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JWI is the leading Jewish organization empowering women and girls – through economic literacy; community training; healthy relationship education; and the proliferation of women’s leadership. Our innovative programs, advocacy and philanthropic initiatives protect the fundamental rights of all girls and women to live in safe homes, thrive in healthy relationships, and realize the full potential of their personal strength.

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Dear Friends, It is a privilege to share this report with you – a chronicle of JWI’s programs and activities during the past two years. As you read the pages that follow, we know you will feel the energy and impact of our accomplishments. JWI’s programmatic initiatives anchor our commitment to safe homes, healthy relationships and strong women. We proudly lead the Jewish community in domestic violence prevention – teaching young women and girls about healthy relationships; helping all women develop economic literacy skills; giving women and children a voice on Capitol Hill. We also lead in healing abuse victims, with children’s libraries in domestic violence shelters and a brand new home for Israeli children undergoing intensive residential therapy. And through our award-winning Jewish Woman magazine, JWI motivates every Jewish woman to explore and enrich her individual lifestyle. JWI is unique among Jewish organizations in our determination to protect the wellbeing of women and girls – from physical safety to financial security; from personal leadership to collective empowerment. Our diverse programs teach, engage, inspire and save lives. Members, donors and partners, both here at home and in Jewish communities around the world, inspire JWI’s work every day. Because of them – because of you – our critical work goes on.

Susan W. Turnbull Chair, Board of Trustees

Lori Weinstein Executive Director 3


The National Alliance to End Domestic Abuse uses webinars to bring critical training to desktops around the world; since the start of 2008 we have hosted 21 training sessions. Participants now represent more than 3,200 organizations; 50 states; and six foreign countries. In April 2009, JWI convened the fourth international conference on domestic abuse in Washington, DC, with partners and participants from Israel, Argentina, Australia, Canada and the U.S. The intensive three-day gathering offered expert-led training and workshops, and furthered the global anti-domestic violence movement. The conference concluded with Advocacy Day – a perfectly-timed opportunity for conference participants to make their voices heard on Capitol Hill, in meetings with key legislators, as policies critical to women’s safety were up for funding.

“Working for a small agency that often feels the financial squeeze, my annual travel for trainings and conferences is limited. JWI’s trainings are a logistical help, and the topics are on-target and extremely pertinent for clinicians in many types of agencies and skill sets, and (thankfully) in any geographic area.” – Rachel Gearhart, MSW, Mental Health Clinician, Craig, Alaska JWI’s Interfaith Domestic Violence Coalition, which cosponsored Advocacy Day, has grown into a powerful lobbying force of religious leaders representing more than 20 faith communities. In early 2008 the Coalition held a briefing on Capitol Hill, featuring and attended by a number of senators, members of Congress and key staff. The following summer, they presented testimony at the Democratic National Committee Platform Hearing urging the party to fund anti-domestic violence measures and support victims.

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Training, Education & Advocacy

Our greatest obstacle is people’s unwillingness to believe that the nice guy next door, or the synagogue board member, or the clergy they know so well could actually be behaving so differently in private than they are in public. People tend to rally behind the abuser... Until that attitude changes, all we can do is help people who’ve already been victimized. – Naomi Tucker, executive director of Shalom Bayit, San Francisco, in JWI’s “Domestic Abuse in the Jewish Community” newsletter, June 2009

Domestic violence conference partners from Shalom Bayit, Argentina


As a leader and partner in the public policy arena, JWI is hard at work in Washington – most actively in a coalition advising legislators on the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. Our fall 2009 survey of Jewish DV organizations helps us represent their needs to policy makers. Members of our Advocacy Network have responded to our action alerts and contacted members of Congress about key issues such as women’s health care, abortion rights and domestic violence legislation.

Education is the key “Domestic violence frequently involves physical beatto breaking the cycle of ings, torture, false imprisonment, psychological violence... and to that abuses including threats to harm or kill the victim end, JWI continually builds and/or her children, and many other crimes; yet, because these abuses often occur within the on training opportunities that protected social institution of marriage or in empower clergy, social workers, dating relationships, these criminal acts of teachers, parents, lawyers, advoviolence are not viewed for what they are: cates, mental health professionals Human rights violations.” – everyone positioned to touch a – IDVC testimony presented at the Democratic National Committee Platform Hearing, August 2008 child, teen, adult or family at risk. We also gain strength by joining Each October, for Domestic Violence Awareness Month, forces: Multi-faith, multi-denominaJWI builds a public awareness campaign around a timely issue: In 2008, a call for policy change before the presidential tional and multi-media initiatives election; in 2009, a demand for media responsibility in the wake of Rihanna and Chris Brown’s much-publicized dating help us raise public awareness violence case. More than 1,000 people, inspired by our 2009 of domestic violence, and action alert, wrote to newspapers to demand more accurate reporting in domestic violence coverage. make ourselves heard as a clear and emphatic voice As an international leader, JWI sends staff to Spain, Argentina, Israel on Capitol Hill. and Australia to consult with communities on creating Jewish domestic violence programs. Our Clergy Task Force brings together rabbis from different denominations to provide trainings, networking and resources for their peers in national and community settings. And our newsletter, “Domestic Violence in the Jewish Community,” unites a diverse global network of DV workers.

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New campus of the Jerusalem Hills Children’s Home in Israel

Our 60-year relationship with the Jerusalem Hills Children’s Home reached a milestone in March 2009 with the opening of a beautiful new campus in Kyriat Yearim. The new campus has double the space for therapy, schooling, music and art, and picturesque views of the Judean Hills and the Mediterranean Sea. There is room for up to 100 children, as well as apartment-style residences for 17 staff and their families. JWI contributed $7.5 million for the project and will continue to provide operating support.

“The Children’s Home represents our investment in a partnership that anchored our commitment to Israel and the most fragile and vulnerable of its citizens — children whose lives had been damaged almost beyond repair — to be brought back to wholeness... You can’t help but think of it as a healing place – a physically and spiritually uplifting environment for the children.” – JWI Executive Director Loribeth Weinstein, at the July 2009 Children’s Home dedication

“My parents and grandparents delighted in making the world a better place because they were fortunate enough to have wealth as a tool. They taught us that we’re each responsible for our own tzedakah. If someone does it on your behalf, you never have the reward of discovering what it means to make that kind of commitment.

Longtime JWI members and donors across the country are especially proud of the new facility: Over the past 60 years their dedication to the Children’s Home has inspired more than $75 million in giving. Their ongoing fundraising efforts – particularly Day of Care events, which highlight the important work of the Home – provide for its annual support. Chapters are also instrumental in opening new children’s libraries, and raising money for the Mother’s Day Flower Project.

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philanthropy

– Lee Meyerhoff Hendler, president of the Harvey & Lyn P. Meyerhoff Charitable Fund, in “JWI News,” September 2009


The National Library Initiative – JWI’s pledge to create 100 new children’s libraries in battered women’s shelters – continually replicates our bright, peaceful sanctuaries, and re-stocks the ones we’ve already built. The support of corporate partners like FirstBook and Verizon amplifies the impact of NLI funds. As of fall 2009, 33 libraries are open nationwide. Young leaders in the NLI’s Library Ambassador program – bar mitzvah students, religious school classes and more – have collected thousands of books and dollars to fill the shelves of JWI libraries in their communities.

Protecting abused women and vulnerable children in the U.S. and Israel is JWI’s most steadfast commitment. As our philanthropic initiatives expand their reach, diversity and impact, supporters are increasingly inspired to become our partners – to personally get involved in creating safe homes and brighter, more independent futures for women and children at risk.

“Our tradition tells us that when you give charity during the first year after a loved one’s passing, you elevate her soul. My mother loved children... I also have fond memories of her taking me to the library and reading to me when I was a child. I thought the best way to honor her was by doing something positive for the Denver community.” – Rivka Yerushalmi, founder of the JWI children’s library at Gateway Battered Women’s Services, Aurora, Colorado

In 2009 the Mother’s Day Flower Project attracted its largest and most diverse coalition of volunteer fundraisers yet. In its first dozen years the project has given thousands of Mother’s Day bouquets to battered women’s shelters across the U.S.; this year JWI partnered with OPI to deliver personal care gift baskets as well. Project donors can have JWI send beautiful Mother’s Day cards – featuring Jewish woman artists, a new one every year – to their mothers, daughters, sisters and friends. Organizations that partner with the Flower Project receive $5 for every $25 donation they raise.

2008 & 2009 Mother’s Day Flower Project materials

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Our Strong Girls programming is now in use at camps, day schools and religious schools nationwide and has been adapted for public school settings. We’ve sold over 200 copies of our materials since the start of 2008. JWI trains and consults with educators across the country; now available in Spanish, our materials are making their way into schools in South America and Spain. JWI and United Synagogue Youth (USY) formed an unprecedented partnership in 2009 to help teens navigate interpersonal relationships. The special curriculum we authored for USY includes training delivered at their International Convention. With planned follow-up programming, this alliance could bring healthy relationship training to more than 14,000 USY members – and countless more as our collaboration grows.

One experimental program piloted nearly five years ago – healthy relationship training for young adults – has burgeoned into a suite of popular abuse prevention programs. Today JWI has “Thank you so much for this blog. I’m recently something for everyone: girls and out of a very abusive relationship. Although it’s a boys; 12-year-old tweens to college cycle that is hard to break, I find it getting easier seniors; students, campers and as time goes by… Your stories gave me hope that I youth group members alike. can make it alone and that eventually there will Our goal is to guide all teens be a sensitive, respectful and reliable man out there who spend time in any Jewish that I can be with.” –Shelly, 19 setting through an open disThe JWI blog, first created as a public awareness project for Domestic cussion of the relationships Violence Awareness Month, touches untold numbers of women – of in their lives. every age, every demographic, everywhere – who read both the personal

Our newest curriculum, Good Guys! Partnership & Positive Masculinity, is designed as a companion piece to our Strong Girls programming; it gives boys a similar chance to discuss relationships in a safe Jewish environment. The two programs can be used separately, but when implemented together they create an invaluable opportunity for coed healthy relationship education.

abuse stories that we share throughout October, and other essays, reports and action alerts posted year-round.

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Students in Sydney, Australia participate in JWI dating abuse programs, spring 2008


Each issue of Jewish Woman magazine reaches thousands of women in print and online, offering resources that enhance their Jewish identity, personal spirituality and lifestyles. Award-winning JW’s recent honors include the 2008 Gold Excel Award for General Excellence from the Society of National Association Publications, and multiple Rockower Awards from the American Jewish Press Association in 2008 and 2009. In the summer of 2010 JW will launch its new website, bringing our readers rich content and new means of community interaction between quarterly issues.

women’s leadership

Success is not luck. It’s believing you are lucky – that you can conquer, solve, persevere and do whatever it takes to make it happen. It’s the unique combination of our experience, our skills and, most of all, our personal ownership of the opportunities and the problems that are going to come our way in equal measure. – Laurie Ann Goldman,

JWI champions and celebrates women’s achievements – past, CEO of Spanx®; 2009 Women to Watch honoree present and potential. We invite Jewish women to look closely and Our signature Women to Watch awards, now celebrating the 12th class of 10 outstanding Jewish women in a range of profind inspiration in one another as fessional fields, generates greater buzz every year. Sponsored professionals, volunteers, mothers, by OPI in 2008 and Spanx® in 2009, the annual Women to Watch gala luncheon in Washington, DC, draws sold-out daughters; as unique individuals, crowds, while readers across North America anticipate each and also members of a community. fall issue of Jewish Woman, which profiles the honorees. As women from every walk of life JWI’s Brain Power for Girl Power Think Tanks have sparked honor today’s Jewish heroines, read a powerful response to teen girls’ struggles with sexuality, body our award-winning magazine, image and self-esteem. Previously held in Chicago, Detroit and Washington, DC, Think Tank roundtables are building on a new think critically and collaboramedia literacy initiative to help parents help daughters process distively about their daughters’ empowering images of women in magazines, on TV and online. well-being... they seize Each summer in Washington, DC, JWI offers a Summer Series for every opportunity to young women – interns from colleges across the country – to learn about connect with JWI. the issues central to our mission (dating abuse; financial literacy; the portrayal of women in the media) and make plans to bring related programming back to their schools and communities.

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Based on the success of our work, JWI received a two-year grant from the New York Jewish Women’s Foundation to develop a teen girls’ curriculum on financial literacy in New York. We are creating LIFE$AVINGS®: Financial Literacy for Teen Girls – workshops ideal for post-bat mitzvah classes and for girls in other Jewish settings. The pilot project begins in early 2010 and will include discussions about Jewish values and money and a special mother-daughter event.

economic security A woman’s personal security is largely dependent on her financial independence – which is why economic literacy must be a cornerstone of every woman’s education. Initially developed for young women entering the workforce, JWI’s popular financial education programs now bring tomorrow’s earners into the fold – teaching Jewish teen girls about the value of money, and its role in creating a self-sufficient future.

“Our parents were determined that we should never worry about money – the way they did as kids – so it was never discussed in our house. They had the best intentions, but a lot of important lessons went unlearned. I was at least 12 before I understood that my mother’s checkbook wasn’t just a fancy pad of paper. Financial literacy would have helped.” – Diana, 32, Washington, DC

Sigma Delta Tau sorority chapters across the country participated in the Mother’s Day Flower Project – feeding a growing national partnership that now includes financial literacy training for SDT members and support for the National Library Initiative.

LIFE$AVINGS®: Financial Literacy for Young Women is appearing in more and more colleges nationwide, reaching young women who are beginning to handle money of their own. In the last two years, the program was also presented at a number of national leadership trainings, including Schusterman Insight Fellows, the Reform Action Center Machon Kaplan intern program, Sigma Delta Tau (SDT) Leadership College and the Kivun Leadership Program.

“At the end of every month, I used to close my eyes and hope I had enough money to pay my bills. Since your LIFE$AVINGS® program, I’m adding it up every week.” – Rebecca, 21, University. of Maryland

Recent features in Jewish Woman magazine

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Financial report

Financial Year 2008 Sources of Income

Current Assets 2008 June 2009 Cash and cash equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,870,677 $2,956,998 Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,083,105 1,531,132 Accounts receivable: Pledges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906,441 626,578 Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,329 44,608 Note receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800,000 Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24,067 24,067 Prepaid expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,589 133,708 Total current assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,983,208 6,117,091 Noncurrent assets Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $128,378 and $107,068, respectively . . . . . . . . . 1,123,623 Land held in trust for Jerusalem Hills Children’s Home . . . . . . . . . 3,750,000 Total noncurrent assets . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,873,623

Financial Year 2009 Sources of Income

1,117,366 3,750,000 4,867,366

Total assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,856,831

$10,984,457

Current liabilities Accounts payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $111,346 Accrued expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596,213 Pledges payable, current portion . . . . . . . . . . . 4,050,000 Deferred dues revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135,318 Current portion of annuities payable . . . . . . . . . . 6,935 Other liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total current liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,899,812

$56,282 403,638 3,775,000 88,840 6,935 114,700 4,445,395

Noncurrent liabilities Pledges payable, non-current portion, net of discount to present value . . . . . . . . . . . . 267,301 Annuities payable, net of current portion . . . . . . . . 47,988 Excess of projected benefit obligation over pension plan assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159,187 Deferred rent liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92,469 Total long-term liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . 566,945

183,339 35,806 573,946 83,087 876,178

Total liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,466,757

5,321,573

Net assets Unrestricted Undesignated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,246,379 Board designated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720,000 Total unrestricted net assets . . . . . . . . . . 4,966,379 Temporarily restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,650,774 Permanently restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772,921 Total net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,390,074

2,253,018 720,000 2,973,018 1,960,791 729,075 5,662,884

Total liabilities & net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,856,831 $10,984,457 (2009 unaudited)

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donors $25,000 and above Christadelphian Israeli Children’s Fund The Hadassah Foundation Joseph & Harvey Meyerhoff Family Charitable Funds OPI Products Inc. Spanx & The Sara Blakey Foundation Esther Weingarden Estate of Ruth Messias Estate of Carol Michaelis Estate of Dr. Arthur Leonard Singer – Ann Kudysh Singer Estate of Bernard G. Stein $10,000 to $24,999 Albin Family Foundation/Joyce Rappeport Atlantic Health Brenda & Phil Rever Aaron & Cecile Goldman Family Foundation Jewish Women’s Foundation of New York Lifetime Entertainment Services The Toby & Nataly Ritter Family Foundation Stacy Schusterman Deena & Lawrence Silver Celina Spiegel Verizon Foundation Weil, Gotshal & Manges Foundation Inc. Frances Zeitler Estate of Harry & Sue Rattner Estate of Duke A. & Terry S. Rosenberg Estate of Erika Saphier Chapter 0461, Maplewood - South Orange Chapter 0803, B. L. Levinthal/Lynnewood Chapter 0849, Skokie Valley Chapter 1039, Hudson Valley Chapter 1313, Monticello/Fallsburg Chapter 1723, Zahava Chapter 1853, JWI Of Greater St Louis $5000 to $9999 Daniel Abrutyn Associated Jewish Charities of Baltimore Vivian & Raymond Bass Bender Foundation, Inc./ Sondra & Howard Bender, Julie & David Silver, Barbara Bender, Nan & David Bender, Eileen & Rich Greenberg B*tween Productions, Inc. The Mervyn L. Brenner Foundation Charles & Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation David Katz Foundation of Honesdale, Pennsylvania Evergreen Partners Clara & Jerome Feldman Sharon E. Friedman Joyce & Irving Goldman Family Foundation Barbra Hirsh Jewish Women’s Foundation of Metropolitan Detroit Roger C. Lipitz TMG Custom Media Estee & Elliott Portnoy Diane & Charles Radin Random House, Inc.

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Dr. Amy Robbins RST Development, LLC Schaeffer Family Foundation Susan & Bruce Turnbull Elisse B. Walter Washington Hebrew Congregation Loribeth Weinstein & Charles Bethel Rivka M. Yerushalmi Estate of Betty Rashkov Chapter 1474, Clearwater Chapter 0473, Grand Rapids Chapter 1785, Hills Chapter 0870, Sheepshead Chapter 0939, Princeton Chapter 1736, JWI of Greater Cleveland Chapter 0785, Independence Chapter 0766, West Orange-Tzedek Chapter 0506, Long Beach Chapter 1612, Simcha Chapter 0941, Springfield Chapter 1525, Gila Chapter 1868, Traditions Chapter 1003, New Milford Chapter 1581, Avodah $1,000 to $4,999 Anonymous Vickie Abrutyn Stephanie Abrutyn Acme-McCrary, Inc. Adas Israel Hebrew Congregation Lois Alperstein Amcha for Tsedakah Muriel Bach Diamond Bethesda Systems Linda & Joel Beren Bernstein Family Foundation Blake Real Estate, Inc. Ruth Braslow Susan & Hyman Bruck Rita Chipkin Trust The Manny & Ruthy Cohen Foundation Nonie & Robert Cohen The Ryna & Melvin Cohen Family Foundation, Inc Audrey G. Cohen Sherwyn & Steven Sherwyn Ann & Bobby Copeland Jillian & Scott Copeland Burton & Beatrice Dermer Family Foundation Dona & Jack Diamond Sara & Max Efron Memorial Fund Diane Eichner Margaret & Mark Eichner Susan Eisenberg Naomi Ruth Eisman Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Ellen S. Fawer Andrew Fawer David Fawer Mark S. Fawer Adrienne & Robert Feldstein Lillian Felsenfeld Susan Kay & Barry Flax Jefferson L. Ford III Memorial Foundation, Inc. Forty Weeks Arlene & Stephen Friedlander Friedlander, Misler, Sloan, Keltzkin & Ochsman, PLLC Ilene & Ronald Fruitman Gail Ross Literary Agency Diana & Maxwell Garret

Annora Gilman Diane & Israel Goldberg Golden & Cohen LLC Dorian Goldman Goodman-Gable-Gould/Adjusters International Harriet & Manuel Gordon Toby Graff Barbara & Leonard Hantman Dora B. Herbert Shelley L. Herman Beth A. Hirsch Home Box Office, Inc. Meredith Jacobs Susan & Jonathan Jerison Jewish Community Board of Akron, Inc. Jewish Community Youth Foundation, Princeton, NJ Jewish Foundation For Group Homes Lois & Stanley Kaish Beth Klarman Susan Kornstein & Lee Krumbein Leah & Philip Krueger Senator Norman J. Levy & Joy Levy Charitable Foundation Lippman Kanfer Family Foundation Jessie Lipson Michelle Malis Jamie & David Matyas Nancy & Roy Mayers Susan Memberg Mental Health Association of Montgomery County Merrill Lynch Randi & Marty Meyrowitz Carol & Barry Minkoff Laurie Moskowitz Hilda Namm Carole & John Nannes Ann Y. Newman Ruth H. Ogulnick Original Pancake House Park Avenue Charitable Fund Joy & Ron Paul Pincus Paul Charitable Trust Poppy Shapiro Philanthropic Fund/ Dr. Charles & Dara Schapiro Schnee Norman Rabkin The Raskin Family Foundation Sylvia Rein Marilyn E. Reinherz Gayla D. Roden Gail Ross Gail & Gene Rubinson Schrayer & Associates, Inc. Lynn Schusterman Tony Scolnick Millie & James Sernovitz Anna L. Shereff Sigma Delta Tau - Upsilon Chapter Sigma Delta Tau - Social Sigma Delta Tau - Chi Chapter Sigma Delta Tau - Alpha Beta Chapter Sigma Delta Tau - Alpha Tau Chapter Silver Marketing, Inc Ileene Simon Sanford & Doris Slavin Foundation, Inc. Elaine & Jerome Snider Lynn Shapiro Snyder & Jeffrey M. Snyder Family Foundation Yoav Spiegel Rachel & Thomas Sullivan


Renee & Harry Swartz Shirley T. Tartak The A. Alfred Taubman Foundation Ellen D. Tillman Sandy J. Unger Donald B. Vogel Wachovia Nonprofit & Philanthropic Services Washington Area Women’s Foundation Emily & Maurice Weinger Carol Weitz Wells Fargo Community Support Campaign Lorraine Whalen Roberta Whalen Martin Whalen William, Morris & Betty Rashkov Charitable Trust Estate of Florence Baim Estate of Ella R. Baskes Estate of Rebecca Beckman Estate of Hildegarde Friedmann Estate of Ruth F. Gordon Estate of Bernice Halpern Estate of Roseline Lissak Estate of Marion B. Matzkin Estate of Herman Robbins aka Hyman Rabinowitz Estate of Bess Shanker Estate of Miriam Wain Estate of Thelma R. Worth Estate of Ruth Yaffee Chapter 0760, Al Jolson Chapter 0321, JWI of Greater Hartford Chapter 1559, JWI Of Omaha Chapter 1036, Simcha Chapter 1285, Chayalot Chapter 1468, Tradition Chapter 0909, Whitestone Chapter 0368, Batim-Union Chapter 1877, JWI of Greater Phoenix Chapter 0839, Lillie Straus/Hope Chapter 0577, Revere-Chelsea Council 213, Bronx Chapter 0489, Oxford/Abram Orlow Chapter 0340, Albert Einstein-Brooklyn Chapter 0633, Rappeport Chapter 0828, Aviva Chapter 1834, JWI of Hemlock Farms Chapter 0524, Clara DeHirsch Chapter 1317, Sunkist Chapter 1730, JWI Of Pittsburgh Chapter 1737, Tikvah Chapter 1371, South Bay Chapter 1866, Hannah Senesh/L’Chaim Chapter 0781, Charlotte Chapter 1411, Skyview Chapter 0412, Riverdale/Hudson Chapter 1114, Albert Einstein Chapter 0713, San Diego Bay City Chapter 0876, Medina Chapter 1519, Chai Chapter 0323, Empire State Chapter 1078, Galilee Chapter 0401, Green Bay Chapter 0036, Cheyenne Chapter 1299, Gerri Kalb/Shalom Chapter 1130, Tamar Marin Chapter 0472, Bensonhurst Chapter 1012, Centennial Chapter 1750, JWI Of Greater Kansas City Chapter 0221, Constitution Chapter 1137, Akedah Chapter 1309, Scott Towers

Chapter 1004, Pascack Valley Chapter 1763, T’kiah Chapter 1766, Judith Resnick Chapter 0798, C Weizmann-F Meadows Chapter 1651, Mission Viejo Chapter 1402, Eternity Chapter 1708, Minneapolis/Golda Meir Chapter 0872, Norfolk County Chapter 0873, Sunnyside Chapter 1733, Century $500 to $999 Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School American Israel Public Affairs Committee Shari Ashman Edith Bamdas Julia S. Beck & Co., Inc. Michelle Benaim Lisa Benjamin Barbara S. Berlin BBYO C. Richard Beyda Judith Blank Dale P. Citron Arnold L. Cohen The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region Congregation Beth Emeth Jeanette & Oscar Cook Melissa Cordish Sandra Darrow Dell Direct Giving Campaign Idalee & Jack Diener Peggy Drexler Ginny Edlavitch Glenda & Al Eisenfeld Jeanne & Jeff Ellinport Melvyn & Suellen Estrin Dolores & Leonard Farber Phyllis & Samuel Feder Sharon Feldstein Fife Family Foundation Inc. Claudia Fleysher Terri Michele Frances Lisa & Scott Friedlander Stephanie Friedman Gay Gershberg Estelle Friedman Gervis Foundation Chip Gibson Marilyn & Michael Glosserman Judith & Richard Goldbaum Roslyn Goldstein Margery Gottfried Harriet & Martin Gottlieb Roe Green Susan Greenstein Manya Gussack Kristy Hamann Just Give.org Sheilah Kalderon Ida & Elliot Kaplan Jessica Kaplan Esta Kornstein Cindy & Charles Krumbein Randee & Edward Lefkow Aviva & David Levine Monica Levinson Ronald & Rosalind Levy Judith & Lester Lieberman Joyce & Lawrence Light

Linda Lipsen & Stephen Stoltz Natalie & Jerome Margolis Marvel Platoff Foundation Maryland Charity Campaign Mayorga Coffee, LLC The McGraw-Hill Companies Alyson Meister Shirlyn & Norman Miller Anna S. Miller Nashuva NBC Universal National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship Amy & David Nisenson Gertrude Nusbaum Olympic Family Unit Ronald Panitch Shirley Picker Prudential Foundation Matching Gifts Max Ramberg Estelle & Harold Robinson Beverly & Morris Rouleau Lynn & Meyer Sapoff Sandra & Alexander Schachter Rochelle Schwartz Jaymi & Joe Schuble Rabbi Amy Schwartzman & Kevin Moss Geri & Gerald Shapiro Terry & David Sherman Sigma Delta Tau - Mu Chapter Sigma Delta Tau - Alpha Mu Chapter Sigma Delta Tau - Beta Xi Chapter Rachel Simmons Beth & Leonard Sloan Sharon Slotkin Solot Family Foundation Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, LLP Natalie Spiewak Stop Aging Now Dan Studnicky Sandra C. Sussman Sonya & Joel Taubin Rita & Arthur Weinfeld Staci Weltmann Elinor Yolles Gail & Paul Zwiebel Estate of Cecile Ehrlich Estate of Evelyn Korn Chapter 1171, Co-Wood Chapter 1659, Yachad Chapter 0573, Morgenthau Detroit Chapter 0784, Johannes Post Chapter 0390, Marshall-Israel-BrandeisB & P - Pisgah Chapter 1272 Shalom Chapter Chapter 1654, Nashe Shalom Chapter 1476, Laguna Hills Chapter 1244, Free State Chapter 0977, Saw Mill Valley Chapter 1223, Sabra Chapter 1222, Bay Terrace Chapter 0290, Delaware Chapter 1498, B’not Gurion Chapter 0827, Edna Falk/Mosholu Chapter 1760, Chevra

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Board of Trustees

national leadership council

Susan W. Turnbull, Chair . . . . . Bethesda, MD

Deena Silver . . . . . . . . . Oldsmar, FL – Chair

Annora Gilman . . . . . . . . . . Atlantic Beach, NY Toby Graff . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York, NY Shelley Herman . . . . . . . . . . Long Beach, NY Meredith Jacobs . . . . . . . . . . . Rockville, MD Laurie Moskowitz . . . . . . . . . . Washington, DC Amy Nisenson . . . . . . . . . . . Richmond, VA Diane Radin . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin, TX Joyce Rappeport . . . . . . . . . . Princeton, NJ Amy Robbins . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicago, IL Millie Sernovitz . . . . . . . . . . . Naples, FL Deena Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . Oldsmar, FL Sandy Unger . . . . . . . . . . . . Eagan, MN

Shelley Herman . . . . . . . L  ong Beach, NY Past Chair and Interfaith Domestic Violence Coalition Meredith Jacobs . . . . . . . Rockville, MD Jewish Woman Magazine Penny Krowitz . . . . . . . . Toronto, ON JWI Canada Jill Lieberman . . . . . . . . Montreal, QC JWI Canada Amy Nisenson . . . . . . . . Richmond, VA Youth and Healthy Relationships Diane Radin . . . . . . . . . Austin, TX Domestic Violence and DV Conference Rabbi David Rose . . . . . . Potomac, MD Clergy Task Force Gail Ross . . . . . . . . . . . Washington, DC National Library Initiative Rochelle Schwartz . . . . . . Philadelphia, PA Chapter Services Millie Sernovitz . . . . . . . . Bonita Springs, FL National Training Institute and National Alliance Ellen D. Tillman . . . . . . . Bethesda, MD Financial Literacy Susan W. Turnbull . . . . . . Bethesda, MD Chair, Board of Trustees Sandy Unger . . . . . . . . . Eagan, MN Children’s Home

Staff Loribeth Weinstein . . . . . Executive Director Debbie Ash-Lee . . . . . . . Finance & Production Specialist Stephanie Beren . . . . . . . Development Coordinator Danielle Cantor . . . . . . . Design & Communications Manager Gwen Carter . . . . . . . . . Receptionist Geri Elias . . . . . . . . . . National Outreach Manager Judith Eichner . . . . . . . . Executive Associate Michelle Freeman . . . . . . Advocacy & Grassroots Coordinator Ann Rose Greenberg . . . . Marketing Associate Susan Behrend Jerison . . . Director of Marketing & Communications Caroline Laskowski . . . . . Program/Development Systems Coordinator Ali Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . Database & Web Manager Linda Roth Platt . . . . . . . Director of Development Denise Roden . . . . . . . . Director of Finance & Administration Deborah Rosenbloom . . . . Director of Programs Diana Russell . . . . . . . . Contributions Coordinator Sue Tomchin . . . . . . . . Editor, Jewish Woman Magazine

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jewish women international 2000 M Street NW Suite 720 • Washington DC 20036 • 202 857 1300 • 800 343 2823 • www.jwi.org

JWI's 2009 Annual Report  

JWI's 2009 Annual Report

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