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DESIGN PORTFOLIO

2008-2011 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

JEFFREY M. GLAD


CENTER FOR CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION

HORIZONTAL PROGRAMMING

IMMEASURABLE HORIZONS

ROSEWOOD WELCOME CENTER

MUSEUM OF REMEMBRANCE

URBAN-REACTIVATION

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12

16

22

26

32


NEW YORK HOTEL: DERIVATION ONE

URBAN-MANIFESTATION

DESIGN-BUILD KIOSK

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44

52


perspective from north west


CENTER FOR CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION INTERGRATED PROJECT DELIVERY (IPD) STUDIO

Gainesville, Florida group: Anas Chehab, Chris Sounders, Kyle Reed critic: Charlie Hailey year: 4 Located in the urban core of downtown Gainesville, the Center for Construction Education creates a learning enviroment through design and practice. With a direct link to Depot Park, the center’s layout provides interest and imagination through the accessible. The park, consisting of a pond, a museum and open spaces emerges from an old contaminated industrial zone to become a focal point for the city. With the location being that of the Center for Construction Education, the design forms a connection between the city’s past and present. The Center for Construction Education’s main purpose is for the development and standardization of construction crafts training. Comprising of over 30,000 square feet of administrative, educational, and workshop spaces, the center injects a large program into a small space, while allowing for Depot Park to function normally.

conceptual progression

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site alteration

circulation

walking

resting

working

site concept

site circulation


southwest perspective

The construction yard becomes the main element of education through the use of doing. Within the center there are three diffrent programatic construction yards: masonry, steel and wood. The practice of each can be exercised to the smallest details through visual stimulation. To the north, the yards open up to the park creating a visual link to the park and city. The yards are supplemented by individual classrooms grafted onto the southern end of the structure linked to the administrative program through a circulation core.

circulation gallery administrative education entrance from park

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siteplan


9

1

level 1 4 5

4 5

4

3

5 6

level 2

level 4

8

7

8

9

10

level 3

11

2

11

11

13 8

12

1 gallery 2 lobby 3 fitness 4 education 5 storage 6 conference 7 adminstrative

8 circulation core 9 coordinators 10 directors 11 classroom 12 managers 13 presidents/CEO


east side

pond view

The circulation core acts as a axis through the center allowing for the movement of people, and the HVAC system. The system is placed within a transparent wall creating an involuntary teaching device. Another use of the core is to provide a noise barrier between the educational and administrative programs. The administrative area for the center is located on the eastern side, adjacent to the access road, creating an urban edge. To the north is the free standing gallery and conference space. This is the public’s access to the center allowing for the open views to the north out over the pond and park. To allow for the park to operate normally the site was altered to allow for the movement around the pond. In doing this the design created public zones of circulation and of rest. With connections to the outdoor construction yards, the center opens its program for the public to view.

section

south side view


11

entrance

central core axis

detail

exploded central core


HORIZONTAL PROGRAMMING ACTIVATION OF THE NON-EXISTANCE

Gainesville, Florida critic: Albertus Wang Year: 2

orthogonal grid

Located on the campus of the University of Florida, the site contains two disjointed programs. One being a parking garage, the other a sports field. The objective is to occupy the non-existance of the joint, and creating a multipurpose program where there once was just one. By creating a connection between the garage and field in the horizontal dimension the joint is formed. To activate the Norman Parking Garage, the program of educational devices are grafted onto the structure. These devices are visualy connected through line of sight to the systematic activation of the field. The activated space of the field becomes the circulation, public and event space for the grafted program. The garage and field becomes an exstention of the teaching space of the university, while keeping the old program of the car park.

early concept sketches

shift in grid

zone layout


ground organization

shift in layout

13


section

1

2

3

KEY 1 theater 2 classroom 3 garage 4 field


15

The field is activated by the shifting and excavation of the ground forming zones of pubic space linked to together by axises of circulation. Through these axies visitors can enter the intervention.

garage

field

public space 4

circulation

event space


IMMEASURABLE HORIZONS SANCTUARY OF SELF REFLECTION

Gobi Desert, China critic: Albertus Wang year: 2 Located within the Gobi Desert in China, the Sanctuary of self reflection is a complex for nomatic people to observe, meditate, and prepare for the journey. For people, the sanctuary is the only shelter in the desert, since the desert is an unmeasurable, everchanging, and unexplorable object. With little or no water, shade, and references the desert presents itself as one with many dangers. For a visitor of the desert there is only the need for shade and water. This is what the sanctuary of self reflection provides. With the desert being an unmeasurable, everchanging, unexploreable object, the sanctuary provides a static datum of access. Providing a axis of direction in an un-directional landscape. Within the sanctuary, visitors are cleansed through the use of fluid meditation, observe the path they were on and the one ahead. Thus creating measure in the unmeasurable, and explorable in the unexplorable.

early conceptual sketches


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conceptual entrance drawing


observation

realization and fulfilment

meditation

preparation

The sanctuary has three stages of realization: observation, meditation, and preparation. Observation is the reflection of the past journey that the visitor has taken. Meditation is where a cleansing of the mind is preformed, as a threshold between the past and future. Finnally, preparation is the contemplation of the journey ahead, and being ready for its challeges. The sanctuary allows for the realization and fulfillment of these three stages through the administration of the visitors’ need for shade and water.

reflection and contemplation


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site plan

circulation and complex

early sketch model

section


model

The sanctuary is grafted onto exposed bedrock creating an anchor in the changing sands while providing admission to the valuble resources of water and shade. To the south, large sand dunes inhabit the landscape, while to the south, ever extending flatness.

view from south

preparation


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entrance perspective


ROSEWOOD WELCOME CENTER Rosewood, Florida critic: Karl Thorne year: 3

FLORIDA | LANDSCAPE

The Rosewood Welcome Center is located in the town of Rosewood. It is a small rural town located near the west cost of Florida that is mostly known as a place that someone drives through to get to the coast. The center welcomes people to the town and tells a brief history of its past. The center provides a surreal view point of the Florida landscape, creating interest in a place that is almost forgotten. In the natural landscape of Florida, the center becomes a observatory of nature, while providing protection from its harsh elements. Above, a large oversized roof protects aganst the intense sunlight that Florida is accustomed to, while light wells in the interior spaces takes advantage of its abundance. The welcome center consists of a viewing area which creates a connection between the visitor and and site. While the small educational museum creates a interest in the history of the Rosewood, Florida.

from north


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entrance perspective


welcome center site

center layout

interior light

1

6

2 5

4

3 KEY 1 video room 2 museum 3 lobby 4 viewing deck 5 restroom 6 light well The site is a low lying area near the coast, which is very prone to flooding. The welcome center is elevated, with a link to the higher ground through a bridge that allows for access. Surounded by the dense Florida hardwoods and pines, the center becomes an appendix of the past, present, and future of the town of Rosewood, Florida.

filtering of light


25

site conditions

from southwest


remaining structures

open grassland

The Museum of Rembrance is located in the town of Rosewood. The largely African-American town was the site of the 1923 tragedy, where a race riot claimed the lives and homes of the population. Today the town is largely non-existant, remaining mostly in the survivors’ memory. The museum is part of a larger complex that preserves the memory of this tragedy by reflecting the history of the area.

The site, within the distinctive Florida landscape, contains open grassland, dense hardwood trees and the last structures from the tragedy. The museum is designed to preserve these elements by keeping a slender profile within the site and using them within the design. Rememberance is through the sense of connection, and solitude, which is created by the juxtaposition of the new and old.

hardwood trees

concept sketches


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MUSEUM OF REMEMBRANCE Rosewood, Florida critic: Karl Thorne year: 3

FLORIDA | LANDSCAPE

entrance perspective


museum of rememberence

site encroachment

bisected program

shifted program

A remembrance wall introduces visitors to the museum, leading them visually and physical through the site. The structure becomes a device that becomes a educational tool to teach the memory of the past. Through the design, the enclosure of the museum becomes a filtering device to shed light on the historic artifacts of Rosewood and the tragedy in 1923.

The design incorporates a rain catching system that ties into a pond system that becomes a reflection of the sky and ground. This is the generates a connection of past and present. The connection links all the structures of the complex together, allowing the visitor to connect where they have been to where they are going.

water collection


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section

elevation


museum plan 4

1 7

KEY 1 cafe 2 restrooms 3 gallery 4 lobby 5 office 6 storage 7 viewing area

6 2 2 3

5 Time is chronologically marked by the flowing of water through the complex, generating a shift in the axis of circulation. The shift acts as a memory of the tragedy and how it changed the town of Rosewood.


31 INFO CENTER

CHAPEL

RESTAURANT

MUSEUM OF REMEMBRANCE

EDUCATION CENTER

complex plan


URBAN-REACTIVATION GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART

Savannah, Georgia critic: Levent Kara year: 3

entrance view


33 The city of Savannah is laid out in a repetitious street grid, disrupted only when bisected by open public squares. These squares act as points of convergence for the populous, with both governance and religion being positioned there. The streets bisected by the squares, act as axis of circulation and density. Branching from these axis is the interstitial resident tissue of the city. These spaces are wedged into the periphery, creating pockets of rest.

savannah grid

The Gallery of Contemporary Art reactivates an urban connection between the populous and the city of Savannah. Located along the active axis of Bull Street and the secondary Jones Street, the art gallery creates a new place of convergence to emerge in the interstitial space of Savannah.

corner site

south elevation


southeastern perspective


35

re

The gallery consists of multiple levels of convergence of contemporary art, each creating a connection between programs on three diffent levels: sense of touch, sound, and sight. To create a focal point along the active Bull Street, a public viewing galley generates an interest, first by sight. By creating this interest a new connection with Jones Street emerges. Along Jones Street a sculpture garden creates the connection to the Gallery of Contempary Art by the sense of touch. Within the center, the sense of sound within the video/sound gallery creates the connection to the city. With each gallery, a different sense of Savannah is created and and a re-activation of a urban edge is created.

St

et

ll

s Stre

Bu

Jone

et

sketches

street gallery scuplture gallery video gallery main gallery circulation


section

views at night


37 6 6

5

4

7 3 2

2nd floor

t

1

Bull

Stree

4

5

Jone

s Str

1st floor site plan

eet

1 lobby 2 event space 3 street gallery 4 sculpture garden 5 main gallery 6 sculpture gallery 7 video gallery

3rd floor


hotel location

zones

grid

deviation

NEW YORK HOTEL: DERIVATION ONE

GRID CORROSION: VERTICAL PROGRAMING EXPERIMENT

New York City, USA partner: David Boynton critic: Albertus Wang year: 4

study of the interstitial spaces in Hell’s Kitchen Set within the dense hyper grid of New York City’s enigmatic Manhattan Island. The hotel stands on 8th Avenue, between Forty-Sixth and Forty-Seventh Streets. Three blocks west of Broadways’ radical interjection to the grid, and twelve blocks south of the vacuum that is Central Park, the location is the empirical joint between the hi-rise density scale of Broadway and the low rise of Hell’s Kitchen.

conceptual site plan


39

fluid void

grafted gallery

static core

8th Avenue entrance

The hotel navigates the diffrence in scale from the skyscrapers of midtown and the low-rise of Hell’s Kitchen. Its primary body, a thin 45 floor skyscraper, is comprised of 4 interplayed conceptual frameworks; a simple and static core, a fluid, amorphous and seductive void, a spine of galleries grafted vertically onto the core but within the void, and a series of programmatic boxes interlaced within the building. void, core, mass


horizontal garden entrance

Manhattan section

grafted studio and core

sculpture terrace


41 The void opens to the city’s western side as well as the rising from the buildings entrance into the underground. Addressing the super tall scale of midtown, the main entrance’s monumental scale is then compressed by the exposed framework of the void, only to be opened onto the uncongested space west of 8th Avenue. The hotel’s secondary mass contains its own fluid void which branches from the main void. The monumental scale of the main entrance becomes the residential scale of Hell’s Kitchen on the building’s south side. Finally, a large sculpted and terraced sculpture garden contains its own spine of horizontal galleries and public spaces gathering the private scale of the garden to the hotel and finally the skycrapers of midtown.

west-east section

fluid void

vertical sculpture garden hotel rooms

grafted galleries

sculpture garden


Public spaces are grafted onto the hotel’s grid, forming zones of programs such as cafes, restaurants and pools. To the visitors of the hotel, a didatic map of Manhattan is formed.

hotel at night


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placement within Hell’s Kitchen

north-south section


U R B A N - M A N I F E S TAT I O N

LAYERD HYPER-URBANISM

New York City, USA partner: David Boytion critic: Albertus Wang year: 4

block organization study

The Manhattan grid, characterized by the city block, is a catalyst for the vertical expansion of a metropolis. Instead of expansion in the horizontal, expansion in the vertical is possible, allowing for the creation of hyper-density. The site of the complex is in the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan. It is bordered on the south by 43rd Street which is a datum of density linking the Hudson River with the density of Midtown. On the north side is the expanse of the mid-rises of Hell’s Kitchen. This area of Manhattan has traditionally been known as an arts district with its close proximity to Broadway.

Manhattan

Hell’s Kitchen

city block


45

entrance perspective


disection of block

early sketches school and public

3 towers and 3 bridges

division of public program

The complex consists of an entire Manhattan block which is bisected on the east by a set of below grade railroad tracks. A program of office, affordable and market rate housing, as well as a school occupy the site.

secondary circulation

primary circulation

circulation studies

inserted circulation


47

West 45th Street 10th Avenue

2 5

4 1

3

West 44th Street

6

KEY 1 office 2 affordable 3 market value 4 school 5 art gallery 6 plaza site plan


elevated perspective

vertical perspective

bridge open core

studios open plaza

west-east section


49 office affordable housing market value housing studio school

3 bridges

For open space to occupy the site, development is pushed to the western edge, forming three towers that hold the north, south, and western edges. The three towers are divided up, one for office, one for affordable housing, and the other for market rate housing. These three towers are linked by a system of three bridges of public space. On the eastern edge of the block there is a school for the arts. The school is a shift in scale downward from the towers. In the layout of the site, a “U” shape is formed by the towers and school which draws people into the interior of the block and into the vertical dimension. This interior zone becomes an elevated street, forming a type hyper urbanism, furthering the congestion which fuels New York’s social discourse.

southwest perspective


Midtown and Broadway

Hell’s Kitchen

W 42nd Street

Hudson River

Hell’s Kitchen location


51 sunlight diagram

spring

summer

north

west

south

fall

winter


desk draws | oak

desk legs | oak

footrests | steel

desk legs | pine

desktops | plywood


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DESIGN-BUILD KIOSK

STUDIO PERCUSION

Gainesville, Florida group: Kyle Altman, Breanna Faye, Nicole Paul, Dylan Rinda critic: Charlie Hailey year: 3 The kiosk was designed and contructed for “Studio Percusion” a non-profit drum shop as a way to improve the atmosphere for the teaching of music to young children of Gainesville. Within there store, the kiosk is used as a display case for drums and other intruments, where they are stored in boxes. These boxes strattle the kiosk’s outside skin like notes sit on a staff. Education can come through the use of the kiosk as a teaching device. Through the idea of a involuntary instrument the kiosk becomes a drum, which when it’s storage boxes are touched resonates with sound. Since each box has a different scale of depth, each one has a unique acoustical sound. This instrument becomes occupiable by the employees as the main desk where they interact with visitors.

early concept sketches

entrance perspective


early mockup

construction

components section


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The kiosk was constructed of multiple materials: oak, pine, steel, and plywood. These came from the dismantling of old decommissioned studio desks. The recovered pine became the armature, becoming the framework to use the oak as clading. The plywood was used to construct the storage devices, and the steel became footrests for the employees while the kiosk was in use. To allow for the movement of the structure, it was constructed in eight components. In the end, the kiosk was constructed and moved three times.

reconstruction


The completed kiosk was displayed in the “Plaza of the Americas” on the campus of the University of Florida for a day before getting moved to “Studio Percusion”.

elevations


57

skin storage

myself

reconstruction complete


design 1 cube

Thank you to my family, professors and friends for their unending support during my time at the University of Florida. Without you, none of this would have been possible.


Jeffrey M Glad|Design Portfoilo  

University of Florida undergraduate design portfolio 2008-2011

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