

Fleet managers and other local government representatives gathered to learn from the successes of the City of Durham and the Town of Cary. These two fleets were ranked among the top forty green fleets in the nation by Government Fleet Magazine, based upon criteria such as quick and efficient repair turnaround, resources stewardship, and accountability. Durham City Councilman Farad Ali was there to present the awards to Durham Fleet Manager Kent Cash, and Tom Johnson, founder of The 100 Best Fleets Award, presented awards to Cary Fleet Manager Juan Vega and City of Charlotte fleet representative Leon Smith. Councilman Ali spoke of how impressed he was by the fleets’ accomplishments. Triangle Clean Cities Coalition Coordinator Kathy Boyer also praised the fleets at the awards ceremony. Mr. Cash highlighted that a successful fleet department depends upon all of the members of the department working together. Reporting alone is a complex task that requires that measurements be taken and recorded on schedule so that reporting deadlines can be met. In addition to celebrating the accomplishments of Durham and Cary, fleet managers also participated in a training session to implement Best Business Practices with proven strategies to meet the current fiscal crisis. A series of presentations

showcased programs and products that would benefit the environment and the bottom line. One of the presentations that fleet managers especially appreciated was given by National Joint Powers Alliance (NJPA) representative, Greg Haglin. Mr. Haglin explained how members of NJPA – a cooperative that serves all public educational systems, governmental agencies and non-profits could save local governments time and money in the bidding process for new equipment and other purchases. Membership for governments comes at no cost and with no obligation. For more information, visit www.njpacoop. org.

AFDC Tools The greatest collection of tools on the planet. Vehicle searches, alt-fuel station locators, the petroleum reduction planning tool, and more. http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/applications.html

TEP TEP is essentially Clean Cities coalitions working to help one another. TEP manages the annual Energy independence Days event in Washington DC. http://www.transportationenergypartners.org

Triangle Clean Cities Coalition was able to host this event thanks to our generous sponsors: • • • • • • • •

Altech-Eco Driver’s Alert Fuelmaster Miles Electric Vehicles NAPA National Joint Powers Alliance NC Solar Center Trimble Mobile Resource Management

NGToolkit.net A great way to start your journey towards learning about compressed natural gas as a vehicle fuel. Need help? Call the fleet managers listed there to get direct input and feedback from the experts.

EPA - RFS2 The EPA has listened to American scientists and industry experts to revise their accounting of indirect land use. Find their numbers at their renewable fuels site. http://www.epa.gov/otaq/renewablefuels/index.htm


FLEX FUEL FOCUS GAS REVIVAL FLORIDA’S NATURAL EPA-certified E85 Conversions Come to Market “Yes you can!” convert your gasoline-powered vehicle to an EPA-Certified flex fuel vehicle (FFV). “That’s exactly what Chicago-based Flex Fuel U.S. set out to do” says Don Althoff, the company’s CEO and a former Fuel Marketing and Distribution Executive for British Petroleum. The Fuels Fix sat down with company CFO Chris Disher to get the high-octane scoop. Fix: Why build an E85 retrofit kit? Disher: We need to reduce foreign oil dependence and greenhouse gas emissions, and do it in a way that can dramatically accelerate alternative fuel use in our overall fuel supply. With E85, a large element of the fuel infrastructure is in place and can quickly and at a relatively low cost be expanded to grow the supply chain. The beauty of a retrofit solution is that it can be applied in a highvolume, low-cost way and build fuel demand faster and cheaper while we slowly replace other vehicles with new alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). Fix: But can we really convert gasoline vehicles cost effectively? Disher: Conventional thinking has been that you need to replace a lot of parts in the fuel system on your car to be able to handle ethanol and that may be true for older cars (1998 and back). But most new vehicles can handle the higher ethanol concentrations so all that’s required is a way to determine the ethanol concentration in the fuel and the ability to deliver the right amount to the engine based on the fuel’s different energy content. This is what the Flex Fuel US conversion kit does. Our processor, fuel sensor, and additional fuel injector delivers the exact amount of fuel needed at the right time. This optimizes the vehicle to run on gasoline or any mixture of gasoline and E85. Emissions are clean and drivers enjoy the high performance E85 fuel through better horsepower and torque. And it does it in a way that doesn’t void the original vehicle warranty. Fix: This issue about vehicles being capable of handling the higher ethanol content fuel... I’m unclear as to how this has been resolved. Disher: Most people know that the EPA is first and foremost looking to make sure that converted vehicle emissions are either better or at least equal to that vehicle while burning gasoline. However, they also look at materials compatibility. That is, the vehicle’s fuel system component’s ability to handle that high alcohol content. The EPA is only certifying our system on vehicles that 1) meet their emissions requirements and 2) meet that materials compatibility requirement. While there are some vehicles that the system

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might not work on for this compatibility reason, the EPA will not certify those vehicles. Just take note of the vehicles that are currently certified to have our system installed on them (more are to come). Fix: Is conversion difficult? Disher: The conversion is relatively simple; a trained mechanic can install the kit in just under two hours, and no maintenance is required. The system runs on its own and no intervention from the driver is required. Fix: How can Clean Cities programs help? Disher: Spread the word! The Clean Cities program is an influential organization with strong credibility in the cities you support. We think EPA Certified E85 conversions can be a key element in the nation’s alternate fuel strategy. Flex Fuel US has developed conversion kits for some of the most popular fleet vehicles; Ford Crown Victoria, F150, and the Chrysler 300/Dodge Charger; GM and Toyota products are in the queue. This makes it practical for a fleet to convert most of its vehicles. With more FFVs in the fleet through retrofit, it’s easy to justify new E85 infrastructure and save more money on fuel. For additional information on Flex Fuel U.S. or the system, see their Website at http://www.flexfuelus.com or contact Chris Disher at cdisher@flexfuelus.com, or by phone at 773-763-7900.

Shown above are all the components of Flex Fuel U.S.’s “FLEX-BOX SMART KIT™“. For around $1,500-$2,000, you can buy the system and have it installed.


2009 Clean Cities’ Coordinator(s) of the Year

Congratulations to the Co-Coordinators of the Year for 2009, Chelsea Jenkins of Virginia Clean Cities and Mindy Mize of Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities!! Mindy and Chelsea work very hard and do a great job! They not only lead their coalitions but also participate in the National Coordinators Council and are co-chairs of the Council.

Picture credit: Melissa Howell. Taken in Cades Cove during the annual retreat in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

“(They’re) some kinda wonderful! Can I get a witness?!? ...”

SPRING FIX 2010

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SOUTHEAST WINTER ALTERNATIVE FUEL INDUSTRY GATHERINGS chelsea jenkins virginia

1059 angler lane, virginia beach, va 23451 cjenkins@hrccc.org - 757-256-8528 www.hrccc.org

with standard charging plugs. Charging system complexity is defined in stages. Currently, many charging locations are standard household power This last quarter, several alternate fuel industry 120 volt systems, known as Level 1, and many are groups held meetings and conferences. These not connected to any smart grid technology, although industry conferences held in the Southeastern states tests are underway throughout the Southeast. Level emphasized many fuels and opinions, and showcased 2 charging uses another common household 220 volt issues and opportunities with advanced vehicle current like a standard clothes dryer and allows for deployment. enhanced rapid charging. The Volt and the LEAF will be ready for rapid Level 2 charging upon deployment. The Electric Drive Transportation Association held Level 3 is even higher voltage (expected to be their annual conference in Washington, DC in January. between 380-500 volts) and may take the appearance The meeting illustrated diversity in support for electric of a fueling station. The advancing North America drive vehicles and fuel cell electric vehicles. The electric J1772 charging standard is in deployment interconnection with hydrogen was emblematic that now for Level 2, integrates advanced safety features, fuel cell enhancements and drive improvements for and looks and feels like a modern adaptation of a electric engines provide reciprocal benefits, as both traditional fueling pump handle. vehicles rely on efficient electric motors for movement. Arguably, the main difference is how energy is stored, Co-location with the DC Auto Show allowed a great either as a gas in refillable tanks, or as electrons number of electric and alternative fuel vehicles to between in electrically refilled batteries. be displayed in a special section of the Auto Show floor and created an opportunity for an alternate fuel The electric drive vehicle dialogue has further soapbox where Energy Secretary Chu announced matured this year with major original equipment a charging station showing Level 1 and Level 2 charing ports with a vehicle manufacturers (OEMs) like GM and Nissan launching Below: plugged in behind. Opposite page: a close-up of the Level 2 charging “nozzle.” Each advanced commercial electric vehicles into the North Level has its own plug, and J1772 is the standard for Level 2 charging. American market place in addition to Coda, other small manufacturers, and other OEM test fleets and concept cars. In 2010 these major OEMS will begin deployment of commercial electric vehicles in the Southeastern regions with DC, Virginia, Tennessee, and others as opening markets, with the Tennessee LEAF manufacturing, and with Chevy working with Dominion Power in Virginia. As these vehicles reach customers, an ever-expanding intelligent infrastructure for fueling will be needed. Contributed by Virginia Clean Cities Program Coordinator Alleyn Harned, aharned@hrccc.org.

To prepare for the successful deployments of electric vehicles on a large scale, it will be helpful to advance a “smart grid” which can efficiently allow vehicles to be charged overnight when electricity costs are low, as well as deploy higher voltage charging stations

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SOUTHEAST WINTER... , CONT. chelsea jenkins virginia

1059 angler lane, virginia beach, va 23451 cjenkins@hrccc.org - 757-256-8528 www.hrccc.org

evolved significantly during the RFS2 process, and that the wealth of new information is now available to help EPA make more informed decisions. This conference highlighted the important Southeast markets for flex fuel vehicles compatible with E85 and the need for transportation, distribution, and retail infrastructure, throughout our region. As numerous ethanol plants come online in the Southeast this year, the availability of locally produced fuels have an opportunity to improve market conditions in our region.

loans for Think and touted successful research and development in alternate fuels and electric drive vehicles. Clean Cities is proud to assist the federal goals to get one million plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the road by 2015, and to advance a wide range of alternative fuels. The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) held their National Ethanol Conference in Orlando, Florida in February. This conference was well attended with representatives from all around the country as well as international participants. Industry representatives energetically touted the record production of 1.6 billion gallons of ethanol last year, and discussed the ethanol landscape including EPA’s new RFS2 ruling. While the industry had some significant continuing concerns over the analysis of indirect land use, they were generally satisfied that the relationships with EPA remain strong and that RFS2 is a step forward. The group was thankful for RFS2’s mandate for increased volumes of renewable fuel (requiring 36 billion gallons of renewable biofuels in use by 2022), and that existing fuel pathways met necessary carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction thresholds. It was noted that lifecycle and biofuels science

The National Biodiesel Board also held their annual conference in February in Texas. This conference was exceptionally well run and captured a diversity of issues while showcasing a wide range of work duty vehicles. Discussions focused on federal interactions, policy, and fuel quality. As the biodiesel blending credit lapsed at the end of 2009, the continued need for federal response and inaction on the tax extender was a major concern of the biodiesel industry. This issue may finally gain some momentum now that health care legislation has passed. All of these recent national gatherings in our region once again show the value of alternative fuels to the economy and well-being of the Southeastern United States. While short-term policy will take a sustained effort to address, the future is bright for all alternative fuels and technologies throughout the Southeast.

SPRING FIX 2010

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CLEAN CITIES FOCUS Council Introduction & Slogan; Map Updated

A couple of new items for you from the National Coordinators Council, and from the U.S. DOE Clean Cities program. First, if you have not heard of it, the Clean Cities Coordinator Council is a working group composed of U.S. DOE representatives, Clean Cities coordinators, and program staff from the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Its mission is to develop strategies and set priorities to chart a course that benefits coalitions and Clean Cities as a whole. The council strives to facilitate communication between Clean Cities coalitions, DOE headquarters, government agencies, associations, and industry. Three coordinators representing each of the seven regions of the country

serve on the council, and three coordinators serve as cochairs. All Council coordinators serve as advocates for their regions and use regional conference calls to identify issues for the council to address and report the outcomes back to their stakeholders. Through action of the Council and input from many coalitions, a new slogan has been selected to be used with the logo: “Clean Transportation for Energy Independence.” It was developed for use with the Clean Cities logo in certain instances, and coordinators are just now searching for appropriate branding opportunities. Second, the national coalitions map has been updated to reflect the addition of the Alabama Clean Fuels Coalition as the 85th coalition that is currently operating. Congratulations Mark and Phillip!!

“Clean Transportation for Energy Independence.”

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PIX PIX PAGES PAGES

Energy Independence Days 2010 ~ Feb. 28- March 3 Representatives from 41 coalitions came to DC to communicate with their congressmen and take action for alternative fuels and Clean Cities everywhere. Counterclockwise from top left. 2 pictures from our presentations on Monday. 3 pictures from our Sunday evening dinner at RIS (thanks Barry!). Rita Ebert’s (Long Island) Representative Steve Israel spoke to the coordinators over a breakfast about how important our work is and how best to get the point across to legislators: jobs, jobs, jobs! Last but not least, the TEP Executive Committee and Board. It was a very good year and event, and all went real well!

FA L L F I X 2 0 0 9 |

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Alabama Clean Fuels Coalition News Counterclockwise from top left 1. ACFC’s Designation Ceremony at Auburn University on 10/20/09. DOE Clean Cities Program Director Dennis Smith and ACFC leaders Mark Bentley and Phillip Wiedmeyer pose with their map and designation plaque. 2. City of Birmingham has acquired 20 propane lawnmowers. As the city is nonattainment (NA) for ozone and PM, the use of propane powered mowers will allow mowing on NA days. 3. Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries Commissioner Ron Sparks fueling his vehicle at department’s new propane fueling station. The department has eleven, propane, pilot-program vehicles. Conversion of the 11 vehicles to operate on both gasoline and propane were done in Birmingham by Precision Sales & Service, an ACFC member organization. 4. Benny Gay, President of the Alabama Propane Association, addresses attendees at the two Propane Road Shows we held in Montgomery (12/16) and Hoover (12/17).

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PIX PAGES Space Coast Clean Cities Coalition - On February 2, the City of Orlando conducted a MOU sign ceremony with Rocky Mountain Institute for the Get Ready Project for implementation of electric vehicles in that community. Mayor Buddy Dyer spoke on the benefits to Orlando for joining the program and the city moving into a community electrification program. Nissan sponsored the event by presenting the Leaf EV for a ride and drive. At right, Space Coast Clean Cities coordinator Bill Young (left) and Chairman John Parker join in a photo with Metroplan Clean Air Team Chairwomen Cynthia Lambert (right) and Secretary Lenora Lockett in front of the Nissan LEAF. Below, Mayor Buddy Dyer speaks during the RMI MOU signing event. Orlando is one of only eight current, official Partner Cities in the Project Get Ready program.

Land-of-Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition - In December, Blue Ridge Biofuels opened its eleventh biodiesel pump at the Eblen Short Stop Station on Amboy Road in Asheville. Left photo, l-r - Scott Barnwell, General Manager, Blue Ridge Biofuels; Martha Thompson, Community Relations Manager, Progress Energy; Melita Kyriakou, Office Manager, Blue Ridge Biofuels; John Smith, VP Western Region, Progress Energy; Rick Perkins, President, Eblen Short Stop Stores (taken by Jeff Hardman). Right photo - The new pump (taken by Melita Kyriakou).

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Southeastern Fuels Fix - Spring '10 edition  

Stories from all over the southeastern U.S. of alternative fuel actions to reduce American reliance on oil, and make a transition to many, c...

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