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24 SIVAN 5778 • JUNE 7, 2018 • VOLUME XXXIX, NUMBER 12 • PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID, SYRACUSE, NY

Community invited to witness burial of religious articles BY STEVEN SISSKIND Under the guidance of Syracuse Rabbinic Council Chair Rabbi Paul Drazen, and with the support of the

Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association, the tradition of burying worn religious items will be carried out on Thursday, June 28, at 3pm, in

a section between the Beth El and Rosenbloom cemeteries. Members of the community are welcome to bring items for burial

Federation’s community calendar BY JUDITH L. STANDER The Jewish Federation of Central New York is hoping to make life easier for planning meetings and events with the use of the community calendar that is located on its website. There are “just so many” dates available for meetings, activities and events throughout the year, with many people attending multiple activities throughout the month and many belonging to multiple organizations. Federation wants to facilitate this process. When planning a major event, schedulers should check the community calendar to be sure that the event doesn’t coincide with another group’s

event – especially if the target audience is the same. In most cases, different programs appeal to different people. If more than one group is reaching out to similar audiences, both groups will be notified so they can determine what works best for everyone. Items on the community calendar should include meetings that might affect attendance at other meetings, as well as at special and community events. As a community, synagogues are now working to hold their board meetings and executive committee meetings on Wednesday evenings. This doesn’t mean that other events should be excluded from Wednesday

evenings. What it does allow is easier scheduling around some of these evenings to maximize adult attendance at other activities and events. Community calendar events are color-coded for identification: yellow means a general activity, orange is a Syracuse University event, blue is a Jewish event, light green is a secular holiday, red is a communitywide event, etc. To view Federation’s community calendar online, go to www.jewishfederationcny.org. To learn more about the community calendar, contact Judith Stander at 315-445-0161, ext. 114, or jstander@ jewishfederationcny.org.

at that time. For more information, contact Steven Sisskind at 315-4464848.

2018 Federation Annual Campaign For more information, contact Colleen Baker at 315-445-2040, ext. 102, or Cbaker@jewishfederationcny.org

1,214,051 as of

$ Goal: $1,300,000

June 4, 2018

Syracuse Hillel hires engagement associate BY RABBI LEAH FEIN Syracuse Hillel announced that Rebecca Zeuschner will join Syracuse Hillel as its first engagement associate beginning in July. In this new position, Zeuschner will “engage Jewish undergraduate and graduate students” at Syracuse University and State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and will support them in creating their vision for Jewish life on campus. Hillel engagement associates develop relationships with 150-200 individual students per year, helping them identify their passions and connecting them to relevant offerings at Hillel, as well as the greater campus, local and national communities. For Syracuse Hillel, Zeuschner will have a particular focus on Jewish first-year students, leadership and Greek life. She will also focus on Birthright Israel recruitment, trip implementation and follow-through, and will spend most of her time on campus, meeting students. She said, “Taking on the engagement associate role at Syracuse Hillel will be an exciting next step in my journey as a young professional. From my first conversation with Rabbi Leah, to my visit to campus, the Syracuse community has been nothing less than welcoming, energetic and passionate. I am confident that my collegiate experiences can benefit me in adding to the positive atmosphere Syracuse Hillel already cultivates. I cannot wait to come to campus and work with the students in creating innovative programs that align with their interests and make Jewish life adaptable to them during the best four years of their lives.” Chair of the Syracuse Hillel Board of

Governors Barbara Kurman Hillel impacts students through said she “looks forward to innovative engagement stratHillel’s reach expanding with egies, dynamic Shabbat and the addition of Rebecca as holiday experiences, vibrant engagement associate. I know social and Israel programming, that Rebecca will only add to tzedek (justice) initiatives and the wonderful work already in meaningful Jewish learning progress and help us to further that make our sacred tradition impact the lives of our Jewish relevant to their lives as college students at Syracuse.” students. These experiences Brian Konkol, dean of empower students to become Hendricks Chapel at Syracuse the next generation of Jewish The Jewish Federation of Central University, sees the impact Rebecca Zeuschner leaders as they nurture and New York has instituted the Hebrew Hillel has on campus, and said, strengthen their Jewish idenInterest-Free Loan program to help “Hillel is a critically important aspect of tity, connection to the Jewish people Jewish people get past a temporary Syracuse University. We look forward to and the state of Israel. Syracuse Hillel financial need. To learn more about welcoming Rebecca as Hillel and Syracuse cultivates the potential within every the program or to see if you qualify, University continue to partner in expand- Jewish student to live a meaningful and visit the Federation’s website, www. ing the presence of religious and spiritual productive life guided by Jewish values jewishfederationcny.org. life throughout our campus and beyond.” and wisdom.” Syracuse Hillel is “grateful for a close partnership” with Syracuse University and Hillel International, as its team and impact on campus continue to grow. Zeuschner just graduated from the University of Hartford with a degree in political science and philosophy. She was involved with Hillel and Greek life communities at the University of Hartford, and held various leadership positions in both. In her spare time, she enjoys being active and is a two-time half-marathon runner and a hiker. She says she loves to travel, immerse herself in a good book and watch sports. Her first day at Syracuse Hillel will be Monday, July 9. The mission of Hillel is to “enrich the lives of undergraduate and graduate C A N D L E L I G H T I N G A N D P A R AS H A students at Syracuse University and June 8............................... 8:24 pm........................................Parashat Shelach Lecha SUNY-ESF so that they many enrich the June 15............................. 8:28 pm.................................................... Parashat Korach Jewish people and the world. Syracuse June 22............................. 8:30 pm..................................................Parashat Chukkat

Hebrew Interest-Free Loan

INSIDE THIS ISSUE SHDS open enrollment

Senior dining at JCC

Summer concerts

The Syr ac use Hebrew Day Weekly summer dinners for The Oaks at Menorah Park will School is accepting admissions seniors will begin on June 18 at host three free summer concerts applications for the 2018-19 year. the Jewish Community Center. starting on June 24. Story on page 3 Story on page 2 Story on page 3

PLUS Calendar Highlights............... 4 Classifieds................................ 4 Obituaries................................. 4 Community Guide........ 1A-20A


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JEWISH OBSERVER ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Syracuse Hebrew Day School CONGREGATIONAL NOTES 2018-19 open enrollment Congregation Beth

BY EVAN BLOOM With an anticipated 100 percent re-enrollment of eligible current pupils for the 2018-19 school year and a projected increase in total enrollment in students from grades kindergarten-six, the Syracuse Hebrew Day School announced that it is now accepting applications for admission. Tuition assistance is available. Head of School Lori Tenenbaum said, “The success of SHDS is due to three core factors that are part of our mission. We have dedicated teachers and support staff; a strong emphasis on academics with an unparalleled dual curriculum of general and Judaic studies; and a focus on educating the whole child – mind, body and soul, which we have been doing for almost 60 years. We are dedicated to providing a rich, meaningful general and Jewish education to any child whose family desires a Jewish day school experience.” SHDS is also seeking potential students to visit the school to experience the SHDS difference by spending a day learning “the SHDS way.” Tenenbaum added, “Once a prospective student immerses him- or herself in a day at SHDS, they quickly see what separates us from the other schools in the area. Any parent interested should call the school office to make the necessary arrangements.” Tenenbaum continued, “Academically, the school seeks to provide each child with an educational journey that is highly individualized. With a lower teacher-student ratio and focused teacher interaction with each student, the school seeks to be inclusive of every student’s needs, and ensure that each child succeeds by recognizing

Sholom-Chevra Shas CBS-CS SEMI-ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE The Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas Sisterhood will hold its semi-annual rummage sale on Sunday, June 10, and Monday, June 11, from 10 am-4 pm, with a bag sale from 2-4 pm on June 11. Proceeds from the sale help support scholarships for Jewish summer camping experiences, gifts for b’nai Sy racus e Heb rew Da y S ch o o l kindergartener Benjamin Bloom, Head of School Lori Tenenbaum and secondgrader Isaac Bloom. and celebrating individual strengths and providing specialized support for specific challenges – something that is not easy to come by at many larger schools.” “All four of our children have benefitted significantly from their time spent at the day school and we know that they will always carry the special values that the school espouses. The SHDS experience is like no other and we see the impact that this school has had on our children every day. We highly recommend it,” said Esa Jaffe, a parent of three SHDS graduates, with one more about to graduate in the class of 2018. SHDS follows the New York state Common Core curriculum. The Jewish studies curriculum includes tal am and yesh v’yesh for Hebrew language instruction. See “School” on page 4

FILM REVIEW

“Defiant Requiem” film – the story of Terezin BY DENISE JOCHEM-ROBERTSON “Memory without action does not honor those who perished,” Beth A. Broadway, president/CEO of InterFaith Works of Central New York, recalled Alan Goldberg saying six years ago when they first spoke about his work organizing a Yom Hashoah community event. Broadway spoke at a reception honoring Goldberg’s distinguished career that preceded the showing of the documentary “Defiant Requiem” at the Jewish Community Center on May 16. Goldberg serves as director of the Regional Holocaust and Genocide Initiative, and is an emeritus professor in the School of Education at Syracuse University and coordinator of the Spector/Warren Fellowship, which is designed to help future teachers bring the lessons of the Holocaust into the classroom. InterFaith Works partnered with the Jewish Federation of Central New York to present “Defiant Requiem” to the Central New York community. Broadway said, “Having the wider community learn about this story of the strength of the human spirit builds alliances and friendships that might not have otherwise been there.” “Defiant Requiem” is the story of Rafael Schachter, a young Czech conductor who demonstrated moral leadership under brutal circumstances by sustaining hope and courage for his fellow prisoners at Theresienstadt (Terezin), a Nazi concentration camp in Czechoslovakia. Schachter formed a prisoner choir that performed Verdi’s “Requiem,” a Roman Catholic mass for the repose of the souls of the dead, to an audience of Nazis during World War II. “Therefore, when the Judge takes His seat, whatever is hidden will be revealed: nothing shall remain unavenged,” were noted as among Schachter’s favorite

lyrics in the “Requiem.” Foreshadowing the Nazis’ defeat, the prisoners sang what they dared not say to their oppressors. “My father served in the 8th Army Air Force during World War II,” said documentary attendee Denise Jochem-Robertson. “I’ve tried to educate myself about the war, but the story of Terezin and this group of brave, defiant prisoners was unknown to me until tonight. How the Nazis transformed the camp prior to an International Red Cross visit to give the appearance that prisoners were treated well was shocking, and the footage of the children playing games and eating bread with butter during the Red Cross visit and before their almost certain extermination was heart-wrenching. People in the audience were deeply moved.” “‘Defiant Requiem’is spiritually profound and makes us realize that we can use our inner strength to stand up in dignity,” said the Rev. Gracious Moyo, director of interfaith initiatives at InterFaith Works, after watching the documentary. “It’s a profound lesson that each and every life is worthwhile and we should never forget that. We are reminded as a faith community that when one loses their freedom, then we are all in danger.” Broadway added, “As an interfaith organization that is devoted to affirming the dignity of all people and all faith traditions, InterFaith Works is pleased to work with Dr. Goldberg and to partner with the Jewish community to help us face the Holocaust and remember and recommit our lives and our work to being a force for good in the world. As Dr. Goldberg challenges us, ‘we owe them a commitment to stand up against intolerance and injustice everywhere, always cherishing the dignity of every human being.’” Denise Jochem-Robertson is director of development at InterFaith Works of Central New York.

mitzvah students and synagogue needs not in the regular budget. CBS-CS also collects toiletries and household products for clients of Vera House and Operation Soap Dish. These items may be dropped off at CBS-CS during the above hours. For more information, contact Steffi Bergman at 315-632-4905, 243-4009 or steffibergman@gmail.com.

Temple Adath Yeshurun TAY SISTERHOOD BOOK DISCUSSION The Temple Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood will host its monthly book discussion on Thursday, June 14, at 7:30 pm, in the Muriel and Aaron Spector Library at TAY. The group will

discuss Amor Towles’ “A Gentleman in Moscow.” The free discussion is open to the public. Participants are asked to enter through the synagogue’s center doors at the main entrance under the canopy. For more information, e-mail info@adath.org.

Temple Concord CINEMAGOGUE PRESENTS ISRAELI DRAMA “WEDDING DOLL” ON JUNE 16 BY CHANA MEIR Temple Concord’s Cinemagogue Series will present “Wedding Doll,” the tale of a young woman with a mild mental deficiency striving for independence and love, on Saturday, June 16, at 7:30 pm. The story is centered around Hagit, portrayed by Moran Rosenblatt, who works in a toilet-paper factory and fashions small dolls from the material. Andy Webster, in The New York Times, praised Rosenblatt’s performance, stating the actress “keeps Hagit’s inner light aflame.” The film is in Hebrew with English subtitles. Cinemagogue events are free and open to the public, and candy and snacks are available. Donations are welcome. For more information, contact TC at 315-475-9952, or office@ templeconcord.org.

of Central New York

Syracuse Office

Bette Siegel Syracuse Editor Publisher Jewish Federation of Central New York Inc. Ellen Weinstein Chair of the Board Michael Balanoff Federation President/CEO Alan Goldberg Vice President for Communications Editorial 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214

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Call for... Address Changes........... 315-445-2040, ext. 116 Local Articles and Announcements ......................................315-445-2040, ext. 116 ..... or e-mail JewishObserverCNY@gmail.com Advertising:.....Bonnie 1-800-779-7896, ext. 244 ...........or e-mail bonnie@thereportergroup.org Advertising Billing only............1-800-779-7896

TEMPLE CONCORD HOSTS PRIDE SHABBAT SERVICE ON JUNE 12 Temple Concord, Atonement Lutheran Church, St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, Syracuse, CNY Pride, the Zen Center of Syracuse, First Unitarian Universalist Society of Syracuse, University United Methodist Church-Syracuse and May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society will celebrate Pride Shabbat on Tuesday, June 12, at 7 pm, for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning and anyone else. Childcare and a children’s program will be provided. SEASONED CITIZENS Temple Concord’s Seasoned Citizens will present “Beautiful Music for Flute and Piano” on Tuesday, June 12, at 2 pm. Featuring Martha Grener on flute and Sar-Shalom Strong on piano, the music will include works of Piazzola, Clark, Godard, Barner and Bizet. For more information, contact Janis Martin at jjmartin@twcny.rr.com. All articles, announcements and photographs must be received by noon Wednesday, 15 days prior to publication date. Articles must be typed, double spaced and include the name of a contact person and a daytime telephone number. E-mail submissions are encouraged and may be sent to JewishObserverCNY@gmail.com. The Jewish Observer reserves the right to edit any copy. Signed letters to the editor are welcomed: they should not exceed 250 words. Names will be withheld at the discretion of the editor. All material in this newspaper has been copyrighted and is exclusive property of the Jewish Observer and cannot be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Views and opinions expressed by our writers, columnists, advertisers and by our readers do not necessarily reflect the publisher’s and editors’ points of view, nor that of the Jewish Federation of Central New York. The newspaper reserves the right to cancel any advertisements at any time. This newspaper is not liable for the content of any errors appearing in the advertisements beyond the cost of the space occupied. The advertiser assumes responsibility for errors in telephone orders. The Jewish Observer does not assume responsibility for the kashrut of any product or service advertised in this paper. THE JEWISH OBSERVER OF CENTRAL NEW YORK (USPS 000939) (ISSN 1079-9842) Publications Periodical postage paid at Syracuse, NY and other offices. Published 24 times per year by the Jewish Federation of Central New York Inc., a non-profit corporation, 5655 Thompson Road, DeWitt, NY 13214. Subscriptions: $36/year; student $10/ year. POST MASTER: Send address change to JEWISH OBSERVER OF CENTRAL NEW YORK, 5655 Thompson Road, DeWitt, NY 13214.

The Jewish Observer is a member of the American Jewish Press Association.


24 SIVAN 5778 • JUNE 7, 2018 • VOLUME XXXIX, NUMBER 12 • PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID, SYRACUSE, NY

• Ahavath Achim Mikvah • Beit Tikvah Group Residence • Chabad Lubavitch of CNY • Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas • Friends of Israel Scouts • Hadassah • Hillel at Syracuse University • InterFaith Works of CNY • Jewish Camp Scholarships • Jewish Community Foundation of CNY • Jewish Federation of Central New York • Jewish Observer of CNY • Jewish Music and Cultural Festival (JMAC) • Jewish War Veterans • Judaic Heritage Center of CNY • Menorah Park • National Council of Jewish Women • Oaks at DeWitt • Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies • Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum • Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center • Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse • Syracuse Area Jewish Educators (SAJE) • Syracuse Community Hebrew School • Syracuse Hebrew Day School • Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association • Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park • Syracuse Rabbinic Council • Syracuse University Jewish Studies Program • Temple Adath Yeshurun • Temple Concord • Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israel Independence Day) Community Celebration • Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Observance) • Ahavath Achim Mikvah • Beit Tikvah Group Residence • Chabad Lubavitch of CNY • Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas • Friends of Israel Scouts • Hadassah • Hillel at Syracuse University • InterFaith Works of CNY • Jewish Camp Scholarships • Jewish Community Foundation of CNY • Jewish Federation of Central New York • Jewish Observer of CNY • Jewish Music and Cultural Festival (JMAC) • Jewish War Veterans • Judaic Heritage Center of CNY • Menorah Park • National Council of Jewish Women • Oaks at DeWitt • Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies • Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum • Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center • Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse • Syracuse Area Jewish Educators (SAJE) • Syracuse Community Hebrew School • Syracuse Hebrew Day School • Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association • Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park • Syracuse Rabbinic Council • Syracuse University Jewish Studies Program • Temple Adath Yeshurun • Temple Concord • Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israel Independence Day) Community Celebration • Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Observance) • Ahavath Achim Mikvah • Beit Tikvah Group Residence • Chabad Lubavitch of CNY • Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas • Friends of Israel Scouts • Hadassah • Hillel at Syracuse University • InterFaith Works of CNY • Jewish Camp Scholarships • Jewish Community Foundation of CNY • Jewish Federation of Central New York • Jewish Observer of CNY • Jewish Music and Cultural Festival (JMAC) • Jewish War Veterans • Judaic Heritage Center of CNY • Menorah Park • National Council of Jewish Women • Oaks at DeWitt • Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies • Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum • Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center • Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse • Syracuse Area Jewish Educators (SAJE) • Syracuse Community Hebrew School • Syracuse Hebrew Day School • Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association • Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park • Syracuse Rabbinic Council • Syracuse University Jewish Studies Program • Temple Adath Yeshurun • Temple Concord • Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israel Independence Day) Community Celebration • Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Observance) • Ahavath Achim Mikvah • Beit Tikvah Group Residence • Chabad Lubavitch of CNY • Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas • Friends of Israel Scouts • Hadassah • Hillel at Syracuse University • InterFaith Works of CNY • Jewish Camp Scholarships • Jewish Community Foundation of CNY • Jewish Federation of Central New York • Jewish Observer of CNY • Jewish Music and Cultural Festival (JMAC) • Jewish War Veterans • Judaic Heritage Center of CNY • Menorah Park • National Council of Jewish Women • Oaks at DeWitt • Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies • Safe Haven Holocaust Refugee Shelter Museum • Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center • Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse • Syracuse Area Jewish Educators (SAJE) • Syracuse Community Hebrew School • Syracuse Hebrew Day School • Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association • Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park • Syracuse Rabbinic Council • Syracuse University Jewish Studies Program • Temple Adath Yeshurun • Temple Concord • Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israel Independence Day) Community Celebration • Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Table of Contents Advertiser Directory................................................................. Page 2A Jewish Federation of Central New York................................... Page 3A Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center............................... Page 4A Jewish Family Service.............................................................. Page 5A Schools Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies............ Page 6A Syracuse Community Hebrew School.............................. Page 6A Syracuse Hebrew Day School........................................... Page 6A Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York............. Page 7A Jewish Observer........................................................................ Page 7A Jewish War Veterans Post 131................................................... Page 7A Friends of Israeli Scouts............................................................ Page 8A Jewish Music and Cultural Festival.......................................... Page 8A Judaic Heritage Center of Central New York............................ Page 8A Hadassah................................................................................... Page 9A National Council of Jewish Women.......................................... Page 9A Syracuse University Hillel................................................................................ Page 10A Jewish Studies Program.................................................. Page 10A Sorkin Chabad House...................................................... Page 10A Ahavath Achim Mikvah.......................................................... Page 11A Chabad-Lubavitch of Central New York................................ Page 11A Chabad of Oswego.................................................................. Page 11A Va’ad Ha’ir.............................................................................. Page 11A Area Synagogues Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas....................... Page 12A Congregation Degel Israel.............................................. Page 14A Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse........ Page 14A Temple Adath Yeshurun.................................................. Page 13A Temple Beth El - Geneva................................................ Page 14A Temple Concord.............................................................. Page 13A Local Jewish Cemeteries......................................................... Page 15A Kashrut Guide ........................................................................ Page 15A Senior Living Menorah Park of Central New York ............................... Page 16A The Oaks at Menorah Park.............................................. Page 17A

Disclaimer

All information contained in the Jewish Observer’s Community Guide was provided by the individual synagogues and organizations. The JO accepts no responsibility for the information provided by contributors.

Advertiser Directory Advertiser Page Barks & Rec........................................................................................... 3A Birnbaum Funeral Service................................................................ 10A Cazenovia Jewelry............................................................................... 3A Century 21 Arquette Properties - Barbara Miller............................ 4A Charitable Auto Resource Service..................................................... 3A Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas......................................... 7A Fashion Exchange, The...................................................................... 15A Fayetteville Hair Design..................................................................... 4A Geddes Federal Savings & Loan...................................................... 13A Genesee Grande Hotel, The................................................................ 5A Health Care Asthma & Allergy Associates............................................... 17A Dr. Joseph Catania, Orthodontics........................................ 17A Dr. William Tucker................................................................. 17A Malara Eyecare & Eyewear Gallery..................................... 16A Upstate Medical University.................................................. 16A Weiss, Savedoff & Ciccone.................................................... 16A Howard Hanna Real Estate - Cheryl Schotz.................................... 3A Hunt Real Estate - Andrew Alpern.................................................. 15A Hunt Real Estate - Judy Winslow...................................................... 5A Hunt Real Estate - Laurie Kushner.................................................... 9A Jewish Observer................................................................................. 20A King David’s Restaurant................................................................... 12A Kreher’s Poultry Farms..................................................................... 12A Oaks at Menorah Park - Kosher Catering, The................................ 2A Paola Kay Gifts..................................................................................... 5A Pexton Memorials................................................................................ 4A Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center...................................... 8A Sisskind Funeral Service..................................................................... 9A Temple Adath Yeshurun.....................................................................11A Temple Concord................................................................................. 10A Village ACE Hardware........................................................................ 2A

About the cover

This year’s Community Guide cover was created by Jenn DePersis, production coordinator of The Reporter Group, which publishes the Jewish Observer.

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JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

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Jewish Federation of Central New York 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-445-0161 Direct Voice Mail to Departments: 315-445-2040 Fax: 315-445-1559 Website: www.jewishfederationcny.org President/CEO: Michael Balanoff (mbalanoff@ jewishfederationcny.org) Federation as Communal Organization The Jewish Federation of Central New York is dedicated to nurturing a thriving Jewish community in Syracuse and throughout Central New York. Established in 1918, Federation celebrated its 100th anniversary in June. Federation strives to build community and ensure the continuity of Jewish life by encouraging the participation of all Jews in activities offered by the Federation and its family of beneficiary agencies, area synagogues and other Jewish organizations. Today, Federation serves a community of about 7,000 Jews living in Syracuse and the surrounding area, as well as people in need in Israel and 60 countries worldwide. Federation is viewed as the central address for the Syracuse and Central New York Jewish community. Federation Board of Directors The Jewish Federation of CNY Board of Directors works cooperatively with community leaders from synagogues and Jewish and civic organizations to identify community needs, and help ensure that those needs are met. The Federation’s Community Relations Committee identifies and educates against antisemitism; maintains strong and positive interfaith relationships; advocates for Israel and world Jewry; and works to safeguard the civic, economic and religious rights of all Jewish people. Financial Goals Fund development is one of Federation’s most important activities. Increased financial support for vital programs and services is critical to the growth and stability of the Jewish community. Through its allocation process, Federation makes funding decisions in the interest of the community’s needs, goals and priorities. Federation helps the community identify its philanthropic passions and provides a wide range of opportunities to fill them. The Annual Campaign is the backbone of Federation’s fund development efforts. In 2018, Federation surpassed its $1.2 million goal, thanks to the leadership of Campaign Chair Mark Wladis and his team of volunteer solicitors. Each year on Super Sunday, a one-day phone-a-thon, more than 100 volunteers gather to raise more than $35,000 for the Annual Campaign. Federation is grateful to generous community members for their support. Each contribution to the Annual Campaign supports a variety of programs provided by a network of local and overseas beneficiary agencies. Local agencies and

programs supported by the Annual Campaign include the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center, Syracuse Jewish Family Service, Syracuse Hebrew Day School, Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies, Hillel at Syracuse University, the Syracuse Community Hebrew School, Ahavath Achim Mikvah, Judaic Heritage Center, Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association, the Jewish Observer, Jewish Music and Cultural Festival, Israel Independence Day celebration, InterFaith Works, Israel Experience program for teens, Friends of Israeli Scouts and the Beit Tikvah home for women with developmental disabilities. The Federation’s Community Program Fund offered grants of $34,550 to local Jewish agencies, organizations and synagogues from a total of $47,814 available funds this year alone. Federation’s overseas partners are the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, the Jewish Agency for Israel and World ORT. As a member of the Jewish Federations of North America, Federation provides funding for the rescue and relief of Jews in need around the world, and assists those making aliyah to Israel. Thousands of people around the world are affected by a single gift to the Jewish Federation of CNY Annual Campaign. Federation offers community members the opportunity to continue their support of local and overseas agencies in perpetuity, through the Perpetual Annual Campaign Endowment (or PACE) program. A PACE gift creates a restricted endowment fund at the Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York dedicated to endowing a donor’s Annual Campaign gift. Federation also establishes emergency relief funds to offer a way for local community members to help when natural disasters and other catastrophes strike around the world. Federation distributes 100 percent of that money to its overseas partner agencies that provide direct services to victims. This year, the Federation will again offer funding to families for Jewish summer overnight camp experiences and scholarships for teens heading to Israel this summer. Community Activities Federation offers a wide range of social, cultural, educational, community service and fund-raising activities, and sponsors programs to help educate Jewish leadership and the entire community. Federation coordinates the community’s annual Holocaust remembrance program, which honors and remembers not only those who were lost during the Holocaust (the Shoah), but also those who survived to share their stories with the generations that follow. In addition, the Yom Ha’atzmaut program, Israel’s Independence Day, is sponsored by the Federation. Through Federation’s Shalom Syracuse program, Community Concierge Jacki Goldberg personally delivers welcome baskets to new Jewish members of the

At left: During Super Sunday 2018, volunteers raised money for the Jewish community. L-r: Steffi Bergman, Steve Greeson, Karen Docter, Cheryl Schotz and Linda Friedman.

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Every year, Federation holds the Yom Hashoah community commemoration. community. Each welcome basket is filled with gifts for a new home, and information from Jewish organizations and synagogues, as well as local arts, leisure and entertainment venues in the secular community. Federation maintains an online community calendar, a comprehensive place to find all local Jewish events. Federation’s website is the first place to go for information about community events, services and activities, and to find links to a variety of news sources, as well as links to local, national and international Jewish agencies. As part of its extensive efforts to keep local Jewish residents safe, Federation maintains a communications network to facilitate the coordination of efforts between law enforcement agencies and local Jewish agencies in the event of a threat to the safety of the community. Federation also coordinates a “digital mapping” program of all Jewish structures, institutions and agencies in Syracuse and surrounding areas. Federation welcomes the energy, enthusiasm and skills of all those willing to work on behalf of the Jewish people. To learn more about the Jewish Federation of Central New York, its beneficiary agencies and other Jewish community resources, visit the website at www.jewishfederationcny.org or contact President/ CEO Michael Balanoff at 315-445-2040, ext. 130, or mbalanoff@jewishfederationcny.org.

For the third consecutive year, Federation held a “friend-making” Chanukah event at the MOST. (Names of children withheld on request.)


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse

5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Executive Director: Marci Erlebacher (merlebacher@jccsyr.org) Phone List: JCC Front Desk: 315-445-2360 JCC Neulander Family Sports and Fitness Center: 315-234-4JCC (234-4522) Direct dial to departments: 315-445-2040 For membership inquiries, contact the membership director: 315-445-2360 Fax: 315-449-4539 Website: www.jccsyr.org Hours of Operation: Main Office Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 8 am-9 pm, Fri. 8 am-6 pm, Sun. 9 am-5 pm Fitness Center Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 5:30 am-9 pm, Fri. 5:30 am-6 pm, *Sat. 8 am-4 pm, Sun. 7 am-6 pm Pool Hours: Sun.-Fri. 9 am-7 pm; Lap Swim – Mon.Fri. 9 am-12 pm, *Sat. 10 am-7 pm During the JCC Camp Joe and Lynne Romano (June 25-August 17): Mon.-Fri. 3:30 pm-8 pm; Lap Swim – Mon.-Fri. 8 am-9 am, *Sat. 10 am-7 pm, Sun. 9 am-7 pm *Saturday hours are for the Fitness Center and pool only. No transactions of business or special activities are carried out during Shabbat. Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse: A place where everyone belongs. Share in a long tradition. Come to the place where the Syracuse Jewish community has come together for generations to celebrate, educate, organize and have fun. With programs and services for infants from 6-weeks-old to seniors, there is something for everyone at the JCC. Membership options vary. All memberships include use of the pool. Call 315-445-2360 to schedule a tour. JCC Neulander Family Sports and Fitness Center The JCC’s Fitness Center is open seven days a week and features more than 25 cardio machines; Keiser M3 bikes; comprehensive free-weight area and strength training machines; more than 50 group exercise classes

Some infants in the JCC’s Jerome and Phyllis Charney Early Childhood Development Program were ready to take a stroll on a spring day. L-r: Greyson Thorpe, Ella Gadarian, Elizabeth Sonneborn, Grace Ondrako, Zachary Kinsella and Cayden Cote.

offered weekly – including free regular TRX classes; banked indoor running/walking track; clean showers and locker rooms; towel service; collegiate-size gymnasium (available to rent); open gym times; family gym; members’ basketball; pickleball; and more. Personal training, massage therapy and nutritional counseling also available. Free orientation and free fitness assessment for new members. SilverSneakers and Silver&Fit insurance fitness programs accepted. Call 315-234-4522 to schedule a tour. Pool and Swim Lessons The JCC’s outdoor heated pools are great for members and their guests to cool off, relax and exercise. Group, semi-private and private swimming lessons for all levels are offered seven days a week through August. Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) Fitness and recreation classes offered to children age three and older include gymnastics, karate, basketball, dance, soccer, rookie sports and sensory gym. Dance classes include ballet, tap and jazz. Gymnastics features preschool classes and a gymnastics team that participates in competitions. JCC membership not required; discount for members. Jerome and Phyllis Charney Early Childhood Development Program Learn, explore, develop and socialize with the JCC’s ECDP, a comprehensive childcare facility and preschool rooted in Judaic teachings and traditions. A New York state-licensed program serving 6-week-old infants through pre-kindergarten, the program features flexible enrollment (open 7 am-6 pm); professional, nurturing teachers; clean, secure facility; field trips; music programs; SMART boards in pre-kindergarten classrooms; available enrichment classes; and more. Before School Care Offering Jamesville-DeWitt elementary and middle school students a safe and comfortable place to go in the morning before the school day begins. This convenient and flexible program includes free busing to school. After School Care The JCC’s state-licensed after-school program for children in kindergarten through sixth grade is fun and educational, providing safe care for children until 6 pm. Children enjoy a healthy snack and supervised activities such as games, arts and crafts, help with homework, sports, seasonal outdoor activities (weather permitting), available enrichment classes and more. Busing is available from most East-area schools. JCC membership not required, but there is a discount for members. Vacation Camps and Snow Days Children can enjoy their days off from school for holidays, breaks and unexpected snow days with various activities, sports and more. JCC Camp Joe and Lynne Romano The JCC’s summer day camp is held weekdays and caters to three distinct age groups. The early childhood camp is for children 6-weeks-old through those entering kindergarten. The school-age camp is open to children entering grades one-six. The SyraCruisin’ teen travel camp is for young teens entering grades seven-10.

PEXTON MEMORIALS (FORMERLY GROSKIN MEMORIALS) MONUMENTS, MARKERS, CEMETERY LETTERING, PLANTINGS ARRANGED

Other JCC summer camp weekly options for teens are the camp aide and counselor in training (or CIT) programs. JCC membership not required, but there is a discount for members. Teens Teen programming strives to enrich the lives of teens in grades seven-12 by promoting an atmosphere of recreation, education, volunteerism and entertainment. The annual Battle of the Bands concert features local high school bands in a friendly competition. Adults Adult programming offers a variety of social, cultural and educational events, such as defensive driving classes, guest lectures, art shows/sales, entertainment, movie screenings, panel discussions and more. Senior Adults The JCC is the place for seniors to connect with new and established friends while broadening their horizons or simply having fun. The Bobbi Epstein Lewis Senior Adult Dining Program, for ages 60 and older, is the only senior nutrition program available outside of New York City serving kosher meals five days per week. Lunch is offered Monday-Friday and switches to Tuesday-Friday during the summer. During the summer, the Dr. Morton and Mrs. Libby Maloff Summer Senior Dinners are held on Mondays at 5 pm. The JCC Senior Dining Program is funded in part by the Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth and the New York State Office for the Aging and Administration for Community Living. The JCC also offers seniors various social activities such as Mah Jongg, bridge, senior fitness classes, entertainers, birthday celebrations and more. The Dr. Morton and Mrs. Libby Maloff Senior Lunch and Learn series, held periodically during senior lunches, offers presentations on a range of issues facing seniors. Neighborhood Advisor The JCC’s Neighborhood Advisor program offers outreach, information and referral services to seniors age 60 and older living in DeWitt, East Syracuse, Fayetteville, Jamesville, Manlius and Minoa. This free, confidential service provides information about programs available in the community. It helps seniors obtain necessary services so they can live independently in their homes. The program is part of the Onondaga County Department of Adult and Long Term Care Services. PJ Library® The PJ Library® (PJ for pajamas) is a nationally-acclaimed literacy program started by the Harold Grinspoon Foundation which gives free monthly Jewish bedtime stories, CDs and DVDs to families raising Jewish children ages 6 months to 8 years old. The PJ Library in Central New York chapter also offers play dates and other family-friendly interactive events. PJ Library in CNY is a program of the JCC of Syracuse and serves children in Cortland, Madison, Onondaga and Oswego counties. It is supported by the Pomeranz, Shankman and Martin Charitable Foundation, Jewish Federation of Central New York, Syracuse Hebrew Day School, and all local synagogues. For more information and to sign up, visit www.pjlibrary.org or e-mail pjcny@jccsyr.org. PJ Our Way is the newest chapter of PJ Library for kids aged 9-11. Each month, kids visit the PJ Our Way website to choose one book from a selection of four high-quality titles with Jewish themes. The books are then mailed to them and they can post comments and reviews online. Enroll online at www.pjourway.org.

Established 1970

Call for appointment 697-9461

Children in the JCC’s After School Program, along with JCC Executive Director Marci Erlebacher and Jewish Federation of Central New York President/CEO Michael Balanoff (to the right of the menorah), stood around the menorah following the lighting ceremony on December 12, the first night of Chanukah.

Your ad SHould be here! To advertise, call Bonnie Rozen at 1-800-779-7896, ext 244 or bonnie@thereportergroup.org JCC Fitness member Jeff Edgar worked out in the adult fitness room.


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park 4101 East Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-9111, ext. 234 Fax: 315-446-1537 Office e-mail: info@sjfs.org Website: www.sjfs.org Director: Judith S. Huober Office hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 am-5 pm (4 pm closing, winter Fridays); evening counseling hours by appointment Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park is the non-profit human services arm of the Jewish community, dedicated to helping individuals and families in the Jewish and general communities maximize their self-determination, realize their potential and live with dignity. With its origins in 1891, SJFS was incorporated in 1939 and is guided by the Jewish values of family, community, diversity, respect and autonomy. It provides holistic, preventive, wellness-oriented integration of social and human services offered from the Jewish community to all residents of Central New York. Placing emphasis on issues relating to aging, SJFS provides services throughout Onondaga County that fall into four interconnected areas: ‹‹Planning and Navigating the Journey: care management: health, housing, services; bill paying, personal affairs assistance; Kosher Meals on Wheels; transportation, medical appointment accompaniment; Kol Chai. Agewise Solutions The agency’s signature care management program empowers individuals and families to successfully navigate life transitions and manage issues of later life or disability. SJFS’s professional geriatric care managers offer personal support and guide individuals and families through care coordination and family liaison, arranging services and benefits, and managing household bills and paperwork. ‹‹A Ride and More provides transportation (with or without a patient advocate) to local appointments and on errands, including grocery shopping. ‹‹Kosher Meals on Wheels provides affordable, nutritious meals and regular social contact for senior adults and individuals with disabilities who are unable to shop or prepare meals for themselves. ‹‹EISEP (Expanded In-home Service for the Elderly Program), administered through a contract with Onondaga County Adult and Long Term Care Services, provides non-medical case management to help seniors retain their independence and live in their own homes. ‹‹Kol Chai coordinates community funds and other resources to help members of the Jewish community prevent or recover from crisis or personal emergency. ‹‹Promoting and restoring mental health: individual, couples and family counseling; CNY PEARLS; learning groups; Family Wellness Connections; Center for Healthy Living wellness events, workshops and classes; Tachlis of Inclusion. Counseling and education are available for individuals, couples, families and organizational groups. CNY PEARLS, the Program to Encourage Active

Seen around the community

Hillel at Syracuse University’s Peer Network Engagement interns in their Syracuse (written in Hebrew) t-shirts.

Rewarding LiveS, is the region’s only evidence-based geriatric depression program and is delivered to clients in their homes free of charge in collaboration with the County’s Office for Aging. ‹‹Supporting Brain Health and Living Well with Dementia: M-Power U: Early Memory Loss Day Program; social and cognitive support programs; depression care; learning groups; brain-health assessments. M-Power U: A Learning Community for Early Memory Loss Using fun, stimulating and creative activities, MPU is a social program promoting well-being and independence for people who are experiencing mild memory loss, mild cognitive impairment, or early stage dementia (no diagnosis required). MPU’s Brain Power Community takes place on Mondays. The Arts and Minds Community and Arts and Minds Café launched on Fridays in early 2018, is an expressive arts-based social program offering a variety of creative arts activities, dance and movement, and more. Individuals and care partners can drop in to the weekly Café from 2:30-3:30 pm. ‹‹Empowering the Team: Families, Professionals and Ancillary Services includes an internship program with accredited colleges and universities; BeWell Institute/ Center for Healthy Living workshops, courses and consulting; Planning to Flourish workplace seminars and clinics; caregiver support and consultation; team planning and coordination for clients, caregivers and professionals; and the Volunteers Program. BeWell Initiative: Behavioral and Emotional Wellness Empowers Later Life BeWell integrates case management, brain health support, therapy and counseling services, and family life and professional education. It is the area’s only nonprofit program to focus holistically on psychogeriatric and cognitive wellness, education and service needs for older adults and their families. Center for Healthy Living SJFS offers individual and family classes and events to extend wellness opportunities to the entire Jewish community and beyond. Many are cross-listed with Oasis, an area program to offer educational opportunities for older adults, e.g., Views on Aging: Though the Movie Lens; Zen and the Art of Caregiving; Brain Fitness; Poetry as a Pathway to Spirituality in Later Life, and more. One group is using Rabbi Dayle Friedman’s book “Jewish Wisdom for Growing Older: Finding Your Grit and Grace Beyond Midlife” as a point of departure for a six-month exploration of their attitudes and feelings about the process of growing older, under the guidance of Menorah Park Chaplain Rabbi Evan Shore and SJFS Director Judith Huober. The SJFS Volunteer Program puts hundreds of individuals to work each year on and off campus. Internships and service learning are available in coordination with various accredited degree programs,

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companies and clubs, as well as court-mandated community service. The Tachlis of Inclusion program reaches out to Jewish clients with special needs, bringing them Jewish holiday and cultural experiences, as well as training in cultural competency to residence staff and other service providers. SJFS provides services without discrimination to people of all backgrounds and economic levels on a sliding fee scale; third party insurance is accepted. SJFS receives funding from the Jewish Federation of Central New York, the Pomeranz, Shankman and Martin Charitable Trusts, the United Way of Central New York, the Onondaga County Department of Adult and Long Term Care Services, the New York state Office of Aging, and program and client fees, as well as charitable contributions and other charitable underwriting. It is a member of the Network of Jewish Human Service Agencies and the Human Services Leadership Council.

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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

The Syracuse Hebrew Day School

5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-1900 E-mail: shds@twcny.rr.com Website: www.shds.org Head of School: Lori Tenenbaum The Jewish community’s future leaders are being created today at the Syracuse Hebrew Day School. A vibrant institution at the forefront of Jewish education in Syracuse, the school serves students from kindergarten through sixth grade, and offers a progressive program of general and Judaic studies complemented by a full range of co-curricular programs in technology, music, art, physical educa-

tion and drama. Each child at SHDS is recognized as a unique learner with an individualized educational goal. The school’s mission is “… to teach, inspire and nurture future leaders of our Jewish community through an unparalleled academic experience guided by Jewish studies and values.” At 58 years old, SHDS is among the oldest community day schools in the United States. Parents who enroll their children at SHDS do so because of two factors: they want an educationally superior program and they want a superior Judaic program. The school’s curriculum and goals for general studies parallel and

frequently exceed those of the public schools. The school’s staff is highly qualified, experienced and committed. SHDS students are encouraged to pursue their interests in the arts, and annually win awards for writing, art and science. The Judaic program is integrated into every child’s day and includes total immersion in Hebrew, as well as the study of Jewish ethics, values, customs, history, prayer and traditions. As graduates become bar or bat mitzvah, they display maturity, confidence and knowledge. Families with varying levels of observance and many different racial, religious

and ethnic heritages enroll their children at the day school, seeking a strong academic program and a values-based education. SHDS graduates not only continue their Jewish education after they leave the school, but often take positions of leadership in youth groups and as teachers in religious schools. Each year, SHDS graduates rank among the leaders of their public or private high school classes and attend some of the finest colleges in the country. The school’s program provides a foundation for success in all aspects of life and learning in the 21st century.

Above: The SHDS Drama Club performs a full-scale production each year. At right: Syracuse Hebrew Day School students enjoyed a visit from Syracuse University’s mascot, Otto the Orange, as a reward for independent reading.

The Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies P.O. Box 161 Syracuse, NY 13214-0161 Located at Temple Adath Yeshurun for academic year 2018-19 on Tuesdays for grades 8-12 Phone: 315-766-0442 E-mail: EpsteinCNY@gmail.com Website: www.EpsteinCNY.org Facebook page: http://tinyurl.com/ EpsteinCNY Twitter: @EpsteinCNY Director: Cantor Paula Pepperstone Throughout the school year, Jewish teens from across the community gather at the Epstein School to see friends, further Hebrew skills, explore ethics and Jewish arts, learn Jewish texts and the wisdom Jewish tradition can bring to current events, and prepare to be Jewish in the larger world. For more than 40 years, the Epstein School has provided all this and more. Study after study shows that ongoing Jewish learning through the high school years is critical to engagement in Jewish life as an adult. Teens are intellectually ready to wrestle with abstract concepts – and hopefully, enjoy the process – and grow to appreciate the complexities of the Jewish tradition. Highlights of the last three years have

included the first two biannual, highly-subsidized Teen Taste of Israel trips (made possible by an endowment fund at the Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York); a student-lead model seder based on a haggadah elective (made possible through a grant from the Philip L. Holstein Community Program Fund of the Jewish Federation of Central New York); the school’s third annual siyyum (celebration of learning), where students made multi-media presentations based on their classes; “Packing for College,” which explored navigating being Jewish on a college campus, and which was also made possible by a Philip L. Holstein Community Program Fund grant of the Jewish Federation of Central New York; and shalshelet (chain), which links Epstein students while they are also madrichim (teachers’ aides) in the community’s religious schools and Syracuse Community Hebrew School, and which increases their compensation (also made possible through a grant from the Philip L. Holstein Community Program Fund of the Jewish Federation of Central New York). The Epstein School is sponsored by

See “Epstein” on page 15A

Rabbi Epstein School of Jewish Studies Teen Taste of Israel trip (made possible by an endowment fund at the Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York).

At right: Epstein School students may choose electives at the school, one of which is weaving. Instructor Sarah Saulson showed student Caleb Porter how to use the loom. Saulson taught arts in the Torah – the different parts of making the Mishkan. Each student made a small weaving and did a hand stitching project, as well. The point is that the students don’t only do text study, even though that is considered highly valued and taken seriously. They also learn more practical aspects of Judaism.

Syracuse Community Hebrew School Located at Temple Concord for fall 2018-2019 910 Madison St. Syracuse, NY 13210 E-mail: schs.syracuse@gmail.com Website: www. syracusecommunityhebrewschool.com Education Director: Alison Bronstein The Syracuse Community Hebrew School formed in the fall of 2014 as a joint venture of the three main collaborating synagogues, Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas, Temple Adath Yeshurun and Temple Concord. Continued funding from the Jewish Federation of Central New York, and the Pomeranz, Shankman and Martin Charitable Foundation, has succeeded in keeping the school cost neutral to parents and congregations. The SCHS planned to rotate among the three member synagogues, spending two years at each location. From fall 2015 through spring 2017, its first two years, the SCHS was hosted by Temple Adath Yeshurun. This past year, the third year of the school, Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas hosted, but space constraints have prompted a move to Temple Concord a year before originally planned. Fall 2018 will thus mark the fourth year of the school, which will be held at Temple Concord. The school’s mission statement reads: “Syracuse Community Hebrew School will provide high quality He-

brew education to prepare students for Jewish life in synagogue and at home. The school will foster a sense of Jewish community throughout the Greater Syracuse area and engage students in grades 3-7, of all abilities and levels, in a creative learning environment.” The SCHS is an inclusive program and has experienced teachers and assistants in every class, a special education teacher and a special education assistant. Alison Bronstein took over as director of the school after Shannon Small moved away from the area, and Cecilia Ellis has taken the job of being the lead teacher. From the school’s inception, the directors have made great efforts to ensure that every functional level be addressed and that every child be able to participate. The staff is confident that there is no educational challenge that cannot be addressed. The rabbis from the three sponsoring congregations share a combined message, “The SCHS was created to provide a high quality Jewish education to the Jewish students in our community. When we commit to educating our children, we are investing in the future of the Jewish people. This is an opportunity for our students to learn in an engaging environment and develop strong Jewish identities that will carry into adulthood.

See “Hebrew” on page 12A


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

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The Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York Inc. 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-445-2040, ext. 130 Fax: 315-234-4350 E-mail: mbalanoff@jewishfoundationcny.org Website: www.JewishFoundationCNY.org Executive Director: Michael Balanoff The Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York Inc. was founded in late 2001. It is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization established to help provide the fiscal structure needed to ensure the continuity and vitality of Jewish life in Central New York. It was designed to facilitate outright and deferred giving easy, personally satisfying and effective, while providing contributors the maximum income, gift and estate tax benefits allowed by law. The Foundation continues to operate at an extremely low overhead, thanks to the time and efforts volunteered by its trustees and committee members. The investment of the Foundation’s assets is managed by financial agents chosen by the Investment Committee for their performance and level of service. The Investment Committee has been chosen from among the most qualified professionals in the community.

Jewish Observer 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Local Editor: Bette Siegel – 315-445-2040, ext. 116 Editorial fax: 315-445-1559 Editorial and change-of-address e-mail: JewishObserverCNY@gmail.com Advertising Representative: Bonnie Rozen – 800779-7896, ext. 244, or 607-724-2360, ext. 244 Advertising fax: 607-724-2311 Advertising e-mail: bonnie@thereportergroup.org Website: www.jewishfederationcny.org The Jewish Observer is published by the Jewish Federation of Central New York 24 times a year, with only one issue each in July and December, and is mailed free of charge to every known Jewish household in Central New York. It has been in print for more than 40 years and is the main source in Syracuse of local, national and international Jewish news. The paper seeks to build and enhance a sense of local and global Jewish connection. The paper is available online on the Federation website, www.jewishfederationcny.org. Every community organization, synagogue and agency uses the Jewish Observer as a means of promoting its activities and programs. Advertising revenue and an allocation from Federation’s Annual Campaign help support the general costs of the publication, while the paper’s annual appeal to readers helps support the costs of local coverage. The Editorial Oversight Committee for the Jewish Observer is chaired by Bernard Bregman. Its members include Ettarae Alpert, Mike Balanoff, Debra Becker, Marci Erlebacher, Mark Field, Alan Goldberg, Helen Marcum, Steve Sisskind, Ruth Stein and Bette Siegel. Siegel has been the local editor since 2000.

Don’t miss the boat... advertise! For information on advertising, please contact Bonnie Rozen at bonnie@ thereportergroup.org or 800-779-7896, ext. 244.

The Foundation currently administers more than 320 funds, including synagogue and agency funds, endowment funds, donor advised funds and B’nai Mitzvah Funds. To date, $16 million has been donated to the Foundation, with more than $11 million in grants from donor advised funds distributed to Jewish and non-Jewish charities – with 85 percent of that money staying right here in Central New York. One of the programs of which the Foundation board is proudest is its B’nai Mitzvah Fund program, which encourages teens to learn tzedakah at an early age. The program is offered to all youngsters celebrating their bar or bat mitzvah each year. The goal is to give teens the opportunity to learn about the world of philanthropy and social action through hands-on involvement. Teens have the opportunity to contribute a minimum of $250 of their savings or bar/bat mitzvah gifts to set up a

donor advised fund in their own name at the Jewish Community Foundation. The Pomeranz, Shankman and Martin Charitable Foundation agreed to match $250 for each teen, raising each fund to a minimum of $500. The teens may direct that donations be sent from their fund to any nonprofit organization, Jewish or not, local or out of town. In addition to individual distributions, a Teen Funders Committee, made up of B’nai Mitzvah Fund holders who designate some of their fund to a pooled fund, meet twice a year and make group decisions on the grants. The teens operate much like an Allocations Committee, considering requests for grant proposals and deliberating over their decisions as a group. One way to ensure a healthy Jewish future is through the establishment of endowment funds. Endowed gifts, including those made from estate planning, the transfer of assets, and retirement fund beneficiary designations,

See “Foundation” on page 15A

The founding members of the Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York. Standing (l-r): Bernard Goldberg z”l, J. Jeffrey Solomon z”l, Philip Pinsky z”l, Mark Field, Sheldon Horowitch, William Pearlman, Warren Wolfson, Deborah Friedman, Nancy Belkowitz, Martin Irwin, Sheldon Kruth, Cheryl Patt, Linda Alexander, William Berinstein, Lynn Smith, Richard Friedman, Neil Bronstein, Debrah Shulman, Arnold Rubenstein and Sheldon Kall. Sitting (l-r): Howard Port, David Holstein, Alexander Holstein, Edward Green z”l and Michael Balanoff.

Jewish War Veterans of the United States of America, Onondaga Post 131 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-445-2360 Office hours: by appointment Post meets at the Jewish Community Center occasionally. Notices are sent out to members in advance. Post Commander: Bruce S. Fein Jewish war veterans associate themselves for a number of wide-ranging reasons: because they are Jewish veterans; to continue a proud tradition of Jewish-American patriots; to ensure that returning veterans, and all who came before them, receive the benefits and care which they have earned; to help poor and homeless veterans assume their rightful place in the community; to affirm Jewish military service to the U.S.A. for more than 350 years; to fight antisemitism at home and abroad; and to stay informed on the latest developments in veterans affairs, foreign affairs and Israel through JWV press releases and the award-winning member publication “The Jewish Veteran.” JWV works to ensure Jewish war veterans benefit

from the myriad programs offered, including scholarships for descendants of JWV members; a network of veterans’ service officers; member life and health insurance coverage and a prescription program; audio-visual library resources; the JWV disaster relief fund; care packages to service personnel; and other programs that can make a difference in a person’s life. Members participate in annual Veterans’ Day and Memorial Day observances. Local funeral director Steven Sisskind, along with veteran Stephen Nathan, provide more than 700 American flags to be placed at the graves of veterans buried in the Syracuse Jewish cemeteries. The annual Memorial Day tradition is coordinated with the sixth and seventh grade students of the Syracuse Hebrew Day School under the guidance of Rabbi Evan Shore. The Post is part of the larger JWV Western District Council, which includes Posts in Rochester and Buffalo, as well as the Department of New York and the national organization, which each hold an annual convention. Post 131 is also part of the Onondaga County Veterans’ Council.


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Central New York Chapter of Friends of Israel Scouts

6889 Hearthstone Ln. Liverpool, NY 13088-5926 Phone: 315-457-7201 E-mail: MelindaL@twcny.rr.com Chairmen: Melinda and Bud Greenman Since 1985, the Central New York Chapter of Friends of Israel Scouts has welcomed the Tzofim Friendship Caravan to the area. Founded in 1919, the Israel Scouts was the first Zionist youth movement in Israel and the first egalitarian Scouting movement in the world, where boys and girls participated together. The first delegation was sent to the United States in 1958. These encounters planted the seeds that are being nurtured and cherished throughout North America almost 50 years later. Today, the Israel Scouts (Tzofim) remains the only non-political youth movement in Israel and is supported mainly by the Ministry of Education and Culture. Like Scouts the world over, the Tzofim are “always prepared” and learn the principles of “working with spirit” and “providing community service.” Two summer programs have been

developed for North America. One is a delegation of senior Israel Boy and Girl Scouts, who serve as counselors in camps throughout the United States. Delegates share their experiences and backgrounds with other counselors and campers, teaching them about Israel’s culture and history through songs, dances, games and group discussions. The second program is the Tzofim Friendship Caravan, which travels throughout North America, visiting summer camps and cities. While all members of the delegation represent Israel, the Tzofim Friendship Caravan members use song and dance as their means of expression. The Caravan is comprised of 10 musically-talented teens and two adult leaders. To become part of the Friendship Caravan, the Tzofim must go through a four-tier elimination process and are then selected based on personal interviews, their knowledge of Israel, English communication skills, general group interaction and leadership abilities. After they are selected to be part of the Caravan, the young people rehearse

weekly for four months in Tel Aviv, under the direction of entertainment professionals. By the end of the rehearsal period, they have attained the level of a professional entertainment troupe. A unique aspect of the Tzofim Friendship Caravan is the relationship that can be formed with the community. The local chapter strives to develop a partnership between Israelis and Americans from different ethnic backgrounds and cultures. Housing for the Scouts is arranged with a cross-section of local Jewish families. The 2018 Tzofim (Israel Scouts) Friendship Caravan. The hosting relationship goes beyond simply providing food and personal contact is considered invaluable. a bed. The host families become surrogate Local families have found that hosting families during the Scouts’stay. Combined an Israel Boy or Girl Scout, who are all with the opportunity for the Israeli teens 17 and going into their senior year of to teach one-on-one about Israel, this high school, can create lasting memories.

Jewish Music and Cultural Festival c/o Jewish Federation of Central New York 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-445-2040 ext. 114 E-mail: jmacsyracuse@gmail.com Website: www.syracusejewishfestival. org The 19th Annual Jewish Music and Cultural Festival will take place on the campus of the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse on Sunday, August 5. This year’s festival will feature family entertainment by two-

time Grammy nominees “The Popups,” as well as a variety of Jewish music, including klezmer from Eastern Europe and contemporary Jewish music, on the Price Chopper Main Stage. The bands will include The Susan Hoffman Watts Jewish Music Ensemble, Farah, and the Keyna Hora Klezmer Band. Festival goers will have the opportunity to purchase an updated selection of Lower East Side kosher food under Va’ad supervision, and catered by The Oaks Catering. There will be many activities

See “Music” on page 9A

The 19th annual Jewish Music and Cultural Festival will take place on the campus of the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse on August 5.

Judaic Heritage Center of Central New York 5730 Commons Park Dr. East Syracuse, NY 13057 Phone: Howard Port, president, 315449-1200 The Judaic Heritage Center was chartered in 2004 by the Board of Regents of the State of New York to operate as a historical society and a nonprofit educational corporation. The JHC has a 501(c) (3) federal tax exemption. Its mission is to preserve and disseminate the heritage of the Central New York Jewish community, with the goals of (a) fostering intergenerational awareness and knowledge of the community’s history and (b) making this history come alive through publications, lectures and exhibits. The JHC has been collaborating with the Onondaga Historical Association to archive and preserve the JHC’s collection of Jewish manuscripts, photographs, historical documents, artifacts, letters, maps, books, audiotapes and other records relating to the history and culture of the Jews in the area. The archived materials housed at OHA are available for public viewing and research by appointment. As one of its earlier projects, the JHC conducted video interviews of local Jewish veterans of World War II and created a permanent archive of their stories. Then, in 2012, the JHC published “A Place That Lives Only in Memory,” written by William Marcus. This book traces the history of Jewish immigrants who lived and worked in Syracuse’s 15th Ward during the 19th and 20th centuries, and who contributed to this region’s and the country’s growth and prosperity. The

The Judaic Heritage Center’s permanent exhibit at the Onondaga Historical Association. The exhibit consists of two parts: a comprehensive wall display and a continually expanding databank of historical materials received from the community. contents of the book are based on an earlier JHC exhibit about the old Jewish neighborhood of the 15th Ward. In 2014, the JHC completed a 90-minute documentary video titled “Stories from the Syracuse Jewish Community.” This was followed, two years later, by a second 90-minute documentary video, “People and Places of the Syracuse Jewish Community.” Both were created and filmed by photojournalist and professional videographer Jay Lurie. The Marcus book and Lurie videos may be purchased at the OHA, at several local synagogue gift shops and at the office of Howard Port. In 2017, the JHC collaborated with the Onondaga Historical Association to create a permanent exhibit at the OHA titled See “Heritage” on page 12A


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

Syracuse Chapter of Hadassah

Contact: Elaine Dubroff (www.hadassah.org) Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America, was founded in 1912 by Henrietta Szold. Hadassah works to advance health and medicine in Israel and promote healthy living in the U.S. It also works to define Zionism for the 21st century and to train and mentor the Jewish leaders of tomorrow. Hadassah projects in Israel include: ‹‹Hadassah Medical Organization, a world-renowned medical complex in Jerusalem, which provides medical

care to more than one million patients a year. It has a non-discrimination policy, providing medical care to both Jews and Palestinians, and is a major employer of Palestinians. HMO is internationally known for its pioneering medical research and its hospital, in addition to normal operations, has 20 operating rooms below ground that are impervious to biological and chemical attack. ‹‹Hadassah Academic College in Jerusalem, which provides scholarships to train students in a variety of technical fields.

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‹‹Youth Aliyah villages, which provide services to immigrants and at-risk children in Israel. Hadassah in the U.S. supports health advocacy, Jewish education and women’s issues. The organization also works to identify and encourage young leaders through Young Judaea and leadership training. It advocates on behalf of Israel, including at the U.N., sends influential secular leaders to Israel and sponsors curriculum watch for public school texts. For more information, visit www.hadassah.org.

National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Syracuse Section human rights, NCJW hopes to leave the world a safer, more inclusive and more prosperous global community. Locally, the Greater Syracuse Section annually honors a woman in the community with the Hannah G. Solomon Award, which is given to someone who has changed the lives of others through leadership efforts and services on a community level. Ellen Weinstein was the 2017 recipient. Beginning in 2008, a tradition was instituted at the Hannah G. Solomon luncheon, when attendees were asked to bring items for the Onondaga County Child Protection Services Agency to the luncheon. The first year was a successful community event. Suitcases were collected for children involved in the child protective system. In subsequent years, luncheon attendees were asked to donate children’s clothing and outerwear, as well as baby items, to Onondaga County Children’s Division. At the Hannah G. Solomon luncheon honoring Weinstein, the NCJW, Greater Syracuse Section continued its efforts on behalf of youngsters in Central New York by asking members and luncheon guests to bring items to donate to McCarthy@Beard, a program run by the Syracuse City School District. In addition, NCJW, Greater Syracuse Section, has been the recipient of a Current and past Hannah G. Solomon award recipients. Contact: Cantor Francine Berg Phone: 315-446-6612 E-mail: songberg@hotmail.com The National Council of Jewish Women is a national organization of volunteers and advocates which, inspired by Jewish values, strives to improve the quality of life for women, children and families, and safeguards individual rights and freedoms. Founded in 1893, NCJW has been at the forefront of social change – championing the needs of women, children and families, and taking a progressive stance on issues such as child welfare, women’s and human rights, and reproductive freedom. Among the challenges Americans and the world face are poverty, injustice and violence. Although significant, these challenges are not insurmountable. Committed to social justice, peace and

Music for children all day, including the Robert Rogers Puppet Theater, and games and face painting hosted by the Jewish Community Center. Check the JMAC website for updated information. Vendors will sell a variety of items at all price points and the local Jewish community organizations will once again be represented with information tables. Interested vendors should contact Judith Stander at 315-445-2040, ext. 114, for information. The festival is free, thanks to sponsors that include contributions from community JMAC supporters, Jewish Federation of Central New York; CNY Arts; the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse; the Paul B. and Georgina H. Roth Charitable Foundation; the Reisman Foundation; a grant from State Senator John DeFrancisco; Key Bank; and the Pomeranz, Shankman and Martin Charitable Foundation. Corporate sponsors include Price Chopper, M&T Bank and the Jewish Observer.

Continued from page 8A

L-r: The band Boichik performed at JMAC. Its members include Joe Eglash, guitar and vocals; John Martin, drums; Cantor Kari Eglash, vocals; and Steve Fleury, bass.

L-r: Ellen Weinstein received her Hannah G. Solomon award from National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Syracuse Section President Cantor Francine Berg. (Photo courtesy of Barbara S. Davis) $2,000 Pomeranz Trust Challenge Grant asking NCJW to raise $1,000. These funds are used to purchase staple necessities for foster children in Onondaga County’s Children’s Division. With the Pomeranz Grant and the Challenge Grant, more than $3,000 worth of winter clothing and other necessities were donated to the county program. NCJW was also the recipient of an additional $1,000 from the Pomeranz Trust to be given to the CNY Diaper Bank to purchase diapers for low-income families in Central New York. The Greater Syracuse Section has worked with Syracuse Jewish Family Service at Menorah Park to help implement and fund the Tachlis program, a religious inclusion program for almost 125 Jewish individuals with exceptional needs who reside in Central New York group homes. Most of these individuals have no families or guardians to provide them with Jewish traditions and values. The program educates the professional staff that oversees these group homes on Jewish traditions, values, foods, holidays and celebrations, and encourages the importance of Jewish communal participation for their Jewish clients. The NCJW Syracuse Section has donated funds to assist Menorah Park’s Outreach Community Nutritional Program. The goal was to present a series of classes focusing on improving the nutritional quality of foods purchased, instruction on how to prepare these healthier foods, and education on potential for improved health outcomes with higher quality nutritional intake. NCJW was one of the founding organizations that established the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology in the 1960s, and then funded and helped with the creation of its Children’s Room. For more information about NCJW, contact Cantor Francine Berg at songberg@hotmail.com.

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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

University-Affiliated Organizations Hillel at Syracuse University Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life 102 Walnut Pl. Syracuse, NY 13210 Phone: 315-422-5082 Fax: 315-422-5083 E-mail: hillel@syr.edu Website: www.suhillel.org Building business hours: Mon.Thurs. 10 am-6 pm, Fri. 10 am-5 pm Rabbi: Leah Fein Syracuse Hillel enriches the lives of

undergraduate and graduate students in Syracuse so that they many enrich the Jewish people and the world. Syracuse Hillel impacts students through innovative engagement strategies, dynamic Shabbat and holiday experiences, vibrant social and Israel programming, tzedek (justice) initiatives and meaningful Jewish learning that make Judaism’s sacred tradition relevant to their lives as college students. These experiences empower

FreshFest, a program run through Syracuse Hillel, is the largest pre-orientation program at Syracuse University. Participants participate in activities that help them acclimate to life as a student at Syracuse University, and build friendships that last during their time at Syracuse and beyond.

students to become the next generation of Jewish leaders as they nurture and strengthen their Jewish identity, and their connection to the Jewish people and the state of Israel. Syracuse Hillel cultivates the potential within every Jewish student to live a meaningful and productive life guided by Jewish values and wisdom. In addition to focusing its efforts on the 3,000 Jewish students attending Syracuse University and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Hillel also serves other regional academic

institutions, including SUNY Upstate Medical University and Le Moyne College. Syracuse Hillel also offers Jewish experiences to the Syracuse Jewish community and the community at large. The Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life is a 16,000-square foot facility located at the corner of Walnut Place and Harrison Street. For information about upcoming events, contact the Hillel office at 315422-5082, or visit Hillel’s website, www. suhillel.org.

Hillel holds a Passover seder in the SU Dome annually.

Jewish Studies Program at Syracuse University 441 Hall of Languages Syracuse University Syracuse, NY 13244-1170 Phone: 315-443-2014 Fax: 315-443-8093 Website: http://asacademics.syr. edu/JewishStudies/requirements_ JewishStudy.html Director: Zachary Braiterman Contact: zbraiter@syr.edu Administrative Support: Arts and Sciences Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Programs The Jewish Studies Program at Syracuse University offers a wide variety of classes, a minor in Jewish studies and a major in modern Jewish studies. The interdisciplinary program explores Jewish history, culture and religion. Faculty research and teaching focus on the Hebrew Bible, modern Hebrew and

Yiddish fiction, European and American literature, Israel studies, and modern Judaic thought and culture. The director is Zachary Braiterman. Core faculty members include B.G. Rudolph Endowed Chair Ken Frieden, Harvey Teres, Miriam Elman, James Watts and Laurence Thomas, with affiliated faculty members and adjunct instructors Stephanie Shirilan, Erella Brown-Sofer, Samuel D. Gruber, Michal Downie, Michael Barkun (emeritus), Alan Goldberg (emeritus), Amos Kiewe, Jaklin Kornfilt, Yüksel Sezgin and Karina von Tippelskirch. The program depends upon generous support from the Holstein Family Endowment, the Harrison G. Levin Endowment and the Arlene and R. Raymond Rothman Endowment. The Benjamin Fellowship underwrites an assistantship for graduate

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work in Judaic studies. In addition, the annual B.G. Rudolph Lecture in Jewish Studies, inaugurated in 1962, has brought speakers such as Israeli writers Etgar Keret and Aharon Appelfeld, and Professors Robert Alter, Benjamin Harshav, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Menachem Lorberbaum and Galit Hasan-Roken to the university. Among the program events are lectures on campus, field trips and klezmer concerts.

Graduate and undergraduate students may submit Holocaust-related essays to the annual Kalina Prize competition. The Jewish Studies Program works closely with Syracuse University Press on the book series “Judaic Traditions in Literature, Music and Art.” Faculty members offer numerous lectures and presentations in the community, and the program played a key role in raising funds for the Norwich Jewish Center Restoration Project.

Sorkin Chabad House 825 Ostrom Ave. Syracuse, NY 13210 Phone: Rabbi Zalman Ives 315-9918377 / Rabbi Yaakov Rapoport 315424-0363 Secondary address: 113 Berkeley Dr. Syracuse, NY 13210 Services: Fridays, 6:30 pm; Saturday minyan 10:30 am, followed by Shabbat dinner or lunch. During June, July and August and for holidays, call before Shabbat to confirm time and availability of services. E-mail: chabad@syr.edu, zalmanives@gmail.com Website: For undergrads www. chabadsu.com, for grad programs chabadsyracuse.com. Facebook: Chabad House at Syracuse University Rabbi Yaakov and Chanie Rapoport, senior rabbi and co-directors Rabbi Zalman and Sorah Ives, program directors for undergrads The Sorkin Chabad House offers a Jewish “home away from home” atmosphere where students can enjoy Shabbat and holiday meals, coupled with conversation and stories. The Shabbat table, one of the many Chabad functions, is a setting for young Jewish men and women to meet and socialize. Whether on a Friday night or during the week, guest speakers provide an opportunity for students to expand their horizons, meet new people and become more Jewishly connected. The Sorkin Chabad House includes the Charney Great Room for Shabbat meals, classes and other gatherings; the Weinstein

Davening Center; and the Chava Rapoport Kitchen, where the Shabbat and yom tov meals are prepared. There is also a student lounge, library and activity room. Guest speakers have recently included Doron Kornbluth, author of “Why Marry Jewish,” and speakers in the past were Zvi Bielski, son of Zus Bielski, one of the Bielski partisan brothers whose story was told in the movie “Defiance”; Dan Alon, one of the five surviving Israeli athletes of the ‘72 Munich Olympics massacre; Rabbi Laibl Wolf, an international lecturer on Jewish mysticism; and Rabbi Tzvi Freeman, author of “Bringing Heaven Down to Earth.” The Sorkin Chabad House’s primary activities include Shabbat and yom tov services (Friday night and Saturday minyan); Shabbat and yom tov meals; challah baking; weekly “pita and parasha” classes; a series of classes on “What do Jews Believe?”; Jewish holiday information tables in the Schine Student Center on the Syracuse University campus; falafel night; Holocaust Awareness Week; World of Good Campaign; the Sukkamobile on campus; Jewish Heritage Week and book fair; Chanukah menorah distribution; mishloach manot and shmurah matzah distribution; Seder-to-Go; and anti-missionary programs and literature. The Sorkin Chabad House is constantly introducing new programs, such as a Jewish scribal arts demonstration in the Schine Student Center. The Chabad/Hillel women’s Rosh Chodesh group gives young Jewish women at Syracuse University the opportunity to bake traditional See “Chabad” on page 14A


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

Chabad-Lubavitch of Central New York 113 Berkeley Dr. Syracuse, NY 13210 Phone: 315-424-0363 Secondary address: Chabad Judaic Center of Fayetteville, 511 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville, NY 13066 E-mail: rabbirap@gmail.com Website: chabadsyracuse.com Director: Rabbi Yaakov Rapoport Educational Director: Chanie Rapoport Chabad-Lubavitch of Central New York is the Syracuse branch of Chabad-Lubavitch International. Chabad is actively working to assure a Jewish tomorrow by bringing Jews closer to the joy of Torah and Jewish traditions in more than 63 countries. Chabad’s underlying doctrine is ahavat Yisrael – love, care and concern for the Jewish people. Pioneers in reaching out to Jews and Jewish communities, Chabad makes no distinction between Jews – all are welcome. Chabad’s mission is to enrich the Jewish identity of each and every

Jew regardless of affiliation or level of observance. Chabad’s primary activities include Kosher Awareness Week; home kashering service; mezuzah authenticity check; provision of kosher mezuzot and tefillin; public Chanukah menorah lightings in Hanover Square, Hancock Airport, and area malls and shopping centers; olive oil pressing workshop; hospital and nursing home visitations; community Purim dinner; Passover experience and model matzah bakery; Jewish life exhibit at the New York State Fair; shofar making workshops; bat mitzvah club; publication of the Jewish art calendar and the Jewish holiday guide newspaper; and various ongoing classes on Torah and mysticism. The most important mitzvah or commandment in Judaism is to learn Torah. Chabad offers multiple adult education classes, including “In the Garden of Torah,” a weekly Torah study class held at the Chabad Judaic Center in Fayetteville, on Wednesdays at 7 pm; and a weekly downtown lunch and learn on the “Psychology

56 Franklin Ave. Oswego, NY 13126 Phone: 315-342-3330 Cell: 315-236-2116 E-mail: rabbi@jewishoswego.org Website: www.JewishOswego.org Directors: Rabbi Yossi and Chana Madvig Friday dinner: September-May at 5:30 pm (students only) Saturday kiddush/lunch: September-May at 12:30 pm (everyone welcome); June, July and August, call first to confirm availability. Ten years ago, Rabbi Yaakov Rapoport, director of Chabad Lubavitch of Central New York, selected Rabbi Yossi and Chana Madvig as directors of Chabad of Oswego. The organization is dedicated to helping strengthen the feeling of Jewish community in Oswego in every way possible. Chabad of Oswego offers weekly Shabbat meals, complete with singing, stories and inspiration. The warm and friendly atmosphere has earned it a reputation as a

“home away from home” for students and families alike. Chabad of Oswego offers educational opportunities that give students a chance to connect to their rich heritage though stimulating Jewish learning. For Oswego community children, there is a Hebrew school, holiday story and craft hour, and bar or bat mitzvah lessons for pre-teens. The Chabad House also hosts a Jewish lending library with novels, biographies, books on Jewish philosophy, Jewish history and Jewish law. To find a book, call Chabad or search its database at www.librarything.com. If you’re in or near the Oswego area, give the rabbi and rebbetzin a call, and visit Oswego’s Jewish oasis.

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of the Soul,” at 499 S. Warren St., on Thursdays at noon. Chabad also offers a number of six-week mini-series throughout the year on topics such as “Introduction to Jewish Mysticism,” “What do Jews Believe,” “Fundamentals of Jewish Faith,” “Introduction to the Talmud,” “Light Out of Darkness” and “The Other Side of the Holocaust.” Chabad also offers one-on-one tutorials on Jewish prayer; how to put on tefillin; the fundamentals of Judaism; and other areas of Jewish knowledge. For children, there is the Chaya Mushka Children and Youth Lending Library at the New Chabad Judaic Center in Fayetteville. Chabad also offers for sale (by appointment) books and Judaica, in addition to mezuzot and tefillin at the Chabad Judaic Center. Call 424-0363 for more information.

Chabad of Oswego

The Syracuse Va’ad Ha’ir

4313 E. Genesee St. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-6194 E-mail: rabbi@stocsyracuse.org Rav Hamachshir (Rabbinic Administrator): Rabbi Evan Shore The Syracuse Va’ad Ha’ir provides kosher supervision to products and institutions, certifying them for the kosher consumer. Mashgichim (supervisors) are employed by the Va’ad Ha’ir to ensure that establishments adhere to the highest standards before the symbol certifying acceptability can be applied. The following are the local establishments under the Syracuse Va’ad Ha’ir: CONSUMER CLIENTS: ‹‹Bagel Lovers Inc. (Ithaca) ‹‹BJ’S Bakery (only items marked with a KOF-K sticker) ‹‹Carvel, East Genesee St., DeWitt ‹‹Fins and Tails Seafood Store (fresh whole fish only) ‹‹Harrison Bakery ‹‹It’s a Confetti Party – Shira Shenberger ‹‹Jewish Health and Rehabilitation Center Senior Apartments Inc. (The Inn) ‹‹Jewish Community Center of Syracuse ‹‹Jewish Health and Rehabilitation Center at Menorah Park ‹‹The Jim and Arlene Gerber Bistro at Menorah Park: breakfast, lunch and dinner available ‹‹Jewish Home of Central New York, Residential Living Inc. (The Oaks) ‹‹Olive on Brooklea (olive oils that are marked as kosher) ‹‹The Pita Factory (under the OU) ‹‹Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life at Syracuse University INDUSTRIAL CLIENTS: ‹‹Benbow Chemical Packaging Inc. ‹‹Express Wash Inc. ‹‹General Chemical LLC ‹‹Decorated Cookie Company/Corsos Cookies ‹‹Natrium Products Inc. ‹‹Keith Titus Corporation – Page The Va’ad also provides kashrut supervision services on a one-time basis to any agency requiring such services. To receive up-to-date kashrut news, updates and alerts, e-mail jedda@aol.com. Those with any kashrut questions, concerns or problems should contact Rabbi Evan Shore at rabbi@stocsyracuse.org or 315-446-6194.

The Model Matzah Bakery is an annual event organized worldwide by Chabad Lubavitch in which rabbis and rabbinical students conduct matzah-making workshops for children in the days leading up to Passover. Connor Kinsella delivered his matzah to be baked at the Model Matzah Bakery at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center’s Jerome and Phyllis Charney Early Childhood Development Program.

The Ahavath Achim Mikvah

The Ahavath Achim Mikvah provides Central New York with a beautiful and modern mikvah that maintains an ancient custom. The mikvah corresponds to the mikvahs found in Israel that are more than 2,000 years old. A mikvah is considered a crucial component of a Jewish community, serving as the mainstay of family purity and as the culminating activity of traditional conversions. The Ahavath Achim Mikvah is used by new brides, converts and families who follow Jewish family purity values and traditions. It is also available on the eve of the High Holidays, as well as on Friday afternoons for men who wish to undergo a ritual purification as part of their spiritual preparation. The mikvah is a community facility serving all of Central New York and is used by visitors from all over the world. Those interested in using the mikvah – or learning about this ancient, beautiful and meaningful tradition – can contact Rose Rosenzweig at 315-475-

The Ahavath Achim Mikvah is on the grounds of Menorah Park. 7606, Chanie Rapoport at 315-424-0363 or Janice Levy at 315-329-0191.


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Synagogues Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas Location: 18 Patsy Ln., Jamesville, NY 13078 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 271, DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-9570 E-mail: manager@cbscs.org Website: www.cbscs.org Office Hours: Mon., Wed., Thurs. 9 am-5 pm, Fri. 9 am-4 pm, closed Tues. Rabbi: Andrew Pepperstone – rabbi@cbscs.org Rabbi’s Study: 315-446-5125 Rabbi Emeritus: Daniel A. Jezer President: Jef Sneider – president@ cbscs.org Program Director – Melissa Harkavy – director@cbscs.org An inclusive egalitarian congregation, CBS-CS strives to promote Jewish values – encouraging the religious, educational and social growth of its members by offering a variety of interactive religious services, educational offerings and social events with the aim of building community and enriching the life of each member. CBS-CS works to engage and support people from all walks of Jewish life, regardless of knowledge or background. Members of the community are welcome to attend services and participate in the many educational, holiday and social events offered. Service Schedule Friday Kabbalat Shabbat and Ma’ariv services are at 6 pm, preceded by asefat Shabbat (schmoozing and a quick nosh) at 5:45 pm; Shabbat services on Saturday at 9:30 am; and the Syracuse daily Conservative service on Sunday at 9 am. The community is invited to services on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, as well as all major Jewish holidays. There is babysitting on Shabbat mornings and during the High Holidays. Clergy Rabbi Andrew Pepperstone, CBSCS’s spiritual leader, sees the synagogue as an entry point into Jewish life for everyone and seeks to establish mean-

ingful relationships with, and between, members of the congregation. Ritual Life CBS-CS encourages the active participation of congregants of all ages in all aspects of services, including frequent interactive Torah study. Once a month, Shirat Shabbat gives participants a musically enhanced Friday evening experience with nigunim, chanting and acoustic guitar and percussion. Monthly Shabbat dinners foster a sense of community. Additionally, people gather monthly for a Shabbat morning meditation. Following services, there is a light kiddush lunch when congregants stay longer to schmooze, play games and participate in Lunch and Learn programs. Home minyanim, as well as meals, are arranged for families sitting shiva after the death of a loved one. Jewish Festivals Jewish festival celebrations are geared to all ages, from introspective events for Tisha B’Av and Selichot, to the musical celebration of Simchat Torah. Cantor Paula Pepperstone serves as the hazzan for Selichot, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, as well as major festivals. There are multi-generational celebrations for Sukkot, Simchat Torah, Chanukah, Tu B’Shevat, Purim and Shavuot. Religious School The CBS-CS Religious School, which meets Sunday mornings from 9 am-noon, provides educational experiences that seek to be warm, inviting, thought-provoking, creative, flexible and interactive, and helps connect students to their Jewish heritage, culture and community. Each Sunday morning ends with an interactive multi-media prayer service. Students in third-seventh grades attend the Syracuse Community Hebrew School on Wednesday, and many students in eighth-12th grades choose to attend the Epstein School of Jewish Studies. Youth Programming CBS-CS seeks to transmit a love of Judaism to its children through enjoy-

The Oys and Joys group enjoyed a Hebrew-infused day at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo. able and meaningful activities, and to establish a sense of community among their families. The Oys and Joys group (families with children under 5), meets monthly to play and explore Judaism. Additionally, Kadima and USY (United Synagogue Youth), the Conservative movement’s youth groups, engage pre-teens and teens in social and educational activities, including regional conventions and community service projects. CBS-CS seeks to keep post-high school young adults connected to Jewish life with holiday mailings. Adult Programming Adult programming offers an extensive program of courses and lectures taught by Rabbi Andrew Pepperstone, other Jewish professionals, outside

Heritage

“From Laying the Foundation to Forging Ahead: Jewish Contributions to Syracuse and Onondaga County.” A wall display summarizes the community’s history and highlights some of the business leaders, entertainment personalities, and sports icons who excelled locally and went on to achieve national and international renown. Supplementing the wall display are three touch-screen computers offering a potentially limitless amount of additional,

Hebrew

Artist-in-Residence Joey Weisenberg led the congregation in song during Havdalah.

Our students will be coming from diverse backgrounds and it is important that we respect and understand our differences, as well as what we have in common. ‘Haverim kol Yisrael,’ all Jews are connected, one to another and we are all part of the Jewish community. By working together, we can strengthen our community.” The SCHS is open to all Jewish children, whether they are members of the three organizing synagogues or not. For more information, or to become involved with the SCHS, contact Education Director Alison Bronstein at schs. syracuse@gmail.com; any of the board

specialists, and many talented and knowledgeable congregants. CBS-CS is an active member of the Alliance of Communities Transforming Syracuse (or ACTS) and InterFaith Works. CBS-CS Sisterhood and Hazak Sisterhood includes women of all ages and interests. The Sisterhood provides funds for synagogue activities, assists youth through camperships and sponsors a wide range of programs throughout the year. Sisterhood plants a tree in Israel in honor of a new baby and provides the first Shabbat dinner for the family. CBS-CS Hazak provides a variety of activities with Jewish themes in the areas of entertainment, education and culture, as well as the opportunity to socialize, for adults ages 55 and over.

Continued from page 8A

searchable information. This exhibit may be viewed during regular OHA hours. The JHC is seeking volunteers to help with its mission and is seeking more memorabilia to add to its collection. Community members are asked to consider volunteering and/ or contributing. For more information, contact Port at 315-449-1200 or Sidney Lipton at 315-682-8489. Continued from page 6A

members listed below; or the rabbi or president of CBS-CS (315-446-9570), TAY (315-445-0002), or TC (315-4759952). The Board of Directors includes Sam Young, outgoing president; Jeanette Myshrall, outgoing vice president and president-elect; Steve Volinsky, treasurer; Jennifer Hirsch, secretary; Andrea Knoller, Joely Kuss, Rebecca Oppedisano, Rachael Porter and Laurie Horowitz. Ex officio board members include the clergy and education directors from each synagogue, as well as Bronstein, the SCHS education director. To find out more, visit the website www.syracusecommunityhebrewschool.com.


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

Temple Adath Yeshurun 450 Kimber Rd. Syracuse, NY 13224-1899 Phone: 315-445-0002 Fax: 315-446-0667 E-mail: info@adath.org Website: www.adath.org Religious School: 315-445-0038 Rothschild Early Childhood Center: 315-445-0049 Rabbi: Paul Drazen – rabbidrazen@ adath.org Rabbi Emeritus: Charles Sherman Ba’alat Tefillah: Esa Jaffe – ejaffe@ adath.org Director of Education: Esa Jaffe – school@adath.org Executive Director: Barbara S. Simon – barbara@adath.org Temple Co-Presidents: Chaim Jaffe and Andrea Knoller Director Rothschild Early Childhood Center: Alicia C. Gross – alicia@ adath.org Temple Adath Yeshurun, “Congregation of the Righteous,” a Conservative synagogue affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, serves the spiritual, educational and social needs of its members, and provides a gathering place for the people of Central New York. It was founded in 1867 by a group of young men, mostly from Neustadt, Poland. For almost 50 years, Temple Adath Yeshurun occupied the corner of South Crouse Avenue and Harrison Street until its move to its present location on Kimber Road. The current building, designed by architect Percival Goodman, was dedicated on June 20, 1971. Temple Adath Yeshurun is a member the USCJ-Ruderman Inclusion Action Community. Its building is fully accessible for wheelchair users, is equipped with a hearing assistance system, and provides large print prayer books and transliterated prayer books. Service Schedule Temple Adath hosts Syracuse’s Conservative daily egalitarian services (co-sponsored by Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas), Monday through Friday at 7:30 am (followed by breakfast) and 5:30 pm. Sunday services are at 9 am (at CBS-CS) and 5:30 pm. Kabbalat Shabbat services are held on Fridays at 5:30 pm. Shabbat morning services are at 9:15 am; end of Shabbat service times vary with sunset. Call the TAY office or check www.adath.org for the Saturday evening service times. Babysitting is available every Shabbat. Mishpacha Shabbat is a monthly program for youth, which includes a tot service, junior congregation for children in kindergarten-sixth grades, and participation by b’nai mitzvah and teens in the main service. TAY has a long history of using music to enhance services and prayers. Several times a year, Ba’alat Tefillah Esa

Eli Gnacik shook the lulav and smelled the etrog while learning about the holiday of Sukkot. Jaffe, accompanied by a klezmer-style band, leads a high-energy Friday night service, Shabbat in the Round, as well as musical Shabbatot on Saturday mornings. The TAY lay choir often participates in Shabbat and yom tov services. There is open seating for High Holiday services and youth services are offered, as well as babysitting. L’dor V’dor… Our Youth, Our Future TAY invests considerable resources in nurturing its young people. Tot Shabbat, a monthly Friday night child-oriented service, is followed by a dinner. Torah Tots, from birth-age 5, is geared to the celebration of holidays. Temple Adath Yeshurun Religious School includes grades pre-kindergarten-seventh grade and meets on Sundays from 9 am-noon. It is an inclusive school that provides accommodations to students with diverse learning needs. The hands-on, interactive curriculum teaches Hebrew reading, prayer, Bible, Israel, lifecycle events, Jewish holidays and music. Sixth-graders learn trope, and there are b’nai mitzvah programs and workshops for sixth-graders and their parents during the year. TAY co-sponsors the Syracuse Community Hebrew School for students in third through seventh grades. The United Synagogue Youth program (grades nine-12) and Kadima group (sixth-eighth grades) provide settings for young people to enjoy social events and participate in community service projects. The TAY Rothschild Early Childhood Center offers a free, optional Jewish enrichment program on Tuesdays and Fridays open to the wider Syracuse Jewish community. The RECC provides childcare for children from 6 weeks through pre-kindergarten. It uses a Reggio-inspired curriculum that prepares See “TAY” on page 18A

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

Temple Concord

910 Madison St. Syracuse, NY 13210 Phone: 315-475-9952 Fax: 315-475-9954 E-mail: office@templeconcord.org Website: www.templeconcord.org Office Hours: Mon.-Wed. 9 am-5 pm, Fri. 9 am-3:30 pm Rabbi: Daniel J. Fellman – rabbifellman@templeconcord.org Cantor/Educator: Cantor Kari Siegel Eglash – cantoreglash@ templeconcord.org President: Jeanette Myshrall – president@templeconcord.org Chief Administrative Officer: Cheri Lass – administrator@ templeconcord.org Founded in 1839, Temple Concord, the only Central New York congregation affiliated with the Union for Reform Judaism, is the ninth oldest Jewish congregation still active in the United States. The 107-year-old sanctuary, placed on the National Register of Historic Places in May 2009, resounds with the joy of Jewish life. Temple Concord serves a large and diverse membership from Central New York. Everyone is welcome, be they Jews by birth or by choice, someone seeking to learn about Judaism, or someone who is part of an interfaith relationship. The synagogue is alive with people of all ages studying and singing; engaging in informal discourse during Torah and Talmud study; learning about Judaism; studying Hebrew; or conversing with friends during the oneg Shabbat or outside the Judaica shop on a Sunday morning. Lifelong Learning Adults regularly participate in workshops and classes, including Torah study every Saturday morning before Shabbat worship, Tuesday Talmud at 12:30 pm and regular Sunday morning classes taught by Rabbi Daniel Fellman, all of which offer an opportunity for Jews and other community members to learn about Judaism and its customs, culture, theology, values and history. Sessions for those interested in conversion are available. Adult Hebrew classes offer multiple levels of Hebrew that teach an understanding of Jewish liturgy, along with building Hebrew fluency and translation skills. The synagogue offers high-quality educational experiences for youths of all ages. Parents and the youngest children of the congregation gather for a monthly Tot Shabbat, family dinners and monthly programs for preschoolers. Temple Concord is home to the community’s largest religious school. Children in kindergarten through seventh grades meet Sunday from 9 am-noon. Temple Concord’s students in third through seventh grades participate in the Syracuse Community Hebrew School, a joint venture with other area synagogues,

13A

L-r: Rabbi Daniel Fellman and Cantor Kari Siegel Eglash are the clergy at Temple Concord. meeting weekly on Wednesdays, from 4-6 pm. Temple Concord also participates in the Rabbi Jacob Epstein School for Jewish Studies. Building upon classroom curricula, programs are offered for families to build connections with each other and integrate the lessons learned in the classroom into everyday life. Temple Concord offers many opportunities for families to connect to each other, as well as to the rich Jewish tradition through Shabbat meals, Havdalah and Shabbaton programs, and holiday events. JYG (Junior Youth Group) and TYCon (Temple Youth of Concord) for children in fifth-12th grades plan social, educational and social action activities. TYCon teens regularly participate in NFTY (North American Federation of Temple Youth) regional events. The synagogue also has a Sisterhood and a Brotherhood, both of which have monthly programs and are involved in many synagogue activities. Seniors can participate in the Seasoned Citizens group. The Lois Arnold Gale Library houses more than 3,000 volumes, ranging from toddler board books to talmudic texts. One of the largest collections of Judaic resources in Central New York, the library contains a variety of media. A section of the library is dedicated to TC lifetime member Louis Marshall, considered one of the most powerful American Jews of the 20th century. Temple Concord also houses the Rakov Museum collection of artifacts. The sanctuary’s Aron Hakodesh houses Torah scrolls saved from destruction during the Holocaust. The Regina F. Goldenberg Cultural Series presents assorted musical performances (classical, jazz, dance and choral); the Cinemagogue Series offers a variety of films with Jewish themes; and the Scholar Series presents local and national experts on a variety of political, cultural health and educational topics. Worship Opportunities Services in Hebrew and English are held Fridays at 6 pm (preceded by a See “TC” on page 14A


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse

4313 E. Genesee St. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-6194 Rabbi: Evan Shore Rabbi’s e-mail: Rabbi@stocsyracuse. org Shul’s e-mail: Info@stocsyracuse.org President’s e-mail: President@ stocsyracuse.org Website: www.stocsyracuse.org President: Elizabeth Steciak

STOCS hosted the Great Big Challah Bake as part of The Shabbat Project, a grassroots movement bringing together Jews of all ages and religious affiliations to experience the delight of one complete Shabbat. L-r: Amira Goldberg, Shira Boschan and Leah Goldberg.

Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse is a centrist Orthodox synagogue affiliated with the Union of Orthodox Congregations of America. Congregants come from a wide range of religious backgrounds; all are welcome to explore the beauty of tradition and the richness and modern-day relevance of Jewish scholarship and lifestyle. Service Schedule Monday-Friday 6:45 am (Rosh Chodesh 6:30 am); Sunday and legal holidays 8 am; Saturday 9 am (9:15 am winter); weekday afternoon service: approximately 15 minutes before sunset, with the exception of 7:15 pm throughout the summer. Call the shul office, or check the website for exact times. STOCS maintains daily morning and afternoon minyanim throughout the year. The past year has offered robust and varied programming, including a panel titled “My Path to Observance” in which some of the STOCS congregants, including Rabbi Evan Shore, provided glimpses into how a small spark of connection to God gets kindled. The Sephardi weekend featured Sephardic melodies during morning services, followed by a kiddush with cholents from various countries across the Middle East, North Africa and South America; and a talk by Professor Dina Danon about the less well-known experience of Sephardic Jews during World War II. Shabbat and holiday dinners and luncheons are held throughout the year. Learning is central at STOCS. Rabbi Evan

Regional Synagogues Congregation Degel Israel 557 Thompson Blvd. Watertown, NY 13601 Phone: 315-782-2860 Website: http://watertownsynagogue.org President/Media Contact: Mary Elizabeth Oar – 315-486-7137 Past President: Neil Katzman – 315-788-0930 (evenings) E-mail: neil@softwaterbygeorge.com Established in the early 1890s and originally called Standard of Israel, Congregation Degel Israel is an egalitarian synagogue serving the Jewish community of the North Country. In 1985, the synagogue changed from traditional Conservative to egalitarian. Congregation Degel Israel celebrates Friday night Shabbat the first and third Fridays at 7:30 pm, occasional Saturday morning Shabbat services and all holidays, including High Holiday services. Guests are always welcome. Sunday school meets occasionally. Call the synagogue for more information.

Temple Beth-El – Geneva 755 South Main St. Geneva, NY 14456 Phone: 315-789-2945 Website: www.BethElGeneva.org E-mail: BethElGeneva@gmail.com Rabbi: Ann Landowne E-mail: rabbiann.tbegeneva@gmail.com President: Donna Cator E-mail: dcator@frontier.com Temple Beth-El of Geneva is an open and inclusive congregation that strives to be a center for Jewish life in Geneva and surrounding communities in the Finger Lakes. The synagogue is located on the shores of Seneca Lake. The spiritual leader of Temple Beth-El is Rabbi Ann Landowne. The congregation is affiliated with the Union for Reform Judaism. Visit the website (www.BethElGeneva.org) and sign up for the synagogues’s weekly e-mail. Call Landowne at 914-645-1276 for further information. Services are held most Friday evenings at 7:30 pm, with an early family service once a month. Torah study is often held on Shabbat mornings at 10:30 am. Prior to attending, call or check the website to confirm the schedule.

s know that To our readers... let our advertiser to u yo d in m re ER! I want to E JEWISH OBSERV TH in re he ad r you saw thei u go to get remember when yo to t an rt po im e or so It is ething at their stor m so y bu or ne do IN THE your hair y I SAW YOUR AD sa u yo at th es ic use their serv know! ER! They want to JEWISH OBSERV Thank you, Bonnie Rozen, ive Advertising Execut

At right, Purim at STOCS: Anick and Jay Sinclair tried to pass on a bit of Ashkenazic culinary heritage to their sons by teaching them that preparing gefilte fish originally involved stuffing a whole fish. The boys “had nothing to do with this fishy project” and “broke into a song, “Gefilte-thefish-alone,” sung in their native London accents to the tune of “Consider Yourself at Home” from the musical “Oliver.” Shore conducts weekly classes on the parasha, “Jewish Thought” and halachah (Jewish law), and shares words of Torah at every minyan. STOCS members are actively involved in community organizations and pro-Israel activism. They play a leading role in establishing and ensuring

Chabad

foods, such as Shabbat challah and Purim hamantashen, and explore their Jewish heritage through discussion and mitzvot. In the past few years, three new Chabad Houses, branches of Chabad House at SU, have opened in the Central New York area, in addition to Chabad of Oswego, which opened nine years ago, under the directorship of Rabbi Yossi and Chana Madvig. The new Chabad houses are Chabad of Clinton, 8 Dwight Ave., Clinton, NY 13323-1614 (315-3813491), under the directorship of Rabbi Diddy and Devorah Waks, serving the Jewish students and faculty at Hamilton College; Chabad of Madison County, Campus Chabad House, 58 Broad St.,

TC

“pre-oneg”). Many services feature the Knesset Shalom Singers (adult choir), Shirat Shalom Singers (youth choir) or the Shabbos Klezmorim Band (the TC band). There is a Shabbat morning service every Saturday at 11 am, except when there is a b’nai mitzvah. Many services in July and August are held outdoors in community parks, and are followed by barbecue or picnic dinners (check the service schedule at www.templeconcord. org). Services are held for all holy days and festivals. Every Member Counts The synagogue works to build its congregational family through a variety of holiday and social events. Chanukah and Pesach are marked with synagogue-wide events. The congregation’s website and weekly e-bulletin keep members up-todate on synagogue events. Social Action Temple Concord continues to have a strong commitment to social action. Members maintain the synagogue’s annual commitment to serve a meal at the

At right,l-r: Temple Concord Mensch of the Year awardees Alex and Chuckie Holstein, New Yo r k State Assemblyman William Magnarelli and Winnie Greenberg. (Photo by Jerry Klineberg)

the ongoing viability of the eruv. For programming and membership information, visit the website, which also provides a number of informative articles and videos; e-mail the rabbi; or call the shul office. Guests are always warmly welcomed. Continued from page 10A

Hamilton, NY 13346 (315-825-9012), under the directorship of Rabbi Shmuly and Chaya Haskelevich, serving the Jewish students and faculty at Colgate University; and Chabad of Cortland, 28 Pleasant St., Cortland, NY 13045 (607-218-5118), under the directorship of Rabbi Mendel and Nechama Deena Hecht, serving the Jewish community of Cortland, and the Jewish students and faculty at SUNY Cortland. The Sorkin Chabad House also works in conjunction with the Mayanot Institute in recruiting and sending Jewish students on Birthright Israel. Chabad now also offers a new program, IsraeLinks, for those not eligible for Birthright.

Continued from page 13A

Samaritan Center and have established a partnership with the J.T. Roberts School in Syracuse. The synagogue houses “The Jewish Community’s Response to Hunger,” a food pantry that serves more than 100 families weekly and provides connections to local job counseling and social service agencies, fulfilling the highest level of tzedakah, helping people move toward independence. The congregation’s Social Action Committee collaborates with Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas and Temple Adath Yeshurun on various issues, including dealing with hunger in Central New York. Temple Concord is an active member of the interfaith advocacy group ACTS, Alliance of Communities Transforming Syracuse. Temple Concord is located on the Connective Corridor in the Syracuse University neighborhood. Once the city’s primary Jewish community address, the location remains at the crossroads of Routes 81 and 690, offering easy access from all directions.


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

Kashrut Guide KOSHER MEAT Frozen poultry products can be found at various locations in local markets, including: BJ’s Tops Price Chopper Wegmans Trader Joe’s Fresh beef and chicken can be purchased from: Price Chopper (corner of Midler Avenue and Erie Blvd. East location only) Carries a full line of fresh chicken, beef, veal and lamb. Wegmans in DeWitt Carries a full line of fresh chicken, beef, veal and lamb. Lipman’s Kosher Market 1482 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618, 585-2717886 Regular deliveries to Temple Adath Yeshurun and the JCC. Call Lipman’s for more information. BAKED GOODS AND DESSERTS BJ’s in East Syracuse 4322 E Genesee St., Syracuse, 315-446-6047 Products marked with a hechsher only and bakery items marked with Kof K hechsher. (Bread baked in BJ’s’ ovens is not certified.) Also offers pre-packaged baked goods for the holidays. Carvel in DeWitt only Dunkin Donuts on Erie Blvd. (donuts only) Harrison’s Bakery 1306 W. Genesee St., Syracuse, 315-422-1468 Wegmans (The Va’ad does not certify the deli counter.) Price Chopper KOSHER WINE Upper Towne Center at Fayetteville, next to the YMCA, 315-637-8909 RESTAURANTS The Bistro at Menorah Park 4101 E Genesee St., Syracuse, NY 315-446-9111, ext. 255 Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life at Syracuse University 102 Walnut Pl., Syracuse, 315-422-5082 Holiday meals, in particular every day during Passover. Call for additional information regarding kosher dining at SU. Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse 5655 Thompson Rd., DeWitt, 315-445-2360, ext. 104 Senior meals served Mon.-Fri. at noon. JCC Café Mon.-Fri. for takeout. Shabbat takeout meals weekly on Fridays. Call JCC for further information, 315445-2360. CATERERS The Oaks at Menorah Park 18 Arbor Ln., DeWitt, 315-449-3309 Providing on- and off-premise catering for kosher events. Traditions 315-656-5298 Providing on- and off-premise catering for kosher events. The Bakergirl Dessert Company Inc. 315-415-6328 Providing on-premise full and/or dessert-only catering for kosher events.

Foundation

are a permanent resource whose earnings may be used to meet the long-term and future financial needs of chosen organizations. A program can be tailor-made to support a dimension of charitable giving that is particularly compelling and important to the donor. Alternatively, a donor might prefer to limit the benefits to a specific agency, organization or synagogue. Plans can readily be designed to implement any and all wishes. The memory of loved ones and the accomplishments of community leaders can be perpetuated through funds specially created in those individuals’ names. The Foundation hopes to serve as the repository of permanent endowment funds for the entire Central New York Jewish community. Another type of fund administered by the Foundation is Donor Advised Funds. Opened with a minimum of $2,500, these funds were created to make giving relevant and meaningful to people of all ages. Gifts can be made in cash, stock or by credit card. Not only does this simplify record keeping at tax time, but it also makes it possible to translate tzedakah into frequent flyer miles if the donor uses a credit card. Once a fund is established, donors can then recommend grants to qualified Jewish and general community charitable organizations, such as an alma mater, professional group or favorite health-related organization, locally and around the country. The Foundation handles all the administrative and investment

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

15A

Syracuse area Jewish cemeteries

The following cemeteries as shown on the maps represent all the Jewish cemeteries in the community. Those with any questions regarding any of the cemeteries should call the Syracuse Jewish Cemeteries Association at 315-472-6341. Chevra Shas....................................................................... Jamesville Avenue ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Ahavath Achim.................................................................. Jamesville Avenue ...................................................................................... Foundation of Jewish Home of Central New York ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Anshe Sfard ...................................................................... (Beth El) Jamesville Avenue ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Workmens Circle............................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Adath Yeshurun................................................................. Jamesville Avenue and Thurber Street ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Frumah Packard ................................................................ Jamesville Avenue and Thurber Street ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Poiley Tzedeck ................................................................. Jamesville Avenue ....................................................................................... Temple Beth El ....................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Linas Hatzedeck................................................................ Jamesville Avenue ....................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Beth Israel.......................................................................... Colvin Street and Jamesville Avenue ...................................................................................... Temple Beth El ....................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Rosenbloom Cemetery...................................................... Colvin Street ...................................................................................... Temple Concord ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Beth El............................................................................... Upper and Lower ...................................................................................... Colvin Street and Hughes Place ...................................................................................... Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association Young Israel....................................................................... Oakwood Cemetery ...................................................................................... Jamesville Avenue Beth Sholom...................................................................... Oakwood Cemetery ...................................................................................... Comstock Avenue Temple Concord................................................................ Woodlawn Cemetery ...................................................................................... Grant Boulevard Thanks to Post 131, Jewish War Veterans of the U.S., for supplying the information. At left and below: Maps showing the locations of the cemeteries for which the Syracuse Jewish Cemetery Association is responsible. (Maps provided by Steven Sisskind)

Epstein

Continued from page 6A

the Jewish Federation of Central New York, parents of students, donors and the community’s synagogues. Classes meet on Tuesdays from 6:30-8:30 pm for grades eight-12. Enrollment is open to any student in grades eight-12, and information and registration is available online at EpsteinCNY.org. Continued from page 7A

responsibilities and furnishes the donor with periodic reports of the fund’s activities. One hundred percent of the amounts contributed to the fund’s principal may be distributed. Board members since founding include Linda Alexander, Nancy Belkowitz, William Berinstein, Jeffry Berman, Neil Bronstein, Asher Black z”l, Gerald Black, Melvyn Charney, I. Stephen Davis, Mark Field, Deborah Friedman, Edgar Galson, Lionel Gilels, Bernard Goldberg z”l, Neil Goldberg, Edward Green z”l, Victor Hershdorfer, Alexander Holstein, David Hootnick, David Horowitch, Sheldon Horowitch, Martin Irwin, Sheldon Kall, Sheldon Kruth, Gary Lavine, Benjamin Levine, Steven Miron, Leslie Neulander z”l, Cheryl Patt, William Pearlman, Marilyn Pinsky, Philip Pinsky z”l, Sarah Pinsky, Norman Poltenson, Howard Port, Paul Roth, Arnold Rubenstein, Elaine Rubenstein, Philip Rubenstein, Jeffrey Scheer, Cheryl Schotz, Debrah Shulman, Steven Sisskind, Lynn Smith, J. Jeffrey Solomon z”l, Paul Solomon, John Sonne, Gershon Vincow, Steven Wells, Ellen Weinstein and Warren Wolfson. David Holstein is the founding attorney. For more information, contact Executive Director Michael Balanoff, who will answer questions, facilitate strategic grant-making and administer any funds that might be established.

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6903 E. Genesee St., Lyndon Corners, Fayetteville, NY 13066


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Senior Living Menorah Park

Hodes Way 4101 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13214 Phone: 315-446-9111 Website: www.menorahparkofcny.com Chief Executive Officer: Mary Ellen Bloodgood Meeting tomorrow’s needs for the next generation, Menorah Park is a non-profit, non-sectarian, continuum-of-care campus that goes beyond traditional care offered to active seniors. Serving the community for 106 years, Menorah Park provides independent living, assisted living, long-term skilled nursing and rehabilitation, home health care and a medical model adult day program. Menorah Park is a kosher campus that honors Jewish holidays and traditions. Shabbat services are offered every Friday night and Saturday morning, and the community is welcome to attend. To make everyone feel at home, worship services are also offered for residents who practice other faiths. Come to Menorah Park and make the next years of your life,

A hall at The Inn at Menorah Park. The Inn is a licensed adult home and assisted living residence.

or someone you care for, the best that they can be. Jewish Health and Rehabilitation Center Admission and Rehab Coordinator, Courtney Stevenson, RN Phone: 315-446-9111, ext. 168 The Jewish Health and Rehabilitation Center at Menorah Park provides care for adults requiring skilled nursing and shortterm rehabilitation. With 132 beds, including private rooms, the residents enjoy an expert and compassionate staff, comprehensive rehabilitation services, spiritual care services and The Jim and Arlene Gerber Bistro at Menorah Park offers breakfast, lunch and activities. A specialty unit dinner. is available for Alzheimer and dementia patients on The Terrace, which is spe- of professionals from different disciplines working cifically designed for the safety and well-being of together to give each resident individual services. these residents. The holistic approach includes physical therapists, The Rehabilitation Unit, located within the Jewish occupational therapists, a speech/language therapist, Health and Rehabilitation Center, is for people who physicians, nurses, a social worker and a dietician. have recently been discharged from area hospitals The professional team works closely with the resiand need rehabilitative services to help regain their dent and family to create a treatment plan designed independence and restore lost or diminished life to bring each person to self-sufficiency and have a skills. Considered experts in their field, the therapists safe return to the community. have worked in geriatric physical and occupational Additional programs and facilities include: therapy for many years. The rehab team consists ‹‹The Center for Healthy Living – The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Center for Healthy Living at Menorah Park places a high value on the integration of mind, body and spirit to achieve health and wellness. Central to the Center for Healthy Living is a major renovation dedicated as the Abraham Shankman Wellness Pavilion which houses, The Jim and Arlene Gerber Bistro, Jeffrey Solomon and Solomon Family Technology and Training Center, The Anne and Hy Miller Theatre, Fox’s Den Sports Bar, The Dr. Irving and Dorothy Goldman Piano Lounge, and the Sephardic Home for the Aged Foundation Arts and Minds Community Room. ‹‹There are also private family dining rooms, a beauty salon and barbershop, gift shop, libraries, gardens and walking paths, a synagogue and a reflections room. Rothschild Adult Day Program Contact: Mark Griffen, R.N. Phone: 315-446-9111, ext.128 The Rothschild Adult Day Program at Menorah Park serves adults of all ages with physical and psychosocial healthcare needs. It is a medical model day program serving adults with health care needs, including medical management, therapies, education, support, activities and social work. Efforts extend beyond the senior community and across cultural, physical and mental barriers to create a positive atmosphere where everyone can achieve daily living skills. The Inn at Menorah Park Director: Tom Carlson Phone: 315-446-9111, ext. 180 Over time, everyone needs help. The Inn at Menorah Park, a licensed adult home and assisted living residence, enables residents to enjoy a home-like environment with the reassurance that help is always available to assist them. A caring staff provides the support and personal assistance that allow residents to maintain a high quality of life. Each resident has an individualized care plan that reflects their specific needs and preferences. Over time, the care plans reflect the changing needs of residents. Residents at The Inn can choose from a variety of spacious floor plans, including large one bedroom and master suites. Many of the apartments offer kitchenettes, storage and large bathrooms with walk-in safety showers. Each apartment is equipped with an emergency response system that allows residents to get help when they need it. Ahavath Achim Apartments Program Coordinators: Patricia McGregor and Beth Beach Phone: 315-449-3309 The Ahavath Achim Apartments offer moderately-priced apartments that provide security, amenities and services for independent adults. Coupled with social opportunities and companionship, these apartments provide a safe and pleasant environment for adults seeking affordable living.

To advertise, please contact Bonnie Rozen at 1-800-779-7896, ext 244 or bonnie@thereportergroup.org

See “Menorah” on page 17A


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

17A

Senior Living The Oaks at Menorah Park

18 Arbor Ln. DeWitt, NY 13214 Phone: 315-449-3309 Fax: 315-449-1566 E-mail: oaksdirector@ menorahparkofcny.com Website: www.menorahparkofcny. com Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 am-5 pm Director: Patricia McGregor and Beth Beach The Oaks at Menorah Park is an independent retirement community for active seniors who desire elegant apartments, gourmet meals, beautiful grounds and superior services. Residents may choose from among one-bedroom, one-bedroom with den, two-bedroom and two-bedroom deluxe apartments. Residents individualize their apartments with their own furniture and belongings to suit their tastes and styles. The basic monthly rental includes gas and electric, 24-hour emergency response, continental breakfast and à la carte dining options. Basic cable TV, free Wi-Fi and housekeeping are all included in the rent. Among the community areas are a social center, courtyard café, restaurant-style dining room, private dining room, library, exercise room and barber/ beauty shop. Friday services are held at 5 pm, with Shabbat services on the second and fourth Saturday of the month at 11 am. Worship services are also offered at Menorah Park

for The Oaks’ residents who practice different faiths. In addition, The Oaks is the only kosher fine dining facility in Central New York and it also caters. The public is welcome to dine in or take out a wide selection of fine glatt kosher offerings. Gracious dining is provided every day at The Oaks. The mornings begin with a continental breakfast. At lunchtime during the week, homemade soups, salads and sandwiches may be purchased at the Courtyard Café. Elegant dinners are prepared by The Oaks’ chef Monday through Saturday and are served in a beautifully-appointed dining room. There is a brunch on Sunday. The wellgroomed grounds, walking path, patio and gazebo may be enjoyed at one’s leisure. Transportation to doctors’ appointments, grocery stores, banks and dry cleaners is provided for a small fee. There is ample parking for residents and valet parking is available in inclement weather. The Oaks offers an array of specialized wellness programs, including personalized exercise and fitness classes. The country-like setting is just minutes from the heart of Syracuse. At The Oaks, residents are close to major medical centers, as well as all the recreational, cultural, shopping and entertainment venues that Central New York has to offer. For active adults who cherish privacy and independence, The Oaks is the only place to be.

The Oaks offers kosher fine dining to the public and is the only kosher fine dining facility in Central New York. Community members often join residents to enjoy a meal in the dining room at The Oaks.

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Elliot Rubinstein, M.D

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Julie McNairn, M.D.

Pediatric & Adult Allergists

• Hay Fever • Asthma • Sinus • Food • Coughing • Sneezing • Wheezing • Ears Popping • Red, Watery Eyes • Drippy, Stuffy Nose • Itching/Insects

For more information and appointment 1-800-88-ASTHMA or allergistdocs.com

The Oaks at Menorah Park is an independent retirement community for active seniors.

Menorah Menorah Park Home Care Director of Menorah Park Home Care: Beverly Klein Phone: 315-446-9111, ext. 249 Providing adults with high-quality healthcare is Menorah Park’s goal to help seniors meet the challenge of “aging in place” with the dignity and respect they deserve. Services are available for those living in the community, as well as those in private residences or group living arrangements. In collaboration with families and physicians, registered nurses develop individualized care plans that

Continued from page 16A

include personal care, nutrition and medication management. The Foundation at Menorah Park Contact: Susie Drazen Phone: 315-446-9111, ext. 141 Many of the programs and services offered for the residents at Menorah Park are made possible thanks to the fund-raising support and guidance of the Foundation. When you give to Menorah Park, you help provide the very best care now and for future generations. Menorah Park accepts all levels of gifts, and provides many opportunities to fulfill your giving interests and philanthropic goals.

Doctors & Health Care Providers To advertise in our upcoming Health & Wellness issues, please contact Bonnie Rozen at 800-779-7896, ext. 244 or bonnie@thereportergroup.org Next Upcoming Issue: August 30 Ad Deadline: August 22

Shaan Waqar, M.D.


18A

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Seen around the community

The Teen Funders of the Jewish Community Foundation of Central New York met on October 8. Clockwise, from the front left: Sophie Scheer, Peri Lowenstein, Elise Beckman, Rachel Scheer, Edwin Hirsh, Colby Porter, Caleb Porter, Alethea Shirilan-Howlett, Sarah Kornfeld and Shaynah Sikora.

Ashley Lavine, of the Temple Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood, offered a step-by-step, guided painting class at the synagogue. The women painted and had desserts and wine while relaxing with friends. Posing with their finished paintings were (kneeling, l-r) Reggie Adler, Alison Bronstein, Abby Gross-Hager and Alicia Gross, as well as (standing) Carolyn Weinberg, Joan Siegel, Jennifer Jordan Hirsh, Paula King, Norene Lavine, Joan Lowenstein and Rena Cantor. L-r: The Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies 2017 graduates: Rabbi Andrew Pepperstone (Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas, Epstein School 2017 host synagogue’s rabbi), Leah Eve Jezer-Nelson, Rachel Beckman, Sarah Lillian Schaeffer, Avery Pearl-Frank, Adena Rochelson and Epstein School Director Cantor Paula Pepperstone.

The local group of Lions of Judah at a luncheon in their honor on October 16.

The crowd listened to music by Bonnie Abrams and Allen Hopkins at the annual fund-raiser for the Jewish Music and Cultural Festival, which will be held on Sunday, September 10.

TAY

children for kindergarten through handson activities and project-based learning. A school-age program for 5-12-year-olds is also offered for before- and after-school, and for school breaks. Camp Rothschild is geared toward 5-12-year-olds and a C.I.T. program is offered for children aged 13-15. Preschool children take part in the summer camp experience with the addition of water play or swimming added to their normal routine, as well as extra time in the nature-based outdoor classroom and garden. Congregational Activities TAY offers a range of social, cultural and educational programming. Adult Jewish learning programs, such as Pause Button, a monthly Shabbat morning study; interactive discussions under the direction of Rabbi Paul Drazen; movies of Jewish interest; and lectures are open to the community and held throughout the year. Other programming includes scholar-in-residence programs, Tikkun

Continued from page 13A

Leil Shavuot, an annual Chanukah dinner and Hava Nagrilla, an annual barbecue prepared by the men of the congregation. Social Organizations The TAY Sisterhood sponsors educational and social events, and its rummage sales are considered the best garage sales in town and provide resources for TAY. The TAY Hazak group for adults 55 and above has more than 125 active participants who gather monthly for movies, lectures, concerts, and local and regional excursions. The TAY Men’s Club provides community service opportunities through its blood drives and partnership with Habitat for Humanity, as well as social activities for the men of TAY. Temple Adath Yeshurun, an engaging, egalitarian Conservative congregation, provides the education, welcoming atmosphere and community that inspires its members to fulfill the words of Isaiah: “For My House shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples.”

L-r: Joanne Greenhouse, Lynn Cohen, Cecile Cohen and Sue Gordon gathered together following TAY Hazak’s viewing of “People and Places of the Syracuse Jewish Community,” presented by The Judaic Heritage Center of Central New York and produced by Jay Lurie.

On September 17, the Young Leadership Committee (with spouses and friends) joined together to sweat and ring in the new year at Orange Theory Fitness.

The “Chosen Meeting,” CBS-CS’ gaming chug (club), held its first meeting on October 18. Members enjoyed playing Dixit, Dominion, Mahjong and Catan.

Maria Cimino, principal at McCarthy@Beard School in the Syracuse City Schools, in front of one of three tables containing items from the NCJW Mitzvah Project. The tables of winter clothing were purchased for the county foster care program with funds from the Pomeranz Shankman Martin Trust and NCJW.


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE

Seen around the community

Temple Concord’s Eastern Europe travel group stopped for a group photo at Trinity Square in Budapest.

On October 9, PJ Library in Central New York and the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center vacation camp children partnered with Mike Stermer at Home Depot for a mini-sukkah building event. More than 30 local families participated in the event, and the children had the opportunity to use real tools and then decorate their sukkahs to their liking.

19A

Children in the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center’s Jerome and Phyllis Charney Early Childhood Development Program posed for a photo after checking out a DeWitt Fire Department fire truck.

After volunteering at the JCC for the past 15 years, Donna Lipton, pictured at the front of the class facing the camera, taught her last Senior Strength and Balance class at the JCC on October 23.

At left:Teacher Scott Miller’s sophomoreJewish history class recreated the Jews’ dispersion into the Diaspora at the Rabbi Jacob H. Epstein School of Jewish Studies.

Hundreds of children helped kick off Camp Joe and Lynne Romano on June 26 at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center. Pictured are JCC camp counselors and campers preparing for the school-age camp’s opening circle on June 26. The JCC’s summer day camp – open to preschoolers, school-age children and teens – runs through August 18. Some spots are still available. Registration will continue throughout the summer until the start of each camp session. For more information about the JCC’s Camp Joe and Lynne Romano, and to request a camp program guide, call 315-445-2360 or visit www.jccsyr.org.

Syracuse Hebrew Day School students gave a musical and drama performance that highlighted every grade.

Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas members shared a communal potluck in the synagogue’s sukkah.

L-r: Members of Thou Shalt Ride of Central New York Peter Caplan, Joel Stein, Dave Feldman, Dave Channin, Ruth Stein, Rivka Channin, Ken Bell and Beth Caplan.


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JEWISH OBSERVER COMMUNITY GUIDE ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

PUBLISHING SCHEDULE • 2018-2019 Issue No.

Publication Date

Special Sections

Closing Date

Y1813.............. June 21........................ Home & Real Estate....................................................................................... June 13 Y1814.............. July 19......................... Bar/Bat Mitzvah Party Planning Guide • Auto •........................................... July 11 Personal & Business Services • Dine Out Y1815.............. August 2..................... Women in Business** • Back to School • Auto............................................ July 25 Y1816.............. August 16................... Seniors • Back to School • Prep. Rosh Hashanah......................................... August 8 Y1817.............. August 30................... Rosh Hashanah • Greetings • Health Care • Primaries............................... August 22 Y1818.............. September 13 .......... Financial Planning • Auto.............................................................................. September 5* Y1819.............. September 27.............. Fall Home & Real Estate • Dine Out............................................................ September 18* Y1820.............. October 11.................. Elections • Small Business Profiles** • Auto • Life Planning...................... October 3 Y1821.............. October 25.................. Elections • Wedding Planning • Dine Out.................................................... October 17 Y1822.............. November 8................ Home & Real Estate • Auto • Chanukah Gifts............................................. October 31 Y1823.............. November 22.............. Chanukah • Greetings • Health Care ........................................................... November 14 Y1824.............. December 6................ Pets • Auto...................................................................................................... November 28 Y1901 ............. January 3..................... Financial • Dine Out...................................................................................... December 26 Y1902.............. January 17................... Health & Wellness • Summer Camps ........................................................... January 9 Y1903.............. January 31................... Simcha & Party Planning Guide .................................................................... January 23 Y1904.............. February 14................. Small Business Profiles** • Tax & Financial Planning.................................. February 6 Y1905.............. February 28................. Seniors • Dine Out ........................................................................................ February 20 Y1906.............. March 14.................... Summer Camps • Spring Home & Garden.................................................... March 6 Y1907.............. March 28.................... Prep. for Passover............................................................................................ March 20 Y1908.............. April 11....................... Passover • Health Care • Pets • Holiday Greetings...................................... April 3 Y1909.............. April 25....................... Wedding & Prom Guide • Gifts for Mother’s Day • Dine Out ................... April 17 Y1910.............. May 9.......................... Women in Business**..................................................................................... May 1 Y1911.............. May 23........................ Gifts for Dads & Grads................................................................................... May 15 Summer Fun Insert** May 8* Y1912.............. June 6.......................... Annual Community Guide •Healthcare• Pets.............................................. May 29 Y1913.............. June 20........................ Home & Real Estate ...................................................................................... June 12 Y1914.............. July 18......................... Bar/Bat Mitzvah Party Planning Guide........................................................... July 10 Personal & Business Services • Dine Out Y1915.............. August 1..................... Women in Business** • Back to School......................................................... July 24 Y1916.............. August 15................... Seniors • Back to School................................................................................ August 7 Y1917 ............. August 29................... Fall Home & Real Estate • Dine Out • Primaries......................................... August 21 Y1918.............. September 12 .......... Prep. Rosh Hashanah • Financial Planning................................................... September 4 Y1919.............. September 26.............. Rosh Hashanah • Greetings • Health Care................................................... September 18 Y1920.............. October 10.................. Elections • Small Business Profiles** • Life Planning................................... October 2 Y1921.............. October 24.................. Elections • Wedding Planning • Dine Out.................................................... October 11* Y1922.............. November 7................ Home & Real Estate ...................................................................................... October 30 Y1923.............. November 21.............. Chanukah Gifts • Pets.................................................................................... November 13 Y1924.............. December 5................ Chanukah • Greetings • Health Care............................................................ November 27 Y2001.............. January 2..................... Financial • Dine Out...................................................................................... December 24*

* Early Deadline **Includes free write-up (due two days before ad copy)

NOTE: Editorial deadline is earlier than ad deadline.

500 Clubhouse Road, Vestal, NY 13850 • Advertising Representative - Bonnie Rozen • Phone: (800) 779-7896 ext. 244 Fax: (607) 724-2311 • E-mail: bonnie@thereportergroup.org • www.thereportergroup.org


JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER

AROUND CENTRAL NEW YORK

The Oaks to present free summer concerts

ment’s Stan Colella All-Star Band will perform. There will be a barbecue at 4:30 pm (reservations required). On Sunday, August 12, at 7 pm, the 11-member a capella group noXcuse will perform a selection of musical styles. Dessert and beverages will be served after the concert. The Oaks at Menorah Park is located at 18 Arbor Way, off East Genesee Street, in DeWitt. For more information, contact The Oaks at 315-449-3309.

pm starting June 18. There will be a variety of live entertainment each week as a part of the meal program. This summertime tradition will run through August 28.

Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center senior dining menu JUNE 11-15 Monday – sweet and sour meatballs Tuesday – tomato basil soup and grilled cheese sandwiches Wednesday – hamburger with sautéed onion Thursday – baked ziti Friday – Father’s Day celebration – brisket JUNE 18-22 Monday – dinner at 5 pm – Moroccan brisket Tuesday – mac ‘n cheese Wednesday – imitation crab cakes Thursday – meatloaf Friday – birthday celebration – stuffed flounder The Bobbi Epstein Lewis JCC Senior Adult Dining Program at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center offers Va’ad

Ha’ir-supervised kosher lunches served Tuesday through Friday at noon. Dinners are served on Mondays at 5 pm throughout the summer through August 28, thanks in part, to the Dr. Morton and Mrs. Libby Maloff Summer Senior Dinner Program. Reservations for dinner are required by the Wednesday before each dinner. Lunch reservations are required by noon on the previous business day. There is a suggested contribution per meal. The menu is subject to change. The program is funded by a grant from the Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth and the New York State Office for the Aging, with additional funds provided by the JCC. To attend, one need not be Jewish or a member of the JCC. For further information or to make a reservation, contact Cindy Stein at 315-445-2360, ext. 104, or cstein@jccsyr.org.

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Wednesday, June 6......................................................................June 21 Tuesday, July 3, early................................................................. July 19 Wednesday, July 18.................................................................. August 2 Wednesday, August 1............................................................. August 16

Must have strong Hebrew skills and knowledge of prayer. Also hiring an office assistant. Hours are 4-6pm on Wednesdays. The Syracuse Community School is being held at Temple Concord. Please contact Alison Bronstein schs.syracuse@gmail.com

Ê

Share your Jewish education and values from generation. to generation. Wednesdays from 4-6pm starting September. Contact Alison Bronstein, schs.syracuse@gmail.com

Visit the JO online at jewishfederationcny.org and click on Jewish Observer

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The Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center’s Dr. Morton and Mrs. Libby Maloff Summer Senior Dinner Program serves a kosher dinner every Monday at 5

Featuring the largest kosher selection of fresh meat, poultry, dairy, frozen & grocery in the Central New York area.

–––––––– ––––––––

JCC senior summer dining schedule

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The Oaks at Menorah Park will once again host three free summer entertainment events in its courtyard. The concerts will start at 7 pm and are free and open to the public. On Sunday, June 24, at 7 pm, the Sola-Martina Trio with vocalist Julie Howard will perform jazz and standards. Dessert and beverages will be served after the concert. On Sunday, July 15, at 7 pm, the city of Syracuse Parks and Recreation Depart-

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Jew 5 x


4

JEWISH OBSERVER ■ JUNE 7, 2018/24 SIVAN 5778

Mother’s Day celebrated at the JCC

BY ANKUR DANG One of the commandments governing religious life in Judaism is the instruction to love and honor one’s parents. While it is something to be done every day, the second Sunday of May is specifically dedicated to celebrating mothers. On May 11, the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center’s Bobbi Epstein Lewis Senior Adult Dining Program celebrated Mother’s Day. In addition to the usual Friday Shabbat prayers and meal, all mothers in attendance received Mother’s Day cards made by preschoolers in the JCC’s Jerome and Phyllis Charney Early Childhood Development Program. The luncheon also featured music and dancing. Sentimental Serenade, a local group of women, performed several Broadway songs, including “Matchmaker” from

“Fiddler on the Roof” and “Consider Yourself” from “Oliver.” They also performed folk songs such as “Grandma’s Feather Bed.” Mary Doto, Sentimental Serenade’s pianist, said that the group loves performing for seniors because “We are all mothers and grandmothers, and Mother’s Day Barbara Bova was all is super special for us – espe- smiles after receiving a cially when we get to sing for homemade Mother’s Day older people.” She added that card. except for one member, the rest are amateur musicians. She was a math teacher. The

SHDS students place flags Flags placed on on Jewish vets’ graves Norwich vets’ graves

Syracuse Hebrew Day School students placed flags on the graves of Jewish War Veterans – an annual tradition for the last 13 years. More than 750 flags are donated annually by Steven Sisskind, of Sisskind Funeral Service, and veteran Stephen Nathan.

Robin Sisskind placed flags at the graves of Jewish war veterans in the Norwich Jewish cemetery, which has become an annual tradition.

group also has a nurse and a social worker. Sentimental Serenade has been performing for 15 years in the city of Syracuse, but this was the group’s first time at the JCC. The JCC’s Bobbi Epstein Lewis Senior Adult Dining Program, open to seniors age 60 and older, is the only Marjorie Carter (in front) senior nutrition program held up a homemade available outside of New Mother’s Day card. Behind York City serving kosher meals five days per week. her is Helen Marcum. For more information on it or the summer dinners, and to register for a lunch or dinner, call 315-445-2360; see also the articles on page 3.

OBITUARIES ROSALYN MELTZER HERSHOWITZ

Rosalyn Meltzer Hershowitz, 101, of Syracuse, died on May 21 at Menorah Park. Born in Syracuse, she was a bookkeeper for plumbing and electrical contractors, and a public accountant. She later earned her New York state public accounting license and worked until her retirement. She was active in Jewish Women International, the Red Cross Blood Services and the Syracuse Parkinson’s Support Group. She was predeceased by her husband, Jacob Hershowitz, in 1986. She is survived by her nephews, Alvin (Catherine) Meltzer and Gerald (Jan) Meltzer; and a great-niece, Donna (John) Breazzano. Burial was in Frumah Packard Cemetery. Birnbaum Funeral Service had arrangements. 

Calendar Highlights

School

Continued from page 2

The SHDS educational experience includes specialized art, music theory and Judaic music, physical education, technology and library classes. There is also an activity period each day when children can participate in clubs such as chess, chorus, drama, art, STEM and Israeli dance. In addition, the school has nine different pets, including hedgehogs, a chinchilla and a bearded dragon, to help teach students empathy and responsibility, and enrich the science curriculum. Kindergartner Benjamin Bloom said, “I love coming to the Syracuse Hebrew Day School because I have great teachers and I have fun with my friends and I am learning a lot about everything.” His brother Isaac, a second-grader, added, “We are a family here and we have great teachers. Every day is different and there are lots of interesting things to do and learn and we all work very hard.” Beginning in kindergarten, students study ELA, math, science, social studies, t’fillah, Jewish social studies and Hebrew daily. Beginning in third grade, Chumash

and dinim are added to the curriculum. Cantillation is included from fifth grade on. At SHDS there are many opportunities for students to socialize as a learning community during academic classes and cultural activities. Tenenbaum said, “This is very important for both the students’ individual and group development. The entire school participates in a morning meeting each day, weekly assemblies and monthly schoolwide Shabbat. In daily and special activities, students are encouraged to engage with pupils in other grades to build long-lasting friendships and a sense of family.” SHDS students from the following districts currently attend the school: Fabius-Pompey, North Syracuse, East Syracuse, Syracuse City, Jamesville-DeWitt and Fayetteville-Manlius. In the past, students from Utica, Sherbourne-Earlville and Tully have also attended. Interest from families as far as Hamilton and Ithaca has inspired the creation of a “Flexible Tuition and Distance Learning” option. Contact the school office at 315-446-1900 or shds@ twcny.rr.com for more information or to schedule a visit.

LARRY METZGER Owner

L-M PAINTING Residential/Commercial 6340 Danbury Drive Jamesville, NY 13078-9729 (315) 446-0966 Fax (315) 446-1555 Email:LMPainting@aol.com

Your ad SHould be here! To advertise, contact Bonnie at 1-800-779-7896, ext 244 or bonnie@thereportergroup.org

To see a full calendar of community events, visit the Federation's community calendar online at www.jewishfederationcny.org. Please notify jstander@jewishfederationcny.org of any calendar changes.

Wednesday, June 6 Deadline for June 21 Jewish Observer Tuesday, July 3 EARLY deadline for July 19 Jewish Observer Friday, June 8 SHDS fifth grade cantillation assembly at 11 am Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation Shabbaton Saturday, June 9 CBS-CS lunch and learn on racism following Shabbat morning services STOCS Shabbaton June 10 Sunday, STOCS Shabbaton Jewish genealogical group presents Nolan Altman at JCC at Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St. in Fayetteville at 1:30 pm Jewish Music and Cultural Festival (JMAC) fund-raiser at the Kimry Moor clubhouse from 4-6 pm CBS-CS Oys and Joys - Pops in the Park at 10:30 am CBS-CS Kadima and USY hike in Ithaca from 1-5 pm Monday, June 11 SHDS - K-6 spring concert at 7 pm Tuesday, June 12 TC Seasoned Citizens group presents a concert at 2 pm CNY Pride interfaith service at Temple Concord at 7 pm Wednesday, June 13 CBS-CS annual meeting at 7:30 pm Thursday, June 14 SJFS presents “Old People in Training,” a Wisdom Circle led by Rabbi Evan Shore and SJFS Director Judith Huober from 5 – 6 pm Friday, June 15 TC annual meeting at 5:30 pm Saturday, June 16 TC Cinemagogue presents “The Wedding Doll” at 7:30 pm Tuesday, June 19 Menorah Park annual meeting at 6 pm Wednesday, June 20 SHDS graduation at 7 pm Sunday, June 24 CBS-CS Hazak presents cantor Marvin Moskowitz at 10:30 am Syracuse Jewish Family Service presents the movie, “Quartet” at 4 pm

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Jewish Observer issue of 6/7/18

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Jewish Observer issue of 6/7/18

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