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Table of Contents Mission and Purpose……………………………………………………………………………………..

2

AJU Advantages……..…………………………………………………………………………….………

3

How it works…………………………………………………………………………..….

4

Admissions……………………………………………………………………………….

5

Transfer Credit Policy………………………...…………………………………………

7

Financial Information & Tuition……………………………………………………...…………….……

8

Scholarships………………………………………………………………………..…….

10

VA Education Benefits………………………………………………………………..…

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How to Start your VA Benefits………………………….………………………………

12

V.A. Academic Calendar……………….……………………………………………….

13

Student Policies…………………………..…………………………..……………………………………

16

Special Initiates ……………………………………………………………………… …………………..

23

The Jeffrey D. Rubenstein College of Criminal Justice & Public Safety………..………..……..

24

Associate of Science in Criminal Justice…………………………………..........……

26

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice……………….…………………...………….

29

Master of Science in Criminal Justice………………………….………………………

33

Master of Public Administration (MPA)………..………………………………………

34

The Sober College School of Addiction Studies………………………………………….……..…..

35

Associate of Science in Health Care Management…………………………………..

36

Associate of Science in Psychology…………………….……………..………………

39

The Brian Tracy College of Business & Entrepreneurship…………………………………...……

41

Associate of Science in Business………………………………………………………

43

Bachelor of Science in Business……………………………………………………….

46

Master of Business Administration (MBA)………………………………… …………

51

Associate of Science in Communication………………………………………………

55

Bachelor of Arts in Communication……………………………………………………

58

Certificates of Proficiency………………………………..………………………………………………

63

Undergraduate Course Descriptions……………………………………………………………..……

68

Graduate Course Descriptions………………………………………………………………………….

75

Honors & Awards………………………………………………………………………………….………

80

2008 Academic Calendar…………………………………………………………………………………

83

Administration…………………………………………………………………………………….…….…

85

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Mission and Purpose Andrew Jackson University’s mission is to provide relevant education of the highest quality at a reasonable cost to working adults who seek career advancement and a more fulfilling life experience. This mission is supported by the development of Colleges within the University that not only fulfill the needs of the general population, but also address the learning requirements of specific professions that are underserved by mainstream academia.

How We Accomplish Our Mission ƒ

Determine the needs – including education requirements, schedule, budget, targeted degree – of each student and provide that student with a program to meet those needs.

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Provide courses, instructors, student services and special support that fulfill each student’s needs.

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Enlist faculty in student care as well as instructional excellence.

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Enlist University staff in supporting the faculty as well as the student.

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Develop courses that are relevant, timely and well structured, and ensure that the content is practical and applicable in a student’s targeted work environment.

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Provide course content that promotes students’ critical thinking skills, ultimately producing graduates who are prepared to function as creative problem solvers and leaders in their targeted profession.

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Continuously upgrade technology, concentrating on changes that improve the learning experience while simplifying the learning process.

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Always look externally and seek input from a diverse group of experts in each targeted profession and industry. Utilize this input to help discover the changing needs of an industry or profession and determine how best to address those needs through university-level education.

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Provide degrees and certificates that convey pride and accomplishment to the student, the instructor, and the University.

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AJU Advantages AJU staff and faculty are dedicated to your educational experience. We take an interest in your education and help you reach your goals through personalized attention and policies that make it easier for you to fit college into your already busy life.

Why You Should Enroll ƒ

Set your own study schedule with flexible, self-paced courses

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100% online courses – no on-campus attendance required

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24/7 course access and technical support

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Enroll and begin immediately – no waiting for another term to begin

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Scholarships and University Grants save you money

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Take fewer courses - credit awarded for college-level professional and military training

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Gain real-world knowledge for real-world jobs

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Learn from professors with actual experience as well as sound academic credentials

Your Degree is Accepted & Approved The U.S. Department of Defense as well as national, state and local governments along with law enforcement agencies, American industry and businesses recognize and value the education you achieve through AJU and offer tuition assistance in support.

Accreditation Andrew Jackson University is accredited by The Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC). The DETC is listed by the United States Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency. For further information about accreditation, contact:

Distance Education and Training Council 1601 18th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20009-2529 (202) 234-5100 www.detc.org

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As an accredited, degree-granting member of the DETC, Andrew Jackson University is an institutional member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). CHEA is a non-profit organization serving as the national advocate for self-regulation through accreditation.

Affiliations American Council on Education (ACE). ACE is the nation's umbrella higher education association. Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) institutional member. CAEL is a national leader in the field of adult learning dedicated to expanding lifelong learning opportunities for adults. Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) member. AACRAO is a nonprofit, professional association of higher education administrators. Andrew Jackson University is licensed to award certificates of proficiency and degrees by:

State of Alabama Department of Post Secondary Education, Private School Licensure P.O. Box 302130 Montgomery, AL 36130 California Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (CAADAC). Andrew Jackson University is approved by CAADAC's Commission of Alcohol and Drug Counselors Education Programs, as an continuing education provider. With its affiliation to the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) and the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium, CAADAC meets the highest levels of quality preparation and testing of its counselors and ethical responsibilities to clients. School approval number: 0S-07-291-1109

How it Works: Admissions We recognize AJU students are busy and we want to help them get started on the path to increasing their knowledge and employability immediately. Enrollment is as easy and flexible as our self-paced study format, and we’ll develop a customized curriculum that gives you the most advanced standing possible. Your admissions representative will assist you throughout your time as an AJU student. To contact an Admissions Representative, call 800-429-9300 (option 1) or email admissions@aju.edu.

Online Courses AJU uses the latest instructional technology and current college-level textbooks to deliver course content. All AJU courses are online. You simply login to your course to access instructions, assignments and to communicate with your instructor.

Proctored Examinations To protect the integrity of the degree you earn from AJU, mid-term and final examinations must be proctored. Selecting an appropriate proctor is a simple process. You also have the option of selecting an online proctor. AJU will work with you to ensure you receive appropriate proctoring for your exams. See the guidelines for selecting a proctor on page 17.

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Program Structure AJU’s degree programs and certificates are based on a flexible format. Courses begin every Monday. Undergraduate and certificate students have either 8 to 12 weeks to complete each course (depending on the course) and graduate students have 16 weeks. Since courses are self-paced you may accelerate your studies as your schedule permits. There are no set login times, no group projects and no oncampus requirements. Associate’s degrees - require completion of 60 semester credit hours: 10 courses (30 semester hours) in general education courses and 10 courses (30 semester hours) in your major. Up to 15 courses (45 semester hours) can be earned through a combination of transfer credit, credit for your life and work experience, and/or credit by examination. Bachelor’s degrees - require completion of 120 semester hours to earn a degree. Up to 30 courses (90 semester hours) can be earned through a combination of transfer credit, credit for your life and work experience, and/or credit by examination. Graduate degrees - require completion of 12 courses (36 semester hours) to earn a degree. Up to 6 courses (18 semester hours) can be earned through credit transferred for previous graduate studies or your life and work experiences. Credit by examination does not apply to graduate programs. Certificates of Proficiency - require completion of four courses. Up to 50% of credits can be earned through transfer credit and credit for college-level training.

Admissions At AJU, we understand you are an individual with desires, goals and needs that you plan to satisfy through education. AJU admissions representatives are here to help you get started with the minimum amount of hassle. From application to enrollment, the entire process can be completed in as little as two weeks.

5 Easy Steps to Realizing Your Dreams 1. Discuss your goals with a professional AJU admissions representative. 2. Submit your application and application fee at http://www.aju.edu/applyonline. 3. Provide copies of previous college transcripts and training certificates for transfer and equivalent credit evaluation. (If no previous college, submit your high school diploma or GED.) 4. Review your credit evaluation with your admissions representative and know exactly what is required to complete your degree. 5. Enroll and begin courses.

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Admissions Requirements Undergraduate. An applicant for the associate’s or bachelor’s program must have a high school diploma or its equivalent. ACT or SAT scores are not required. Written permission from a legal guardian is required for admission of persons under legal age. Graduate. The requirement for admission to a master's program is a baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required. Written permission from a legal guardian is required for admission of a person under legal age. International Students. Applicants for whom English is a second language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL®) and have their official TOEFL® score report sent to the Office of Admissions under separate cover. AJU also accepts TOEFL waivers. Applicants with non-U.S. educational credentials must first obtain a foreign credentials evaluation from Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. (ECE), Post Office Box 92970, Milwaukee, WI 53202-0970, USA, telephone (414) 289-3400, fax (414) 289-3411, or another independent U.S. evaluation service approved by the University. Request forms and cost information are available at the ECE website (www.ece.org). International applicants seeking admission to graduate programs must obtain a general evaluation while subject evaluations will be required for undergraduate or graduate transfer courses.

How to submit your application documents Apply online

Fax

Apply online at www.aju.edu/applyonline

Fax your application and transcripts toll free to (877) 737-6217.

Mail

Phone

Mail your application and transcripts to:

To talk to an admissions representative, call (800) 429-9300 (option 1) or email admissions@aju.edu.

Office of Admissions Andrew Jackson University 2919 John Hawkins Parkway Birmingham, AL 35244

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Transfer and Extra-institutional Learning Credit Sources of Credit AJU students have varied backgrounds. Many have completed some college and most have extensive training and work experience. Students may earn credit toward a degree or certificate through transfer credit, military and/or law enforcement training, credit by examination, credit for life and work experience (experiential learning), or a combination of all of the above. Undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 25% of required courses at AJU and graduate students must complete 50% of courses for a degree to be conferred. Transfer Credit AJU accepts transfer credit from other colleges and universities accredited by agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Simply provide transcripts from previous college work for transfer credit evaluation. Credit for Training Many students with careers in law enforcement, corrections, and business have earned college level credit through official training. AJU evaluates this training and awards credit based on the student’s degree requirements. AJU also accepts military and other training for academic credit based on ACE College Credit Recommendation Service evaluations as outlined in The National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs and The Guide to Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. Credit by Examination AJU accepts the recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) for approved agencies offering credit by examination. These include: • CLEP (College Level Examination Program) • Excelsior College Exams • DANTES subject exams *Credit by examination is not available at the graduate level. Prior Learning Experience Portfolio Evaluation AJU recognizes that learning takes place throughout life in many settings. Students interested in earning credit for their life and work experience may compile an Experiential Learning Portfolio and relate their knowledge to the learning objectives of specific AJU courses. Talk to your admissions representative about the guidelines for portfolio evaluation. Both undergraduate and graduate students may earn up to 25% of credits required for graduation through portfolio evaluation. Total Credit Awarded From All Sources Associate’s Degree . . . . . . . . 45 semester hours Bachelor’s Degree . . . . . . . . . 90 semester hours Master’s Degree . . . . . . . . . . . 18 semester hours The acceptance of transfer credits between institutions lies within the discretion of the receiving college or university. Credits earned at other institutions may or may not be accepted by Andrew Jackson University. Likewise, credits earned at Andrew Jackson University may or may not be accepted by another institution. Any student relying on Andrew Jackson University credit for transfer to or enrollment in another institution is urged to check with that institution prior to enrollment at Andrew Jackson University.

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Financial Information Think you can’t afford to enroll in college right now? You can’t afford not to. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, over a working lifetime a college graduate will earn $1,000,000 more than a worker with only a high school diploma. What could that mean for your life and those you care about? At AJU we believe every student willing to do the work deserves the chance to improve his/her life through education. We work hard to offer the highest quality education at an affordable price and offer a variety of financial options, scholarships and University grants to help you complete your education. How much you pay in tuition depends on how many courses you take concurrently. AJU offers students several payment options. Students who take multiple courses pay less per credit hour than students taking only one course at a time. Students who pay in full for their courses receive a 5% reduction in course tuition. They can also choose to pay in two or four monthly installments. Military T.A., V.A., and employee reimbursement benefits are available to our students as well. See the tuition chart on the next page to determine your tuition for the number of courses you would like to take. Your admissions representative will work with you to determine the best option for your financial circumstances.

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Tuition Associate, Bachelor’s & Certificate Tuition Course by Course

Start anytime - 8 or 12 week courses

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts TUITION Full Tuition

$ 636.00

2 Courses

Per Cr. Hr.

In-Full

Pymnt

$ 212.00

$ 604.20

$ 318.00

Start anytime - 8 or 12 week courses

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts

TUITION Full Tuition

$1,110.00

3 Courses

Per Cr. Hr.

In-Full

Pymnt

$ 185.00

$1,054.50

$ 277.50

Savings 13%

Start anytime - 8 or 12 week courses

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts

TUITION Full Tuition

$1,575.00

4 Courses

Per Cr. Hr. $ 175.00

In-Full $1,496.25

Pymnt $ 393.75

Savings 17%

Start anytime - 8 or 12 week courses

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts TUITION Full Tuition

$1,998.00

Per Cr. Hr. $ 166.50

In-Full $1,898.10

Pymnt $ 499.50

Savings 21%

Graduate Tuition Course by Course

Start anytime - 16 weeks to complete

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts

TUITION Full Tuition

$ 786.00

2 Courses

Per Cr. Hr.

In-Full

Pymnt

$ 262.00

$ 46.70

$ 93.00

Start anytime - 16 weeks to complete

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts

TUITION Full Tuition

3 Courses

$1,410.00

Per Cr. Hr.

In-Full

Pymnt

$ 235.00

$1,339.50

$ 352.50

Savings 10%

Start anytime - 16 weeks to complete

Payment Options: in-full upon enrollment (gives 5% discount) or 4 payments due 30, 60, 90, 120 days after semester starts

TUITION Full Tuition

$2,025.00

Per Cr. Hr.

In-Full

Pymnt

$ 225.00

$1,923.75

$ 506.25

Savings 14%

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There is a one-time application and enrollment fee for new students. Application Fee: (Undergraduate & Graduate Students) . . . . . . $75 Upon enrollment, this amount will be credited toward the $200 enrollment fee. Enrollment Fee: (Undergraduate & Graduate Students) . . . . . $125 The $200 for your application and enrollment fee is included in the total tuition price. It offsets administrative costs. Other General Service Fees Academic Extension - half course…….………..$35 Academic Extension – full course……………….$70 Change in Program Curriculum………………….$30 Change in Degree Program……………………...$30 Course Withdrawal…………………….….$0 to $786 Graduation Fee…………………………………..$100 Late Fee (monthly payments)……………..…….$10 Experiential Learning Evaluation (Optional) ….$225

Reexamination Fee…………………….…………$20 Replacement Student ID…………….………...…$10 Returned Check Fee…………………………...…$30 Transcript Fee…………………………...…...……$10 Tuition Rollover Service Charge……………..….$10 Online Proctoring Fee (optional, per exam)……$15

Scholarships and University Grants Scholarships AJU sponsors scholarships, generally ranging from 10 percent to 25 percent of tuition, for various groups or academic programs. Qualifications for scholarships vary, but generally require the student to write an essay describing how he/she will benefit from the scholarship. Military Spouses Scholarship Recognized as a “Military Spouse Friendly” institution by the U.S. Department of Defense, AJU offer partial scholarships to military spouses of active duty officers through The New Center for Military Spouse Studies. Learn more at http://www.aju.edu/militaryspouses Brian Tracy Scholarship Students enrolling in AJU’s business or communication degree or certificate programs may be eligible to receive the Brian Tracy Scholarship, equal to 25 percent of tuition. Learn more at http://www.btc.aju.edu/Update_Scholarship.asp Jeffrey D. Rubenstein Scholarship Sworn law enforcement officers and staff of law enforcement departments throughout the United States are invited to apply for the Rubenstein Scholarship. This partial scholarship applies to any AJU course, degree program or certificate. Learn more at http://www.jrc.aju.edu/Update_Scholarship.asp LEOS Scholarship (Law Enforcement Officer Spouse) In an effort to fully support those who serve and protect us everyday, AJU created the LEOS scholarship for spouses of police and public safety officers. This scholarship applies to all courses, degrees and certificates. Click here for more information. Learn more at http://www.aju.edu/lawenforcementspouses

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University Grants Periodically the University makes grants available to enrolling students. Ask your admissions representative if grants are currently available.

VA Educational Benefits Andrew Jackson University is classified by the Veterans Administration (VA) as an Institution of Higher Learning (IHL), making it possible for eligible individuals to receive monthly payments for VA educational benefits. The Academic Calendar is designed to allow new VA students to enroll and begin a new semester at the beginning of any month of the year. Upon enrollment, each student is assigned to semester A, B, or C as outlined on the current Academic Calendar. Within the assigned semester, students may register for any combination of eight- and/or sixteen-week courses to meet the total number of credit hours necessary to maintain full-time, three-quarter time, or half-time status. (See table below.) Students who are enrolled for less than half-time will be eligible for VA benefits for tuition only.

VA Credit Hour Requirements Student Status

Undergraduate

Graduate

Full-time

12 semester hours

9 semester hours

Three-quarter time

9 semester hours

6 semester hours

Half-time

6 semester hours

3 semester hours

Andrew Jackson University is responsible for certifying a student’s enrollment to the VA and reporting the student’s status and progress through each semester. Satisfactory progress is maintained dependent upon the following criteria: 1. Within five business days of the start date for each course, a student must login to begin lessons in the online classroom. 2. Students in eight-week courses must complete their midterm examination within five weeks of each course start date. Students in 16-week courses must complete their midterm examination within ten weeks of each course start date. 3. On or before the course end date, the final exam must be completed or the student must have submitted a petition to the Student Services Department for an incomplete grade (“I”). Approval must be authorized by both the course instructor and a University VA Certifying Official. Students will be allowed one additional semester in order to complete a course for which an incomplete grade (“I”) has been approved or a failing grade (“F”) will be assigned. If any of the above criteria are not met, a student will be withdrawn from the course immediately and a change in status will be reported to the VA. In addition, withdrawal from a course or a request for an academic extension both constitute a change in student status that must be reported. Depending on a student’s course load, a change in status will result either in the reduction or termination of VA education benefits.

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How to Use Your VA Educational Benefits 1. Determine your Eligibility Contact the Veterans Administration online at www.GIBill.va.gov (or toll-free at 888-442-4551) to see if you qualify for VA educational benefits and to request any necessary forms. Forms should also be available at all DVA offices, most active duty military stations, and American Embassies in other countries.

2. Complete & Send Your VA Application Obtain your VA Application for Benefits (VA Form 22-1990). If you are on active duty, your ESO will need to sign the bottom of the third page. Mail or fax the form to: Andrew Jackson University 2919 John Hawkins Parkway Birmingham, AL 35244 ATTN: VA Certifying Official Fax: 877-737-6217 Please note: ƒ

Discharged students must also send a copy of their DD214.

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Students who have previously been approved for VA educational benefits may submit a "Certificate of Eligibility" instead of the application.

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Students who have used VA benefits at another school must submit a completed "Request for Change in Program or Place of Training" (VA Form 22-1995) instead of the application.

3. Apply for Admission, Enroll and Pay Tuition Apply for admission, complete an enrollment agreement and arrange for payment of tuition.

4. Send Enrollment Verification to VA An AJU VA Certifying Official verifies your enrollment. This includes the following steps and can take up to ten business days depending on the number of applications received weekly: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Application for VA education benefits (VA Form 22-1990) is received. Incoming applications are matched with completed enrollments. . Payment of tuition is confirmed. The enrollment certification is sent to the VA. VA completes the certification process by enrolling you in their system.

The process VA must follow to enroll you in their system includes the following actions and may take up to 12 weeks: 1. 2. 3. 4.

VA receives your enrollment verification from Andrew Jackson University. VA contacts the DoD to verify that you have made payments toward the VA Program. VA confirms that the "VA Entitlement" was awarded to you. VA enters your student information in their system to complete the application process. Students who wish to verify the status of their VA application may contact the VA toll-free at 888-442-4551.

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V.A. ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2008 — 2009 Summer A 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Fall A 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Spring B 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Summer B 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Fall B 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Spring C 2008 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Summer C 2008-2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course

Course Start Date 5/5/2008 5/5/2008 6/2/2008 7/7/2008 Course Start Date 9/1/2008 9/1/2008 10/6/2008 11/3/2008 Course Start Date 2/4/2008 2/4/2008 3/3/2008 4/7/2008 Course Start Date 6/2/2008 6/2/2008 7/7/2008 8/4/2008 Course Start Date 9/29/2008 9/29/2008 10/27/2008 11/24/2008 Course Start Date 3/3/2008 3/3/2008 4/7/2008 5/5/2008 Course Start Date 7/7/2008 7/7/2008 8/4/2008 9/1/2008

Log In

Midterm

5/9/2008 5/9/2008 6/6/2008 7/11/2008

7/11/2008 6/6/2008 7/4/2008 8/8/2008

Log In

Midterm

9/5/2008 9/5/2008 10/10/2008 11/7/2008

11/7/2008 10/3/2008 11/7/2008 12/5/2008

Log In

Midterm

2/8/2008 2/8/2008 3/7/2008 4/11/2008

4/11/2008 3/7/2008 4/4/2008 5/9/2008

Log In

Midterm

6/6/2008 6/6/2008 7/11/2008 8/8/2008

8/8/2008 7/7/2008* 8/8/2008 9/5/2008

Log In

Midterm

10/3/2008 10/3/2008 10/31/2008 11/28/2008

12/5/2008 10/31/2008 11/28/2008 12/26/2008

Log In

Midterm

3/7/2008 3/7/2008 4/11/2008 5/9/2008

5/9/2008 4/4/2008 5/9/2008 6/6/2008

Log In

Midterm

7/11/2008 7/11/2008 8/8/2008 9/5/2008

9/12/2008 8/8/2008 9/5/2008 10/3/2008

Course Semester End Date End Date 8/22/2008 8/29/2008 6/27/2008 8/29/2008 7/25/2008 8/29/2008 8/29/2008 8/29/2008 Course Semester End Date End Date 12/19/2008 12/26/2008 10/24/2008 12/26/2008 11/28/2008 12/26/2008 12/26/2008 12/26/2008 Course Semester End Date End Date 5/23/2008 5/30/2008 3/28/2008 5/30/2008 4/25/2008 5/30/2008 5/30/2008 5/30/2008 Course Semester End Date End Date 9/19/2008 9/26/2008 7/25/2008 9/26/2008 8/29/2008 9/26/2008 9/26/2008 9/26/2008 *Holiday Schedule Course Semester End Date End Date 1/16/2009 1/23/2009 11/21/2008 1/23/2009 12/19/2008 1/23/2009 1/16/2009 1/23/2009 Course Semester End Date End Date 6/20/2008 6/27/2008 4/25/2008 6/27/2008 8/30/2008 6/27/2008 6/27/2008 6/27/2008 Course Semester End Date End Date 10/24/2008 10/31/2008 8/29/2008 10/31/2008 9/26/2008 10/31/2008 10/24/2008 10/31/2008

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Fall C 2008-2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course *Holiday schedule Spring A 2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Summer A 2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Fall A 2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Spring B 2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Summer B 2009 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Fall B 2009 - 2010 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course

Course Start Date 11/3/2008 11/3/2008 12/1/2008 1/5/2009 Course Start Date 1/5/2009 1/5/2009 2/2/2009 3/2/2009 Course Start Date 5/4/2009 5/4/2009 6/1/2009 7/6/2009 Course Start Date 8/31/2009 8/31/2009 9/28/2009 10/26/2009 Course Start Date 2/2/2009 2/2/2009 3/2/2009 4/6/2009 Course Start Date 6/1/2009 6/1/2009 7/6/2009 8/3/2009 Course Start Date 9/28/2009 9/28/2009 10/26/2009 11/23/2009

Log In

Midterm

11/7/2008 11/7/2008 12/5/2008 1/9/2009

1/9/2009 12/5/2008 1/2/2009 2/6/2009

Log In

Midterm

1/9/2009 1/9/2009 2/6/2009 3/6/2009

3/13/2009 2/6/2009 3/6/2009 4/3/2009

Log In

Midterm

5/8/2009 5/8/2009 6/5/2009 7/10/2009

7/10/2009 6/5/2009 7/3/2009 8/7/2009

Log In

Midterm

9/4/2009 9/4/2009 10/2/2009 10/30/2009

11/6/2009 10/2/2009 10/30/2009 11/27/2009

Log In

Midterm

2/6/2009 2/6/2009 3/6/2009 4/10/2009

4/10/2009 3/6/2009 4/3/2009 5/8/2009

Log In

Midterm

6/5/2009 6/5/2009 7/10/2009 8/7/2009

8/7/2009 7/3/2009 8/7/2009 9/4/2009

Log In

Midterm

10/2/2009 10/2/2009 10/30/2009 11/27/2009

12/4/2009 10/30/2009 11/27/2009 12/25/2009

Course End Date 2/20/2009 1/2/2009* 1/23/2009 2/27/2009

Semester End Date 2/27/2009 2/27/2009 2/27/2009 2/27/2009

Course End Date 4/24/2009 2/27/2009 3/27/2009 4/24/2009 Course End Date 8/21/2009 6/26/2009 7/24/2009 8/28/2009 Course End Date 12/18/2009 10/23/2009 11/20/2009 12/18/2009 Course End Date 5/22/2009 3/27/2009 4/24/2009 5/29/2009 Course End Date 9/18/2009 7/24/2009 8/28/2009 9/25/2009 Course End Date 1/15/2010 11/20/2009 12/18/2009 1/15/2010

Semester End Date 5/1/2009 5/1/2009 5/1/2009 5/1/2009 Semester End Date 8/28/2009 8/28/2009 8/28/2009 8/28/2009 Semester End Date 12/25/2009 12/25/2009 12/25/2009 12/25/2009 Semester End Date 5/29/2009 5/29/2009 5/29/2009 5/29/2009 Semester End Date 9/25/2009 9/25/2009 9/25/2009 9/25/2009 Semester End Date 1/22/2010 1/22/2010 1/22/2010 1/22/2010

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Spring C 2009 - 2010 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Summer C 2009 - 2010 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course Fall C 2009 - 2010 16-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course 8-week Course

Course Start Date 3/2/2009 3/2/2009 4/6/2009 5/4/2009 Course Start Date 7/6/2009 7/6/2009 8/3/2009 9/7/2009 Course Start Date 11/2/2009 11/2/2009 12/7/2009 1/4/2010

Log In

Midterm

3/6/2009 3/6/2009 4/10/2009 5/8/2009

5/8/2009 4/3/2009 5/8/2009 6/5/2009

Log In

Midterm

7/10/2009 7/10/2009 8/7/2009 9/11/2009

9/11/2009 8/7/2009 9/4/2009 10/9/2009

Log In

Midterm

11/6/2009 11/6/2009 12/11/2009 1/8/2010

1/8/2010 12/4/2009 1/8/2010 2/5/2010

Course End Date 6/19/2009 4/24/2009 5/29/2009 6/26/2009 Course End Date 10/23/2009 8/28/2009 9/25/2009 10/30/2009 Course End Date 2/19/2010 12/25/2009 1/29/2010 2/26/2010

Semester End Date 6/26/2009 6/26/2009 6/26/2009 6/26/2009 Semester End Date 10/30/2009 10/30/2009 10/30/2009 10/30/2009 Semester End Date 2/23/2010 2/23/2010 2/23/2010 2/23/2010

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AJU Student Policies AJU students are expected to be a credit to themselves, the community and the University. The following policies are created to ensure the integrity of the degree you earn from AJU.

HONOR CODE The Andrew Jackson University Honor Code has been implemented to guide the actions of each student academically and as a member of his or her community. Individuals who sign the Enrollment Agreement agree to abide by, and all enrolled students will be expected to comply with, the Andrew Jackson University Honor Code as outlined in the University’s Student Handbook in myClassroom at www.myclassroom.aju.edu.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE The academic standing of a student is expressed in terms of a grade point average (GPA). A grade point average is computed by dividing the total number of grade points earned at Andrew Jackson University by the total number of hours attempted at Andrew Jackson University.

GRADING SYSTEM Andrew Jackson University uses the following system of grading for undergraduate students: A Outstanding 4.00 B Commendable 3.00 C Marginal 2.00 D Deficient, minimal pass 1.00 I Incomplete 0.00 F Failure 0.00 Andrew Jackson University uses the following system of grading for graduate students: A Outstanding 4.00 B Commendable 3.00 C Deficient, minimal pass 2.00 I Incomplete 0.00 F Failure 0.00

POLICIES FOR COURSEWORK SUBMISSION Term Deadlines. A student begins a new term upon his/her registration for each individual course. Each term completion date is determined by the length of the course or courses that a student may be concurrently enrolled in. If the student foresees that he/she will not be able to complete the course within the term, a Request for Academic Extension may be submitted, with appropriate fee. This form must be received and approved before the student’s term expires. (Additional policies may apply—see Academic Extension section of this catalog.) Lesson Deadlines. A schedule for lesson/exam completion dates is provided in each online course in myClassroom. Students are encouraged to follow the schedule in order to achieve satisfactory progress.

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Format for Coursework. How to Submit a Lesson. Andrew Jackson University procedures are designed to clearly classify student work, facilitate timely faculty feedback, and accurately indicate student progress. All work should be completed using Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel and uploaded through myClassroom. Complete instructions by assignment are provided within myClassroom. Lessons must be submitted as individual assignments. Partial Submissions. The student is responsible for ensuring that each lesson is complete. It is important to double check the lesson materials before submission. Incomplete lessons will be graded as is; missing assignments will receive a grade of 0 (zero). Once a student takes the final exam for a course no further assignments will be accepted. Non-Lesson Materials. Correspondence with the University related to other matters besides specific lessons (i.e., proctor forms, tuition payments, requests for academic extension, etc.) are to be submitted separately to the attention of the appropriate department.

THE PROCTOR APPROVAL PROCESS Proctor forms provided in the Student Handbook located in myClassroom must be approved before the first exam can be taken. Students may submit up to three proctors for approval or elect to use an AJU online proctor via webcam. Students choosing to use an online proctor will need a webcam. Webcam’s are provided by the University in the online proctor setup fee. In most cases, the University will select ONE individual to serve as the proctor for all examinations. Upon receipt of the form(s), Student Services will finalize the proctor approval process. To avoid conflicts of interest, co-employees, relatives, and housemates of a student, other Andrew Jackson University students, and individuals who would not be qualified to proctor other Andrew Jackson University students will not be approved as a proctor regardless of their employment position. Students who wish to utilize the online proctoring program simply fill out the Proctor Approval Form selecting the online proctor option.

THE PROCTORED EXAMINATION PROCESS A student arranges to meet the proctor at a central location when there will be sufficient uninterrupted time to complete the exam. A computer with Internet access is required to take the exam. Students should notify Student Services of the date, time, proctor’s name and email address a minimum of four (4) business days prior to taking the exam. Student Services will provide the proctor with an exam code to enable access at the assigned time. Each online, proctored examination consists of multiple choice and/or essay questions and should take approximately 90-120 minutes to complete. The student takes the exam without study aids, notes, or help from any individual.

THE ONLINE PROCTORED EXAMINATION PROCESS A student sets up an appointment through student services to schedule an online proctor for their exam when there will be sufficient uninterrupted time to complete the exam. A computer with Internet access and a useable webcam is required to take the exam. Students should notify Student Services of the date and time they wish to test a minimum of three (3) business days prior to taking the exam. The online proctor will provide the student with an exam code to enable access at the assigned time. Each online, proctored examination consists of multiple choice and/or essay questions and should take approximately 90-120 minutes to complete. The student takes the exam without study aids, notes, or help from any individual.

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SATISFACTORY STUDENT PROGRESS Andrew Jackson University encourages persistent efforts on the part of all students. To maintain an active standing, students must maintain a GPA of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale for undergraduate work or a GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale for students enrolling in a graduate program after January 1, 2008.

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT A student will be considered enrolled if they are registered for a course or currently active in a course. A student will also be considered to be enrolled if they are on an approved Leave of Absence or on an Academic Extension. Enrollment in the University will continue for 30 days beyond the end of a course, or the expiration of an Academic Extension or Leave of Absence. A student who goes beyond the 30 day period will be withdrawn from the University and will need to reapply and pay all applicable fees, including a new enrollment fee in order to continue their program. The enrollment contract for a student who has been withdrawn according to this policy will be terminated and the student will be subject to all terms and conditions of enrollment at the time of re-enrollment.

GRADUATION Degrees are conferred on the last Friday of each month. A Notice of Intent to Graduate form must be filed no later than 60 days prior to graduation accompanied by the $100 graduation fee. Most students prefer to receive their diploma in absentia; however, when a sufficient number of students are able to attend, formal commencement exercises will be conducted. All students who have earned a degree since the previous graduation ceremonies were held will be invited to participate.

STUDENT RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTS Upon written request of the student, academic records will be made available to employers and other duly authorized persons. Only official written transcripts bearing the school seal will be issued. A $10.00 transcript fee must accompany each request. A separate fee is required for each transcript recipient. Andrew Jackson University will not honor transcript requests from any student having a past due financial obligation to the University. Transcripts from other institutions found in admission files cannot be reproduced for student use. These transcripts must be obtained directly from the other institutions.

ASSIGNMENT AND EXAMINATION RESUBMISSION POLICY Assignment Resubmission. As a rule, an assignment may not be resubmitted once it has been uploaded for grading. Part of the collegiate experience involves taking individual responsibility for excellence. Students are advised to carefully review each assignment before submitting it to their instructor for grading. Once an assignment has been uploaded, it is considered “complete.� Instructors will assume any unanswered questions were purposely omitted and the grade will reflect the omission. The decision to allow the resubmission of an assignment is at the discretion of the course instructor. If an instructor believes a student failed to meet the objectives of an assignment through a lack of understanding of the course content, the instructor may require the student to repeat the assignment. Examination Resubmission. In order to successfully pass a course, undergraduate students must receive a grade of 60 (D) and graduate students must receive a grade of 70 ( C ) or better on all proctored course exams. If a student fails a proctored midterm and/or final, he/she has one opportunity to retake and pass each failed exam. Only failed exams may be retaken.

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Within 15 days of notification of a failing grade, a student may request an alternate examination by submitting the Request for Reexamination form with a $30.00 fee. If a Request for Reexamination is not received within 15 days, the examination grade will stand resulting in a grade of “F� for the course.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE Students are permitted to take a leave of absence in the amount of six months per every 10 undergraduate courses or the full graduate degree program. This may be requested in one to six month increments. If taken mid-course, the student will be allowed to resume the course upon reactivation. To obtain a leave of absence, students are to submit a Request for Leave of Absence form accompanied by a completion plan. The completion plan will outline why a leave of absence is necessary (providing documentation as needed), how a leave of absence is beneficial, and a timeline for how they propose to complete their coursework upon their return. To return to active status following a leave of absence, the student may submit a Request for Reactivation form accompanied by the $25.00 reactivation fee. If a student chooses not to return to active status at the conclusion of the leave, administrative withdrawal from the University will be initiated.

MILITARY DEPLOYMENT LEAVE OF ABSENCE Andrew Jackson University understands and responds to the special needs of military service members. When military deployment prohibits satisfactory progress, students may request a Military Deployment Leave of Absence by submitting a Request for Military Deployment Leave of Absence. In the event that a leave of absence must be extended beyond the original reactivation date, a new Request for Military Deployment Leave of Absence must be submitted. To return to active status, the student must submit a Request for Reactivation form. No reactivation fee will be required after a properly requested military deployment leave of absence.

ACADEMIC EXTENSION Students who are unable to complete all course requirements within the length of their course, 8, 12 or 16 weeks, may submit a Request for Academic Extension, with appropriate fee, indicating their petition for a fifty percent or one hundred percent course extension in order to complete all course requirements. For example, students enrolled in a 12 week course may request a fifty percent extension for 6 weeks or one hundred percent for 12 weeks. Students may request only one academic extension per course which must be received by the University before the term date expires. An academic extension in no way suspends any financial obligations students may have to the University. If approval for an academic extension is not granted by the term expiration date or if all required coursework is not submitted by the academic extension deadline, a final grade of F will be awarded for the course. The student will be required to repeat the course at their current tuition rate.

COURSE FAILURE AND REPETITION In order to successfully earn a degree, undergraduate and graduate students must pass all courses in their program with a minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.00 (undergraduate students) or 3.00 (graduate students). Failed courses must be repeated to meet graduation requirements. If a failed course results in a G.P.A. falling below 2.00 (undergraduate) or 3.00 (graduate) academic probation occurs, the student is encouraged to retake the failed course immediately to ensure that the G.P.A. is sufficiently raised within six months, thereby avoiding academic suspension. When a failed course does not result in academic probation, the option exists to continue with other courses and retake the failed course at a later date. A student may retake a course by submitting the Request to Repeat a Course form with the required undergraduate or graduate tuition.

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ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION Academic probation results when a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 2.00 at the undergraduate level or 3.00 at the graduate level. A student on academic probation has a maximum of six months to raise the cumulative average above the minimum standard, either by completing additional courses or repeating courses bearing inadequate grades. When an undergraduate course is repeated, the original course grade is replaced by the subsequent course grade. When a graduate course is repeated, the original course grade is averaged with, rather than replaced by, the subsequent course grade. The cost for repeating a course is determined by the course-by-course tuition schedule outlined in the Financial Information section of this catalog. Academic suspension will follow only if a student is unable to return to good standing active status within six months. Suspended students may apply for readmission to the University after a period of one year.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS The acceptance of transfer credits between institutions lies within the discretion of the receiving college or University. Credits earned at other institutions may or may not be accepted by Andrew Jackson University. Likewise, credits earned at Andrew Jackson University may or may not be accepted by another institution depending upon its own programs, policies, or regulations. Students planning to complete credit elsewhere before applying to Andrew Jackson University are advised to contact the Admissions Office and check on the acceptability of credits from that institution. Likewise, any student relying on Andrew Jackson University credit for transfer to or enrollment in another institution is urged to check with that institution prior to enrollment at Andrew Jackson University.

WITHDRAWAL & REFUND POLICY A student seeking withdrawal may notify the university in any manner - written or verbal- of his/her desire to withdraw. However, for protection of student records, a written withdrawal request is preferred. Refunds, if applicable and requested, will be made by the bursar within 30 days of the request. If you have any questions about the status of your refund, please contact the bursar's office at bursar@aju.edu. 1. If withdrawal occurs anytime prior to five calendar days after the university accepts enrollment, the student may request a refund of all money paid to the university. 2. If withdrawal occurs more than five calendar days after the university accepts enrollment, the university will refund tuition according to the schedule below. The university may withhold a minimum of $75 but no more than $200 or 20% of the tuition as an administrative fee. Refundable tuition is the total tuition less the student portion based on percentage of completion (according to the schedule below). The refund policy is based on a percentage of completion formula on the next page.

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If the following has been completed None of the required assignments (lessons) in a course(s). Up to and including ten percent (10%) of the required assignments (1 Lesson) in a course(s). More than ten percent (10%) and up to and including twenty-five percent (25%) of the required assignments (2 lessons) in a course(s). More than twenty-five percent (25%) and up to and including fifty percent (50%) of the required assignments (3 - 5 lessons) in a course(s). More than fifty percent (50%) of the required assignments (6 - 10 lessons) in a course(s).

He/she will be responsible for payment of: (per course) None of the refundable tuition. 10% of the refundable tuition. 25% of the refundable tuition.

50% of the refundable tuition

All tuition

FINANCIAL PROBATION It is Andrew Jackson University policy that students’ financial accounts must be current. If difficulties arise, appropriate arrangements must be made with the Bursar’s Office. Students who fail to complete satisfactory arrangements or who default on their financial arrangement are subject to financial probation. No transcripts or other documents, including student study materials or grade reports, will be issued to students on financial probation.

RETURNED CHECKS A charge of $25.00 will be made for all returned checks. Should a student have checks dishonored on two or more occasions, the University reserves the right to require payment by cashier’s check, money order, or credit card.

DENIAL OF ADMISSIONS The University reserves the right to reject any applicant judged as unprepared to complete college-level work based on an evaluation of the individual’s application and transcripts, or any individual whose academic needs and goals may not be best served by the University.

APTITUDE POLICY If, at anytime during enrollment, the academic staff determines the student does not have aptitude sufficient to progress successfully through the University program in which he or she is enrolled, the student may be withdrawn from the program. This decision is at the discretion of the academic staff after discussions with the student. Students withdrawn under this policy receive a full refund.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE POLICY Students aggrieved by actions of the University should attempt to resolve these problems with appropriate university officials. Should this procedure fail, students may contact the Private Schools Licensure, State of Alabama Dept. of Post Secondary Education, P.O. Box 302130, Montgomery, AL. 36130.

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NONDISCRIMINATION The University is in compliance with requirements imposed by or pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the regulations issued thereunder, to the end that no person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored at this institution. Further, as prescribed by Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, this institution does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in admission or employment in its programs and activities.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS The University is aware of the confidential nature of students’ records, both personal and academic. No information will be released to anyone without your prior written consent. The University recognizes your right of access to your own records and will provide students with the opportunity to review education records to seek correction of information in those records.

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AJU Special Initiatives At AJU we realize certain segments of our society have special needs not regularly met by traditional educational institutions. We strive to serve these groups by creating programs tailored to their special circumstances.

The New Center for Military Spouse Studies Often, military spouses forego their own career and educational interests “in the best interest of the service,” but a spouse’s career success and earning power is essential to a strong family unit as well as the readiness of the military family. The New Center for Military Spouse Studies’ mission is to develop, implement and promote programs that assist military spouses in gaining employable skills and achieving their educational goals. We offer: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Certificate programs that are designed to help military spouses find jobs in high-demand fields Partial scholarships or grants that reduce out-of-pocket expenses Online courses accessible 24/7 Extensions for course completion to accommodate relocation or special requests

AJU is proud to be recognized by the U.S. Department of Defense Office of Military Community and Family Policy as a Military-Spouse Friendly Institution. More information on special initiatives for military spouses is available from an AJU admissions representative at 800-429-9300, admissions@aju.edu, or at www.aju.edu/militaryspouses.

Leaders in Law Enforcement Accelerated Master’s Programs Whether preparing for your first “chief” position or one with a larger department, or getting ready for a new career after retirement, leaders in law enforcement find an advanced degree helps in the transition. It is widely recognized that command-level law enforcement officers have advanced experience in management, administration and policy-making. Through the creation of the Leaders in Law Enforcement Accelerated Master’s Program, AJU recognizes this experience by awarding nine semester hours of graduate credit (3 courses) toward our 36 semester hour (12 course) Master of Science in Criminal Justice, MPA and MBA degrees. Partial scholarships are available. Chiefs, sheriffs and other command-level officers who wish to qualify should: ƒ Have a minimum of three (3) years command-level experience ƒ Contact an Admissions Representative at admissions@aju.edu or 800-429-9300 (option 1) ƒ Submit a resume detailing management, administrative and policy-making experience

Law Enforcement Officer Spouse Scholarships (LEOS) To support the families of those who protect and serve us, AJU created the LEOS scholarship program for spouses of law enforcement officers. Spouses who meet the qualifications below are eligible for the LEOS scholarship, equal to 25 percent of tuition. Scholarship Eligibility/Requirements ƒ Be the spouse of a sworn law enforcement officer ƒ Submit a one-page “life plan” essay detailing how you will benefit from the degree or certificate ƒ Participate in a telephone interview with an AJU Scholarship Committee member ƒ Annual individual income not to exceed $87,000

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The Jeffrey D. Rubenstein College of Criminal Justice & Public Safety Criminal Justice These degrees and certificates provide skills and knowledge required for entry level and advanced careers in the rapidly growing field of criminal justice and law enforcement.

Why Law Enforcement Officers Don’t Complete College The Rubenstein College conducted a survey of law enforcement officers located in the southeastern United States and identified three primary reasons that police officers don’t complete college: ƒ ƒ ƒ

Time Money Credit for law enforcement training

The AJU solution: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Study at your own pace, online courses available 24/7 Begin immediately, no waiting for another term to begin Scholarships reduce out-of-pocket cost Flexible tuition payment plans work with your reimbursement benefit Credit for college-level police and military training Faculty are active or retired law enforcement professionals with sound academic credentials

Scholarships Partial scholarships to the Jeffrey D. Rubenstein College of Criminal Justice at Andrew Jackson University may be available. To qualify for a scholarship, an individual must meet all of the following requirements: • •

Applicant must be a current or retired employee of a law enforcement, corrections or other public safety agency. Applicant must complete a phone interview with Jeff Rubenstein or his designee.

A Rubenstein Scholarship is offered without regards to age, race, religion, sex or political affiliation to those meeting the above criteria.

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Degree Programs ƒ

Associate of Science in Criminal Justice

ƒ

Bachelor Of Science in Criminal Justice

ƒ

Master of Science in Criminal Justice

ƒ

Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)

See program details beginning on page 26.

Certificates of Proficiency ƒ

Certificate in Corrections

ƒ

Certificate in Criminology

ƒ

Certificate in Homeland Security

ƒ

Certificate in Investigative Techniques

ƒ

Certificate in Law Enforcement Management

See certificate details beginning on page 66.

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Associate of Science in Criminal Justice The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice degree program presents the major components of the criminal justice system. It includes criminal behavior, law enforcement organizations, juvenile systems, legal principles and fundamentals of criminal investigation. This program serves the challenging professional growth and career needs of each element of the criminal justice system as well as providing a step up the ladder for students who plan to continue toward a bachelor’s degree.

Program Objectives ƒ

Develop students’ understanding of the criminal justice system.

ƒ

Identify and analyze institutions, laws, theories, and players that make up the criminal justice system.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers in the criminal justice field.

ƒ

Prepare for continued study in the field.

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) General Education 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Major Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) General Electives Students choose courses from the following:

English Composition and Oral Communication 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112

Composition I Composition II

Mathematics and Statistics 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) MA 135

Finite Mathematics

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Associate of Science in Criminal Justice (cont.) Natural Sciences 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) GS 150 GS 210

General Biology Earth Science

Critical Reasoning 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

Major Electives 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) In addition to approved transfer courses, any of the following Andrew Jackson University courses not duplicated by general education coursework may be used to meet the major elective requirement. Select six courses

Criminal Justice Courses CJ 316 CJ 321 CJ 336 CJ 341

Introduction to Criminal Justice Leadership in Law Enforcement American Constitutional Law Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System

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Associate of Science in Criminal Justice (cont.) CJ356 CJ 361 CJ 363 CJ 366 CJ 371 CJ 376 CJ 395 CJ 396 CJ 426 CJ 431 CJ 441 CJ 446 CJ 451 CJ 456 CJ 463 CJ 465 CJ 466 CJ 467 CJ 495 CJ 496

Judicial Process Criminology Victimology Criminal Investigation Criminal Justice Research Methods Police and Community Relations Topics in Criminal Justice I Internship in Criminal Justice I Correctional Practice and Policy Probation and Parole Criminal Law and Procedure Juveniles in the Justice System Drugs-Use and Abuse Private Security Modern Terrorism Organized Crime Critical Issues in Criminal Justice White Collar Crime Topics in Criminal Justice II Internship in Criminal Justice II

General Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Twelve (12) semester hours of coursework in general education or any major discipline may be taken as electives. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in criminal justice-related areas. If not previously elected, up to six (6) semester hours of topics or internship courses may be completed. See course descriptions beginning on page 68.

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Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is a 120-semester-hour program designed to provide a balanced education that examines the multidisciplinary nature of criminal justice and the organization and operation of each functional component in the field of law enforcement. Students will gain essential skills and knowledge pertinent to the criminal justice system.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Develop an understanding of criminal justice organizations and operations through courses that reflect current industry practice. ƒ

Demonstrate proficiency in researching, collecting and organizing complex data, problem solving, and working collaboratively.

ƒ

Exhibit the ability to think critically and communicate effectively, both verbally and non-verbally.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry to mid-level positions in the criminal justice field.

ƒ

Prepare for advanced study in the field of criminal justice.

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

20 Courses (60 Semester Hours) General Education 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Foundation Courses 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) Major Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) General Electives

English Composition and Oral Communication Choose 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112 CM 220

Composition I Composition II Fundamentals of Speech

Mathematics and Statistics Choose 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) MA 135 MA 245 ST 235

Finite Mathematics Survey of Business Calculus Elementary Statistics

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Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (cont.) Natural Sciences Choose 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) GS 150 GS 210 GS 261

General Biology Earth Science Introduction to Physics

Critical Reasoning Choose 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts Choose 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences Choose 5 Courses (15 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

Foundation Courses Choose 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Foundation courses provide basic knowledge in the field of criminal justice and prepare students for further study in this major. The following Andrew Jackson University courses meet foundation requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice:

Criminology - History/Theory CJ 361

Criminology

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Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (cont.) Interdisciplinary Criminal Justice Survey CJ 316

Introduction to Criminal Justice

Introductory Criminal Justice Administration CJ 321

Leadership in Law Enforcement

Research Methods CJ 371

Criminal Justice Research Methods

Legal and Ethical Issues Choose 2 Courses (6 semester hours) CJ 336 CJ 341 CJ 441 CJ 446

American Constitutional Law Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Criminal Law and Procedure Juveniles in the Justice System

Major Electives Choose 10 Course (30 Semester Hours) A total of 10 courses (30 semester hours) of intermediate and advanced courses must be completed in four or more subject areas in criminal justice including at least five (5) (15 semester hours) advanced courses. In addition to any approved transfer courses, any of the Andrew Jackson University courses indicated below may be used to meet these major requirements when not duplicated by general education, foundation, or other emphasis requirements. Select a total of 10 courses in at least four (4) areas of interest:

Administrative Processes CJ 361 CJ 363 CJ 371

Criminology Victimology Criminal Justice Research Methods

Community Relations/Social Issues CJ 341 CJ 376 CJ 446 CM 458 CM 457 CJ 466

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Police and Community Relations Juveniles in the Justice System Conflict Management Intercultural Communication Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

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Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (cont.) Correctional Settings CJ 426 CJ 431

Correctional Practice and Policy Probation and Parole

Law and Social Control CJ 356 CJ 441 CJ 446 CJ 451

Judicial Process Criminal Law and Procedure Juveniles in the Justice System Drugs—Use and Abuse

Procedure and Practice CJ 366

Criminal Investigation

Public Policy CJ 336 CJ 356

American Constitutional Law Judicial Process

Security CJ 456 CJ 463 CJ 465 CJ 467

Private Security Modern Terrorism Organized Crime White Collar Crime

General Electives Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Up to four courses (12 semester hours) in general education course Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice or any major discipline may be taken as electives. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in criminal justice, criminal justice administration, corrections, law enforcement, law and society, or public safety. Not more than six (6) semester hours of elective transfer credit may be awarded for internship. Up to six (6) semester hours of electives may be completed as topics or internship courses. CJ 395 CJ 396 CJ 395 CJ 496

Topics in Criminal Justice I Internship in Criminal Justice I Topics in Criminal Justice II Internship in Criminal Justice II

See course descriptions beginning on page 66.

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Master of Science in Criminal Justice The Master of Science in Criminal Justice is a multidisciplinary, broad-based program that includes study in the overall criminal justice discipline and stresses the application of theory and research to current managerial and societal issues. Criminal justice policy, research methods, data analysis principles, and criminological theory are introduced early in the program so students can gain skills in applying theory and research as they investigate various managerial and ethical challenges. A baccalaureate degree will qualify applicants to enter this program. Whether gained by undergraduate study or workplace experience, a familiarity with basic statistics and introductory calculus is required.

Program Objectives ƒ

Develop analytical and critical thinking and interpersonal skills applicable to real-world problems.

ƒ

Obtain a thorough knowledge of management skills specifically needed to develop proactive, ethical approach to organizational management of a criminal justice agency.

ƒ

Gain knowledge of advanced theory and applications of criminal justice practice in the field as well as within an agency including investigative techniques, criminal theory, ethical leadership, crisis negotiation, community policing, crime prevention and control, and interagency cooperation.

ƒ

Perform critical analysis of criminal justice-oriented research and research design.

12 Courses (36 Semester Hours) (See course descriptions beginning on page 75.)

Foundation Courses (Required) 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) CJ 526 CJ 541 CJ 626

Prevention and Control of Crime Criminological Theory Ethics in Crime and Justice

Core Courses Choose 9 Courses (27 Semester Hours) CJ 546 CJ 551 CJ 556 CJ 561 CJ 601 CJ 606 CJ 611 CJ 633 CJ 645 CJ 690

Criminal Investigation Methodology for Criminal Justice Research Data Analysis Methods Probation, Parole & Community Corrections Proactive Police Management Multicultural Law Enforcement Community Policing and Problem Solving Crisis Negotiations Delinquency in America Topics In Criminal Justice

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Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) The Master of Public Administration is a professional degree program that attracts those planning leadership or managerial careers in federal, state, or local government, as well as current public administrators who want to augment their professional experience. The program is designed to develop the insights and skills needed to plan and help formulate policy, and to organize, manage, and implement programs and operations. In seeking to develop these general competencies, studies discuss the political, social, economic, and legal context of public administration and offer broad-based training in management, organizational behavior, research methods, policy analysis, personnel, and budgeting. A baccalaureate degree will qualify applicants to enter this program. Whether gained by undergraduate study or workplace experience, a familiarity with business statistics and introductory calculus is required.

Program Objectives ƒ

Develop analytical and critical thinking and interpersonal skills applicable to real-world problems.

ƒ

Obtain a thorough knowledge of management skills specifically needed to develop proactive, ethical approach to organizational management of a government agency.

ƒ

Gain knowledge of advanced theory and applications of public administration practice including studies in political, social, economic and legal context of public administration.

ƒ

Perform critical analysis of public administration-oriented research and research design.

12 Courses (36 Semester Hours) (See course descriptions beginning on page 75.)

Foundation Courses (Required) GM 520 MG 641 MG 665

Survey of Public Administration Organizational Behavior Managerial Communication

Core Courses Choose 9 Courses (27 Semester Hours) GM 551 GM 552 GM 595 GM 625 GM 631 GM 645 GM 651 GM 661 GM 667 MG 615 GM 675 GM 690

Powers of Government Rights of the Individual Research Methods for Public Administrators Public Sector Economics Public Human Resources Perspectives & Choices in Public Policy Public Budgeting Problems & Issues in Public Administration Comparative Public Administration Management Information Systems Public Policy Analysis Topics in Public Administration

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Sober College School of Addiction Studies The Sober College School of Addiction Studies at Andrew Jackson University is created to serve the needs of people who have an interest in addictive behaviors, either because of personal experience or an interest in working with those who need help. Developed in cooperation with Sober College, a national leader in recovery from chemical dependency and related issues for young adults, Sober College professionals have combined their expertise in addiction recovery with the faculty and staff at Andrew Jackson University to create a program that is uniquely tailored to meet the needs of this important field of study.

Why Sober College? The Sober College School of Addiction Studies is created to provide real world information on addiction and recovery. Its courses are designed by professionals with years of experience working with people who are suffering from addiction. All of the courses offered by the Sober College School of Addiction Studies are taught by top level professionals with intimate knowledge of addiction. These courses will not only provide you with the knowledge to work with people suffering from addiction but they will provide you an opportunity to learn more about yourself. Andrew Jackson University is a member of and a continuing education provider for The California Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (CAADAC). Provider #0S-07-291-1109.

Degree Programs ƒ

Associate of Science in Health Care Management

ƒ

Associate of Science in Psychology

ƒ

Certificates of Proficiency (see page 63)

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Associate of Science in Health Care Management The Associate of Science in Health Care Management prepares students for positions in the field of health care management. The curriculum covers medical office management, medical records and insurance claims, medical coding, human anatomy and physiology, patient relations, medical assisting, and using Microsoft® Office. Students also learn essential business and communication skills, critical to administrative tasks and business duties that ensure the smooth delivery of health services.

Program Objectives ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Develop students’ understanding of the field of health care management. Understand principles of health care management and how they are applied to administrative and business tasks in the industry. Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry level positions. Prepare for continued study in the field of health care management.

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) General Education 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) Major Electives Students choose courses from the following:

English Composition and Oral Communication 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) EN 111 Composition I EN 112 Composition II (Prerequisite EN 111)

Mathematics and Statistics 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) MA 135 Finite Mathematics

Natural Sciences 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) GS 150 General Biology GS 210 Earth Science GS 261 Introduction to Physics

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Associate of Science in Health Care Management (cont.) Critical Reasoning 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System CM 365 Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) BA 175 Ethical Decision Making EN 221 American Literature I EN 222 American Literature II HI 171 Western Civilization I HI 172 Western Civilization II HI 231 American History I HI 232 American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 340 Business Law BA 371 Macroeconomics BA 372 Microeconomics CJ 336 American Constitutional Law CJ 361 Criminology CM 101 Principles of Human Communication PS 150 American Government PS 271 American State and Local Politics

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Associate of Science in Health Care Management (cont.)

Major Electives 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) In addition to approved transfer courses, any of the following Andrew Jackson University courses not duplicated by general education coursework may be used to meet the major elective requirement. HC 170 Medical Office Management I HC 271 Medical Office Management II HC 275 Medical Terminology HC 180 Anatomy & Physiology I HC 281 Anatomy & Physiology II HC 285 Health Records Management HC 190 Medical Coding I HC 291 Medical Coding II CS 110 Microsoft速 Office I CS 115 Microsoft速 Office II

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Associate of Science in Psychology The Associate of Science in Psychology provides a practical understanding of personality disorders, social problems, developmental and cognitive disorders, abnormal behaviors, treatment techniques, psychometrics testing, age- and sex- specific disorders, substance abuse and more. This program serves the professional growth and career needs for each element of the psychological discipline.

Program Objectives ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Develop students’ understanding of the fields of psychology. Understand principles of psychology and how they are applied to individual and social problems. Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry level positions. Prepare for continued study in the field of psychology.

10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) General Education 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) Major Electives

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

Students choose courses from the following:

English Composition and Oral Communication Associate of Science – 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112

Composition I Composition II (Prerequisite EN 111)

Mathematics and Statistics Associate of Science - 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) MA135

Finite Mathematics

Natural Sciences 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) GS 150 General Biology GS 210 Earth Science

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Associate of Science in Psychology (cont.) Critical Reasoning 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics

Major Electives 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) In addition to approved transfer courses, any of the following Andrew Jackson University courses not duplicated by general education coursework may be used to meet the major elective requirement. SO 241 PY 141 CM 301 PY 245 PY 250 PY 251 PY 255 PY 260 PY 265 PY 270

General Sociology General Psychology Survey of Communication Human Relations Human Growth and Development I Human Growth and Development II Social Problems Social Psychology Abnormal Psychology Psychology of Personality

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The Brian Tracy College of Business & Entrepreneurship Based on proven strategies and techniques of experienced professionals, the Brian Tracy College provides immediately applicable skills and knowledge for serious adult learners. Courses incorporate time-tested business basics that can be applied immediately in the competitive world of business. Our entrepreneurial insights and business expertise offer the serious student a wealth of proven, practical and immediately applicable principles – a refreshing change from the purely theoretical approaches employed by many academics. Whether you are seeking to advance with an MBA, earn a Bachelor’s degree, or simply take an individual course or certificate program, the Brian Tracy College of Business and Entrepreneurship will give you the skills that set you apart from the rest.

Scholarships The Brian Tracy College of Business and Entrepreneurship offers partial scholarships to deserving students. To qualify, a student must meet the requirements below. The scholarship applicant must: • • • • • •

Be an employed adult or an entrepreneur Earn less than $87,000 annually Submit a one page essay describing how the student will benefit from the scholarship, including their career plan Select a degree program Submit, with an application, proof of the above Complete a phone interview with a designated College scholarship officer

For more information call your admissions representative at 800-429-9300 or e-mail to scholarship@aju.edu.

Degree Programs Associate of Science Degrees ƒ ƒ

Associate of Science in Business Associate of Science in Communication

See page 43 for details.

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Bachelor of Science Degrees ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Bachelor’s of Science in Business -Entrepreneurship Bachelor’s of Science in Business - Sales & Sales Management Bachelor’s of Science in Business - Management/Leadership Bachelor’s of Science in Business - General Business

See page 46 for details. Bachelor of Arts Degree ƒ

Bachelor’s of Arts in Communication

See page 58 for details. Master of Business Administration Degrees ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Master of Business Administration, concentration in Entrepreneurship Master of Business Administration, concentration in Sales Management Master of Business Administration, concentration in Strategic Leadership Master of Business Administration, concentration in Management Master of Business Administration, concentration in Finance Master of Business Administration, concentration in Human Resource Management Master of Business Administration, concentration in Health Services Management Master of Business Administration, concentration in Marketing

See page 51 for details. Certificates of Proficiency ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Certificate of Proficiency in Entrepreneurship Certificate of Proficiency in Human Resource Management Certificate of Proficiency in Sales & Marketing Certificate of Proficiency in Organizational Leadership

Other certifications include: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Certification of Proficiency in Business Communications Certification of Proficiency in Business Finance Certification of Proficiency in Business Management Certificate in of Proficiency Small Business Office Management

See page 64 for details.

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Associate of Science in Business The Associate of Science in Business degree program focuses on today's increasingly complicated business environment. It equips professionals with a comprehensive knowledge of the economic climate in the modern workforce. This degree program provides career education for individuals seeking employment as well as those already employed in business and business-related fields. The Associate’s in Business degree requires completion of 20 courses (60 credit hours). The same course may not be used to fulfill multiple requirements in general education and major areas of this degree program.

Program Objectives ƒ

Develop students’ understanding of the functional fields of business and their interrelationships in complex organizations.

ƒ

Identify and analyze economic climate and business trends in a global business context.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry level in the business field.

ƒ

Prepare for continued study in the field of business.

10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) General Education 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Major Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) General Electives

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

Students choose courses from the following:

English Composition and Oral Communication 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112 CM 220

Composition I Composition II Fundamentals of Speech

Mathematics and Statistics 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) MA 135 MA 245 ST 235

Finite Mathematics Survey of Business Calculus Elementary Statistics

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Associate of Science in Business (cont.) Natural Sciences 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) GS 150 GS 210 GS 261

General Biology Earth Science Introduction to Physics

Critical Reasoning 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

Major Electives 6 Courses (18 Semester hours) In addition to approved transfer courses, any of the following Andrew Jackson University courses not duplicated by general education course work may be used to meet the major elective requirement. Select Six Courses.

Business Courses BA 301 BA 331 BA 340

Introduction to Business Organizational Behavior Business Law

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Associate of Science in Business (cont.) BA 351 BA 356 BA 358 BA 395 BA 396 BA 415 BA 416 BA 425 BA 436 BA 445 BA 448 BA 451 BA 452 BA 453 BA 456 BA 461 BA 464 BA 466 BA 471 BA 495 BA 496

Principles of Management Human Resource Management Production and Operations Management Topics in Business I Internship in Business I Financial Accounting Managerial Accounting Managerial Finance International Business Effective Leadership Team Development and Motivation Entrepreneurship New Venture Creation New Venture Financial Planning Strategic Entrepreneurial Management Principles of Marketing Marketing Strategy Introduction to Selling Money & Banking Topics in Business II Internship in Business II

General Electives Four Courses (12 Semester Hours) Four courses in general education or any major discipline may be taken as electives. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in business-related areas. If not previously elected, two courses (six (6) semester hours) of topics or internship courses may be completed. See course descriptions beginning on page 68.

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Bachelor of Science in Business The Bachelor of Science in Business is a 120-semester-hour program that provides a balanced, liberal arts-based education including a comprehensive survey of the business world and a strong foundation on which to advance or build a career. Students gain skills and knowledge for decision-making positions in business, industry, and government and receive the preparation necessary for satisfactory performance in graduate business studies. Concentrations are available in: ƒ

Entrepreneurship

ƒ

Sales/Sales Management

ƒ

Management/Leadership

ƒ

General Business

Program Objectives Develop a broad-based understanding of the functional fields of business and their interrelationships in complex organizations. ƒ

Identify and analyze economic climate and business trends in a global business context.

ƒ

Apply quantitative and behavioral tool of business analysis and decision-making.

ƒ

Utilize information technology to improve communication and management decision-making.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry to mid-level positions in the business field.

ƒ

Prepare for advanced study in the field of business.

20 Courses (60 Semester Hours) General Education 11 Courses (33 Semester Hours) Foundation Courses 6 Courses (19 Semester Hours) Concentration Courses 3 Courses ( 9 Semester Hours) General Electives

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

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Bachelor of Science in Business (cont.) English Composition and Oral Communication Choose 3 Courses EN 111 EN 112 CM 220

(9 Semester Hours) Composition I Composition II Fundamentals of Speech

Mathematics and Statistics Choose 3 Courses MA 135 MA 245 ST 235

(9 Semester Hours) Finite Mathematics Survey of Business Calculus Elementary Statistics

Natural Sciences Choose 2 Courses GS 150 GS 210 GS 261

(6 Semester Hours) General Biology Earth Science Introduction to Physics

Critical Reasoning Choose 1 Course CJ 341 CM 365

(3 Semester Hours) Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts Choose 6 Courses BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

(18 Semester Hours) Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences Choose 5 Courses BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

(15 Semester Hours) Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

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Bachelor of Science in Business (cont.)

Foundation Courses (Required) Choose 11 Courses

(33 Semester Hours)

Business Overview BA 301

Introduction to Business

Legal Foundations BA340

Business Law

Accounting BA 415 BA 416

Financial Accounting Managerial Accounting

Financial Management - Select One Course BA 425 BA 471

Business Finance OR Money and Banking

Global Business BA 436

International Business

Human Resources BA 356

Human Resource Management

Marketing - Select One Course BA 461 CM 346

Principles of Marketing OR Advertising and Promotion

Management BA 351

Principles of Management

Organizational Behavior BA 331

Organizational Behavior

Business Policy BA 486

Business Policy

Concentrations Choose One Concentration - 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) (See course descriptions beginning on page 68.)

Entrepreneurship Concentration Learn to create and manage your own business, or help your employer develop their business. BA 445 BA 448 BA 452 BA 453 BA 456 BA 464

Effective Leadership Team Development and Motivation New Venture Creation New Venture Financial Planning Strategic Entrepreneurial Management Marketing Strategy

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Bachelor of Science in Business (cont.) Sales & Sales Management Concentration Learn personal skills and successful techniques for effectively selling any product or service. BA 445 BA448 BA 466 CM 456 BA 464 BA 461 CM 346

Effective Leadership Team Development and Motivation Introduction to Selling Effective Communication Tools Marketing Strategy Principles of Marketing OR Advertising and Promotion

Management/Leadership Concentration Learn skills, techniques, and strategies required to balance the needs of your organization with the needs of the people who comprise the organization. CM 436 BA 445 CM458 BA 448 BA 456 BA 452

Group Communication Effective Leadership Conflict Management Team Development and Motivation Strategic Entrepreneurial Management New Venture Creation

General Business Concentration Customize your degree program by selecting the six courses that best align with your career plans. In addition to any approved transfer courses, any of the Andrew Jackson University courses indicated below may be chosen for the general business concentration when not duplicated by general education or foundation course work. Two courses (six (6) semester hours) of electives may be completed as topics or internship courses. Business Courses BA 358 BA 395 BA 396 BA 425 BA 445 BA 448 BA 451 BA 452 BA 453 BA 456 BA 461 BA 464 BA 466 BA 471 BA 495 BA 496

Production and Operations Management Topics in Business I Internship in Business I Managerial Finance Effective Leadership Team Development and Motivation Entrepreneurship New Venture Creation New Venture Financial Planning Strategic Entrepreneurial Management Principles of Marketing Marketing Strategy Introduction to Selling Money & Banking Topics in Business II Internship in Business II

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Bachelor of Science in Business (cont.) General Electives Three Courses (9 semester hours) Up to nine (9) semester hours of general education coursework or courses in any major discipline may be taken as electives when not duplicated to meet other program requirements. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in business-related areas. If not previously elected, up to six (6) semester hours of electives may be completed as topics or internship courses. See course descriptions beginning on page 68.

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Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) The Master of Business Administration is a professional degree suited to applicants preparing for managerial positions in the workforce as well as those with extensive experience in a specific discipline or industry. Students first participate in an integrated curriculum examining the functional areas of business, then personalize management knowledge and skills by selecting a concentration. MBA concentrations using Brian Tracy’s courses are available in:

Other concentrations include:

ƒ

Entrepreneurship

ƒ

Management

ƒ

Sales Management

ƒ

Finance

ƒ

Strategic Management

ƒ

Health Services Management

ƒ

Human Resource Management

ƒ

Marketing

Program Objectives Develop analytical and critical thinking and interpersonal skills applicable to real-world business. ƒ ƒ ƒ

Obtain a thorough knowledge of management skills specifically needed to develop a proactive, ethical approach to the organizational management of a business. Gain knowledge of advanced theory and applications of business practices; analyze business trends to predict the global economic climate. Perform critical analysis of business-oriented research and research design.

3 courses (9 semester hours) of Foundation Courses 5 courses (15 semester hours) of Core Courses 4 courses (12 semester hours) in the concentration of their choice

Foundation Courses (Required) Choose 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 541 MG 641 MG 665

Business Ethics Organizational Behavior Managerial Communication

Core Courses (Required) Choose 5 Courses (15 Semester Hours) BA 511 BA 521 MG 615 BA 621 BA 623 BA 635 BA 637 BA 651

Accounting Concepts for Managers Managerial Finance Management Information Systems Business Law Health Services Law & Policy - Health Services Concentration Only Economic Analysis Health Services Economics - Health Services Concentration Only Marketing Research & Analysis – Marketing Concentration Only

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Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) (cont.)

Concentrations Concentration in Entrepreneurship Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Learn advanced methods and skills for launching your own business or capitalizing on your creative ideas. BA 538 BA 539 BA 662 MG 673 BA 690

Business Growth Strategies Profit Maximization Advanced Selling Strategies Entrepreneurial Management Topics in Business

Concentration in Sales Management Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Learn executive techniques and skills needed to effectively develop and lead a competitive sales organization. BA 547 BA 661 BA 662 MG 672 BA 690

Management Skills and Style Intermediate Selling Advanced Selling Strategies Sales Management Topics in Business

Concentration in Strategic Leadership Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Learn personal leadership, negotiation, and decision-making skills necessary to strategically lead an organization in the competitive marketplace. BA 547 BA 548 MG 647 MG 673 BA 690

Management Skills and Style Executive Leadership Human Resource Management Entrepreneurial Management Topics in Business

Concentration in Management Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) The general management concentration focuses on leadership and management skills for positions of increasing managerial responsibility. MG 647 BA 655 MG 656 MG 671 BA 690

Human Resource Management Marketing Strategy Operations Management Strategic Management Topics in Business

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Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) (cont.) Concentration in Finance Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Evaluating the risks of doing business and the prospects of earning a suitable rate of return are essential for survival and growth. The finance concentration provides up-to-date knowledge of financial theory, analytical techniques, institutional practices, and practical applications and allows students to become effective decisions makers regarding fiscal policy and strategy. BA 526 BA 531 BA 533 MG 631 BA 690

Financial Institutions and Markets Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management Risk Analysis & Insurance International Financial Management Topics in Business

Concentration in Human Resource Management Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Designed for students entering the managerial workforce as specialists in human resource management, this concentration considers traditional personnel functions from strategic and tactical management perspective in the context of today’s diverse, global business environment. BA 548 MG 636 MG 647 MG 668 BA 690

Executive Leadership Cross-Cultural Management Human Resource Management Organizational Development & Transformation Management Topics in Business

Concentration in Health Services Management Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Management of health-care organizations is a complex and dynamic field requiring knowledgeable and flexible administrators. This concentration prepares students to successfully encounter the challenges and opportunities unique to this demanding environment. BA 553 MG 634 MG 647 MG 651 BA 690

Revenue Issues in Health Services International Health Human Resource Management Management Control of Health Services Topics in Business

Concentration in Marketing Choose 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) The marketing concentration is designed for those involved in marketing, advertising, or public relations. Students will examine issues routinely confronting marketing managers and the constantly changing role of various marketing functions in a firm. BA 653 BA 654 BA 655 BA 657 BA 690

Consumer & Buyer Behavior Global Branding Marketing Strategy E-Marketing Topics in Business

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Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) (cont.)

Program Prerequisites A baccalaureate degree in any discipline will qualify you to enter this program. Although individuals from diverse educational backgrounds bring unique combinations of leadership potential, professional experience, and personal perspective, those entering this program are required to demonstrate a common set of skills necessary for success. As part of the admissions process, applicants must satisfy the following requirements: Microeconomics College-level mathematics These prerequisites can be satisfied in several ways: 1. Completed courses (at least one undergraduate course in each discipline) with a grade of “B� or better; 2. A minimum score of 50 on College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests in each subject area.

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Associate of Science in Communication The Associate of Science in Communication degree program focuses on the basic communication skills highly sought after in relationships, business, and industry. Individuals who communicate well, adapt to social and economic change, function as team players, analyze issues, and solve problems are vital in today’s workforce. This program helps develop these qualities and lays the groundwork for further study toward a baccalaureate degree. The same course may not be used to fulfill multiple requirements in general education or major areas of this degree program.

Program Objectives ƒ

Apply the major theories of communication.

ƒ

Develop an understanding of the quantitative and qualitative research methods in the field of communication.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry level positions in the communication field.

ƒ

Prepare for continued study in the field of communication.

10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) General Education 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Major Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) General Electives

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education. Students choose courses from the following:

English Composition and Oral Communication Choose 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112 CM 220

Composition I Composition II Fundamentals of Speech

Mathematics and Statistics Choose 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) MA 135 MA 245 ST 235

Finite Mathematics Survey of Business Calculus Elementary Statistics

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Associate of Science in Communication (cont.) Natural Sciences Choose 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) GS 150 GS 210 GS 261

General Biology Earth Science Introduction to Physics

Critical Reasoning Choose 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts Choose 2 Courses (6 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences Choose 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

Major Electives Choose 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) In addition to approved transfer courses, any of the following Andrew Jackson University courses not duplicated by general education coursework may be used to meet the major elective requirement. Select six courses CM 101 CM 220 CM 301 CM 325 CM 341

Principles of Human Communication Fundamentals of Speech Survey of Communications Research Methods in Communication Public Relations

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Associate of Science in Communication (cont.) CM 346 CM 351 CM 352 CM 365 CM 383 CM 395 CM 396 CM 425 CM 431 CM 436 CM 437 CM 451 CM 456 CM 457 CM 458 CM 461 CM 471 CM 495 CM 496

Advertising and Promotion Mass Communication Issues in Mass Communication Developing Critical Thinking Skills The Role of Broadcasting in America Topics in Communication I Internship in Communication I Introduction to Media Writing Communication Theory Group Communication Nonverbal Communication Business Communication Effective Communication Tools Intercultural Communication Conflict Management Management Information Systems Rhetorical Theory Topics in Communication II Internship in Communication II

General Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Twelve (12) semester hours of coursework in general education or any major discipline may be taken as electives. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in criminal justice-related areas. If not previously elected, up to six (6) semester hours of topics or internship courses may be completed. See course descriptions beginning on page 68.

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Bachelor of Arts in Communication The Bachelor of Arts in Communication is a 120-semester-hour degree program designed to reflect the theoretical and practical aspects of communication in the context of a traditional liberal arts education. By developing skills that support a variety of careers that involve or emphasize communication, students obtain a competitive edge in the information age.

Program Objectives ƒ

Develop a broad-based understanding of the functional fields of communication and their interrelationships in complex organizations.

ƒ

Identify and analyze economic climate and business trends in a global business context.

ƒ

Apply quantitative and behavioral tools of communication analysis and decision-making.

ƒ

Utilize information technology to improve communication and management decision-making.

ƒ

Through degree completion, demonstrate the depth of knowledge sought by employers for entry to mid-level positions in the communication field.

ƒ

Prepare for advanced study in the field of communication.

20 Courses (60 Semester Hours) General Education 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) Foundation Courses 10 Courses (30 Semester Hours) Major Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) General Electives

General Education Requirements: The general education component is designed to emphasize cognitive development and is “general” in the following ways: ƒ ƒ ƒ

it is not directly related to students’ formal technical, vocational or professional preparation; it is a part of every student’s course of study, regardless of his/her area of emphasis; and it is intended to impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that provide a foundation upon which students can build a rewarding educational experience.

Through Andrew Jackson University’s general education courses, students will acquire the breadth of knowledge characteristic of a liberal arts education.

English Composition and Oral Communication 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) EN 111 EN 112 CM 220

Composition I Composition II Fundamentals of Speech

Mathematics and Statistics 3 Courses (9 Semester Hours) MA 135 MA 245 ST 235

Finite Mathematics Survey of Business Calculus Elementary Statistics

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Bachelor of Science in Communication (cont.) Natural Sciences Bachelor of Science/Arts - 2 Courses GS 150 GS 210 GS 261

(6 Semester Hours)

General Biology Earth Science Introduction to Physics

Critical Reasoning Bachelor of Science/Arts - 1 Course (3 Semester Hours) CJ 341 CM 365

Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Humanities/History/Fine Arts Bachelor of Science/Arts - 6 Courses (18 Semester Hours) BA 175 EN 221 EN 222 HI 171 HI 172 HI 231 HI 232

Ethical Decision Making American Literature I American Literature II Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History I American History II

Social/Behavioral Sciences Bachelor of Science/Arts - 5 Courses (15 Semester Hours) BA 340 BA 371 BA 372 CJ 336 CJ 361 CM 101 PS 150 PS 271 PY 141 SO 241

Business Law Macroeconomics Microeconomics American Constitutional Law Criminology Principles of Human Communication American Government American State and Local Politics General Psychology General Sociology

Foundation Courses 8 Courses (24 Semester Hours) Foundation courses provide basic knowledge in the field of communication and prepare students for further study in this major. The following Andrew Jackson University courses meet foundation requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Communication:

Introduction to Communications CM 301

Survey of Communication

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Bachelor of Science in Communication (cont.) Interpersonal Communications CM 101 CM 458

Principles of Human Communication OR Conflict Management

Professional and Organizational Communication BA 331 CM 456

Organizational Behavior OR Effective Communication Tools

Legal Foundations BA 340

Business Law

Marketing BA 461 CM 346

Principles of Marketing OR Advertising and Promotion

Management BA 351 BA 356

Principles of Management OR Principles of Human Resource Management

Microeconomics BA 372

Microeconomics

Research Methods CM 325

Research Methods in Communication

Major Electives 8 Courses (24 Semester Hours) A total of 24 semester hours (8 courses) of intermediate and advanced courses must be completed in four (4) or more areas of emphasis in communication including at least 15 semester hours of advanced courses. In addition to any approved transfer courses, any of the Andrew Jackson University courses indicated below may be used to meet these major requirements when not duplicated by general education, foundation, or other emphasis requirements. See course descriptions beginning on page 68.

History of Communication CM 383

The Role of Broadcasting in America

Psychology/Theory of Communication CM 101 CM 431

Principles of Human Communication Communication Theory

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Bachelor of Science in Communication (cont.) Group Process BA 331 CM 436 CM 451 CM 456 CM 458

Organizational Behavior Group Communication Business Communication Effective Communication Tools Conflict Management

Mass Communication CM 351 CM 352

Mass Communication Issues in Mass Communication

Nonverbal Communication CM 437

Nonverbal Communication

Cross-Cultural Communication BA 436 CM 457

International Business Intercultural Communication

Journalism CM 425

Introduction to Media Writing

Technology CM 461

Management Information Systems

Public Relations CM 341 CM 346

Public Relations Advertising & Promotion

Rhetorical Theory and Criticism CM 365 CM 471

Developing Critical Thinking Skills Rhetorical Theory

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Bachelor of Science in Communication (cont.)

General Electives 4 Courses (12 Semester Hours) Four courses (12 semester hours) in general education or any major discipline may be taken as electives. In order to develop additional depth and breadth in their major, students are encouraged to choose intermediate or advanced courses in communication-related areas. If not previously elected, up to six (6) semester hours of topics or internship courses may be completed. CM 395 CM 396 CM 495 CM 496

Topics in Communication I Internship in Communication I Topics in Communication II Internship in Communication II

See course descriptions beginning on page 68

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Certificates of Proficiency Andrew Jackson University Certificates of Proficiency Demonstrate Mastery of Skills and Knowledge. The university offers certificates in a variety of fields: ƒ

Addiction Studies

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Business

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Communication

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Criminal Justice

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Technology

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Writing

Certificate programs generally require completion of four courses totaling 12 semester hours. The Certificate of Proficiency in Graphic Arts and Web Design requires completion of four courses totaling four semester hours. Courses completed to meet the requirements of a previously awarded certificate may be applied toward any other certificate. Up to 50% of the certificate program can be earned through transfer credit, creditby-examination, educational credit for training programs, or educational experiences in the Armed Services. Credit for experiential learning is not applicable to a certificate program. In order to be issued a certificate, a student must maintain a minimum 2.0 grade-point average in all classes, fulfill all financial obligations, and submit a certificate request. It is not necessary to be admitted to a degree program in order to complete a certificate, and the admission procedures for the certificate programs are streamlined and brief. However, students who have been admitted to a degree program are not required to apply separately for admission to a certificate program. Undergraduate students may apply to receive a certificate at any time provided they have completed the required courses for that certificate.

Addiction Certificate of Proficiency in Chemical Dependency Studies The Certificate in Chemical Dependency Studies provides students with an understanding of the science involved in chemical dependency, how to manage and repair the conflicts caused by addiction and how to navigate the road to recovery. The certificate is designed for students who want to pursue a career in the addiction field or who know someone suffering from addiction. CM 458 Conflict Management CJ 451 Drugs Use and Abuse

CM 395 Topics in Communication GS 150 General Biology

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Business Certificate of Proficiency in Business Communication The Certificate in Business Communication is designed to provide systematic instruction in well-written proposals and reports, persuasive presentations, and first-rate interpersonal skills. CM 436 Group Communication CM 451 Business Communication

CM 456 Effective Communication Tools CM 458 Conflict Management

Certificate of Proficiency in Business Finance The Certificate in Business Finance offers managers and new or mid-level executives whose role may not be primarily financial an opportunity to better understand the daily business dynamics of money. BA 415 Financial Accounting BA 416 Managerial Accounting

BA 425 Managerial Finance BA 471 Money and Banking

Certificate of Proficiency in Business Management The Certificate in Business Management is designed to arm students with the competencies required to accomplish critical and innovative business objectives in today's dynamic and changing business environment. BA 301 Introduction to Business BA 351 Principles of Management

BA 356 Human Resource Management CM 461 Management Information Systems

Certificate of Proficiency in Small Business Office Management The Certificate in Small Business Office Management is designed to provide skills and knowledge needed for office management of a small business, such as payroll, accounts receivable and payable, hiring, marketing and management. (select four courses) BA 301 BA 415 BA 416 BA 452 BA 448

Introduction to Business (required) Financial Accounting (required) Managerial Accounting (required) New Venture Creation Team Development & Motivation

BA 356 CM 456 CM 451 CM 458

Human Resource Management Effective Communication Tools Business Communication Conflict Management

Certificate of Proficiency in Entrepreneurship The Certificate in Entrepreneurship is designed for individuals seeking to own and operate their own business or holding management positions in the small business environment. Through these Brian Tracy courses, students will learn to critically evaluate a business plan and to write a plan for a new enterprise. (Select four courses.) BA 452 New Venture Creation BA 448 Team Development and Motivation BA 466 Introduction to Selling

BA 453 New Venture Financial Planning BA 456 Strategic Entrepreneurial Management

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Certificate of Proficiency in Human Resource Management The Certificate in Human Resources Management is designed for professionals in the private or public sector who are preparing to enter the human resource management field or who are working in human resources and need to update and review key issues in human resources. BA 331 Organizational Behavior BA 356 Human Resource Management

BA 445 Effective Leadership BA 448 Team Development and Motivation

Certificate of Proficiency in Organizational Leadership Due to changing labor market demographics, increased workforce diversity, economic disruptions, nonstop technological developments and on-going re-engineering efforts, the role of the supervisor has become increasingly complex. Successful managers must demonstrate strong leadership skills, effective communication techniques and solid negotiating strategies as they work to balance the needs of their organizations with the needs of the people who comprise the organization. BA 445 Effective Leadership CM 458 Conflict Management

BA 448 Team Development and Motivation BA 456 Strategic Entrepreneurial Management

Certificate of Proficiency in Sales and Marketing The Certificate in Sales and Marketing is designed for individuals who want a solid foundation in sales and marketing concepts, business owners and entrepreneurs who market and sell their own products and services, and other business and technical professionals with an interest in sales and marketing. Marketing and sales professionals can fill in any gaps in their previous training, make better informed decisions, and stay on top of developments in the field with these Brian Tracy courses. (select four courses) BA 461 Principles of Marketing (required) BA 464 Marketing Strategy (required) CM 458 Conflict Management

BA 466 Principles of Selling (required) CM 346 Advertising and Promotion CM 451 Business Communication

Communication Certificate of Proficiency in Interpersonal Communication Many organizations are seeking employees who can work effectively with other people and apply the principles of human behavior to the workplace. The Certificate in Interpersonal Communication exposes students to interpersonal skills that will enhance their ability to work as leaders in organizations or to work in personnel-related fields. CM 101 Principles of Human Communication CM 220 Fundamentals of Speech

CM 431 Communication Theory CM 456 Effective Communication Tools

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Criminal Justice Certificate of Proficiency in Corrections The Certificate in Corrections provides the skills and knowledge needed in correctional settings. Areas of emphasis include counseling and rehabilitation of the offender, probation and parole, and juvenile corrections. CJ 316 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 426 Correctional Practice and Policy

CJ 431 Probation and Parole CJ 446 Juveniles in the Justice System

Certificate of Proficiency in Criminology Criminology is the multidisciplinary, scientific, broad-based study of crime, criminal behavior, and social reactions to crime and criminal behavior. The Certificate in Criminology provides students with theoretical and practical knowledge relevant to work in the criminal justice system. CJ 361 Criminology CJ 363 Victimology

CJ 371 Criminal Justice Research Methods SO 241 General Sociology

Certificate of Proficiency in Homeland Security The Certificate in Homeland Security is useful to current criminal justice professionals as well as individuals who desire skills and knowledge in this field. Students will learn about modern-day terrorist techniques and analyze response plans and security proposals. CJ 456 Private Security CJ 463 Modern Terrorism

CJ 465 Organized Crime CJ 467 White Collar Crime

Certificate of Proficiency in Investigative Techniques The Certificate in Investigative Techniques introduces the fundamentals of legal investigation. Students will prepare to assist attorneys, paralegals, insurance companies, and private businesses, as well as state and federal government agencies in the process of civil and criminal investigation. (select four courses) CJ 366 Criminal Investigation (required) CJ 441 Criminal Law and Procedure (required) CJ 463 Modern Terrorism

CJ 371 Criminal Justice Research Methods (required) CJ 465 Organized Crime CJ 467 White Collar Crime

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Certificate of Proficiency in Law Enforcement Management The Certificate in Law Enforcement Management focuses on the development of managerial skills for law enforcement, corrections, and other professionals in the field of criminal justice. Persons employed in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their credentials can prepare to assume administrative and advocacy positions in the criminal justice profession. CJ 316 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 321 Leadership in Law Enforcement

CJ 341 Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System CJ 376 Police and Community Relations

Technology Certificate of Proficiency in Graphic Arts and Web Design The Certificate in Graphic Arts and Web Design provides students with the knowledge to design and implement effective, dynamic web sites. Using Macromedia Dreamweaver and skills from Photoshop and QuarkXpress students will learn web design techniques. Each course is one semester hour, for a total of four semester hours for this certificate. CS 120 Introduction to Photoshop CS 140 Introduction to QuarkXpress

CS 230 Introduction to Web Design I CS 232 Introduction to Web Design II

Writing Certificate of Proficiency in Writing The Certificate in Writing provides academic and professional development in the theory and practice of written communication and offers students the opportunity to acquire the communication skills essential in most business and professional careers. Completion of this program can dramatically impact performance in other courses that involve writing. EN 111 Composition I EN 112 Composition II

CM 365 Developing Critical Thinking Skills CM 425 Introduction to Media Writing

(See course descriptions beginning on page 68.)

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Undergraduate Course Descriptions Business: BA 175 - ETHICAL DECISION MAKING. An introduction to the construction and evaluation of ethical arguments and forms of reasoning. Basic moral questions confronting contemporary society, as well as ethical issues in the workplace, are explored. (3 credit hours) BA 301 - INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS. A survey of business in American society, including an introduction to current business trends, basic forms of business ownership, various business careers, the management functions, the role of finance, and other current topics and issues in business. (3 credit hours) BA 331 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. An examination of theories, research results, and applications that focus on managing organizational behavior in small, large, and multinational organizations. Topics include individual behavior and differences, group behavior, team building, organizational structure, and effectively managing the various processes that take place within organizations. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 340 - BUSINESS LAW. A survey of the legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons, the development of the legal system, business crimes and liabilities, regulatory systems, consumer protection, basic contract, personal property, and ecommerce/cyberlaw. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 351 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT. A study of general managerial concepts, the many environmental factors that impact top-level managers, and the management functions of planning, organizing, influencing, and controlling. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 356 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT. A study of the organization, functions, and administration of a personnel department; selection, training, placement, promotion, and appraisal; pay and incentives; and laws affecting the personnel function. Prerequisite: BA 301 & BA 351 (3 credit hours) BA 358 - PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGE-MENT. An examination of the concepts, processes, and methods of managing and controlling operations in manufacturing or service settings. Through real-world cases and problems, current issues such as globalization, supply chain strategy, E-business, and ERP are analyzed. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours). BA 371 - MACROECONOMICS. A study of the economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations; inflation; unemployment; the role of central banking; the banking system; and monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 372 - MICROECONOMICS. A study of the core concepts of microeconomics, product markets, resource markets, modern microeconomic issues, and the international economy. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours)

BA 395 - TOPICS IN BUSINESS I. An independent readings project of a business topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite: BA 301 (1-3 credit hours) BA 396 - INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS I. Undergraduate students arrange for part-time or full-time positions in business related fields then relate their experiences to their academic curriculum through research and writing, under the guidance of a business faculty member. Prerequisite: BA 301 (1-3 credit hours) BA 415 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. A survey of the basic financial accounting concepts and techniques with emphasis on the accounting cycle and financial statements. Prerequisite: BA 301 & BA 372 (3 credit hours) BA 416 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. A survey of accounting for managerial analysis and decision making, providing an analysis of accounting data useful in the planning and control functions of a firm. Emphasis is on terms and concepts utilizing mathematical models to reinforce accounting theory. Prerequisite BA 301 & BA 415. (3 credit hours) BA 425 - MANAGERIAL FINANCE. An examination of current financial theory and the financial decision-making process. This course gives students a strong theoretical foundation and utilizes Excel spreadsheets for mathematical calculations. Prerequisite: BA 301 & BA 372 (3 credit hours) BA 436 - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. An introduction to international organizational structures and management processes; the cultural, political, economic, and legal environments of global marketing; and world market patterns. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 445 - EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP . A leader is a person who is able to cast a vision in a way that others want to follow and accomplish that vision. Leadership may mean the difference in success or failure of a company. Through practical, hands-on activities and exercises, learners will focus on developing and refining essential leadership skills including thinking and planning strategically; communicating effectively; negotiating well; and building and maintaining a productive, high-trust work environment. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 448 - TEAM DEVELOPMENT AND MOTIVATION . People are the most important asset in business today. Hiring and maintaining a highly qualified workforce are keys to the success of any enterprise. This course will give learners insight into the management and motivation of employees. Areas covered in this course include selecting the right people for the job, delegating effectively accountability, coping with challenging people and building effective teams. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours)

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BA 461 - PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. A decision-oriented overview of marketing management in modern organizations including a broad introduction to marketing concepts, the role of marketing in society and in the firm, and the various factors that influence marketing decision making. The product, place, promotion, and price aspects of a marketing mix are emphasized. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 464 - MARKETING STRATEGY. This course teaches the learner to develop, implement, and critically evaluate the marketing strategy for a product or service. It will provide the conceptual frameworks and hone the analytical and creative skills that are necessary to define and develop superior value, persuasively communicate that value, profitably deliver it to a carefully selected target market, and sustain both the value and the profitability in the face of ever-changing customer needs and competitive offerings. Prerequisite: BA 301 & BA 461 (3 credit hours) BA 466 - INTRODUCTION TO SELLING. This course focuses on important sales skills, which can lead to large increases in sales volume such as getting appointments, making persuasive presentations, overcoming objections and closing the sale. The learner is given specific tools and practical exercises to build strengths, overcome critical weaknesses and improve their sales performance. Prerequisite: BA 301 (3 credit hours) BA 471 - MONEY & BANKING. A study of money and banking that includes an examination of financial markets, financial institutions, the money supply process, the Federal Reserve System and the conduct of monetary policy, and monetary theory. Prerequisite: BA 301 & BA 372 (3 credit hours)

BA 486 - BUSINESS POLICY. This capstone course focuses on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies in a turbulent, rapidly changing environment. Through case study analysis, students will focus on integrated decision-making in terms of strategy formation, implementation, and evaluation. Prerequisite: BA 301, BA331, BA351, BA356, BA 340, BA415, BA 416, BA436; and BA 425 or BA 471; and BA 461 or CM 436. (3 credit hours) BA 495 - TOPICS IN BUSINESS II. More independent readings of a business topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite BA 301 & BA 395. (1-3 credit hours) BA 496 - INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS II. Undergraduate students arrange for part-time or full-time positions in business related fields then relate their experiences to their academic curriculum through research and writing, under the guidance of a business faculty member. Prerequisite BA 301& BA 396 (1- 3 credit hours)

Communication: CM 101 - PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION. A basic introduction to the skills and principles which will increase the student’s ability to communicate orally. (3 credit hours) CM 220 - FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH. A study in the fundamental principles of oral communication and application with emphasis on the construction and delivery of various types of speeches. (3 credit hours) CM 301 - SURVEY OF COMMUNICATION. An introductory study of human communication. Students will first consider the basic elements of communication, such as definitions and models, the function of language, nonverbal communication, listening, and interpersonal processes. After this overview, attention will focus on social processes in interpersonal communication, small group communication, and organizational communication. Finally, public communication will be considered, including public speaking, broadcasting, and advertising. (3 credit hours) CM 325 - RESEARCH METHODS IN COMMUNICATION. An introduction to the processes of communication research, common quantitative research methodologies, and concepts of statistical literacy. Students will learn how to best select a research method to answer scholarly questions, find pertinent information about a selected topic both in primary and secondary research, and better understand and critique research they read. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 341 - PUBLIC RELATIONS. A study of the principles and practices of public relations including formation and measurement of opinion, tools of communication, and techniques of identifying and influencing public opinion. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 346 - ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION. A survey of the fast-changing field of advertising and promotion from an integrated marketing communications (IMC) perspective. Topics include situation analysis; the communication process; the importance of objectives and budgeting; and how to develop, monitor, evaluate, and control an IMC program. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours)

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CM 351 - MASS COMMUNICATION. Newspapers, radio, television, the Internet–these and other communication technologies are a significant part of modern life. They increasingly influence how we work, interact, play, and think in today’s world. They can help us, they can hurt us, they can enrich us, they can change us–but they can hardly be ignored. This course helps students think critically about the mass media–to reflect upon how it influences the world and us. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 352 - ISSUES IN MASS COMMUNICATION. An examination of clashing views on controversial issues in mass media. Topics include mass media’s role in society, media ethics, First Amendment rights, regulation, media business, and privacy. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 365 - DEVELOPING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS. An examination of how to reason reliably through inductive, deductive, and other types of arguments and how to avoid the most common mistakes of reasoning. (3 credit hours) CM 383 - THE ROLE OF BROADCASTING IN AMERICA. An in-depth study of the role of broadcasting in America and its influence on individual attitudes and perceptions. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 395 - TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION I. An independent readings project of a communications topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite: CM 301 (1-3 credit hours) CM 396 - INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION I. Undergraduate students arrange for part-time or full-time positions in communication related fields then relate their experiences to their academic curriculum through research and writing, under the guidance of a communication faculty member. Prerequisite: CM 301 (1-3 credit hours) CM 425 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA WRITING. An examination of the theory and practices of writing for print and electronic media as dictated by current techniques, styles, and formats of various media. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 431 - COMMUNICATION THEORY. An examination of classic and recently-emerged theories that explain a wide range of phenomena associated with verbal messages, nonverbal messages, interpersonal communication, group and public communication, mass communication, and intercultural communication. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 436 - GROUP COMMUNICATION. A study of “how groups work,” that includes the latest research in the field on such issues as racial, ethnic, religious, generational, political, class, an gender differences. Other topics include leadership in meetings, group participation, speaking anxieties, improving listening, conflict resolution and mediation, decision-making and argumentation, and effective agendas. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours)

CM 437 - NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION. An exploration of the principles of nonverbal communication and the actual and potential impact of nonverbal behaviors on communication. Students will build skills needed to become competent nonverbal communicators in today's global community. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 451 - BUSINESS COMMUNICATION. A review of theory and processes in oral and written business communication with emphasis on general business communication through memos, letters, and written reports. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 456 - EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION TOOLS. A study of oral communication skills that students will need in the workplace. Focus is placed on all four phases of the communication process–setting goals, knowing the audience, mastering skills, managing anxiety–while also covering the three communication contexts in which oral skills are necessary– interpersonal, group, and public speaking. Students will address the challenges of business communication presented by new technology, the global marketplace, and the increasing diversity of the workplace. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 457 - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. An examination of factors and issues contributing to effective communication in an intercultural context. Through a study of the role of history and identity, cultural perceptions, values and beliefs, language and meaning, and nonverbal behaviors, students will have the opportunity to gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will increase their intercultural communication competence. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 458 - CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. This course offers students techniques and skills to enhance their management of conflict. Emphasizing the need to build long-term positive relationships in the business world, students will investigate the theoretical and practical aspects of power, face-saving, conflict assessment, communication, and problem solving with regard to appropriate strategies, tactics, and goals in conflict resolution. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 461 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. An exploration of how information systems may be used, developed, and managed to support the operation, tactical and strategic decision-making activities and operations of organizations. Topics include general systems theory, cybernetics, and information technology and planning. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 471 - RHETORICAL THEORY. An examination of communication and public speaking through the study of rhetorical theory. A review of the history and basic theories of rhetorical communication provides an backdrop for learning contemporary theory and improving persuasive communication skills. Prerequisite: CM 301 (3 credit hours) CM 495 - TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION II. More independent readings of a communications topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite CM 301 & CM 395. (1-3 credit hours)

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Criminal Justice: CJ 316 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. An examination of the American criminal justice system as an interdisciplinary social science involving aspects of criminology, sociology, law, and political science. (3 credit hours) CJ 321 - LEADERSHIP IN LAW ENFORCEMENT. An examination of contemporary concepts and practices for first line supervisors in law enforcement. Character, motivation, teamwork, and conflict resolution are emphasized in this practical, ethics-based approach to leadership in a complex organization. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 336 - AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. An examination of the historical development and constitutional principles of American government including inquiries into federalism, national and state powers, separation of powers, checks and balances, due process, and equal protection of the laws. The primary focus will be on case law of the Supreme Court from the Marshall court to the present. (3 credit hours) CJ 341 - ETHICAL BEHAVIOR IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. An examination of a wide range of ethical issues in policing, the practice of law, sentencing, corrections, criminal justice research, and crime control policy. Prerequisite: (3 credit hours) CJ 356 - JUDICIAL PROCESS. A study of the dynamics of courthouse justice including an overview of the legal basis for criminal courts, the legal actors–judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys–and their working relationships, the stages through which criminal cases pass, and what happens after conviction. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 361 - CRIMINOLOGY. An inspection of classic theories and current developments in theory, research, and policy with regard to such issues as mass and serial murder, hate and occult crimes, drugs and crime, career criminality, terrorism, and new forms of organized and white-collar crime. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 363 - VICTIMOLOGY. A comprehensive examination of the historical importance of victim restitution and contemporary developments within this field of study. Students will explore the role of victimology in today’s criminal justice system, investigate the consequences of victimization, and examine the various remedies now available for victims. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 366 - CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. An examination of the fundamental principles and procedures employed in the investigation of a crime. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of specific crimes, the identification of sources of information, and the procedures necessary for the proper handling of evidence. Students develop a working knowledge of the steps of investigation beginning with the initial security of the crime scene and concluding with the presentation of evidence and proper testimony in court. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours)

CJ 371 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS. An introduction to criminal justice inquiry including research theory, inquiry structure, modes of observation, data interpretation, program evaluation, and policy analysis. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 376 - POLICE AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS. A study of the relationship between police and the community with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally-diverse society. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 395 - TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE I. An independent readings project of a criminal justice topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (1-3 credit hours) CJ 396 - INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE I. Undergraduate students arrange for part-time or full-time positions in criminal justice related fields then relate their experiences to their academic curriculum through research and writing, under the guidance of a criminal justice faculty member. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (1-3 credit hours) CJ 426 - CORRECTIONAL PRACTICE AND POLICY. A comprehensive study of the context, practices, and special interests of corrections. Topics include the early history and current trends of correctional thought and practice, jails and other short-term facilities, intermediate sanctions, the prison experience, women in prison, institutional management, educational/treatment programs, prisoners’ rights, and race/ethnicity challenges. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 431 - PROBATION AND PAROLE. An examination of the theory and practice of probation and parole, including persistent investigation, supervision of probationers, parole administration and services, treatment theory, parole officers, juvenile services, and new concepts (such as community-based corrections, the justice model, and determinate sentencing) that have impacted traditional probation and parole theory. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 441 - CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE. A comprehensive survey of source, distinctions, and limitations relating to criminal law; the development of criminal law in the United States; the principles of criminal liability; the various crimes and their elements; and the criteria considered in determining capacity and defenses. Also explored are the elements of due process, rule of law, and the role of the Constitution in protecting rights. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 446 - JUVENILES IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM. A study of youthful crime: its volume, causes and trends. The prediction, prevention, treatment and control of juvenile delinquency by social control agencies is examined relative to social policies needed to reduce its incidence. The organization and procedures of the juvenile justice system are also explored. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 451 - DRUGS–USE AND ABUSE. A study of drugs and drug-taking behavior including such topics as alcohol and other depressants, stimulants, tobacco addiction, psychedelics, marijuana, and over-the-counter or prescribed medicines. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours)

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CJ 456 - PRIVATE SECURITY. An examination of private security from an historical and philosophical perspective. Topics include the evolution of private security; basic security goals and responsibilities; investigation; loss prevention through risk management; security systems in the industrial, retail, commercial, and institutional settings; and current challenges facing the security profession. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credits) CJ 463 - MODERN TERRORISM. An exploration of the threat of terrorism, both domestic and international, and basic security issues surrounding terrorism today. Students will learn the principles behind why terrorism exists, consider motivations, review the restructuring of federal law enforcement and recent policy changes, examine offensive and defensive strategies, identify new dangers associated with terrorist access to weapons of mass destruction, and evaluate policy proposals that might be taken by democratic regimes to reduce the likelihood of terrorism or to mitigate its consequences. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 466 - CRITICAL ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. An examination of current issues that impact the criminal justice system. Topics to be addressed include (but are not limited to) crime challenges in the twenty-first century, policing issues, the courts and future interpretation of law, technology, correctional issues, and issues of gender and race. Practical implications as well as theoretical models will be explored. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 467 - WHITE COLLAR CRIME. The study of white-collar crime has challenged commonly accepted explanations of crime and has introduced new complexities at all levels of the criminal justice system, including widespread victimization, difficulties in crime discovery, ambiguous legal definitions, corporate and individual deterrence, and disparity in sanctioning. In this course, students will review the debate regarding the definition of white-collar crime, examine the costs of white-collar and corporate crime to society, consider competing theories to explain white-collar criminality, and explore the use of criminal sanctions to deter the misconduct of corporations. Prerequisite: CJ 316 (3 credit hours) CJ 495 - TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE II. More independent readings of a criminal justice topic of particular interest to the individual student. Prerequisite CJ 316 & CJ 395. (1-3 credit hours) CJ 496 - INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE II. Undergraduate students arrange for part-time or full-time positions in criminal justice related fields then relate their experiences to their academic curriculum through research and writing, under the guidance of a criminal justice faculty member. Prerequisite CJ 316 & CJ 396. (1-3 credit hours)

Computer Science: CS 110 - MICROSOFT OFFICE I. Includes an interactive CDROM to simulate various Microsoft Office applications. Students will learn about similarities among Office applications and will focus on Word and Excel, the word processing and spreadsheet programs included in Microsoft Office. (3 credit hours)

CS 115 - MICROSOFT OFFICE II. Includes an interactive CDROM to simulate various Microsoft Office applications. Students will focus on Access, PowerPoint, and Outlook, which respectively are the database, presentation, and email/scheduling programs included in Microsoft Office. (3 credit hours) CS 120 - INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOSHOP. This course provides an introduction to the basics of Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn how to scan and edit documents. (1 credit hour) CS 140 - INTRODUCTION TO QUARKXPRESS. This course provides an introduction to the basics of QuarkXPress. (1 credit hour) CS 230 - WEB DESIGN I. This course provides an introduction to the basics of Dreamweaver. Students are recommended to take CS120 Introduction to Photoshop or have a good working knowledge of Photoshop before taking this course. (1 credit hour) CS 232 - WEB DESIGN II. This course provides a continuation of the basics of Dreamweaver. (1 credit hour) Prerequisite: CS230 Web Design I Instructor Approval

English: EN 111 - COMPOSITION I. A basic course stressing the composition process and communicating ideas effectively in writing. (3 credit hours) EN 112 - COMPOSITION II. A continuation of basic composition with an emphasis on the logical presentation of grammar and major critical thinking strategies. Prerequisite EN 111. (3 credit hours) EN 221 - AMERICAN LITERATURE I. An overview of the emergences and progress of authentic American literary genius and creativity from the early discovering and colonizing of America to the mid-nineteenth century. (3 credit hours) EN 222 - AMERICAN LITERATURE II. An overview of modern American literature during the latter half of the nineteenth century, the literary renaissance and social challenge experienced in the early twentieth century before the Second World War, and various aspects of drama, poetry, and fiction since World War II. (3 credit hours)

General Science: GS 150 - GENERAL BIOLOGY. An introduction to the basic principles of biology including genetics, plant and animal diversity, ecology, and evolution. (3 credit hours) GS 210 - EARTH SCIENCE. Earth science is a larger term to encompass a group of sciences that attempt to understand the Earth and neighboring planetary bodies. In this course, you will be introduced to the general underlying principles of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. (3 credit hours)

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73 GS 261 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS. An introductory overview of classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite MA 135 and MA 245. (3 credit hours)

History: HI 171 - WESTERN CIVILIZATION I. A chronological survey of the political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, cultural, and military aspects of Western humanity from the earliest cultures to 1715. (3 credit hours) HI 172 - WESTERN CIVILIZATION II. A chronological survey of the political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, cultural, and military aspects of Western humanity from the Age of the Renaissance to contemporary times. (3 credit hours) HI 231 - AMERICAN HISTORY I. A survey of political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life from the discovery of America until 1877. (3 credit hours) HI 232 - AMERICAN HISTORY II. A survey of political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life from 1865 to the present. (3 credit hours)

Health Care Management: HC 170 - MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT I. An overview of medical office topics, including typical happenings in a medical office; an introduction to medical terminology, insurance, and coding; and safety issues, communications issues, and records management. (3 credit hours) HC 180 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I. This course builds on previously acquired knowledge about the human body to provide students with a clear understanding of how each system works and how the systems work together. As a foundation, the student is introduced to the chemistry of the human body, an analysis of the structure and function of cells, tissues, and membranes, and a description of how disease affects systems of the body. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems are explored in detail. (3 credit hours) HC 190 - MEDICAL CODING I. An introduction to the claim forms and billing concepts that depend upon the proper coding of each diagnosis and medical procedure. Topics will include descriptions of the most common insurance plans and health care programs, such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare/Champus, and Workers’ Compensation. (3 credit hours) HC 271 - MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT II. A continuation of Medical Office Management I, this course provides a first look at anatomy, building a patient’s record, patient examinations, laboratory procedures, medications, and responding to medical emergencies. (3 credit hours) HC 275 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY. This course will familiarize students with the medical terminology they will encounter in their studies and their career. Lessons are organized based on the systems of the human body. (3 credit hours)

HC 281 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II. A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I, this course explores in detail the senses, blood, and heart, along with the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Topics such as immunity, nutrition, metabolism, development, and inheritance of medical characteristics are also covered. (3 credit hours) HC 285 - HEALTH RECORDS MANAGEMENT. This course introduces most of the records used in a medical office. Students will see examples of these records, study their contents, and learn how these records are used, shared, and stored by the medical office. Students will also learn about the relationships among these records and medical care, legal, and insurance or billing concerns. (3 credit hours) HC 291 - MEDICAL CODING II. A continuation of Medical Coding I, this course provides a focus on coding from source documents. Students will broaden their knowledge of specific coding issues and improve their coding skills. ICD, CPT, and specialty coding topics are covered in this course, along with instruction on how to avoid or prevail in the audit and appeals process. (3 credit hours)

Mathematics: MA 135 - FINITE MATHEMATICS. A balanced and comprehensive overview of the math topics that business and social science majors need to know. Topics include sets and counting, permutations, basic and conditional probability, along with a brief introduction to statistics. (3 credit hours) MA 245 - SURVEY OF BUSINESS CALCULUS. A study of differential and integral calculus appropriate for business or social science majors. This course emphasizes concepts and problem-solving and leaves numbers-crunching and graphing to technology. Many interesting, relevant, realistic applications to business and social sciences are included. Prerequisite: MA 135 (3 credit hours)

Political Science: PS 150 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. An examination of constitutional principles, functions, and administration of the American federal government with an overview of Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court. (3 credit hours) PS 271 - AMERICAN STATE & LOCAL POLITICS. A survey of politics at the state and local level with emphasis on the political forces that shape policy making and policy outcomes. (3 credit hours)

Psychology: PY 141 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. An examination of human mental processes and behavior including sensation and perception, variations in consciousness, learning through conditioning, human memory, language and thought, the biological bases of behavior, intelligence and psychological testing, motivation and emotion, personality theories, stress management, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (3 credit hours)

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74 PY 245 Human Relations - An examination of the four major issues in human relations: understanding and managing one’s self, dealing effectively with others, fostering career success, and managing one’s personal life. These issues are presented within the premise that career and personal success are interrelated. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours) PY 250 - Human Growth and Development I - This course is an in-depth look at physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from birth through middle childhood. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours)

Statistics: ST 235 - ELEMENTARY STATISTICS. An introduction to basic statistical concepts. Although underlying theory is included, this course does not stress the mathematical rigor more suitable for mathematics majors. Exercises covering a wide variety of statistical applications are included. (3 credit hours)

PY 251 - Human Growth and Development II - A continuation of Human Growth and Development I, this course covers physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from adolescence through late adulthood and death. Prerequisites: PY 141 & PY 250 (3 credit hours) PY 255 - Social Problems - An overview of social problems with emphasis on sexual variance, alcohol and drugs, crime and delinquency, violence, poverty, family problems, physical and mental illness, war, population, aging, urban problems, and environmental destruction. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours) PY 260 - Social Psychology - An introduction to the behavior of individuals as members of the larger society, with emphasis on beliefs, judgments, attitudes, conformity, persuasion, group influence, prejudice, aggression, intimacy, altruism, conflict, peacemaking, and practical applications. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours) PY 265 - Abnormal Psychology - An introduction to abnormal behavior with particular emphasis on classification, treatment, and assessment of various disorders, including anxiety disorders, sexual disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, substance related disorders, eating disorders, and impulse control disorders. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours) PY 270 - Psychology of Personality - Factors shaping personality, including the biological (genes and evolution), the intrapsychic (factors within the mind that influence behavior, thoughts, and feelings), the dispositional (aspects of personality that are stable over time and relatively consistent in a variety of situations), the cognitive and experiential (perceptions, thoughts, feelings, desires, beliefs, and other conscious experiences), the social and cultural (social institutions, social roles and expectations, and relationships with other people), and adjustments to events in day-to-day life. Prerequisite: PY141 (3 credit hours)

Sociology: SO 241 - GENERAL SOCIOLOGY. A basic study of the origins, organization, institutions, and development of human society, including an analysis of major social institutions in relation to society as a whole and the causes and effects of social change. (3 credit hours)

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Graduate Course Descriptions Business BA 511 - ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS FOR MANAGERS. A survey course in accounting principles with emphasis on the managerial uses of accounting data. This course discusses what kind of information is needed, where this data can be obtained, and how these figures can be used by managers as they carry out their planning, controlling, and decision- making responsibilities. Prerequisites: BA 415 and BA 416 or the equivalent (3 credit hours) BA 521 - MANAGERIAL FINANCE. Theory and practice are integrated in this study of the rapidly evolving theory of finance as it relates to corporate investment and the environment in which financial decisions are made. Using a calculator or spreadsheet, students learn the analytical techniques brought to bear on financial decision-making. Prerequisite: BA 511. (3 credit hours) BA 526 - FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MARKETS. This course examines and compares the nature, functions, and regulatory framework of key financial institutions and markets in the dominant economies of the world. Each financial market is studied with a focus on its utilization by financial institutions, its internationalization, and recent events that have affected it. Each type of financial institution is examined with a focus on its regulatory aspects, management, use of financial markets, and performance. Prerequisite: BA 521. (3 credit hours) BA 531 - INVESTMENT ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT. Focusing on the tools and principles essential for sound money management and investing in a global market, this course focuses on developing the ability to analyze the return-generating process of assets (including stocks, bonds, and the basic form of derivatives) and exploring how various assets can be combined to form efficient portfolios in the meanvariance framework. Through an in- depth study of portfolio theory and asset-pricing models, students acquire the analytical skills necessary to conduct valuations of equities, fixed-income securities, and alternative investments. This exploration leads to an understanding of the concept of portfolio management and the importance of diversification in controlling portfolio risk. This is the capstone course for the finance concentration. Prerequisite: BA 521, BA526, BA 533, and MG 631. (3 credit hours) BA 533 - RISK ANALYSIS AND INSURANCE. This course focuses on analyzing and solving risk management problems in business organizations based upon the assumption that risk can be managed if risks are identified prior to a loss and that insurance is an important tool for that purpose. Utilizing managerial, consumer, and societal perspectives, topics include methodology for risk analysis, insurance principles and practices, and techniques for risk and loss control. (3 credit hours) BA 538 - BUSINESS GROWTH STRATEGIES. This course provides learners with hands-on experience in the preparation of a professional business plan for an existing operation. The focus is on strategic objectives, tactical objectives, and strategic variables critical to achieving business success. (3 credit hours)

BA 539 - PROFIT MAXIMIZATION .This course focuses on the unique financial issues facing growing firms in today’s business setting. The areas covered include selecting a new product or service, testing the market, determining costs, and setting prices. The learner will have the opportunity to practice budgeting, breakeven analysis, and dealing with investors and lending institutions with the focus placed on obtaining positive financial results. (3 credit hours) BA 541 - BUSINESS ETHICS. This course prepares students to make informed ethical decisions in the workplace by allowing them to experience decision making for themselves through a wide variety of contemporary real-world case studies. (3 credit hours) BA 547 - MANAGEMENT SKILLS AND STYLE .This course is designed to help learners develop their personal management style by the application of proven processes and skills. The areas covered include change management, setting priorities, problem solving, and decision making. (3 credit hours) BA 548 - EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP. A leader is a person who is able to cast a vision in a way that others want to follow and accomplish that vision. This course is designed to help learners improve their leadership skills in order to function effectively in the global economy. Topics discussed include foundational concepts in leadership, critical issues in leadership, motivation, insights, strategies, and negotiation skills. (3 credit hours) BA 553 - REVENUE ISSUES IN HEALTH SERVICES. Financing health services organizations is increasingly important in today’s society. This course provides a conceptual and practical knowledge of health care finance including sources of funding operations, the inter-relationship between department and total facility budget, the accounting and reporting process, and the influence of third parties on revenue and cost of health care. Students will learn techniques and strategies for intelligent financial decision- making in a health services delivery system. Prerequisite: BA 521, Managerial Finance. (3 credit hours) BA 621 - BUSINESS LAW. An alternative to the traditional method of case analysis, this course emphasizes the importance of incorporating a questioning dimension into legal reasoning–one which involves critical thinking and the consideration of the impact of values (ethics) on the outcome being considered. Using a step-by-step analysis model, students develop critical thinking skills by a hands-on study of various legal environment topics. (3 credit hours) BA 623 - HEALTH SERVICES LAW AND POLICY. Managers in medical offices, hospitals, clinics, or skilled nursing facilities have a professional stake in understanding the multiple legal and ethical issues they will encounter as part of their day-to-day responsibilities. This course examines the legal aspects of health services management including consumer protection, the patient/physician relationship, principles that govern patient information, professional licensure and liability, medical malpractice, and public duties of a health care professional. (3 credit hours)

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BA 635 - ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. A survey of the tools available and the methodologies needed to solve managerial economics problems. The course will include the study of supply and demand, quantitative analysis, the organization of firms, monopolies and oligopolies, and the economics of information. Using mathematical and graphical methods, students will demonstrate the ability to use the appropriate models and techniques for solving managerial economics problems. Prerequisites: BA 371 and BA 372 or the equivalent (3 credit hours) BA 637 - HEALTH SERVICES ECONOMICS. In an examination of the supply and demand for health services, this course surveys the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers (i.e., physicians and hospitals), the functioning of insurance markets, and technology diffusion. Students will also have the opportunity to focus on major policy areas, such as the structure and effects of Medicare reform, competition and regulation in health care, and international comparisons of health care systems. (3 credit hours) BA 651 - MARKETING RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS. Marketing research serves as a central basis for marketing strategy and firm profitability. It is critical for marketing managers to understand the nature of marketing research and to be able to specify what information to seek, how to get it, and how to utilize it in making marketing decisions. Emphasizing the manager’s perspective, this course examines marketing research in terms of needs, definition, process, analysis, and reporting. Topics include emerging trends in marketing research, ethical and global implications, and the continuing integration of new technologies. (3 credit hours) BA 653 - CONSUMER AND BUYER BEHAVIOR. This course provides an in-depth study of how psychological, sociological, and cultural variables influence buying behavior and marketing strategy development. Through case study and experiential exercises, students will focus on identifying the relevant behavioral variables in a given product purchase situation and determining how marketing strategy can be adapted to meet the way in which consumers perceive, select, and buy. Prerequisite: BA 655 (3 credit hours) BA 654 - GLOBAL BRANDING. Incorporating the latest thinking and developments from both academia and industry, this course explores brands, brand equity, global branding, and strategic brand management. Students are provided specific tactical guidelines for planning, building, measuring, and managing brand equity, as well as techniques and practical insights for making better day-to-day and long-term brand decisions. Prerequisite: BA 655 (3 credit hours) BA 655 - MARKETING STRATEGY. An analysis of the managerial approach to marketing activities in a business enterprise emphasizing products, pricing, promotion, physical distribution, sales, advertising, and sales promotion. This is the capstone course for the marketing concentration. (3 credit hours)

BA 657 - E-MARKETING. This course examines Internet marketing, a process that is challenged by rapidly-evolving electronic and interactive media and communications methods. Students will have the opportunity to assess the benefits and risks of Internet marketing, integrate marketing techniques with technology, evaluate old vs. new methods and paradigms, and investigate some of the controversial issues still hotly contested in the marketing field and the public policy arena: privacy, security, measurement of advertising impact, filtering, etc. Prerequisite: BA 655 (3 credit hours) BA 661 - INTERMEDIATE SELLING. This course is designed to give the graduate learner the concepts and skills necessary to successful sell to executive level decision makers in a corporation. The topics covered include responding to request for proposals, making formal presentations, selling in the boardroom, selling to top level executives and selling strategies. Prerequisite: BA 466 or the equivalent (3 credit hours) BA 662 - ADVANCED SELLING STRATEGIES. This course is designed to give the graduate learner high level sales concepts and skills in preparation for selling to complex organizations or selling high priced items. Topics covered include determining sales motivators, developing an effective sales strategy, gaining access to decision makers and developing self-confidence in making presentations. The course will also use case studies to provide insight into dealing with complex or multinational organizations. Prerequisite: BA 661 (3 credit hours) BA 690 - Topics in Business. An independent readings project of a business topic of particular interest to the individual student. (3 credit hours)

Criminal Justice CJ 526 - PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF CRIME. An examination of a wide spectrum of views concerning criminal justice in contemporary America. You will learn to clearly think about crime by cutting through myths and political rhetoric, and challenge both conservative and liberal crime control positions. (3 credit hours) CJ 541 - CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY. An exploration of the nature, extent, and patterns of crime; victims and victimization; theories of crime causation (i.e., choice theories, biosocial and psychological theories, social structure theories, social process theories, etc.); and crime typologies. (3 credit hours) CJ 546 - CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. An examination of the criminal investigation function of police, the elements of investigation, and the steps taken when investigating major crimes. (3 credit hours) CJ 551 - METHODOLOGY FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH. A survey of scientific research in criminal justice including ethics and professionalism; research design; alternative data-gathering strategies; sampling and survey research; participant observation; unobtrusive measures; validity, reliability, and triangulated strategies; scaling and index construction; and data analysis. (3 credit hours)

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CJ 556 - DATA ANALYSIS METHODS. A hands-on examination of strategies and tools of modern statistical data analysis. Emphasis is placed on the serious analysis of real case studies, using the computer as a computational and analytical tool. (3 credit hours) CJ 561 - PROBATION, PAROLE & COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS. This course examines the origins, functions, and contemporary developments of probation, parole, and community corrections. Topics include first offenders and recidivists, shock probation, boot camps, parole trends, judicial discretion, the NIMBY Syndrome, home confinement, electronic monitoring, furlough programs, halfway houses, training and responsibilities of probation/parole officers, and special needs offenders. (3 credit hours) CJ 601 - PROACTIVE POLICE MANAGEMENT. A study of police organizational management that is proactive rather than reactive. Students learn how to anticipate events through planning, use police personnel and resources effectively, and deliver a wide range of police services to the community. (3 credit hours) CJ 606 - MULTICULTURAL LAW ENFORCEMENT. An examination of the cross-cultural contact that police officers have with citizens, victims, suspects, and co-workers from diverse backgrounds. Topics including the pervasive influence of culture, race, and gender in the workplace and in the community. (3 credit hours) CJ 611 - COMMUNITY POLICING AND PROBLEM SOLVING. A step-by-step study of how to apply, implement, and evaluate the community-oriented policing and problem solving process. A variety of projects allow students to apply what they have learned to real-world situations. (3 credit hours) CJ 626 - ETHICS IN CRIME AND JUSTICE. By providing a strong theoretical foundation for solving ethical dilemmas, this course helps students gain a realistic picture not only of what ethical questions arise in the criminal justice system, but also how sound moral decisions are made in response to them. Through case study, students are placed in a variety of real-life scenarios where they practice resolving dilemmas ethically. (3 credit hours) CJ 633 - CRISIS NEGOTIATIONS. An examination of how to effectively manage critical incidents and hostage situations in law enforcement and corrections. Combining principles and applications from criminal justice, psychology, sociology, communications, business and other disciplines, this course presents an effective conceptual framework students can apply in high-pressure situations. (3 credit hours) CJ 645 - DELINQUENCY IN AMERICA. An examination of juvenile rights and the effectiveness of the juvenile court and corrections systems. Topics include an analysis of current trends and issues related to delinquency in America. (3 credit hours) CJ 690 - TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. An independent readings project of a criminal justice topic of particular interest to the individual student. (3 credit hours)

Public Administration GM 520 - SURVEY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. An examination of the past and present role of public administration in the challenges faced by the United States. The complexity of public administration in theory and practice is addressed, and a comprehensive framework for understanding new values emerging in public administration is provided. (3 credit hours) GM 551 - POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. This course explores the Supreme Court's constitutional interpretation of the powers of government through the examination of critical landmark cases. Topics include the doctrine of judicial review, legislative power, executive power, the Commerce Clause, regulatory power, and the Contract Clause. (3 credit hours) GM 552 - RIGHTS OF THE INDIVIDUAL. This course explores the Supreme Court's constitutional interpretation of the rights of the individual through the examination of critical landmark cases. Topics include due process of law; obtaining evidence; the right of privacy; freedom of speech, the press, and religion; and equal protection of the laws. (3 credit hours) Prerequisite GM 551 GM 595 - RESEARCH METHODS FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS. Emphasizing the importance of problem solving and decision-making, students practice commonly-used research techniques and procedures. (3 credit hours) GM 625 - PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS. This course explores how policymakers must choose between government intervention and market reliance to resolve the core issues of what, how, and for whom to produce. In an evaluation of realworld policy issues that emphasize the markets vs. government dilemma, students will examine market structure, regulatory issues, the labor market, distributional issues (taxes, welfare, Social Security), and international economics. (3 credit hours) GM 631 - PUBLIC HUMAN RESOURCES. Students hone their problem-solving skills in this performance-oriented study public personnel management. Current and often controversial issues are addressed. Topics include the political setting of government employment, equal opportunity, affirmative action, and collective bargaining. (3 credit hours) GM 645 - PERSPECTIVES & CHOICES IN PUBLIC POLICY. This course will acquaint the student with the systematic thinking and analysis that should be involved in making and evaluating public policies. Focusing on the functions and process of policy analysis, students will use case studies and projects to improve their critical thinking skills. (3 credit hours) GM 651 - PUBLIC BUDGETING. In a hands-on study of public budgeting and financial management from the public manager's perspective, this course presents a balanced blend of theory and nuts-and-bolts “how to� information. (3 credit hours) GM 661 - PROBLEMS & ISSUES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. An independent readings project of a problem in public administration of particular interest to the individual student. The student must submit a one-page synopsis of the topic prior to beginning the research. The report or summary of the readings must be no less than 8,000 words. (3 credit hours)

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GM 667 - COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. This course is a comparative study of public administration within specific regions and individual countries of the world. This analysis includes an evaluation of the structure, functions, and ideological basis of various types of administrative systems including western democracies, the former Soviet Union, China, Japan, and some Third World countries. (3 credit hours) GM 675 - PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS. This course focuses on the definition and formulation of complex policy problems and the analysis of policy argument. In a step-by-step approach, students practice technical methods for making practical arguments and counter-arguments regarding current public policy issues. Prerequisites: GM520, GM551, GM552, GM595, GM 625, and GM651 (3 credit hours)

GM 690 - TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. An independent readings project of a public administration topic of particular interest to the individual student. (1-3 credit hours)

Management MG 615 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Using a managerial focus, students learn how to become effective business professionals who will use, participate in, and manage systems. By applying information management concepts to real-world settings, students diagnose information needs, assess and analyze various approaches, and develop plan for effective information management. (3 credit hours)

MG 631 - INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. In a study of the financial operations of multinational corporations and financial institutions, students will focus on investment, finance, and operational decisions made in an international setting. Topics include foreign exchange risk, working capital management, investment analysis, and financial arrangements in the unique context of multinational rather than single country activities. (3 credit hours) MG 634 - INTERNATIONAL HEALTH. This course explores health and health services delivery in developed and developing countries throughout the world. Topics include universal health care and it sociological effect, current social patterns of infectious and chronic diseases (such as SARS, West Nile, AIDS, and heart disease), bioterrorism, the new genetics, Internet medicine and how it has affected doctor- patient interaction, women in medicine, the evolution of managed care, and rising health care costs. (3 credit hours) MG 636 - CROSS-CULTURAL MANAGEMENT. The hypercompetitive global arena of the twenty-first century mandates that managers develop the skills necessary to design and implement global strategies, to conduct effective cross-national interactions, and to manage daily operations in foreign subsidiaries. Through extensive case study, students learn how the variable of culture interacts with other national and international factors to affect managerial processes and behaviors. Cross-cultural management and competitive strategy is evaluated in the context of global changes–the European Union, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the liberalization of eastern Europe, and the evolving marketplace of the Commonwealth of Independent States–that require new management applications. (3 credit hours)

MG 641 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. Using a researchbased approach to organizational behavior, students study and apply innovative techniques to better manage their human resources. (3 credit hours) MG 647 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT. An examination of how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Through real-life case study, students research, critically evaluate, and resolve various human resources challenges. (3 credit hours) MG 651 - MANAGEMENT CONTROL OF HEALTH SERVICES. This course addresses the management of organizations that deliver health care services such as hospitals, nursing homes, multi-specialty clinics, and home health care agencies. Students will examine principles of effective management including organizational design, motivation, leadership, conflict management, teamwork, and strategic alliances. Management issues that distinguish health services organizations from other types of organizations will be identified and strategies for dealing with these issues will be evaluated. This is the capstone course for the health services management concentration. Prerequisites: BA 553, MG 634 & MG 647. (3 credit hours) MG 656 - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. A study of the latest techniques and methods for managing operations in services and manufacturing. Using a real-world perspective, this course stresses teamwork, quality, and customer service. (3 credit hours)

MG 665 - MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION. Using the case study method, students examine the principles of effective writing and speaking. Placed in the role of decision maker and communicator in actual business situations, students have the opportunity to master a full range of skills required of a successful manager. Topics include audience analysis, meeting management, giving and receiving feedback, intercultural communication, and corporate ethics. (3 credit hours) MG 668 - ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION LEADERSHIP. This course investigates organizational development and change practices used to enhance organizational effectiveness, improve quality of work life, increase productivity, and facilitate the organization’s ability to assess and solve its own problems. In an examination of the role of transformation leader/change agent, students will develop skills in organizational diagnosis, survey development, change management, team building, systems redesign, problem identification, and problem solving. This is the capstone course for the human resource management concentration. Prerequisites: BA 548, MG 636 & MG 647. (3 credit hours) MG 671 - STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT. A study of the strategic management process. Through case study analysis and real-life problem solving, students integrate management, finance, accounting, marketing, economics, production, and decision-making concepts. force. This is the capstone course for the management concentration. Prerequisites: MG 647, BA 655, MG 656, BA 521, BA 635, & MG 641. (3 credit hours)

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MG 672 - SALES MANAGEMENT. The effective sales manager is a person who can mold a variety of different personalities into an effective sales team in order to produce predictable sales results month after month. This course is designed to teach learners a series of key concepts, methods, techniques, and skills that, when used by the sales manager, can produce a highly effective and successful sales. This is the capstone course for the sales management concentration. Prerequisites: BA 547, BA 661 & BA 662. (3 credit hours) MG 673 - ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT. This course focuses on the creation of strategic growth as a catalyst for a small company's transition to being a key competitor in an industry segment. Using a diverse selection of case studies, learners explore the strategic management process as it relates to building the entrepreneurial firm. This is the capstone course for the entrepreneurship concentration. Prerequisites: BA 538, BA 539, BA 662, BA 521, BA 635 & MG 641. (3 credit hours)

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Awards and Honors Andrew Jackson University promotes academic excellence in its students. We believe that special recognition for outstanding scholastic performance is one avenue available for accomplishing this purpose. In addition to specific requirements described below, the student must have met all requirements for graduation to be eligible for an award. Currently the University bestows the following awards:

Andrew Jackson Medallion The Andrew Jackson Medallion is the highest academic recognition given to a graduate of the University. It is reserved for one student each year. The recipient of the award is also honored as the AJU Graduate of the Year. A recipient of the Jackson medallion must have demonstrated work superior to all other conferees. The graduate must have shown an exceptional ability to communicate thoughts clearly and succinctly, justify a point of view, and effectively express himself.

Richard R. Francis Jr. is this year’s Medallion Award recipient and AJU Graduate of the Year. A graduate of the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program, Mr. Francis is a state law enforcement officer in Florida. In 2006, after only two years on the force, he was honored by the State of Florida Law Enforcement Chief’s Association as Law Enforcement Officer of the Year as well as Officer of the Year by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and the Florida Boating Law Enforcement Officer of the year. Mr. Francis has been deployed as a first responder in nine hurricane relief efforts in Florida and Mississippi.

“The quality education I received from Andrew Jackson University was challenging yet manageable and flexible, preparing me for my upcoming role as a lieutenant.” – Richard R. Francis Jr.

Samuel Adams Public Administration Award A conservative theologian, Samuel Adams became a patriot of patriots. He was most decisive and indefatigable in the pursuit of liberty–organizing the first Continental Congress and becoming a key proponent for American independence. When the British crown proffered a bribe if Adams would suspend his American patriotic politics and subjugate himself to the policies of King George, Adams responded, “I trust I have long since made my peace with the King of Kings. No personal consideration shall induce me to abandon the righteous cause of my country. And, tell Governor Gage it is the advice of Samuel Adams to him, no longer to insult the feelings of an exasperated people.”

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This award is presented to the graduate of the Master of Public Administration program whose philosophy and achievement best typifies the passion of a 21st-century American patriot.

Marty Simone is the recipient of the Samuel Adams Public Administration Award. A resident of Charlotte County, Florida, Mr. Simone recognized the value of the county’s small town charm and beautiful location on the Gulf of Mexico and wanted to help the county remain a great place to live. While his responsibilities as a budget analyst for the county included helping prepare the annual budget, he desired a position that encompassed greater involvement with the public. After enrolling in the Master of Public Administration “Andrew Jackson University’s program at Andrew Jackson University, Mr. Simone was distance learning program allowed promoted to finance manager for the county public works me to obtain an advanced degree in department, allowing him to work closely with members of the spite of all my job and family community in determining the current and future transportation responsibilities. The knowledge I needs of the county. gained was directly relevant to my position in local government and The demands of his work and his commitment to community greatly enhanced my work involvement, as well as a busy family life, made distance performance and communication learning a great choice for completing his education. In spite of skills.” challenging circumstances, he was able to graduate with a 4.0 grade point average. – Marty Simone

August Vollmer Criminal Justice Award Despite a lack of formal education, August Vollmer, the son of German immigrants, became a prominent figure in the history of American police reform. His police career began when he was elected police marshal of Berkeley, California, in 1904 and ended when he retired in 1932 after serving as chief for 23 years. Vollmer advocated a professionalized police force of dedicated crime fighters with specialized training to use science and technology in all aspects of their work. The first police chief to actively recruit college students, Vollmer pioneered the development of college-level police education programs. To more efficiently deliver police services, his department instituted bicycle and motorcycle patrols, becoming the first in the nation to use automobiles. Under Vollmer’s direction, the Berkeley Police Department installed a fingerprint and handwriting classification system and hired the first full-time forensic scientist to help solve crimes. This award is presented to the criminal justice graduate who demonstrates characteristics of the professional police officer envisioned and exemplified by August Vollmer.

Wesley A. Thiel is the 2008 recipient of the Vollmer Award. As an active duty commissioned officer in the United States Air Force serving as operations officer for a security forces squadron (Air Force Police) Major Thiel realized that a master’s degree would allow him “Andrew Jackson University was to move up within the organization. He enrolled in the the ideal venue for me to pursue Master of Science in Criminal Justice program at Andrew higher education in the criminal Jackson University, completing the program with a 3.75 justice field and still keep pace GPA. with my military career.” Major Thiel is currently a security forces officer assigned as Commander of the 439th Security Forces Squadron. In 2005,

– Wesley A. Thiel

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he led a 44-man team in support of Joint Task Force Katrina and he recently deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom Headquarters Special Operations Command, Europe. He has served at a variety of locations, including Kunsan AB, RAF Lakenheath, Grand Forks AFB, Pittsburgh ARS, and Westover ARB.

Henry Huddleston Rogers Business Humanitarian Award The philosopher has said “Give me neither poverty nor riches.” Thus was the lot of the parents of H. H. Rogers. They were neither rich nor poor. They had enough but there was never an excess. From this straight American stock grew Henry Huddleston Rogers, an ordinary man with common beginnings, who through self-effort, study, and experience succeeded masterfully in the world of business. It is said of Rogers that though he ultimately created great personal wealth, he cared little for it. He analyzed every man not for what he was but for what he might become. Humanity was Rogers’ raw stock, not petroleum. His success hinged on bringing humanity to bear on his business. This award, in honor of H. H. Rogers, is received by a business graduate whose studies and philosophy most closely mirror those of this early humanitarian businessman. No recipient was selected for 2008.

Undergraduate Honors Those undergraduate students who have maintained an exceptional grade-point average throughout the entire program will be considered for honors recognition. To be eligible, an undergraduate student must have completed at least half of the degree program at Andrew Jackson University and achieved a gradepoint average, based on the 4.00 scale, as follows 3.40 - 3.59 3.60 - 3.79 3.80 - 4.00

Cum laude Magna cum laude Summa cum laude

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2008 ACADEMIC CALENDAR Registration Date

All AJU courses begin on Mondays. Course End Dates Start Date 8 Week 12 Week 16 Week

12/24/2007

1/7/2008

3/2/2008

3/30/2008

12/31/2007

1/14/2008

3/9/2008

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8/11/2008

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11/23/2008

12/21/2008

8/25/2008

9/8/2008

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12/28/2008

9/1/2008

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12/28/2008

1/25/2009

9/29/2008

10/13/2008

12/7/2008

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2/1/2009

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10/27/2008 11/3/2008

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Administration Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Member, Board of Directors L. Joseph Schmoke B.S., University of Detroit

Chief Operations Officer (COO), Corporate Treasurer, Vice President, Academic Affairs (Acting) Office of the President E. Donald Kassner M.S., San Jose State University B.S., San Jose State University

Director of Education Larry V. Flegle D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University

2919 John Hawkins Parkway, Birmingham, Alabama 35244 (800) 429-9300

fax (800) 321-9694

www.aju.edu, www.btc.aju.edu, www.jrc.aju.edu, www.sc.aju.edu

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2008 AJU Catalog - 0801