Picture Book 1

Page 1


/Une/ ^ijyincU^na


R.

CALDECOTT'S

j^i'i

PICTURE BOOK (No.

r)

CONTAINING

THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN THE HOUSE THAT JACK BLTLT AN ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF A MAD DOG

THE BABES

IN

THE WOOD

LIBRARY MAy

1

4

J

1997 97

OISE/UT

LOX

])OX

FREDERICK WARNE AND i\

N U

iN

Printed

E in

W

Y

Gvtat Britain

(

)

R K

CO.

Lid.



THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF

JOHN GILPIN: Showing /low he we?ii farthe7' than he came safe home again.

JOHN Of

A

GILPIN

was

a citizen

and renown, train-band captain eke was he, Of famous London town.

" To-morrow

And we

credit

John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, " Though wedded we have been "These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen.

iiitended^

Unto

the

'

is

will

ajid

our wedding-day, then repair

'

Bell

at

Edmonton,

All in a chaise and pair.

"

My

sister,

and

my

sister's child.

Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride

On

horseback

after

we."


Tke. iiinen.cLTah.er

He

soon replied, "

I

l/oIcL

do admire

Of womankind but one, And you are she, my dearest Therefore

it

shall

"

I

am As

dear,

be done.

a linendraper bold. all

the world doth know.

And my good

friend the calender

Will lend his horse to go."


Qtioth Mrs. Gilpin, "That's well said; John Gilpin kissed his loving wife

And

We

will

for that

wine

is

be furnished with our own,

Which

is

O'erjoyed was he to find,

dear,

both bright and clear."

!

That though on pleasure she was bent, She had a frugal mind.



The morning came,

the chaise was

But yet was not allowed

To

drive

up

And

To

never folks so glad fwheels. stones did rattle underneath.

As

if

^e S

!

Cheapside were mad.

Costom

;

For saddletree scarce reached had he. His journey to begin. his head,

Three customers come

thin.

the whip, round went the

Were

the flowing mane, up he got, in haste to ride.

When, turning round

all

agog dash through thick and

Smack went

The

and

at his horse's side

fast

But soon came down again

was proud.

So three doors oft the chaise was stayed, Where they did all get in ; Six precious souls,

Seized

[brought,

to the door, lest all

Should say that she

John Gilpin

So

down he came

;

he saw

in.

for loss of time.

grieved him sore. Yet loss of pence, full well he knew,

Although

Would

it

trouble

him much more.


To

'Twas long before the customers Were suited to their mind,

hold the liquor that she loved. And keep it safe and sound.

When

Betty screaming came downstairs, Each bottle had a curling " The wine is left behind "

ear,

!

Through which

"Good

My

lack!" quoth he, "yet bring leathern belt likewise,

In which

When

Now

bear

I I

do

my

[me,

sword trusty

And hung

a bottle

To make Then

exercise."

Mistress Gilpin (careful soul Had two stone bottles found,

it

over

the belt

on each

side.

his balance true.

all,

that he

Equipped from top !)

he drew,

might be to toe.

His long red cloak, well brushed and He manfully did throw. [neat,


Now

see

him mounted once again

Upon

his

nimble steed,

Full slowly pacing o'er the stones, With caution and good heed.

But finding soon a smoother road Beneath his well-shod feet,

The

snorting beast began to trot.

Which

galled

him

in his seat.


"So,

fair

and softly!" John he cried,

But John he cried in vain

What

thing upon his back had got. Did wonder more and more.

;

That

trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein.

Awav went Gilpin, neck or nought Away went hat and wig He little dreamt, when he set out, Of running such a rig.

•,

;

So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright.

He

grasped tlie mane with both his And eke with all his might, [hands,

His horse, who never in that sort Had handled been before.

The wind

did blow, the cloak did

Like streamer long and gay. Till, loop and button failing both.

At lO

last it

flew away.

fly


^

c

Away went

A

"

;

swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung.

bottle

The dogs

Up And

windows

every soul cried out,

As loud

as

all

weight he rides a race " 'Tis for a thousand pound

And

carries

!

still

as fast as

he drew near, to view

'Twas wonderful

;

How

"We^l done!''

he could bawl.

He

!

did bark, the children screamed,

flew the

who but he ? Gilpin His fame soon spread around ;

Then might all people well discern The bottles he liad slung

i

II

in a trice the

I'heir gates

turnpike-men wide open threw.



,-vV^^j>^


(\nd

now,

as

he went bowing

down Down

His reeking head full low, The bottles twain behind his back

j

ran the wine into the road.

Most piteous to be seen, Which made the horse's flanks

to

\

Were

shattered at a blow.

'

14

As they had

basted been,

[smoke,


^

But

he seemed to carry weight. With leathern girdle braced ;

For

all

still

might

Still

see the bottle-necks

dangling

at his waist.

15


I.

.ir O-^'?:

Thus

all

through merry Islington These gambols he did play, Until he came unto the Wash

Of Edmonton

10

so gay

;


And there he threw the wash about On both sides of the way, Just

Hke unto

Or

a trundling

mop,

a wild goose at play.

n


At Edmonton

From

the balcony spied tender husband, wondering

Her

To

see

'^

his loving wife

how

he did

ride.

Stop, stop, John Gilpin

For

why

?

his

— Here's

They all at once did cry much "The dinner waits, and we Said Gilpin— "So am I

;

the

fhouse

!"

are tired;" !"

So like an arrow swift he flew, Shot by an archer strong ;

But yet his horse was not a whit Inclined to tarry there

!

;

So did he

owner had a house

fly

—which

The middle

Full ten miles off, at Ware. i8

of

brings

my

song.

me

to



Away went Gilpin, out of breath, And sore against his will,

The

Till at his friend the calender's

Laid

His horse

"

at last stood

tidings

why

amazed

[tell

his

in

to see

such trim.

pipe, flew to the gate,

thus accosted

him

:

Now

Gilpin had a pleasant wit, And loved a timely joke And thus unto the calender

i

'

;

;

bareheaded you are come,

Or why you come

down

And

still.

What news ? what news ? your Tell me you must and shall Say

calender,

His neighbour

;

at all?"

i

20

In merry guise he spoke:


"

I

came because your horse would And. it 1 well forebode, [come

My

A

straight

wig

hat not

Each comely

But to the house went in

He

he came with hat and |

that flowed behind,

much

[wig, the worse for wear, in

its

calender, right glad to find

His friend in merry pin, Returned him not a single word.

:

hat and wig will soon be here, They are upon the road."

Whence

A

The

held them up, and in his turn Thus showed his ready wit :

i

"

kind.

My

head

They 21

;

twice as big as yours. " therefore needs must fit. is


"But

let

me

'Twas

scrape the dirt away,

That hangs upon your face stop and eat, for well you may Be in a hungry case." ;

And

Said John,

And

"

all

It is

my

And

I

Ah

!

your pleasure you came here. go back lor mine."

shall

luckless speech,

and bootless boast

For which he paid

full

dear

;

For while he spake, a braying ass Did sing most loud and clear

wedding-day.

the world would stare

If wife should dine at

for

You

Edmonton,

Whereat

should dine at Ware."

Had

And

So turning to his horse, he said " I am in haste to dine ;

his horse did snort, as

he

heard a lion roar.

galloped off with

As he had done 22

;

all

his

before.

might,

^



Away went Gilpin, and away Went Gilpin's hat and wig;

He

Now

lost

them sooner than

For

why

?

Into the country far away, She pulled out half-a-crown

they were too big.

And

when she saw Her husband posting down Mistress Gilpin,

at first,

thus unto the youth she said

That drove them

"This

shall

Mv

;

24

be yours

husband

safe

to the "Bell,"

when you bring and well." [back


_i£^S!s^

The youth

did ride, and soon did meet

But not performing what he meant, And gladly would have done,

John coming back amain ; in a trice he tried to stop,

Whom

By catching

The

frighted steed he frighted more.

And made him

at his rein.

25

faster run.


Away went Gilpin, and away Went postboy at his heels, The postboy's horse right glad to miss The lumbering of the wheels.

Six

gentlemen upon the road.

Thus seeing Gilpin fly. With postboy scampering in

They

raised the

hue and

the rear, cry.


"

Stop thief

!

Not one

And

all

stop thief of

"

a

highwayman them was mute !

!

;

and each that passed that way

Did join

in the pursuit

^.

Ijfe^

/^

V

.cr




p.

A.nd

The

now

the turnpike-gates again Flew open in short space ;

toll-man thinking, as before, That Gilpin rode a race.

'

And

c

so he did,

For he got

i

Nor stopped

He

30

and won first

to

it

too,

town

;

where he had got up, did again get down. till


Now

let

And

us sing,

Gilpin, long

And when he

May

Long

I

live the

live

he

King,

;

next doth ride abroad,

be there to

31

see.



THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT



nPHIS

is

the

House

that

Jack

built.


ACK




This

That

is

the Malt,

lay in the

Jack

House

that

built.

This

is

That

ate the Malr,

the Rat,

That lay

in

the

House

that Jack built.





This

That

is

che Cat,

That

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

lay in the

House

lO

that Jack built.


II


(2



This

is

the

Dog,

That worried

the Cat,

That

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

That

lav in the

Jack

House

that

built.

c

H


'5


/^

i6

y


This

is

That

the

Cow

tossed the

That worried

with the crumpled horn,

Dog,

the Cat,

That

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

That

lay in the

Jack

House

that

built.

..:'

r-

£>^fek-L2^a.£::^:^^l?L:22^^ /'.I,

••

,^•^-y^^^r'2l^''t^^H^~^'.^'•^::::2:r:^

.-NiQf^-+^r:i4:f-

17



IQ


„,-

20

..in

:

K^

yn


This

is

the

Maiden

That milked

the

all

Cow

forlorn,

with the crumpled horn,

That

tossed the

That worried

Dog,

the Cat,

That

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

That

lay in the Housfc

that Jack huilt.

This

That

is

the

Man

kissed the

That milked

the

all

tattered

Maiden

Cow

all

with

the crumpled horn.

That

tossed the Doo^

That worried

the Cat,

That

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

That

lav in the

House

that Jack built. ?i

and torn. forlorn.



<=^i

^

23


^ ,«r^-

24


shaven and shorn, That married the Man all tattered and torn,

This

That

is

the Priest,

all

Maiden

kissed the

all

forlorn,

That milked

the

Cow

with

the crumpled horn. tossed the Doe,

That That worried the Cat, That killed the Rat, That ate the Malt,

That

This

is

the

Cock

that

crowed

lay in the

House

Jack

built.

the

morn

in

That waked the Priest all shaxen and shorn. That married the Man all tattered and torn. That kissed the Maiden all forlorn. That milked the

Cow

with

the crumpled horn. tossed the Dog,

That That worried the Cat, That killed the Rat, That ate the Malt, That lay in the House

that ^<-

Jack

built. 25

o

that




'"•C

28


This

That

is

the Farmer

Cock

fed the

That waked

in

the morn,

shaven and shorn.

Man

all

tattered

the

kissed the

the

tossed the

That worried

Maiden

Cow

the Cat,

killed the Rat,

That

ate the Malt,

That

lay in the

Jack

all

and

torn,

forlorn.

with the crumpled horn,

Dog,

That

that

crowed

all

That milked That

that

the corn,

the Priest

That married

That

who sowed

House

built.

29




AN ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF A MAD DOG



ELEGY on the

DEATH

of

MAD DOG WRI TTEN D'

GOLDSMITH


^OOD

people

all,

Give ear unto

And

if

you

tind

it

of every

my

song

wondrous

sort, ;

short,


It

cannot

liold

you long.



Ill

Islinston there lived a

Of whom That

still

man,

the world might say,

a godly race he ran,


Whene'er he went

8


to pray.



A

kind and

To

gerxtie

neari He had.

comfort friends and foes;

The naked

every day he clad.

[1


when

he put on

13


*J«iii^-<

nis clothes loth



^~^/->^/^yy^

And

in that

town

a

dog was found

As many dogs there be

puppy,

Both mongrel,

wheJp,

and hound,

-to And

curs of T5

low degree.


This dog and man

at first

16

were friends


But,

when

a pique began,

^7


The

dog, to gain some private ends,

'rC /r.

^

/'^•'

€^%^-''\

Went mad, and

iS

>

%

bit the

man.


X

'''

^0S>'


Around Irom

20

all


m the neighbouring streets

21


L^-.^ i-^'^

Lli.^ 1

'1^'

'-

T-

kS'

The wondering neighbours

22

ran

;

1



And

swore the dog had

24

lost his wits,


To

bite so

good a

2S

mm.


-^^-^

The wound

To

it

-

seem'd both sore and sad

every christian eye

2i>

;



And

while they swore the dog was mad,

28


r-A

-%!>

They swore

the

29

man would

die


But soon a wonder came to

lieht.

That show'd the rogues they hed-

Ihc man recover'd of the

bite

t^y^-

The dog

it

was that died. \o




THE BABES IN THE WOOD


Soke sicKe THEy ^NJ>

LIKE

were

TO £>YE


The

BABES IN THE WOOD.

"^OW

ponder well, you parents deare, rhese wordes which I shall write ;

A

doleful story

shall heare,

you

In time brought forth to light.

A

gentleman of good account In Norfolke dwelt of

Who

did in honour

Most men

of

far

late.

surmount

his estate.

Sore sicke he was, and like to dye. No helpe his life could save ;

His wife by him as sicke did lye, And both possest one grave. 3


V'-,

^••".

s

-(

"

n.1.--

'TilpinLTT-

No

between these two was

love

lost,

Each was

to other

kinde

In love they

liv'd, in

love they dyed,

And

left

The one

two babes behinde

a fine

Not passing

The

;

:

and pretty boy. three yeares olde

;

other a girl more young than he

And

fram'd in beautye's molde.


The

father

As

When

left

his little son,

plainlye doth appeare,

he to perfect age sJiould come

Three hundred poirndes

And

to his little

a veare.

daughter Jane

Five hundred poundes in gold,

To

be paid

downe on marriage-day,

Which might

But

if

not be controlled

:

the children chanced to dye,

Ere they to age should come,

Their uncle should possesse their wealth

For so the wille did run. 5

;


[OW.PROTHE:R,^a.ioL the oLying

Taa.n.,

LOOK

To

MY CHILDREN

DEAR.L


"Now,

brother," said the dying man,

" Look to

my

Be good unto

No

But

my

boy and

;

girl,

friendes else have they here

"To God

My

children deare

and you

I

do commend

children deare this daye

little

while be sure

Within

this

God knowes what

When

I

am

;

we have

world to

"You must be father And uncle all in

:

staye.

and mother both.

one

will

;

become of them,

dead and gone."


With '

"

that bespake their

O

You

mother deare

:

brother kinde," quoth shee, are the

To

man must

wealth or miserie

bring our babes :


"And

if

you keep them careluUy,

Then God But

if

will

you reward

you otherwise should

God

will

;

deal,

your deedes regard."



With

lippes as cold as any stone.

They kist the children 'God bless you both, my With

small

children deare;"

that the teares did

II

:

fall.


These speeches then

To "

this sicke

The keeping Sweet

sister,

their brother spake

couple there

of

your

do not

12

:

Httle ones,

feare

:


"God

never prosper

Nor aught If I

me

nor mine,

else tliat I have,

do wrong your children deare,

When

you are lavd

13

in grave/'



The

parents being dead and gone,

The

And

children

bringes

home he

them

Where much

of

straite

takes,

unto

his house.

them he makes.


— aui/l!iiii\^


He

hargain'd with two ruffians strong,

Which were

of furious

mood,

That they should take the children voung,

And

slaye

them

in a

^1

wood.


He

told his wife an arttul tale,

He would

To

the children send

be brought up in

With one

London,

that was his friend.

Away then went Rejoycing

faire

those pretty babes,

at that tide,

Rejoycing with

a

merry minde,

They should on cock-horse i8

ride.


AWAV THEN "Rejoyc/nc

VVfNT THE TrETTY BaBETS

at twat

Tide:

v

^ ^


They

prate

and

prattle pleasantly

As they rode on the waye,

To

those that should their butehers be.

And work

their lives' 20

deeaye

:


So that the pretty speeche they had,

Made

And

murderers' heart relent

:

they that undertooke the deed,

Full sore did

now

repent.

Yet one of them, more hard of heart,

Did vow

to

do

his charge,

Because the wretch, that

Had

paid

him

liired

very large.

21

him.


The

other would net agree thereto,

So here they

fell

to strife

With one another they About the children's

And

;

did fight, life

:

he that was of mildest mood,

Did

slaye the other there,

Within an unfrequented wood.

Where

babes did quake for feare 22



He

took the children by the hand,

While

And

teares stood in their eye,

bade them come and go with him,

And

look they did not crye

24

:


And two

long miles he ledd them on,

While they "

for food

complaine

:

Stay here," quoth he, "ril bring ye bread,

When

I

come back

^^%w^.

25

againe."


These prettyc babes, with hand

in

Went wandering up and downc

But never more they sawe the

hand, ;

man

Approaching from the town.

26



Their prettye lippes with blackberries Were all besmear'd and dyed ;

28


And when They

they sawe the darksome night,

sat

them downe and cryed.

.«'^^"' -^^-dThus wandered

two prettye babes.

these

Till death did

end

their grief

;

In one another's armes they dyed,

As babes wanting

29

relief.


No

burial these

Of any man

prcttyc babes receives,

,1

Till Robin-redbreast

painfully

Did cover them with 30

leaves.

III