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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013


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CONTENTS

Vol. 330 No. 4 | January 25, 2013 | Candle lighting 5:00 p.m.

LOCAL NEWS 15 BRIEFS 18 LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

What’s happening in Annapolis? 20 IN SHORT SUPPLY

Local doctors concerned about availability of many life-saving drugs 22 PARTNERS IN CHANGE

Teens, young adults say Baltimore-Ashkelon Partnership has unceasing effect on their lives 24 FORGIVE AND LET LIVE

Rebbetzin Siegelbaum to offer workshop on forgiveness, change 26 A CHANGE AT THE TOP

Outgoing LifeBridge Health President, CEO Warren A. Green discusses tenure, future

David Stuck

NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL NEWS 28 TU B’SHVAT! AFTER FIRE

Israel’s Carmel Forest rejuvenates

36

30 AT THE INAUGARATION

COVER STORY

A report from the field on the day President Obama was sworn in for another four years 32 ISRAEL VOTES 2013 — NEWS ANALYSIS

ZAP! POW! BAM! A large cadre of young Jewish men — many the children of immigrants or first-generation Americans themselves — found their niche in this country by creating the superheroes that would go on to influence people’s attitudes and thoughts during historic periods such as the Great Depression and World War II.

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Likud leads, but rise of Yesh Atid, Jewish Home mean bumpy road for Netanyahu

ARTS & LIFE 40 PUMPKINS AND PJS AND ZIZ BIRDS, OH MY!

Pumpkin Theatre/PJ Library collaboration brings literature to life

BOOKMARKED

42 CLASS ACT

Beth Tfiloh students interview Israeli film star and author Gila Almagor

URGENT AND IMPERATIVE New legislation to fight gun accessibility finds support from Jewish leaders. Spiritual leaders examine how the Torah views guns and when, if ever, there is justification to take another life.

43 BRIDGING THE ‘GAP’

Students seek unique opportunities between high school and college

COVER PHOTO by David Stuck

IN EVERY ISSUE

OPINION

COMMUNITY

7 OPENING THOUGHTS

45 BESHERT

34 WORTH THE SCHLEP

8 EDITORIALS

46 MILESTONES

35 MISHMASH

10 FROM THIS VIEW

48 OBITUARIES

44 THE JEWISH VIEW

13 YOUR SAY …

6 THE SEEN

50 AMAZING MARKETPLACE

Baltimore Jewish Times (ISSN 0005-450X) is published by Route 95 Publications, LLC DBA Clipper City Media, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Subscription price is $50 in-state; $57 out-of-state. For subscriptions, renewals, or changes of address call 410-902-2300 (Baltimore). Periodical postage paid at Baltimore MD and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Baltimore Jewish Times, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Published 52 times a year.

jewishtimes.com

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Paul Fenton/ZUMAPRESS.com

The Seen Compiled om assorted news and wire services

Lena Dunham

MARIO ANZUONI/REUTERS/Newscom

Steven Spielberg

Jewish Winners At The Golden Globes

More Razzies Expected For Sandler In addition to celebrating Hollywood’s best, the worst of showbiz is also recognized this season with the annual Razzies. As in past years, Adam Sandler is set to clean up, leading the way in nominations for “That’s My Boy.” Sandler’s film is nominated for worst picture, worst screen ensemble, worst director and worst screenplay. Sandler, 46, is nominated for worst actor and worst screen couple with Leighton Meester. Sandler also dominated the Razzies last year for his horrendously unfunny comedy “Jack and Jill.” This year, the tribe gets another Razzies shot with Barbra Streisand, who was nominated for worst actress for “Guilt Trip.”

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Oscar Nods For Spielberg And Israeli Documentaries A few days prior to the Golden Globes, the nominees for the 85th Academy Awards were announced, and Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” led the way with 12, including for best film and best director. Spielberg still is expected to take both awards despite falling short in the Golden Globes to Ben Affleck of “Argo.” On the Israeli side, the lack of presence in the best foreign film category was compensated by a heavy presence in the best documentary field, with two nominees: “5 Broken Cameras” and “The Gatekeepers.” The former tells of a Palestinian farmer who tries to document Israeli settlers building homes and a barrier wall in the West Bank village of Bil’in. “The Gatekeepers” is a series of interviews with former heads of Israel’s counterterrorism agency the Shin Bet, who describe their roles carrying out operations against Palestinians. “Family Guy” creator Seth MacFarlane will host on Feb. 24.

And Then There’s Maude For those who have ever doubted the legitimacy of the acting of Maude Apatow, the daughter of celebrated filmmaker Judd Apatow, here’s reason to confirm you’re a fan. In a deleted scene from Apatow’s recent film, “is is 40,” Maude demonstrates that she is able to perfectly impersonate all three of the Kardashian sisters, even at the age of 15. First she mocks Khloe, whom she calls the smartest (“well, out of all of them”) and then nasally mimics her “Lamaaaaar.” Maude then moves onto Kourtney, the sister she calls the most responsible, and puts on a typical Valley girl drawl to talk about Scott Disick, who is “so out of control.” Finally, she deadpans into Kim in a higher-pitched voice and whines about not having butt implants.

Maude Apatow and father Judd Apatow

Russ Einhorn / Splash News/Newscom

The 70th annual Golden Globe Awards kicked off the Hollywood awards season last Sunday, and it was in TV that the Jewish people stood tall — notably Lena Dunham, the new queen of TV comedy. Dunham, the creator of “Girls,” brought home two awards — for best actress as Hannah Horvath and for the HBO show itself, which won best comedy. In her acceptance speech, a shaken Dunham said, “This award is for every woman who felt like there wasn’t a space for her. This show has made a space for me.” Dunham also randomly thanked Chad Lowe. The reason? During the 2000 Academy Awards, Lowe’s thenwife, Hillary Swank, forgot to thank him when she won best actress for “Boys Don’t Cry.” Dunham promised Lowe she would mention him if she ever won an award. Another TV topper was “Homeland,” the Showtime CIA thriller based on the Israeli show “Prisoners of War.” The show won best drama, in addition to best actor for Damian Lewis and best actress for Claire Danes. Daniel Day-Lewis, who portrays Abraham Lincoln in “Lincoln,” won best actor in a drama.


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Opening oughts

EMERGENCY APPEAL

Maayan Jaffe

Why I Hate Technology I’m old enough to have learned to type on an Apple IIe and to have saved my files on eight-inch floppy disks. But I’m young enough to still be at least as, if not more, technologically adept than my children. I can pretty easily learn and find new programs and best practices on the computer, phone, Web, social media, etc. But I am starting to loathe technology. We are too dependent on something unreliable and impersonal. 1. It takes p ower to r un most t ypes of

te chno lo g y. We live in Maryland, where the weather is often unpredictable and swings to extremes more oen than anywhere else. Derechos and hurricanes mean fallen trees and power lines, which translate to blackouts. Technology = life. No electricity = no technology. Erratic weather = no life. Snowstorms used to mean a day off from work and a cup of hot chocolate, curled under a blanket with a thick novel.

Russ Einhorn / Splash News/Newscom

2. It can g et infe cted. We recently had

a computer virus that attacked our company’s whole server — three separate times over the course of one week. In the past, when you — or anything you owned — got sick, you rested and went to the doctor (or repair man) to heal. Today, a computer virus is a colossal disaster. Every minute disconnected from the computer feels like a lifetime. It means money and morale lost and makes pica poles and Blue Streak pens look good. We expect the IT team to fix problems instantly. If they can’t — we are ready to fire them as quickly as an entertainer changes costumes during a performance. 3. Ever yone ha s s hiny-obje ct s yn-

drome. If you don’t have the latest and greatest (and expensive) gadget or gizmo, you’re nobody and probably pretty unworldly. It’s impossible that you could prefer to hold a magazine

than scroll through its contents on your Nook. 4. e spe ed — and when lack thereof

— makes people cranky. One cranky person becomes multiple cranky persons, which makes an entire household, office — world! — very cranky. 5. It’s distracting . We can’t work with-

out it. … We can’t work with it. Email alerts pop up every half-second. The phone beeps to let you know you’ve received a text. You have to post on Facebook, and opening facebook.com is 10 wasted minutes while you check what your friends, and your friends’ friends, ate for dinner. Our attention spans have become as short as those of newborns. 6. Iron ical ly, te chn olog y, with al l its

advances in communication, keeps us further apart and makes communication har der. The choices are overwhelming; do you text, email, Skype, chat? God forbid you should pick up the phone?! The people you communicate with are going to have the choice to reply. They may not even open your email or click on the red notification button. In a world where we are all connected 24/7, it makes connecting impossible at times! The worst of it is that we are so busy “talking” to each other electronically that we forget how to talk to each other. It’s true, I’m not ready to hand in my iPhone or kill plans for the Feb. 1 launch of our digital magazine and, just a few weeks later, our JT app (stay tuned!). Maybe hate is a strong word. I’m just reminding myself that with all its advantages, technology has also exercised a benevolent tyranny over us. And it’s not so bad if every once in a while we force ourselves — or are forced — to break free. JT Maayan Jaffe is JT managing editor mjaffe@jewishtimes.com

“The situation is not if we’ll suffer another missile attack, but when.” – Amnon Rofe, MD, CEO of the Bnai Zion Medical Center

Israel must be prepared for any attack from the north. Help the Bnai Zion Medical Center build a new protected underground emergency department. During the 2006 Second Lebanon War, Haifa was attacked and the Bnai Zion Medical Center provided outstanding medical care to hundreds of injured victims. The new protected emergency department is urgently needed. Half of its cost of $8 million has already been raised. For the remaining $4 million, Bnai Zion has a $2 million matching gift. For every dollar you contribute, it will be doubled. Please contribute generously at bnaizion.org

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Editorials

— President Barack Obama

Addressing America’s Gun Problem With the announcement of his gun-control agenda last week, President Barack Obama offered the country a reasonable, measured approach to tackling America’s gun problem. e president’s emphasis on universal background checks and a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines is a good place to start. e National Rifle Association’s uncompromising response to the proposal is unfortunate and ill-serves the interests it purports to represent. According to the NRA and its supporters, everything but guns is to blame for decades of gun violence in this country — including criminals, the mentally ill and unarmed teachers in our schools. While there is no question that some of these problems contribute to gun violence, the one common element in all gun deaths is guns, and the abuse of guns. It is troubling that the NRA seems committed to opposing any effort to control or moderate that abuse. The NRA and its friends in the gun lobby will unquestionably have a significant voice in the national conversation regarding gun control. But in order to add credibility to their arguments, they should stop equating reasonable gun control suggestions with an assault on the Second Amendment; they should stop insisting

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

that hunters and sportsmen need military-style assault weapons, high-capacity magazines and the uncontrolled sale of weapons in order to pursue their sport; and they should reconsider their accusation that Mr. Obama is an “elitist hypocrite,” because his children receive secret service protection in their school while he has voiced uncertainty about the NRA’s proposal to put armed guards in schools nationwide. We recognize, of course, that gun-control efforts are not likely to prevent mass shootings such as the one last month in Newtown, Conn. ere are millions of assault weapons in circulation, and it may take decades for those numbers to diminish significantly. But had the assault weapon ban been renewed and tightened in 2004, as President Obama is now proposing, there would likely be fewer such guns in circulation today. e gun-control debate in Congress presents an opportunity: It could set the tone for bipartisanship in the second Obama administration, or it could be one more example of the gridlock that has caused many Americans to lose faith in their government. e choice could literally be one of life and death. See related story, “Urgent And Imperative,” page 16.

AFP PHOTO/ MICHAEL REYNOLDS - POOLMICHAEL REYNOLDS/AFP/Newscom

“We won’t be able to stop every violent act, but if there is even one thing that we can do to prevent any of these events, we have a deep obligation, all of us, to try.”

‘Descendants Of Apes And Pigs’ In 2010, Mohamed Morsi, then a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and not yet Egypt’s president, told a TV interviewer that Israelis were “bloodsuckers” and “the descendants of apes and pigs.” Caught on video at a rally the same year, Morsi exhorted Egyptians to “nurse our children and our grandchildren on hatred” for Jews and Zionists. These despicable comments, unearthed by researchers and published last week by The New York Times, while hateful, are not surprising. Such views are, unfortunately, common in Egypt and in the Arab world and even among leaders of the Nation of Islam in this country. The U.S. responded to the news quickly. White House spokesman Jay Carney described the comments as “deeply offensive” and called on Morsi to “make clear that he respects people of all faiths and that this type of rhetoric is not acceptable or productive in a democratic Egypt.” A delegation of U.S. senators visiting Cairo when the story broke conveyed its disapproval to Morsi, who, for his part, said his comments were taken out of context. We’re not sure what context Morsi had in mind that could excuse such venom. There simply is none. But we hope that the public exposure and denouncement of hate speech was instructive to Morsi about the norms in the world outside of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egyptian society. Morsi now knows that the world is watching him and listening to what he says. That may not change how he feels or thinks about Jews and Israel. But it may affect what he says publicly and, more importantly, what he does. The late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat was famous for saying one thing in English and an entirely different thing in Arabic. Shining a light on what Morsi says in all languages may help clarify a relationship as important to Egypt as it is to the U.S. and Israel.


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Vol. 330 No. 4 January 25, 2013

Publisher & Chief Operating Officer | Craig Burke Executive Editor | Phil Jacobs

Director of Design & Production | Erin Clare Photographers | David Stuck

Managing Editor | Maayan Jaffe Senior Features Reporter | Simone Ellin Senior News Reporter | Paul Foer Reporters | David Snyder, Ron Snyder Copy Chief | Michael Marlow Editorial Intern | Patrice Williams

Art Director | Lindsey Bridwell Assistant Art Director | Ebony Brown Graphic Designer | Sid Kukreti Web Design Manager | Heidi Traband

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Director of Sales | Kristen Cooper Senior Sales Consultant | Andrea Medved Sales Consultants | Jenifer Harrington, Karl Hunt, Gary LaFrance, Shelly Stevens-Feldman

Classified Sales Consultant | Ira Gewanter Sales Assistant | Pam Stegemerten

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Editorial Deadline: All public and social announcements must be received Wednesday, nine days prior to desired date of publication. Please include name, address and phone number. Acknowledgments and unveilings cost $14 for each appearance. Classified Advertising Deadline: Monday, noon Display Advertising Deadline: Tuesday, 3 p.m.

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From î&#x201A;&#x160;is view Ellie Kaplan

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A little over three years ago, i was going through the exciting and stressful process of applying to colleges; there were many factors involved, but a strong Hillel was not one of them, although i had grown up as part of a reform Jewish Community. Certainly, i wanted a place to go for services during the High Holy Days, and i was interested in participating in taglit-Birthright israel, but these things seemed pretty secondary to me at the time. today, when people ask how i became so involved in the Johns Hopkins University Hillel, i have to resist answering â&#x20AC;&#x153;by accident,â&#x20AC;? because looking back, my journey seems to be a natural (although oî&#x2020;?en subconscious) process toward deďŹ ning my Jewish self-identity. it was not my original intention, but Hopkins Hillel most certainly has become a deďŹ ning aspect of my college experience. i am continually amazed and grateful for the support network i have found there, as well as the incredible opportunities that iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve discovered through continued involvement. My original involvement with Hopkins Hillel started aî&#x2020;?er i had participated in Birthright my freshman year, when a friend asked me to join him in leading monthly reform Shabbat services. Previously, reform services were not offered at all at Hopkins Hillel, and we both thought it crucial that there were opportunities for Jews of all kinds to be able to connect and pray on Shabbat. Before we knew it, there were people asking us to hold services at least twice a month; we renamed it â&#x20AC;&#x153;communityâ&#x20AC;? services because there were students from many diďŹ&#x20AC;erent backgrounds (Conservative, reform, reconstructionist) who would come to sing and share Shabbat. to our great delight, we also received a lot of support from the Conservative and orthodox minyans; it was through these interactions that i began to real-

ize what a unique and enriching environment Hillel has the potential to be. As Jews, all of the students who sit down for Friday night dinner at Hillel have a lot in common: We all have a kind of shared heritage; all of us know how to say the Motzi and Kiddush before we eat; and, of course, everyone loves the matzo ball soup. Yet, despite the fact that we have many similarities, we also have so much to learn from each other. Peers from the orthodox minyan have fallen in love with a beautiful melody of Hashkiveinu sung at community services, and i personally have learned a lot about kashrut and the meanings of many of the traditions of my more observant friends.

Recognizing the benefit of our differences, and how we can learn from each other, is certainly a process. Hillel is a unique Jewish space because, unlike any time before or aî&#x2020;?er college, students who identify with Judaism, from orthodoxy to simply culturally Jewish, share the same space. While these diďŹ&#x20AC;erences may at times be challenging, framed in the right light, they can be seen as part of Hillelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest draw. recognizing the beneďŹ t of our differences, and how we can learn from each other, is certainly a process; Hillel is an invaluable resource to Jewish life on college campuses because it not only facilitates our personal Jewish journeys, but also fosters a diverse and connected Jewish community. JT Ellie Kaplan is a cognitive science major at Johns Hopkins University. He is also a Hillel student leader.


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From is View Autumn Sadovnik

Playtime For Entrepreneurship During Chanukah, i asked my 5-year-old how many candles we needed for two chanukiot on the fourth night. While he calculated, my 3-year-old daughter told me she would get the box of candles. i watched, mouth agape, as she walked to the china cabinet, nimbly operated the child lock, reached over my great-grandmother’s pink antique martini glasses and removed the box of candles. noah told Lila we needed 10 candles, and she counted them for him. What was most impressive? Was it a kindergartner using his Jewish knowledge to include a shamash for each chanukiah or that he used repeated addition multiplying five times two? Was it that a 3-year-old counted 10 candles or that she operated a child lock more dely than my husband could

without any instruction? is academic achievement the hallmark for intelligence? We measure scores across schools, states and countries. e focus on reading and math skills for standardized tests debilitates us. We are failing against Finland and Japan and even (gasp) China on various academic measures. Somehow though, we produce more patents. Yong Zhao, in his book “World Class Learners,” describes this as america’s entrepreneurial advantage. We create ideas and solve new problems at a superior rate, yet measure ourselves on content standards, not on innovative thinking. his concern is that we will lose our edge if we move to a skill-andstandard-centric system like ailand and other “academic powers” whose visions of success and progress differ from ours. We are undermining our strengths

by acquiescing to the assessment solely on other societies’ values. as a result, we reshape education to mirror test scores rather than testing what we value: flexible thinking and new ideas. Parents are asking for more academics at school to increase the competitive advantage. in turn we reduce play time and hinder creative growth. Without time for play, our children aren’t engaged in the kind of exploration that helps them develop as competent creators, solvers and engineers of new ideas. We are making computers of our children and stifling their instincts. For the under-5 set, we know that children learn self-regulation, executive function and cultivate higher-order thinking skills earlier and with greater competence when child-directed, teacher- facilitated play-based activity is the academic approach. We need to

appreciate that this type of learning continues to be valuable in primary grades and beyond. noah is correct when he says the best part of the day is free play. e boys gather around a box of Magna-Tiles. ey barter and negotiate for the pieces they need. ey collaborate to build structures. ey develop elaborate stories to accompany their creations. is is the work of entrepreneurs and inventors and leaders. Play is the other great school subject area. e teacher, like me on Chanukah, can observe her students’ math, language and problem-solving skills in action. is method, far more than a standardized test, demonstrates the students’ acquisition and application of vital skills for a successful future. JT Autumn Sadovnik is the director of professional development at the Macks Center for Jewish Education.

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From is View Susan (Feldman) Amerikaner

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I grew up in Baltimore, went to school at pimlico and western High and attended the university of Maryland. I left town in 1979 to work as a writer in Los Angeles. My first day at the Disney Studio, a secretary looked up from my paperwork and said, “Baltimore? That’s a good place to be from.” Frankly, Baltimore doesn’t get a lot of respect in L.A., with the exception of David Simon’s gritty crime shows. In 1966, I watched the Orioles’ victory parade down Howard Street while leaning out of a window at western. That was fun, but I was never into sports. At western I had an exceptional english teacher, Michael Franko. His classroom was an open door to the world. Before google, there was Franko. He was not into sports either. However, one day Franko explained why sports — particularly football — so strongly grabbed the public’s imagination. He said that life is full of conflict, often never resolved. But when watching football, one can safely see a conflict acted out and brought to its resolution. This provides a satisfying catharsis. He referred to the players as “our gladiators.” I never forgot that fascinating insight. Still in California, still not interested in sports, I caught the end of the Broncos-ravens playoff game. Suddenly, I was dancing around the room! I flashed on the tragedies that had occurred in our world. I flashed on Franko. Yes, we do need those warriors. we need to see somebody get to the end zone because he never, ever gave up, no matter how terrible the odds or how horrible the weather. The english teacher was right. where was he now? I searched the web, found a phone number and

called. Decades and miles dissolved instantly. Michael Franko was as bright as ever and at 77 teaching at Johns Hopkins. I was not one of his best and brightest students. It took him a while to remember me. This didn’t diminish the joy of our reunion. I had been a teacher, too. I know that the students you remember best may not be the ones you influence most. You never know when a random bit of wisdom tossed out to a class is caught and — perhaps years later — becomes a “Hail, Mary” for a kid you never noticed. I told Franko that I remembered him while watching the ravens game. He laughed, as he still is not a sports fan. However, in one of those moments when the universe conspires to draw unlikely people to the same cosmic space, he also saw the “miracle” game in Denver. Franko is delighted with the way the game galvanized the residents of Baltimore. He described how strangers were spontaneously chatting with one another everywhere — proud of their purple gladiators. His love for Baltimore shone through his words. Our soldiers are marching on to the Super Bowl in New Orleans. winning that contest would be sublime, but for me that miracle game in Denver was a personal tipping point. Joe Flacco’s incredible 70-yard pass kept on going — traveling 3,000 miles to reconnect a Baltimore native with the best of her past. In 1966, in Michael Franko’s western High english class, I first read emily Dickenson’s words, “Hope is the thing with feathers … ” Now, fly, ravens, fly! JT Susan Amerikaner was born and raised in Baltimore. She now lives in California. susanamerikaner@roadrunner.com


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Your Say … e following letters reflect the opinions of our readers. e Baltimore Jewish Times strives to run all letters to the editor, as space provides. e publication edits for grammar and clarity. Please send your letters to editor@jewishtimes.com.

Tip Of The Hat To JT It is a pleasure to look forward to receiving the “new” Jewish Times each week. From the editorials and news to the sports articles, the Jewish Times publication is better than ever! We are enjoying David Snyder’s sports features. “Fitness Faux Paus” ( Jan. 11) brought us laughs. “Big On Perspective” ( Jan. 11) brought tears and understanding, especially after watching the turnabout for the Ravens! Kudos to David Snyder for his accomplishments in great writing. Barbara and Louis Hyatt Baltimore

Reaction To Hagel, Shameful The reaction of far-right American Jews to Chuck Hagel’s nomination as defense secretary (“Jury Out On Hagel,” Jan. 18) was hysterical and shameful. On most Israeli Internet news sites thousands of comments are posted every week accusing anyone who does not agree with the Netanyahu government of being an anti-Semite and any Jew who voted for Obama and supports a two-state solution [of being ] a self-hater and enemy of the Jewish people. … Former Prime Minister Rabin has been called a traitor to his people as has former Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and former Defense Minister Ehud Barak. … This is total madness, and we American Jews must not tolerate it. We must speak out against it because it will wind up destroying Israel in the end. Israel’s supporters love to claim …

that Israel is the only democracy in the Middle East. If that is so, why do these same people engage in character assassination and debasement of anyone who dares criticize the policies of the Netanyahu government? Why is it wrong for former and current generals in Israel’s military and members of Israel’s security agencies to criticize bombing Iran? Why is it wrong for American Jews and many Israeli citizens to support a two-state solution to the Israeli Palestinian conflict? … Any country that tries to silence its critics is not a democracy. What once made Israel so special was that spirited debate and disagreements were a vital part of its democracy. Attacking someone’s “Jewishness” and their character and trying to destroy them is not what the founders of Israel ever envisioned. … [This] must be resisted by all those who truly love Israel. Mark Jeffery Koch New Jersey

Blankchtein demonstrating his selfdefense strategy. Larry Lichtenauer Baltimore

‘You Need Help’ Helpful Mental illness must be unstigmatized. There are gaping invisible black holes between minutes, hours, days, months and sometimes years of indecision on whether or not to seek help. The fear of being permanently labeled or mislabeled by health professionals has tragically deterred adults and parents with children in debilitating pain from seeking treatment. e Jewish Times is to be commended for featuring Dr. Mark Komrad’s book “You Need Help: A Step-by-Step Plan to Convince a Loved One to Get Counseling” (Dec. 28). Chazzan Emanuel C. Perlman New Hyde Park, N.Y.

A Letter To The Government

Chuck Hagel’s record as far as Israel and the American Jewish community indicates that his selection will be a disaster for our relations with the Jewish state. Even more important is what this tells us about the innate feelings of our now lame-duck president. His appointment of Chuck Hagel tells the entire story, and those interested in the security of Israel should be alarmed.

Police are armed to protect the people. Without armed police there is no public protection. Why do all federal buildings have armed guards? Why are government employees protected by armed guards? Why do the Fortune 1000 companies have armed guards in their lobbies? Why are government officials protected by armed guards? Given perceived threats “you” are armed! Given real threats our children are defenseless! Afford our children the same protection as “you,” armed guards!

Nelson Marans Maryland

William Francis Rockville

Hagel Appointment A Disappointment

Smiling At Sandy Hook?

No Pork In Relief Bill

Upon reading and reviewing the photos accompanying your timely and enlightening piece “Sandy Hook Fallout,” ( Jan. 11), I was stunned to notice three women smiling and laughing at the scene unfolding in front of them. I remain at a loss to discern what they find so funny about soldier [Tzviel]

Joseph DuPont (“Pork In The Bill,” Your Say …, Jan. 11) blames “the defeat of the important Hurricane Sandy relief bill” on “selfish members of Congress” who loaded the bill with pork. Here is the entire relief bill increasing the borrowing authority of FEMA to fund the National Flood Insurance Program, which

Speaker Boehner initially kept from a vote: “(a) Section 1309 (a) of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 4016(a)) is amended by striking ‘$20,725,000,000’ and inserting ‘$30,425,000,000’.” Mr. DuPont is entitled to his own opinions. He is not, however, entitled to his own facts. Sheldon Laskin Baltimore

CHAI Weatherization Programs … In all the articles about CHAI, as well as the accomplishments of past Executive Director Ken Gelula (“Life of CHAI, Dec. 28), nothing was mentioned about the Weatherization Program that CHAI has been offering for the past three years. In today’s world, it is so important not only to save money where possible, but also to properly maintain appliances and equipment [and] to insulate and to preserve homes for better greening. What better way than to be assisted by an organization that is already invested in our community? … [CHAI] services include (but may not be limited to): • Safety testing for furnaces and boilers • Cleaning and tuning heating systems • Sealing and insulating duct work • Water heater and pipe insulation • Attic, wall and floor insulation • Door weather strips and sweeps insulation • High-efficiency compact fluorescent light bulb installation • Low-flow shower heads and faucet aerators installation People with limited income can apply with the help of CHAI to receive free weatherization services. Qualification is based upon household-income guidelines. Although it is not mentioned on its website, it is my understanding that CHAI offers these services as a fee-based program for those who

jewishtimes.com

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desire and can afford to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. For certain energy-efficient services, there are tax deductions, but I am unsure whether or not CHAI services are deductible. I believe the Weatherization Program is available to all Baltimore-area residents, although those with limited income may or may not have to be Baltimore City residents. For information and more details, visit chaibaltimore.org/page.aspx?id= 237962. Robin I. Cushner Baltimore

Reform Not What Is Needed I would be remiss if I didn’t make some comments about Del. Jon Cardin’s grandiose claim to be someone who wants to bring about campaign reform to our political process (“e Year of Campaign Reform,” Jan. 11). What Mr. Cardin didn’t tell you is the amount of contribution money he and his associates, Sen. Bobby Zirkin and Del. Dana Stein, have collected in their campaign treasuries as career politicians. You would be stunned upon learning the figure they have accepted in their political careers as district politicians. Just imagine if we could use that money to feed the needy. Wouldn’t that be a lot better? The reality is that no new laws are needed for campaign reform. All that politicians have to do is make a commitment not to take any money from anyone. Campaign contributions are nothing but legal bribes. While they might be legal, they are morally wrong. Additionally, to bring about real campaign reform, politicians should make a commitment to serve no more than two terms and then conclude their public service as “politicians.” This would allow them to concentrate on really serving the people instead of focusing on holding on to power and fame. Hence, if Mr. Cardin and other politicians were really sincere about campaign finance reform, they would

acknowledge that the two greatest causes of the destruction of the integrity of our political system are as follows: campaign contributions and career politicians. Ralph Jaffe Baltimore

President Obama Has Gone Too Far I recently heard a choir sing about King John and the Magna Carta, and it dawned on me how far King Barack Hussein Obama II has dried from the whole basis of our laws. Even before the Magna Carta was signed by King John in 1215, various kings of England understood the concept of unalienable rights and due process. Today, the president can order you imprisoned without a trace, without a speedy trial, assassinated on a whim. Today, you can be put on a no-fly list, and you have no right to even find out why or how to get off it. Today, you are forced to make insurance companies even richer by mandatory health insurance. Any thought of retiring to the backwoods without producing revenue for the state is now gone. I finally can appreciate what the American Indians went through. Joseph DuPont New Jersey

CORRECTIONS • We would like to apologize to the family and friends of Ike Sapperstein. It has come to our attention that there were incorrect facts and misleading characterization about Mr. Sapperstein’s life in the Dec. 7 article “Ike Sapperstein.” • In the article “Legislative Session Under Way” ( Jan. 18), it is Sen. Brian Frosh and Del. Jon Cardin who want to repeal the death penalty. • Incorrect information was submitted to the JT regarding Jewish View writer Rena Rotenberg’s credentials. She is the author of “Torah Talk: An Early Childhood Teaching Guide and Lively Legends-Jewish Values,” and she was the founder of the Center for Jewish Education’s early childhood department. The Baltimore Jewish Times regrets these errors.


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| News Briefs

Joan Nathan’s got nothing on you, so enter the 7th Annual Man-O-Manischewitz Cook-Off for a chance to win $25,000 worth of Maytag appliances, an all-expense-paid trip, a crystal trophy, plus lots of cash. The contest will be held March 21, at the Manischewitz Manufacturing Plant and Headquarters in Newark, N.J. The deadline for entry is Monday, Feb. 4. The rules are simple: Select any kosher recipe with no more than nine ingredients that can be prepared in less than an hour. The recipe must include one of the new Manischewitz All-Natural broths. Cooks can choose from flavors such as turkey, chicken, reduced sodium chicken, beef and vegetable and must use one additional Manischewitz product in their recipes. Judges will choose four finalists, and five other semi-finalists will be posted on manischewitz.com between Feb. 21 and Feb. 28. Consumers will have the opportunity to vote online to select a fifth finalist from among those posted. Each of the five finalists will be transported to the competition, where they will prepare their dishes before judges, which will include culinary mavens from the food media. “As the leader in the finest kosher foods, we are delighted to invite people to prepare family recipes using their favorite Manischewitz products, “said Paul Bensabat, Co-CEO of Manischewitz.

Rhoda Baruch (left) celebrates the opening of a stem cell research fund in her husband’s honor with Ben-Gurion University President Rivka Carmi.

provided

Progress at the Metro Centre transitoriented development in Owings Mills is continuing at a steady pace. This includes the announcement last week that the leasing center for its luxury apartment component is now open. The apartment complex, Metro Crossing, will include 232 units in its first phase and is expected to be delivered in March and April. “We have a lot going on right now,” said Larry Lichtenauer, spokesman for David S. Brown Enterprises, the developer of the project. According to a news release, the units will range from 700 to 1,245 square feet and will feature one- and two-bedroom designs with rental rates beginning at $1,580 a month. Eventually, the complex will include 1,700 units, Lichtenauer said. In addition, Metro Crossing will include a two-story clubroom with lounge seating, a multimedia center, a fitness facility, a yoga room, billiards and a catering kitchen; a covered parking garage; a rooftop pool with barbeques, a fireplace and lounge seating; bicycle racks; and a controlled access to the residential units. Once fully developed, Metro Centre will support more than 1.2 million square feet of office space, 300,000 square feet of retail space and a hospitality unit that could contain up to 250 rooms. There is a six-story, 120,000-squarefoot building under construction that eventually will hold the county’s largest public library and a branch for the Community College of Baltimore County. “A lot of our progress is targeted for the March and April timeframe,” Lichtenauer said. “Eventually people will be able to drive right through and connect with Painters Mill Road and 795.” For more information, visit metro crossingapts.com or call 410-363-3309. — Ron Snyder

Cook Your Heart Out

“We are equally as thrilled to host the 7th Cook-Off at our headquarters and production facilities for the first time, to offer our guests a sneak peak at where it all begins,” Co-CEO Alain Bankier noted. In recent years, the 120-year-old company has offered healthy options identified on packaging with the healthy and wellness icon, as well as a gluten-free line. To enter, log onto manischewitz.com and click on the “CookOff Banner” and submit your recipe. For more information, visit manischewitz.com. — Simone Ellin

Provided

Leasing Center Opens for Metro Centre Apartment Complex

New Stem Cell Fund At BGU Ben-Gurion University of the Negev established a stem cell research fund last month, a fund that will support scholarly collaboration between selected medical and pharmacological researchers, stem biologists and tissue engineers. The source of the funding is Rhoda Baruch, in memory of her late husband, Dr. Jordan Baruch. e Baruchs are from Chevy Chase, Md., and are the founders of the Washington-Baltimore Region of American Associates of Ben-Gurion

University of the Negev (AABGU). “The stem cell center is a new endeavor [for BGU],” said Keren Waranch, director of the regional branch. “This is one of the top priorities for President Rivka Karmi and for the school. … This endowment fund … is a big step in the fulfilling their plans.” Dr. Baruch, said Waranch, was a longtime supporter of Ben-Gurion University and himself an inventor, an incredible innovator and a forward thinker. He was considered one

of the foremost authorities in the field of acoustics and had several patents for sound-dampening technology and loudspeaker systems. In the late 1970s, he served as assistant secretary of commerce for science and technology under President Jimmy Carter. In that role, he helped create the Binational Research and Development Foundation (BIRD), administered locally by the Maryland/Israel Development Center. Rhoda Baruch flew 20 children and grandchildren and other extended family to Israel for a funddedication ceremony on Dec. 30. This, said Waranch, was the largest such ceremony of its kind that the university has ever held. “It was unprecedented,” she said. “AABGU owes so much to Rhoda and Jordan,” said Waranch. “is gi … is a wonderful thing, but it is just representative of the kind of long-term loyalty [the Baruchs] have for research and for the university.” — Maayan Jaffe jewishtimes.com

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Local News |

URGENT AND

Vincent DeMarco addresses congregants at Temple Solel in Bowie. The anti-gun advocate wants to see the state ban on assault weapons reinstated.

IMPERATIVE New legislation to fight gun accessibility finds support from Jewish leaders Vincent “Vinny” DeMarco likes to tell the story of his upbringing in an italian-Jewish neighborhood in new Jersey, where he gained entrance into an aZa function by saying he was Vinny DeMarcowitz. But when he recounted this recently while talking about gun-violence prevention at Bowie’s temple Solel, he did not need to “Judaicize” his italian moniker before his audience of about 40 congregants. DeMarco, a Baltimore resident, is already well known to lawmakers and political activists for his work as a health advocate through Maryland Health care for all: the Maryland citizens’ Health initiative and as a proponent of using proceeds from tobacco taxes to curtail smoking. But the purpose of his talk earlier this month was not about health care but about gun violence and the legislation needed to prevent it. Most guns used in street crimes and violence, DeMarco said, were recently purchased, and by making it harder for more guns to get out on the streets “you turn off or turn down the spigot and you save lives.” DeMarco wants the state ban on assault weapons, which expired in 2004, reinstated. He also wants a restriction on the capacity of ammunition clips and an expansion of background checks to gun shows and private sales. DeMarco’s talk came just days before Gov. Martin o’Malley introduced legislation to ban assault weapons and large-capacity magazines and enact a comprehensive licensing system for handgun buyers. He recently joined new york city Mayor Michael Bloomberg at a two-day conference on gun violence at Johns Hopkins University that called for similar initiatives along with expanding conditions for firearms purchase and funding research. at the same time, two new statewide campaigns were launched to urge Maryland legislators to curb gun violence. one of them, Smart Gun Laws Maryland, will advance the governor’s agenda.

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Leon Steinberg

By Paul Foer

“ese are reasonable and common-sense measures,” said ed Hatcher, director of the new group. “We want to build the political will so that these proposals do not get watered down and are passed into law.”

“GUN-VIOLENCE PREVENTION IS A MORAL ISSUE. THERE IS POWER HERE TO GET IT DONE. WE ARE GOING TO SUCCEED.” — Vincent DeMarco, national coordinator of Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence

DeMarco is leading Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence, a broad-based coalition that includes faith-based, public health and public safety officials to advocate for comprehensive measures aimed at preventing gun violence. the coalition will support what it calls “common-sense measures to reduce gun violence,” which essentially mirror o’Malley’s proposals. Baltimore Jewish council’s Dr. arthur abramson is a board member of the group. He told the Jt, “Gun

violence is one of the most pressing problems facing this country and certainly the citizens of Maryland. We must make sure that our citizens are safe. … i believe strongly that there is more to do, and we can do it. Staying within the parameters of the courts and the Second amendment, we believe that the legislative package offered by Gov. o’Malley to stem gun violence is a superb beginning.” other Jewish leaders feel similarly and plan to take action this legislative session. Some already have. on Jan. 14, a group of faith leaders sent a plea to both President Barack obama and Vice President Joe Biden to address gun violence. e plea, which came in the form of a letter, stated: “We endorse reasonable steps taken to keep dangerous weapons out of the hands of dangerous people through measures such as ensuring and enforcing universal background checks for gun purchases, collection and publication of relevant data on gun violence, and other constructive measures that will limit gun violence.” e letter was spearheaded by the rabbinical assembly’s rabbi Julie Schonfeld and organized by Susan Stern of the council on Faith-Based and neighborhood Partnerships and rabbi David Saperstein of the religious action center of reform Judaism. a letter sent to Vice President Biden’s task force on guns by rabbi abba cohen of agudath israel of america supported the need for security hardware such as cameras, metal detectors and barricades.


Leon Steinberg

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Cohen said that budget cuts have made federal school safety assistance “virtually nonexistent.” Also on Jan. 14, B’nai B’rith’s International Executive Committee passed a formal resolution that called for a ban on assault weapons, as well as a limit on ammunition magazine capacity. The group also issued a statement praising President Obama for his plans to introduce a legislative package to reduce gun violence. The next day, 47 religious leaders gathered in Washington as Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence. Those who turned out included representatives from the Jewish Council for Public Affairs, the Jewish Reconstructionist Movement, the Rabbinical Assembly, the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism and Women of Reform Judaism. They called for similar legislative action and spoke of a need to improve the way people with mental illnesses are helped. “Gun-violence prevention is a moral issue,” said DeMarco. “There is power here to get it done. We are going to succeed. Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence represents 80 million Americans. On Jan. 16, Lori Weinstein, executive director of Jewish Women International, issued a statement in support of “President Obama’s bold leadership on reforming gun laws in an effort to reduce gun violence in our nation.” Rachel Laser, deputy director of the Religious Action Center, said that there has been “enough pain, enough despair, enough injustice. Let us learn from our grief and the errors of the past and resolve in this very moment to do better.” Religious leaders will mobilize congregants to join in an Interfaith Call to Prevent Gun Violence on Feb. 4. Citizens are being asked to call their representatives in Congress and ask that they be “held accountable for the safety of our communities.” Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) expressed his support for an assault-weapons ban and prohibition of highcapacity ammunition clips. He said he will be an original co-sponsor of the Assault Weapons Regulatory Act of 2013, which Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.) plans to introduce. “Despite lobbying efforts to the contrary, we can protect our children while still protecting the Constitutional rights of legitimate hunters and existing gun owners,” Cardin said. JT Paul Foer is JT senior news reporter — pfoer@jewishtimes.com The JTA Wire Service and Suzanne Pollak from Washington Jewish Week contributed to this article.

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GUN CONTROL AND THE TORAH As the debate over gun control heats up, many in the Jewish community are seeking guidance to determine what side to take. How does the Torah view guns? Is there ever justification to take another life? How do Hebrew teachings reflect modern-day concerns over gun violence? With President Barack Obama nationally and Gov. Martin O’Malley in Maryland among those seeking tighter gun restrictions following the recent massacres in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., rabbis throughout the country have tried to offer guidance to their congregations. Many have turned to various scripture to make their case. Among them is Rabbi Levi Druk, the co-director of Chabad Lubavitch of Downtown Baltimore. During a recent discussion — “Gun Control: What Does the Torah Say?” — Rabbi Druk said the Torah recognizes that there are times when people have to defend themselves but also places limitations on the use of deadly force. “Self-defense is a principle the Torah is for. If someone comes to kill you, wake up and kill them first,” said Rabbi Druk, citing Sanhedrin 72a in the Talmud. “The Torah also considers it an obligation to save someone’s life from a pursuer, whether it’s a sexual pursuer or someone that is trying to kill [another]. This can be done by any means, although preferably without killing [the perpetrator]. But if there is no choice and one needs to save a life, then they can kill the pursuer.” Rabbi Druk explained the Torah is very clear that if someone breaks into your home, robs you and then leaves without hurting you, then you can’t kill [him or her], because the threat to human life is gone. “The Torah is not looking for the ideologically correct answer. It is looking for what’s best to save lives right here and right now,” he said. At the same time, Rabbi Druk and other local rabbis agree that there is religious justification for increased background checks and for restrictions when it comes to owning certain assault weapons and high-capacity magazine clips. This comes in part from Leviticus 19:14, which states: “You shall not curse a deaf person. You shall not place a stumbling block before a blind person.” Rabbi David Saperstein, director of the Washington-based Religious Action Center of Reform

Judaism, said this means more should be done to ensure that those with mental health issues and/or felonious criminal records cannot access guns. “If you know people have disabilities where they are a danger to themselves and others, giving them the ability or setting up the circumstances where they are far more likely to act with devastating consequences is like putting a stumbling block before the blind,” said Rabbi Sapperstein, who is advocating for greater gun-control regulations. Rabbi Steven Schwartz of Beth El Congregation, a conservative synagogue in Pikesville, also supports banning semiautomatic assault weapons, assault rifles and large-capacity magazines. “It absolutely mystifies me that we do not hesitate to regulate something like driving for the safety of others,” said Rabbi Schwartz in a recent sermon. “You might like to drive 100 mph down Reisterstown Road, but it is illegal, largely because it puts the lives of others in danger. But we cannot muster the political will we need to regulate guns.” Rabbi Schwartz added that Jewish law would support a far more intensive regulation of how weapons are purchased and what types of weapons are available in our society. He cites Deuteronomy 22, in which the Torah commands: “When you build a new house you shall make a parapet for your roof, so that you do not bring bloodguilt on your house if anyone should fall from it.” “Even in your private home you are responsible for ensuring the safety of your community,” Rabbi Schwartz said during his sermon. “Judaism’s take would essentially be that the individual’s right to bear arms is trumped by the community’s right to be safe and protected.” Rabbi Druk said the Torah also recognizes that sometimes you need a gun but also that guns are dangerous. “I have struggled with this,” said Rabbi Druk, who does not own a gun. “I have children at home, but I also live in East Baltimore. Do I want more locks on my door to be safer? But the more complicated the locks are, the harder it is for the kids to get out in case of a fire. This leads to many halachic questions. What’s the right balance?” — Ron Snyder

BACKGROUND BULLETS • 40% — Nationwide gun sales that do not involve background checks • 1988 — Maryland banned “Saturday Night Specials,” cheap and easily available handguns (this was challenged by the National Rifle Association but was upheld in court) • 2004 — The year the state ban on assault weapons expired Source: Vincent DeMarco


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Local News |

LEGISLATIVE

UPDATE What’s happening in Annapolis?

O’MALLEY RELEASES BUDGET:

DEATH PENALTY:

With his blue tie loosened and shirt sleeves rolled up, Gov. Martin O’Malley told the news media last week that his proposed nearly $37.3 billion budget, 4 percent higher than the previous one, is a “jobs budget” that will support 43,000 jobs in school construction, roads, bridges and more because “there is no progress without a job.” In contrast to what he called the “hari-kari Congress down the street,” O’Malley said his budget is “balanced and fiscally responsible.” He pointed to our once again topranked schools. “The more a person learns, the more a person earns,” he said. There are no great surprises. The main point is what O’Malley refers to as the “psychedelic dollar,” which shows for every dollar we pay in taxes, he plans to spend 47 cents for education, 25 cents for health and 11 cents for public safety; 17 cents is for what he calls “everything else.” The “everything else” is public debt, natural resources and environment, legislative, judicial, legal and other activities. There were no revenue or tax changes, and he chose not to talk about the threatened Transportation Trust Fund. His capital budget also asks for funding the renovation of the University of Maryland’s Hillel Center at College Park to the tune of $1 million; that was a part of the budget that the Baltimore Jewish Council planned to push. Stay tuned for the governor’s “State of the State” speech on Jan. 30.

O’Malley continues pushing hard to repeal the state’s death penalty. At a news conference on Jan. 14 with NAACP President Ben Jealous, among other leaders, O’Malley said he believes he has the votes in the House; some reports suggest he is one vote short in the Senate. Sen. President Mike Miller opposes repeal. Attorney General Doug Gansler, a putative candidate for governor, also opposes repeal. State executions in Maryland are rare, but replacing the death penalty with a life sentence without parole may become law by the end of this session — but even then could possibly move on to a statewide referendum.

18

GUNS, GUNS AND FEWER GUNS:

’Malley is also working for stiffer gun control and appeared last week with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg at a gun violence summit at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. That was about the same time that the state of New York passed an assault-weapons ban and restrictions on ammunition and the sale of guns, considered to be the most restrictive in the nation. O’Malley wants licensing with fingerprints through the state police, a hands-on weapon-familiarization and gun-safety course and background checks before seeking a permit to purchase a weapon. Two Jewish lawmakers, Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery) and Del. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore), both candidates for attorney general in 2014, are

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Kirsten Beckermann

By Paul Foer

Gov. Martin O’Malley reveals his 2013 budget.

seeking even more restrictions. Cardin wants to impose a 50 percent excise tax on firearms ammunition and add a $25 annual gun registration fee, with the revenues to fully fund mental health and the developmentally disabled in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Frosh wants to give the Maryland State Police authority to inspect the inventory of gun dealers, a job now undertaken by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. LEOPOLD WAIVES RIGHT TO JURY TRIAL:

Anne Arundel County Executive Jon Leopold has asked that his criminal misconduct case be heard by Judge Dennis M. Sweeney rather than a jury—this was after having brought in hundreds of prospective jurors. This may speed up his trial, which possibly could conclude by the end of January. Leopold is accused of using police officers to drive him around for alleged sexual activities and using police to compile political dossiers on political rivals.

CONGRESSMAN HARRIS GETS SUBCOMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIP:

U.S. Rep. Andy Harris (R-Md.-1) has been named chairman of the Subcommittee on Environment of the Science, Space and Technology Committee. Only beginning his second term in Congress, he is the lone Republican in the Maryland delegation and represents the Eastern Shore, as well as some areas north of Baltimore. Harris, an anesthesiologist, is a staunch conservative. The Science, Space and Technology Committee has partial or complete jurisdiction over federal agencies such as the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. While a state senator, Harris was an outspoken opponent of legislation aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. On his website, Harris writes, “I


18-25-legis,medic,bap,chana:Layout 1

Tuesday, Feb. 26 4:30 p.m.: Meetings with Legislators in Annapolis House Office Building Room 145 6 Bladen St. | Annapolis 6:15 p.m.: Reception Francis Scott Key Auditorium St. John’s College 60 College Ave. | Annapolis

Kirsten Beckermann

Light fare provided. Dietary laws observed. Free to attend; registration is required. For more information, contact Jasmine Estes at jestes@baltjc.org or 410-542-4850. Register online at baltjc.org.

am committed to common-sense, multistate solutions that protect the Bay and its precious waterways. In order to make meaningful progress, we need to make sure that all of the stakeholders have a seat at the table, and everyone has a voice in repairing our beautiful estuary. If we don’t receive ‘buy-in’ from all active partners, we can never achieve the goal of a robust environment that our children will be able to appreciate.” However, the Maryland chapter of the Sierra Club said that Harris has “one of the worst environmental voting records in Maryland politics.” In 2010, he had amassed a lifetime score of only 13 percent from the Maryland League of Conservation Voters. JT The JT will continue to keep you u pdated in print on what’s happening in the capital each week. For more equent updates, visit jewishtimes.com. Paul Foer is JT senior news reporter pfoer@jewishtimes.com

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

ARE DRUG COMPANIES choosing profits over saving lives? That is the question many doctors across the country are asking following a report last month by The New England Journal of Medicine, which concludes that a drug shortage led to a higher rate of cancer relapses among children. e study, led by Dr. Monika Metzger of St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, found that the two-year remission rate of Hodgkin’s lymphoma among children fell from 88 percent to 75 percent in 2010 when the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide was substituted for mechlorethamine. e latter had become unavailable to many hospitals nationwide in recent years, and only recently returned to the market again. Mechlorethamine, which has been used for cancer treatment since the 1960s, is one of hundreds of drugs that have been in limited supply in recent years, according to the Food and Drug Administration. A major reason for the short supply, local medical experts say, is the low profit margins within the generic drug business. This makes it unattractive for

pharmaceutical companies to manufacture certain common medications. “This is a devastating example of how drug shortages affect patients and why these shortages must be prevented,” said Dr. Metzger, an associate member of St. Jude’s Department of Oncology, in a statement. “Our results demonstrate that for many chemotherapy drugs, there are no adequate substitute drugs available.” Dr. Joseph Wiley, chief of pediatrics at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, said the study is very credible and highlights the concerns facing many oncology patients. Dr. Wiley, a pediatric oncologist, said while Sinai has not had to substitute chemotherapy drugs yet, they are constantly keeping tabs on what medications might be hard to purchase. “It’s definitely gotten more difficult to purchase many generic drugs over the last two to three years,” Dr. Wiley said. “There’s just no incentive for many drug companies to manufacture generic drugs, despite their life-saving abilities. “In other cases, hospitals may be forced to purchase a second-generation drug, which may have a different


potency, and that could open the door to potential mistakes when trying to calculate dosages. These newer drugs are also exponentially more expensive than their generic counterparts,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Wiley said. Lisa Polinsky, director of pharmacy at LifeBridge Health, said chemotherapy drug shortages represent just a fraction of the problem facing medical facilities across the country. According to the FDA, the number of medications on the administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shortage list has gone from 61 in 2005 to a record 250 in 2011. Polinsky said about 80 percent of these were sterile injectable drugs commonly used in emergency departments and operating rooms. These include electrolytes, anesthetics and epinephrine, the latter of which is often used for patients in cardiac arrest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The federal government needs to have better control over keeping track of when there might be a shortage and finding incentives for companies to continue to produce generic drugs,â&#x20AC;? Polinsky said. Last year, President Barack Obama issued an executive order that called for further action to reduce and prevent drug shortages, protect consumers and prevent price gouging. Part of the concern over drug shortages, Polinsky said, is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emerging â&#x20AC;&#x153;gray marketâ&#x20AC;? for pharmaceuticals, in which companies purchase drugs in low supply and sell them at an average markup of 650 percent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This gray market is like insider trading for drugs,â&#x20AC;? Polinsky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Companies become aware of the shortages prior to the public and take advantage of the situation.â&#x20AC;? Maryland has been at the forefront of this battle for the last few years. Among those trying to bring light to the issue is University of Maryland womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball coach Brenda Frese. Freseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son, Tyler, 4, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 2010 and will continue to receive chemotherapy for the next two years.

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One of Tylerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drugs has been on the shortage list. Frese has lobbied federal and state lawmakers, including U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings (D-7), who plans to introduce legislation that would prohibit pharmacies from selling their supplies to wholesalers. Most recently, Frese offered written testimony to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joint Committee on Health Care Delivery and Financing. The committee is exploring legislative options during the 90-day General Assembly session, which began on Jan. 9.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JUST SAD TO KNOW THAT PEOPLE ARE BEING DENIED DRUGS BECAUSE OF PROFIT MARGINS.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brenda Frese

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic that in the 21st century this is a debate we are having,â&#x20AC;? Frese said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just sad to know that people are being denied drugs because of profit margins. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m curious to think what the heads of those drug companies would think if it was one of their kids who was in danger of dying because a certain drug was just not being produced.â&#x20AC;? Del. Dan Morhaim (D-11) is chairman of the committee and a physician. He said drug shortages have become a serious issue that has led to dangerous situations. Anne Arundel Medical Center was nearly forced to cancel surgeries because it lacked many commonly used medications. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve skated near the edge of danger and need to find solutions to this problem,â&#x20AC;? Morhaim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, there are always some people out there who will find a way to make money off of other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suffering.â&#x20AC;? JT Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com

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tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rare to meet a teen who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t looking for a way to ďŹ&#x201A;esh out his resume. Leadership programs and community service hours certainly give already good students an edge when it comes to the college admissions process. However, even if that is why some teens apply to the Diller Baltimore Teen Fellows program, operated through the Jewish Volunteer Connection of î&#x201A;&#x160;e Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, that is never why they stick with it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or keep friendships made during the program for years past its oďŹ&#x192;cial culmination. No, said Justin Hayet, a student at Binghamton University. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the emotional connection â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to the people of Israel, the land of Israel and the people and city of Ashkelon. Hayet described the friendships he made through Diller as â&#x20AC;&#x153;boldâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;meaningful,â&#x20AC;? and he said the Diller program opened his eyes to what it is like to live as an Israeli. Hayet, who attended Carver Center for Arts and Technology, said he hated Hebrew school and found few Jewish friends at his high school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one was proud to say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I am Jewishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I love Israel,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and that really bothered me. â&#x20AC;Ś I wanted to feel connected to something. ... I applied [for Diller] and it has, without a doubt, been the best decision I ever made,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jews living in the Diaspora need to feel an emotional connection to the people, culture and land of Israel.â&#x20AC;? Hayet was a member of the 20102011 Diller cohort. Sam Sugarman of

The Park School, took part a year later. He said he got involved to â&#x20AC;&#x153;continue to find my Jewish identity.â&#x20AC;? While Park has many Jewish students, Sugarman said he turned to the Partnership to better connect with his Judaism and Jewish values. Sugarman, of course, also learned about Jewish life in Israel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned that in Israel all of the citizens can approach one another and feel like family, even if the people associating have never met,â&#x20AC;? Sugarman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Israel is special in that all of the Jewish people in Israel feel like a close community. â&#x20AC;Ś There are no hesitations approaching a random person and talking to them or asking them a favor.â&#x20AC;? Sugarman said he felt this familiarity with one another â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this closeness â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even stronger in the city of Ashkelon. Hannah Marcin, Diller 2008-2009, said the Baltimore-Ashkelon Partnership has given her a more realistic perspective on Israel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Staying in an Israeli home for a week completely immersed us into the Israeli lifestyle and we were able to truly understand Israel,â&#x20AC;? she said. Diana Peisach, a student at the University of Maryland, College Park, said she does not believe she would have the same love for Israel as she does today without having participated in the Diller 2007-2008 program. She, too, said she learned about the Israeli people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; their â&#x20AC;&#x153;spirit and spunk and national pride.â&#x20AC;? Josh Finifter, who participated between 2005 and 2006, felt similarly.


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“What I have taken away is really what their [the Israelis’] culture is like and how they perceive their lives,” said Finifter. “The way they see and perceive and think is different than the way we do. It is not right or wrong. And I think I have seen and taken some of that culture and applied it to my own life. I hope they [Finifter’s friends in Ashkelon] have done the same.” Nir Yakobov, a 2010-2011 Diller Fellow, and a current young Israeli emissary here in Baltimore, said he wanted to let Finifter know that certainly is the case. While Jews in Baltimore have increased their Jewish identity and connection to the land of Israel, Israelis have learned about new and different ways of defining Jewish identity from America, too. Yakobov said his eyes were opened to the concept of pluralistic Judaism through the Diller program. “In Israel, we have traditional and we have religious, and here there is Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist. It is really interesting to me, and in some ways I think it is one of the things we should learn in Israel from the community here,” he said. Yakobov’s current role, inspired by the fact that he “fell in love with the community here,” enables him to teach students in the congregational and day schools about Israel on a consistent basis. He described it as planting seeds that one day can blossom into a beautiful connection to Israel. “Right now, it’s little things to connect them to Israel. But I want to be a part of building [the connection] from the beginning, so it will one day become something big,” he said. Everyone interviewed said the Diller program is doing its part to foster a new generation that identifies with its Judaism and the importance of the State of Israel, and that will be a part of a strong and vibrant global Jewish people. However, no one felt it was — or could be — the only answer. Each had some advice, some ideas, for what he or she would like to see next.

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“ere are so many programs for teens to go to Israel, and it is terrific,” said Hayet. “What about our parents?” Hayet, Sugarman and Peisach all said they would recommend a family Partnership trip — something more than stopping in for a day as part of a larger tour. “By creating a home away from home for Baltimore Jews in Ashkelon, we strengthen Baltimore’s support and love for Israel on an even more personal level. Simply touring the country for its famous cities is not the same as forming a connection with an individual city,” said Peisach. “It’s nice to know — for both cities — that someone is supporting them.” Finier said now that he has graduated from college, he is back in Baltimore and eager to volunteer. He is slowly getting involved and he hopes e Associated will allow for young leadership to create new grassroots initiatives to bolster the partnership above and beyond what already exists. “We have an amazing opportunity that no other generation of Jews had — we have the freedom and technological ability to connect with Jews in Israel,” said Hayet. “We would only be putting those who fought for the birth of Israel to shame if we did not take full advantage of experiencing and connecting with Israel by means of the Baltimore-Ashkelon Partnership.” JT

Justin Hayat says all Jewish Baltimoreans should take advantage of connecting with Ashkelonim.

Hannah Marcin says as soon as she returned to Baltimore from Israel, “I knew I had to go back — fast!”

This year, the Baltimore-Ashkelon Partnership is celebrating its 10th year. Each month for 10 months, the JT will explore a topic related to Ashkelon or the Partnership. To learn more and to get involved, visit baltimoreashkelon.org.

Maayan Jaffe is JT managing editor mjaffe@jewishtimes.com

Nir Yakobov of Ashkelon says he “fell in love with the community here.”


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Local News |

Rebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum will talk about forgiveness at an upcoming event.

AND LET

LIVE

Rebbetzin Siegelbaum to offer workshop on forgiveness, change By Maayan Jaffe A SPIRITUAL GUIDE and healer from Israel, Rebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum is not your average rabbi’s wife. She comes to Baltimore each year to assist women who struggle, who need to heal. She also infuses in those who meet with her a strong desire to grow and change. Her goal: to ensure each Jewish woman has the self-confidence and love to lead a productive and meaningful life. Rebbetzin Siegelbaum, a native of Denmark, is the director of

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Midreshet B’erot Bat Ayin: Holistic Torah for Women on the Land in Bat Ayin, located in the Judean hills of Israel. She holds a Bachelor of Education in Bible and Jewish Philosophy from Michlala Jerusalem College for Women and a Master of Art in Jewish History from Touro College. Rebbetzin Siegelbaum will be in Baltimore on Thursday, Jan. 31 for a workshop in conjunction with the Jewish Women’s Project for Ahavas Yisrael. She caught up with the JT ahead of her talk.

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Provided

FORGIVE

JT: The title of your talk is “A Forgiveness Workshop for Spiritual Self-Healing and Ahavas Yisrael.” What does that mean? Rebbetzin Siegelbaum: … ere is a

great revival of ahavas Yisrael, to really work on loving our fellow Jew with a full heart. … The reason for this revival … is our yearning to return to our Golden Age and rebuild our glorious Temple, a spiritual healing structure that connected us with our higher soul and with our Creator. While the First Temple was destroyed due to idol worship, illicit sexuality and murder, the Second Temple was destroyed due to sinat chinam, senseless hatred. Therefore, the Talmud equates senseless hatred with these three cardinal sins (Babylonian Talmud, Yoma 9b).

… We may have spiritual and emotional blocks that make it very hard to truly love our fellow Jew. One of the most common blocks is the inability to forgive ourselves and others. It is our pent-up grudges … that block us from really opening our hearts in true ahavas Yisrael. … We need spiritual self-healing in order to truly learn to let go of our spiritual blocks. Why now?

Ahavas Yisrael is timeless and must be practiced at all seasons. Yet, it is especially relevant during the month of Adar with Purim as its centerpiece, which celebrates our reunification as a people. As we approach the Jewish month of Adar, … I thought teaching about … forgiveness and self-healing would be appropriate.


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release unhealthy emotions that block our “ahavas Yisrael. Most of us push grudges under the rug, the goal of the guided meditation of this workshop is to become more conscious of our personal “unforgivenessess,” which is the first step to releasing them and learning to truly forgive. In addition, my first CD: “Online with Hashem: Meditations on the Weekly Torah Portion” will be available for purchase.

Provided

to reclaim our heritage and do the inner work of ahavas Yisrael that will bring about the geulah and the rebuilding of our glorious Temple. Women are connected to the moon called levana in Hebrew, including within it the word lev, Hebrew for heart. erefore, women are leaders in engendering heart/emotional health. e forum of just women is therefore more conducive to opening our hearts, learning and supporting one another in doing our inner work together. With what will people leave?

My goal is that people will leave with a much greater awareness of how vital forgiveness is for the quality of their lives and for their spiritual, emotional and physical health. ey will also leave with Torah sources in Hebrew and English on the ramification of ahavas Yisrael, with special emphasis on forgiveness. Learning these Torah sources inside the texts inspires a desire for continuing the inner work required to

NEW LOOK & NEW LOCATION!

LIFE FITNESS PHYSICAL THERAPY IS EXCITED TO BE A

Even if we have learned much about the importance [of forgiveness], it may still be hard to actually change the feelings in our heart. In this

— Rebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum

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Will this really work?

“WOMEN ARE LEADERS IN ENGENDERING HEART/EMOTIONAL HEALTH.”

B

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As I write in my first book, “Women at the Crossroads: A Woman’s Perspective on the Weekly Torah Portion,” the process of redemption is intrinsically linked to women. It is known that not only the past redemption took place in the merit of the righteous women (Sotah 11b), but also the future redemption will be in their merit (Arizal, Sha’ar HaGilgulim, Introduction 20). We experience the rays of the feminine radiance unfolding through the renewed thirst among Jewish women

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This is open only to women. Can you talk about the power of women’s learning?

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PART OF THE OWINGS MILLS COMMUNITY! 23 Crossroads Dr. Suite 300, Owing Mills, MD 21117 phone: (410) 998-9133 fax: (410) 998-9155 Audra Stern, MPT - Clinic Director

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“EmunaHealing” workshop, we will not only learn Torah sources on how to forgive ourselves and others, we will do guided visualization and practice spiritual healing exercises to clear negative feelings from the heart. Learning to open our heart energy center, “Tiferet,” will help break our “heart walls” and enable love to flow freely into and out of our heart. JT

FORGIVE & LET LIVE: A FORGIVENESS WORKSHOP FOR SPIRITUAL SELF-HEALING AND AHAVAS YISRAEL Thursday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. At the home of Danielle Sarah Storch 3209 Fallstaff Road, Baltimore Contact Danielle Sarah at 410-764-6094 or dss770@comcast.net

Maayan Jaffe is JT managing editor mjaffe@jewishtimes.com

jewishtimes.com

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Local News |

A CHANGE AT THE TOP Outgoing LifeBridge Health President, CEO, Warren A. Green, discusses tenure, future By Ron Snyder

health-care transformation in Northwest Baltimore County and Baltimore City over the last 22 years. Green took over as president and chief executive officer of Sinai Hospital of Baltimore in 1991. During his tenure he helped the hospital expand and oversaw the formation of LifeBridge Health in 1998, which includes Sinai and Northwest Hospital, along with Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Hospital and Courtland Gardens Nursing & Rehabilitation Center and their subsidiaries and affiliated units. Green, the president and chief operating office of LifeBridge Health, is set to retire on July 1. He will be succeeded by Neil Meltzer, current president and chief operating officer of Sinai Hospital. Green recently spoke with the Baltimore Jewish Times to discuss his tenure, the future of LifeBridge Health and the health-care industry and his plans for the future.

successful and has become the sum of its parts. Northwest, Levindale and Sinai coming together created a real synergy. How important is it today for smaller health companies to merge — like LifeBridge did 15 years ago — in order to compete in a health-care industry in which costs continue to rise?

It’s true there is a scale argument in our industry just like there is in other industries. But we always chose to grow in a rational way, focusing our attention on growing geographically. It was never our intent to pick up hospitals in the Eastern Shore or in Western Maryland. We wanted to concentrate on the communities in Northwest Baltimore City and Baltimore County and deepen our roots in those areas. Today, LifeBridge enjoys a substantial market-share advantage in those communities, too.

JT: What do you consider your greatest accomplishment over the last 22 years? Green: The creation of LifeBridge

How does having that center in the northwest corridor of the county and city help LifeBridge better serve the area’s Jewish community?

Health in 1998 had to be a high point for me and for all of us working on it. LifeBridge has become very

We have focused on finding ways to be relevant to those communities that are just outside our four walls, which

“WE’RE BIG, BUT NOT SO BIG THAT YOU CAN’T GET YOUR ARMS AROUND US.” — Warren A. Green

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Warren A. Green says the creation of LifeBridge was a career highlight.

has allowed us to ensure the needs of those communities are met. Do you believe that because LifeBridge limited where it wanted to grow that its facilities were able to maintain a community-hospital feel while being able to provide services associated with large health-care systems?

Our objective was to be ‘right-sized,’ if you will. And we are. We’re big enough to be taken seriously. We have a billion dollars in revenue [annually], 7,200 employees and 1,500 physicians. So, we’re big, but not so big that you can’t get your arms around us. We’re also small enough to be very high-touch with the people we impact. Would recent capital projects, including the development of a new children’s hospital at Sinai and planned expansion at Northwest have been possible, had the hospitals not merged?

It’s been a very rewarding process.

Provided

WARREN A. GREEN has overseen a

We’ve invested heavily in capital projects at all of our facilities, and we’re very pleased we’ve been able to bring the physical plant standards in our institutions up to the 21st century and expanded the physical footprint of LifeBridge to accommodate new services like the Rubin Institute [and] the Berman Brain and Eye Institute. In addition, the Kreiger Eye Institute is expanding, so the investment has allowed us to modernize and expand at the same time. What message do you hope to leave to LifeBridge Health’s new leadership?

The message has to be that LifeBridge is a special, maybe even a unique, kind of organization that has to be carefully nurtured and guided along the way, especially given the changes taking place in the industry. is has to be done in a way that it retains our values of caring and concern for the total community and of the employees and staff of the company.


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News

How do you envision the transition in leadership within LifeBridge Health?

It’s going to be an easy and seamless transition. It’s not like someone is coming in here from some distant part of the country. Neil understands the company and the community as well as I do. How would you gauge the state of health care in the state today compared to when you arrived in Baltimore in 1991?

e institutions in the area, including ours, are taking better care of the community than ever before. ere has been an added emphasis on patient safety over the past several years. All institutions, ours included, have spent a considerable amount of time redesigning systems and protocols to make sure patients are spared unnecessary harm, that there aren’t any hospital-related infections and that slips and falls are reduced to the barest minimum. I think the pace of all of that has quickened over the past 10 to 15 years. What I’m seeing at LifeBridge today is an intensification of that. What about the impact of the Affordable Care Act on LifeBridge Health?

We’re well positioned for this transition, but all health-care facilities are facing a period of uncertainty when this very expansive new law takes root. There’s a lot in this 2,000-page document that not everyone fully understands. What we do know is that we will be responsible for the health of a population, not just for each episode of illnesses that come down the line. In the past, hospitals were paid for the more things they did. The more admissions, the more surgeries, the more ER visits they had, the more cash flowed into institutions. In the future, with healthcare reform, we’re going to see facilities getting paid to keep people out of here and keeping them healthy and well at home. It’s a new set of

incentives and a new way of thinking, but it’s something we’re going to have to adjust to.

MAY BREAK ELSEWHERE.

STORIES COME TO life IN THE JT.

Is that adjustment the biggest issue in health care moving forward?

It’s one of a cluster of several big issues. Another issue is financing. It’s clear the country is running out of money for health care, and county and state budgets are becoming increasingly strained to handle the explosive growth of health care. We also have an aging population that is growing, which by itself would create a great deal of stress on the economy. So one of the things that hospitals and doctors are concerned about as we look to the future is how are we going to get paid for what we do. We have such massive fixed costs with all of these millions of square feet of high technology, and all health-care facilities have debt that has to be serviced. At LifeBridge we have a payroll of a couple of million dollars a day, and how do we make our way through all of this change and do it in a financially responsible way? Therefore, a lot of emphasis today is being placed on refining operations to make them more efficient, more effective and to cope with what we know will be downward pressure on reimbursement.

Our new DIG ITAL MAGAZ I N E offers readers: VIDEOS • PHOTO SLI DESHOWS AUDIO FILES • SOCIAL MEDIA I NTEG RATION LIVE LINKS • AND M UCH MORE!

Current paid print subscribers receive the digital publication with their subscription. To access the digital magazine beginning February 1, 2013: 1. Visit digital.jewishtimes.com. 2. Your username, which will be your subscriber account number located on your printed JT label.

What are your plans?

I’m going to continue to work with some voluntary boards. I’m a commissioner for Maryland Public Television, and I’m going to be chairing a special project for MPT, a salute to Vietnam veterans. I’m going to be active with them, as well as the board of the American Red Cross [of Central Maryland]. But I’m going to consider other volunteer options because I like to give back to the community. At the same time, my wife and I plan to travel and over time find other ways to be engaged in the community. JT Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com

3. Use JTdigital as your password. If you have any trouble, please call our subscription office: 410-902-2300.

Don’t miss this compelling digital publication with all the tools you need to connect with Jewish Baltimore. jewishtimes.com

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International News

Israel’s Carmel Forest rejuvenates

Omri Boneh, the Jewish National Fund's northern Israel regional director, stands in an area destroyed by the 2010 Carmel Fire.

THE RABBI’S YARMULKE fluttered in the wind,

his hand holding it to his head, as he recited El Malei Rachamim, the traditional prayer for the deceased. In front of him were 50 guards from a nearby prison. Behind him, a wall displayed the names of 44 prison service cadets, teachers, police and firefighters who died when a bus carrying the cadets was engulfed by the largest fire in Israel’s history. The Carmel Fire started on Dec. 2, 2010 and burned for five days, destroying 6,000 acres of northern Israel’s expansive Carmel Forest. In June, the government released a harsh report criticizing the conduct of its agencies during the fire. But even as the country continues to mourn the fire’s dead, the forest is being reborn. Trees are regenerating on their own, new species are being planted, protection against future fires is expanding, and hikers are returning to once-charred trails. Israel’s fire services also have grown. On Jan. 18, for the first time since the fire, families will come to plant trees in advance of 28

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Tu b’Shvat, the Jewish New Year for trees. Today, the area of the fire looks like a giant bald spot in the middle of a dense forest of pines and oaks. Rolling hills, bare of trees, stand encircled by verdant slopes where the ground is hardly visible. On the empty hills, a few solitary trees have survived. Many of them are black on one side and green on the other, partial victims of the fire. Closer to the ground are rows of light brown tubes about 2 feet tall made from a plastic material that looks like cardboard. A few leaves peek from underneath. These are the oaks, carob trees and Jerusalem pines planted by the Jewish National Fund, a quasi-governmental organization that helps develop Israel’s land and is famous for planting trees across the country. “Usually, a natural forest you leave to nature,” said Omri Boneh, director of Israel’s northern region for JNF. “But in the specific environment of the Carmel, if we don’t intervene, it will lead to a very dense forest with lower biodiversity and with

“PLANTING A TREE IN ISRAEL TESTIFIES TO OUR ROOTS IN OUR HOMELAND. BUT YOU HAVE TO MAKE SURE THE TREES ARE APPROPRIATE TO THEIR SURROUNDINGS.” — Guy Ayalon of the Nature and Parks Authority

great vulnerability to a future fire.” JNF sits on a committee to rehabilitate the forest along with Israel’s Nature and Parks Authority, the Environmental Protection Ministry and the Agriculture Ministry. Formed in 2011, the committee has been able to accelerate its work after being granted a nearly $15 million budget last year. e committee hopes to turn tragedy into opportunity. Its team wants to let the forest regenerate

Photos JTA Wire Ser/Ben Sales

By Ben Sales


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Visitors read the names of the Carmel Fire victims at a memorial in Beir Oren, Israel.

Photos JTA Wire Ser/Ben Sales

TU B’SHVAT IN BALTIMORE

on its own but will intervene in a few ways: thinning out the pine regrowth to prevent future fires from spreading quickly; introducing new tree species; and rebuilding hiking trails. “We’re changing the nature of the character of the flora,” said Guy Ayalon, the Nature and Parks Authority’s northern Israel director. “When they’re dense, they are a risk for a fire like the one we saw.” The authority plans to introduce more Jerusalem pines, as well as oak, almond, olive and carob trees — all native to Israel and thus, explains Ayalon, in better sync with the environment. Boneh said that a wider range of trees will attract a wider range of wildlife to the forest. Both expect the rehabilitation process to take at least 10 years, by which time the newly planted trees will grow tall and thick. In the meantime, Ayalon hopes the government will keep funding the project. “Forest care needs to happen all the time, and Israel needs to know how to invest in it,” he said. “If you do adequate prevention, fires will be rarer and smaller.” The government, meanwhile, has invested in its fire-prevention capabilities, which drew heavy criticism in the Carmel Fire’s wake. It has united the local fire stations under a new national umbrella agency and invested nearly $100 million in fire equipment and personnel. The funds have paid for new gear for firefighters, an expanded fleet

of trucks and, for the first time, a fleet of eight planes dedicated to fire prevention. Each plane can spray nearly 80,000 gallons of water. Still, Fire and Rescue Service spokesman Yoram Levy said Israel has a long way to go: The goal is to be able to respond to fires within nine minutes. The average now is 14. The government has promised the service an additional $268 million over five years. But with Israel facing a $10 billion budget deficit this year, Levy suspects that may turn out to be an empty promise. “Now we’re talking about budget cuts, and [members of Knesset] are saying they want to cut us,” he said. “They’re definitely going to try.” Boneh is happy to see Israel’s fire services improve but says that in the end preventing fires like the Carmel is near impossible. “It doesn’t matter what we do,” he said. “On Dec. 2 [2010], there hadn’t been significant rain, the dryness of the soil was extreme, and there was wind. If there’s a fire, it’ll get to that size.” For now, though, Boneh and Ayalon hope to rebuild the forest they saw burn — and to see it last. “Planting a tree in Israel testifies to our roots in our homeland,” Ayalon said. “But you have to make sure the trees are appropriate to their surroundings.” JT

Tu b’Shvat is on Sat., Jan, 26. Area synagogues will be hosting events in its honor. Here are two ideas for things you can do this Festival of Trees: FRI., JAN. 25 Tu b’Shvat Seder Dinner and Wine Tasting at Har Sinai Har Sinai Congregation will hold a public Seder dinner and wine tasting at 5:30 p.m. A musical Shabbat Shira service will follow at 7:30 p.m., commemorating the song the Israelites sang after crossing the Red Sea. The dinner and service will take place at the synagogue, 2905 Walnut Ave. in Owings Mills. Adam’s Garden of Eatin’ will cater the dinner of Sephardic three-bean salad, lemon thyme chicken breast in sun-dried tomato Madeira sauce, sweet yellow corn polenta and haricot vert sauté and Viennese desserts. The service is free. Dinner costs $30 per person. Babysitting is available for $5 per child. For more information or to make reservations, contact Susan Bernstein at 410-654-9393 or sbernstein@harsinai-md.org. SAT., JAN. 26 Tu b’Shvat Seder at Beth El Congregation Beth el Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Ave. in Pikesville, will be holding its Seder immediately following Shabbat morning services. RSVP to Ellen Marks at 410-484-0411 or email ellenm@bethelbalto.com. For more ideas, visit jewishtime s.com and cli ck on “Calendar.”

Ben Sales writes for JTA Wire Service.

jewishtimes.com

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National News |

MAI / Splash News/Newscom

President Barack Obama was sworn on Monday for a second term as President of the United States.

AT THE INAUGARATION

A report from the field on the day President Obama was sworn in for another four years Compared to 2009, the weather was warmer, the crowd smaller, and the mood a bit more subdued during President Barack Obama’s second inauguration on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Fresh from his election victory, Obama stood in front of the U.S. Capitol to face a crowd estimated at more than 1 million and spoke of his vision of anAmerica where a poor girl can live and fulfill her dreams and where the most vulnerable are protected, although not by government alone. Referring at times to Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the Constitution and Declaration of Independence, Obama promised to strive for a world in which everyone is equal. The time is ripe, Obama said, now that the country’s decade of war is ending. “We are made for this moment. We will seize it, so long as we seize it together,” he said. But peppered throughout his speech,

Obama made it clear that he adamantly was going to work to keep America’s safety net and a more peaceful world, regardless of his political opponents. “We cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat namecalling as reasoned debate,” he said in his 15-minute speech. Obama made few references to foreign policy. Potential hot spots like Iran and Syria were not mentioned. The Middle East entered into the speech just once when Obama talked of supporting democracies throughout the world. “We will support democracy from Asia to Africa, from the Americas to the Middle East, because our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom,” Obama said. He warned Americans that the best intentions and dreams “could all come

crumbling down” due to storms like Hurricane Sandy, the horrific elementary school shooting at Sandy Hook, a sudden job loss or illness. Obama and Vice President Joe Biden actually were sworn in a day earlier, on Jan. 20, in private ceremonies. The public 57th swearing in was held on Monday. Faith in America’s Future was the theme. In the public ceremony, Obama was sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts. He used two bibles, one used by President Abraham Lincoln in his first inauguration, and the other was the bible Rev. King used while traveling. Moments before Obama took the oath of office, Biden was sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Biden placed his hand on the bible that has been in his family since 1893. For devoted Obama supporters, many

By Suzanne Pollak

of whom flew or rode in a bus from all parts of the country to watch history being made, it was a wonderful day. They made clear whom they loved, clapping loudly for Bill and Hillary Clinton and Obama’s two daughters, and showing far less enthusiasm for politicians like Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) and other Republicans. Sen. Charles Schumer, (D-N.Y.) chaired the inauguration events. Myrlie EversWilliams, former chair of the NAACP and wife of the late civil rights leader Medgar Evers, gave the invocation. There were short patriotic musical interludes featuring James Taylor, Kelly Clarkson and Beyonce, who sang the national anthem. Rabbi Benjamin G. Kelsen of Teaneck, N.J., thought Obama’s speech was “fantastic. I think he made a fantastic speech.”


MAI / Splash News/Newscom

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As he stood waiting for the Obamas to make their appearance at the Commander-in-Chief ’s Ball, the former vice chair of Rabbis for Obama said the president “was very inspiring. He clearly laid out where he wants to go,” but did tell the crowd the journey wouldn’t be easy. Also ecstatic with the day were Joann and Bob Balzer who had traveled from Santa Fe, N.M., as they did four years ago for Obama’s first inauguration. “We thought it was absolutely wonderful,” Joann Balzer said. She specifically liked Obama’s references to diversity and his description of a country where everyone is equal. Monday’s journey clearly wasn’t an easy one for many people. Gigantic signs throughout D.C. pointed the way to different colored gates, so people with green or orange tickets dutifully followed their respective arrows, basically pushed along by others in the crowd. But certain sections filled up fast, and it soon become apparent that holding the right ticket wasn’t a guarantee to be in that section. Getting home was even harder. Lines that lasted two and three hours were reported at several Metro stops, and some of the stations were closed intermittently to deal with the huge crowds. Pennsylvania Avenue was closed for the inaugural parade so anyone needing to get to the other side had to walk all the way past the Washington Monument to 18th Street to cross. For many, that meant walks of a mile or two after already standing for several hours at the swearing in. Along their trek, they passed lots of portable bathrooms and television news vans. Also scattered along the walk were many souvenir hawkers. For less than $10, inauguration-goers could purchase Obama buttons, posters, calendars, mugs, hats and other collectibles. Photos of Obama could be found everywhere, some of him alone, others with his wife,

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Michelle, and still others featuring the president with Rev. King. Biden’s picture also could be found. The people walked where the crowd took them, hoping those in front knew where they were going. Others bucked traffic, repeatedly asking why they couldn’t turn down one of the several closed-off streets. It turns out that a Metro bus is just the right length to block a street. Also present to make sure no one dared walked down particular streets were scores of security officials — some were police officers, others in the military. Scattered around the area were members of J Street, who busily handed out information sheets. MaxSocolofRaleigh,N.C.,repeatedly said, “Tell President Obama to support Middle East peace” as people walked by. Socol, who used to live in D.C. and attended Temple Sinai, said he jumped at the chance to come when he learned J Street was looking for volunteers. Some attendees decided not to bother with the crowd at all. They stopped at the nearest restaurant, relaxing and warming up before making the trip home. Others ended up watching the parade for a while. Once again, Charlie Brotman, a retired sports announcer, was the voice of the parade. is was the 85-year-old’s 16th parade, having made his debut at President Dwight Eisenhower’s second inauguration. The several-hour parade featured floats and marching bands from all over the country. e parade was hardly the end of the festivities. ree balls were held that evening, including the Commanderin-Chief ’s Ball, the Ambassador’s Ball and the Captain’s Ball. e highlight of each was that special dance and kiss featuring the president and first lady, which, while only lasting a few minutes, probably generated more tweets and comments than some of the very famous performers. Talk was centered on the Michelle

Obama’s Jason Wu ruby-colored chiffon and velvet gown. She also sported a handmaid diamond embellished ring by jewelry designer Kimberly McDonald and shoes designed by Jimmy Choo. This outfit is destined for the National Archives. When they made it to the Commander-in-Chief ’s Ball in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, the Obamas danced, as Jennifer Hudson sang Al Green’s hit “Let’s Stay Together.” e crowd stood nearly frozen, the only movement was the clicking of thousands of cell phones and the occasional camera, all held high for a better shot. Although many famous singers performed, there was little dancing across the vast bottom level of the convention center, which was estimated at between the lengths of two and three football fields. There were many bars scattered throughout the center as were snack tables filled with bowls of pretzels, cheese crackers and nuts. Alicia Keyes performed first, singing a special song for the night that featured the line, “He’s president, and he’s on fire.” Also appearing were such musical groups as Mana, Brad Paisley and FUN. Katy Perry, Stevie Wonder, Usher and Smokey Robinson performed at the other balls. The day before the public inauguration, there was a worship service at St. John’s Episcopal Church in which Rabbi Jack Moline of Agudas Achim Congregation in Alexandria blessed the congregation. In that blessing, Moline told the Obamas, who were in attendance, that when they go to sleep at the end of all the events, “May you dream sweet dreams of a world repaired in righteousness and justice, in love and compassion.” He closed by saying, “May you go in peace, and may each of you be a blessing.” There also was a National Prayer Service at Washington National

Cathedral Tuesday morning. Rabbi Stuart Weinblatt of Congregation B’nai Tzedek in Potomac attended the service and praised it for being “so reflective of the diversity of our country.”?Religious leaders of various faiths spoke or led prayers, showing “the beautiful tapestry that is America.” Rabbi Julie Schonfeld, executive vice president of the Rabbinical Assembly, led the 2,200 audience members in Psalm 116:4-12. However, she changed the text at one spot. In the line that reads, “e Lord watches over the innocent,” Schonfeld added that besides watching us, God “calls upon us to watch over the innocent.” Following the service, Schonfeld explained that she wanted people to understand that through God’s accomplishments on earth, the people also must watch over the most vulnerable. She said she felt compelled to adapt this psalm in light of the recent shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. “From a Jewish point of view, we are really obligated” to help each other, she said. During the national service, which Schonfeld, termed “very moving and covering quite a lot of depth,” Cantor Mikhail Manevich of Washington Hebrew Congregation recited the Sh’ma and the V’ahavta. Also speaking was Rabbi Sharon Brous, founding rabbi of IKAR Jewish Community, who said in part, “God of love: You challenge us to widen the boundaries of our hearts. You know us better than we know ourselves.” While people le the service emotionally uplied, many were greeted along their trip home by anti-abortion protesters holding several large signs depicting fetuses, clearly sending the message to politicians and religious leaders alike, that while everything seemed wonderful at that moment, there is much conflict ahead. JT Suzanne Pollak writes for our sister publication, Washington Jewish Week.

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Israel Votes 2013 — News Analysis His party sHrunk, his opponents grew, and his challengers multiplied. But with the results in, it seems Binyamin netanyahu survived the knesset elections on Jan. 22 to serve another term as prime minister. netanyahu faces a bumpy road. His Likud party, together with the nationalist yisrael Beiteinu, fell to 31 seats in the voting from its current representation of 42. the biggest surprise of the election was the ascendance of former tV personality yair Lapid’s centrist yesh atid party. Founded just a year ago, yesh atid won 19 seats on a platform of national service and pro-middle-class economic reform. Likud’s traditional rival, the center-le Labor, grew to 15 from eight seats promoting progressive economic policy. and another political newcomer, naftali Bennett, is likely to push netanyahu to the right on security issues. His Jewish Home party, a successor to the national religious party, quadrupled its representation from three to 11 seats. together with the sephardic Orthodox shas party and the haredi Orthodox united torah Judaism, the right-wing knesset bloc will hold 60 of the knesset’s 120 seats — a slim majority. that’s anything but a mandate for netanyahu, who campaigned on the slogan “a strong prime minister, a strong israel.” instead of being able to lead a new coalition with a large party behind him, netanyahu will have to negotiate with rivals and forge compromises with opposing camps.

Judging from the success of yesh atid, Labor and Jewish Home, israelis cast a resounding vote for progressive economic reform and new leaders in their parliament. e biggest thorn in the prime minister’s side looks to be Lapid. unlike the fiscally conservative netanyahu, Lapid won support by calling for housing reform, opposing tax increases for the middle class and including haredi yeshiva students in israel’s mandatory military conscription. But netanyahu’s biggest concern may be a rival in his own right-wing camp, Bennett, who appears to have picked up most of the seats lost by Likud-Beiteinu. While netanyahu remains ambiguous on the question of a palestinian state — he formally endorsed the idea in a 2009 speech at Bar-ilan university but hardly has mentioned it since or done much to promote it — Bennett passionately opposes the idea. instead, the former high-tech entrepreneur calls for annexing much of the West Bank. Even within netanyahu’s party, nationalists on the Likud list who never before made it into the knesset will now occupy seats. among them is Moshe Feiglin, leader of the Jewish Leadership faction of Likud, who favors West Bank annexation and encouraging arabs who hold israeli citizenship to leave israel. the rise of yesh atid and Jewish Home do offer netanyahu some new opportunities, too. rather than rely on the haredi Orthodox parties such as shas and united torah Judaism for

Members of Yair Lapid's Yesh Atid party celebrate in Tel Aviv after hearing the results of exit polls.

the coalition, netanyahu could make common cause with yesh atid and Jewish Home, both of which want to dra haredi israelis into the army or some form of national service — even though they may significantly disagree on security matters. Lapid talked during the campaign of his willingness to join a netanyahu coalition, influencing the government from within rather than from the opposition. so even though the haredi parties grew by three seats — shas stayed at 11 seats and united torah Judaism went to seven seats from five, according to exit polls — Lapid’s willingness to provide netanyahu with an equally large chunk of seats to build his coalition means that the haredi parties may have lost their political leverage to keep yeshiva students out of israel’s military draft. For its part, Labor looks destined to lead the knesset’s opposition; its chairwoman, shelly yachimovich, has vowed not to join a netanyahu coalition. tzipi Livni’s new Hatnua party, which won just six seats, is likely to stay in the opposition, too. the election represented a major defeat for Livni, who in the last election led the kadima party to 28 seats — more than any other party. this time, the eviscerated kadima failed to win even a single seat.

Election Results (according to exit polls): Likud-Yisrael Beiteinu: 31; Yesh Atid: 19; Labor: 15; Shas: 11; Jewish Home: 11; Meretz: 6; United Torah Judaism: 7; Hatnua: 6; Hadash: 4; Raam-Taal: 5; Balad: 3; Kadima: 2 32

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

The Consequences Of Israel’s Vote By Uriel Heilman

A few observations about the Israeli election results: Right-left split changes, but not much: From an outsider’s perspective, Israel would seem to be a very politically unstable place. The biggest party in the previous Knesset, Kadima, crashed from 28 seats to a grand total of zero. The No. 3 party, Yisrael Beiteinu, hitched its wagon to the ruling party, Likud, but their combined list lost about a quarter of its seats, down to 31 from 42. Meanwhile, a party that didn’t exist until a few months ago, Yesh Atid, emerged as the 120-seat Knesset’s second-biggest party, with 19 seats, according to exit polls. Yet despite the swapping of party labels, not too much changed in the right-left split. The right wing appears to have lost a little ground — from 65 seats in the last Knesset to 60 seats in the new one. The center and left gained some adherents but remains a minority with fewer than 50 seats (the balance goes to the Arab parties). New priorities: With Israelis deeply pessimistic about the chances for imminent peace, a significant number of voters went for parties that made socioeconomic issues, not security, the centerpiece of their campaigns. Yesh Atid ran a campaign about social and economic issues, and Labor leader Shelly Yachimovich, who led the party to 15 seats, up from eight in the last Knesset, virtually ignored security

Yehoshua Yosef/Flash90/JTA

Likud leads, but rise of Yesh Atid, Jewish Home mean bumpy road for Netanyahu By Ben Sales


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Ben Sales writes for the JTA Wire Service.

issues in her campaign. This is a sea of change from the old days, when campaigns were all about security. Tzipi Livni’s Hatnua bucked that trend, emphasizing peace with the Palestinians. The result: six seats. New faces: The 19th Knesset will see a plethora of new members, with more than a quarter of the Knesset occupied by first-timers, most from Jewish Home and Yesh Atid. Jewish Home is led by a son of American immigrants to Israel, businessman-turned-politician Naftali Bennett, and Yesh Atid is headed by former TV personality Yair Lapid (son of the late politician Tommy Lapid). Women: The new Knesset will see the number of women rise, with the biggest representation from Yesh Atid, eight of whose new representatives are women. The Likud-Beiteinu list has seven, Labor has four, and Jewish Home and Meretz each have three. Hatnua and Hadash each have one. Among the new women in the Knesset will be the body’s first

Ethiopian-Israeli woman, Penina TamnuShata of Yesh Atid, an attorney who immigrated to Israel at age 3 during Operation Moses. The end of Kadima: Twice in its short history, the Kadima party leader occupied the prime minister’s office. But in just one election cycle, the party went from Israel’s largest faction all the way down to zero: Kadima failed to win a single seat. The party was doomed by a variety of factors: the rise of Yesh Atid, whose socioeconomic-focused platform and charismatic leader peeled away centrist voters; Livni’s failure to gain adherents for Kadima and subsequent defection to her new party, Hatnua; and Shaul Mofaz’s decision to join, albeit briefly, the Likud-led ruling coalition. It’s not the end of centrist politics in Israel, but it is the end of the road for the party started by Ariel Sharon as a breakaway from Likud. Bibi’s reign: Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s supporters used to herald him as Bibi, King of Israel. So did Time

magazine just a few months ago. But with the combined Likud-Yisrael Beiteinu list falling by a quarter after what was widely panned as a lackluster campaign, it’s difficult to make the case that Netanyahu’s star is burning brighter. He’s almost sure to capture the premiership again (now comes the horse trading that is Israeli coalition building), but it seems it will be more for lack of an alternative than enthusiasm for Netanyahu. Hello, Naftali Bennett: If there was any enthusiasm on the right wing this time around, it appeared to be for Bennett, leader of the newly constituted Jewish Home party (itself a successor to the National Religious Party). The party captured 11 seats, up from just three (as the NRP) in the last Knesset. Bennett, who supports annexation of parts of the West Bank, is likely to apply pressure on Netanyahu to shift further right on security issues. Uriel Heilman writes for the JTA Wire Service.

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Yehoshua Yosef/Flash90/JTA

The Consequences Of Israel’s Vote from page 32 Hatnua’s poor showing also suggested how little of the election was about negotiations with the Palestinians. Livni made much of the issue during the campaign, but it clearly failed to resonate with voters. Hatnua’s six seats equaled the showing of Meretz, the solidly left-wing party. By contrast, Labor, traditionally a promoter of peace talks, barely raised the issue in the campaign. Instead, it focused on socioeco nomic issues and made significant Knesset gains. With Election Day over, the coalition building begins: To win another term as prime minister, Netanyahu now must cobble together an alliance of at least 61 Knesset members to form Israel’s next government. Who he chooses — and who agrees to join him — will determine a great deal about the course charted in the years to come by the Israeli government. JT

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Har Sinai Tu B’shevat Seder, Jan. 25.

WORTH THE SCHLEP Community calendar for Jan. 25 to Feb. 1

Centerstage celebrtes 50 years with Gordon Center performance.

Friday 25

Saturday 26

Sunday 27

Monday 28

OrchKids: BSO OrchKids Artistic Director Daniel Trahey will be featured at TEDxBaltimore’s “Baltimore ReWired.” 4:30 p.m., Morgan State University, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore. A performance by the OrchKids Orchestra will follow.

Pumpkin Theatre Presents: “Quest of the ZIZ Bird,” based on the children’s book, “The Hardest Word.” 1 and 3 p.m., St. Timothy’s School, 8400 Greenspring Ave., Pikesville. Cost: $14 in advance, $16 at the door. Contact 410-8281814 or visit pumpkintheatre.com.

Torah Tot Class: Bolton Street Synagogue is hosting the first of four classes for children ages 4 and 5. 10 a.m. to noon, 212 W. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore. Contact 410-235-5354 or visit boltonstreet.org.

Job Search Network: Learn about current job-search and recruiting trends. 5:30 to 7 p.m., Rosenbloom Owings Mills JCC, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. Preregistration required. Contact Ronnie Green at 410-843-7433 or rgreen@jcsbaltimore.org.

Tu B’shevat Seder: Har Sinai Congregation will host a Tu B’shevat service and seder dinner. 5:30 p.m., 2905 Walnut Ave., Owings Mills. Service is free; dinner is $30; babysitting for $5 per child. Contact 410-654-9393 or sbernstein@harsinai-md.org.

Hadassah’s Cell-A-Brate: Honoring Dave Sandler. 7:30 p.m., Sheraton Inner Harbor, 300 S. Charles St., Baltimore. Cost: $125 Hadassah members, $150 guests. Contact Hadassah at 410-484-9590 or baltimore.chapter@hadassah.org.

Tuesday 29

Wednesday 30

Thursday 31

Friday 1

Saying Yes To Success: Learn skills to meet your employer’s expectations. 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Rosenbloom Owings Mills JCC, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. Preregistration and membership required. Contact 410-466-9200 or info@jcsbaltimore.org.

Preschool St ory Time: To nurture a love of reading for children ages 2 to 5. 10:30 a.m., Reisterstown Library, 21 Cockeys Mill Road.

Nook Night: Learn how to use your Nook e-reader. 6 p.m., Barnes & Noble, 1819 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Free.

‘To the Arctic 3D’ at I MAX: Movie tells the adventure of a mother polar bear and her twin cubs in the Arctic wilderness. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St., Baltimore. Cost: $8. Contact 410-685-5225 or visit marylandsciencecenter.org.

J C C Pizza Party: Learn about all our upcoming programs. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Rosenbloom Owings Mills JCC, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave. JCC members only. Contact Brad Kerxton at bkerxton@jcc.org.

Entrepreneur and Business Meetup: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Weinberg Park Heights JCC, 5700 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Contact 410-843-7433 or rgreen@jcsbaltimore.org.

A Taste of Limmud: A preview of a Day of Jewish Learning. 2 to 4 p.m., Weinberg Village 5, 3430 Associated Way, Owings Mills. Contact 410-580-0640 or visit limmudbaltimore.org.

Torah St udies: Weekly gathering to explore contemporary Torah thought. 7:30 p.m., Chabad of Owings Mills, 11299 Owings Mills Blvd., Suite 202. Contact 410-356-5156 or visit chabadom.com.

Five Decades of Plays: Recognizing Centerstage’s 50th anniversary. 7 p.m., Gordon Center, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. Cost: $10 general admission, $5 for students, seniors. Visit jcc.org/gcreg.

Maryland Science Center: It’s First Friday and admission is just $8. 5 to 8 p.m., 601 Light St., Baltimore. Contact 410-685-5225.

For complete community calendar, visit jewishtim es. com. Please send calendar submissions to rsnyder@jewishtimes.com. 34

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

Provided by Centerstage

istockphoto.com/ keiichihiki

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misHmAsH ISRAEL

Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, 1987.065.034

{Snapshots}

Zionism 101 Do you know your Zionism ABCs? If you do, you are among the rare. A new Web portal, Zionism 101, is designed to help fill that gap. Zionism 101 educates people about Zionism wherever they may be; all that’s needed is a Web connection. The site presents materials in the framework of video courses. There are 20 in all, and they include titles like “Founding Fathers,” “Origins of Zionism” and the “British Mandate Period,” covering every aspect of the Zionist enterprise from its early founding to present day. The films are YouTube length, five minutes or less. Each course is comprised of about 20 films. Get started! zionism101.org. — Maayan Jaffe

An unidentified group of Joseph M. Zamoiski Company employees gather in a Youngstown Kitchens store display. Can you identify anyone in this photo? Contact Jobi Zink, 410732-6400, ext. 226 or jzink@jewishmuseummd.org. To see more of the Jewish Museum’s extensive collection and find out who has been identified in past photos, visit http://ow.ly/2QOgZ.

Who was your favorite superhero?

Sidney Levin: Superman is definitely my favorite. If it wasn’t for the Superman comic books, I wouldn’t have learned to read.

istockphoto.com/picturejohn

Man On The Street

goodreads The Masada Solution Jeffrey M. Fishman

Eileen Himmelfarb: Wonder Woman. She was my hero. She was gorgeous, she was sexy. She had all the guys looking at her. I thought she was the most beautiful woman in the world.

Paul Lurie: Batman. He was the one superhero that wasn’t blessed with super powers. He was all manmade.

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2012; paperback, 372 pages

is book is a semi-fast read that takes a near-futuristic look at the middle East conflict. While the individual players have changed, the various ideologies are the same, and so the conflict continues. e author skillfully weaves the concept of true peace, that ever-elusive wisp, into a hard reality being fought for, not in the middle East, but in the halls of American politics and the ever-watchful media. He makes the daring assumption that israel’s fate lies completely within the U.s.’s control. And, as the title suggests, the author makes the bold

move of suggesting a solution can be found in the total sacrifice of the Jewish people. e book has an interesting plot, but the flip-flops in time and space tend to get complicated and difficult to follow. i found difficult the significant number of characters. To help the reader remember them, an interesting method of repeating a character’s description appears quite frequently. ere were a few places where whole sections of text seemed to be repeated. What kept me riveted was a tantalizing statement on the back cover that promised to keep me turning pages right up to the unexpected ending. Unfortunately, i didn’t think the ending was particularly unexpected, given the title. it was a decent read i’d recommend to those fairly knowledgeable in the history of Eretz Yisrael. — Sheryl Grossman jewishtimes.com

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Arts Life

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Bam!

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JEWISH SUPERHEROES?!

By David Snyder

Even a person with a casual knowledge of comic books most

likely is familiar with superheroes such as Superman, Batman and Spiderman and their secret identities, Clark Kent, Bruce Wayne and Peter Parker, respectively. What many don’t know is that it’s not just the characters in these books who are disguising their true identities. ose largely responsible for creating this fleet of crusaders may not have had fancy capes, distinguishing masks or clandestine lairs to conceal themselves, but many altered their names, in part to obscure who they were. You probably have never heard of Jacob Kurtzburg, Robert Kahn and Stanley Lieber, but the names Jack Kirby, Bob Kane and Stan Lee are more likely to ring a bell — or at least turn up far more results on a Google search. Regardless of which names you refer to, there is no denying that a large cadre of young Jewish men — many the children of immigrants or first-generation Americans themselves — found their niche in this country by creating the characters that would go on to influence people’s attitudes and thoughts during historic periods such as the Great Depression and World War II. These are characters who still resonate in books, movies and TV shows.


As was popular in the “Golden Age” of comics, the comic creator Stanley Lieber changed his name to Stan Lee. The move was in part an effort to establish his American identity.

m.com tion/Newsco Everett Collec

Jewish Characters? In addition to being the first comic book superhero, Superman is also one of the most hotly debated subjects when it comes to the Jewish influence on comics, and it all starts with his original

Joe Shuster (left) and Jerry Siegel celebrate Superman’s birthday in 1976. The team created the legendary superhero.

U Archives /

Unwelcoming Economy If not for an incredibly discriminatory job market for American Jews in the 1930s and 1940s, it’s difficult to predict if the superhero comic book genre would have ever taken off like it did. “e Jewish writers, and especially the illustrators, were not able to get jobs in general industry because of prejudice,” said Marvin Pinkert, JMM executive director. “It was a way to try to make a living out of your talents when other doors were closed.” Jobs at mainstream industries such as newspapers, magazines and advertising agencies either did not

employ minorities or used a quota system to limit the amount they hired. Meanwhile, comic books were perceived as one of the lowest forms of entertainment. However, the owners of DC Comics (originally National Allied Publications) and Marvel (originally Timely) were Jewish and thus provided a landing spot for young job hopefuls who had nowhere else to turn. “They were creative, they were young, they were artistic, and it was the best place to get a job. They started a whole new medium,” said Sandy Berman, archivist at The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum in Atlanta, which created the ZAP! POW! BAM! exhibit in 2005. Arie Kaplan looks at the Jewish foray into the comic book realm on a different level. Kaplan, author of “From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books,” explained that these young men were taking a significant risk by leaping into a job and creating an industry that had no proven market. However, he said, they knew the successes of newspapers and magazines, pulp books and radio and attempted to create a hybrid medium of the three. “That was kind of their market research. [They said], ‘This will make a profit because it’s kind of like all these other mediums but combined in this new way,”’ said Kaplan, a Pikesville native who writes for MAD magazine. “They took this huge gamble and said, ‘I’m going to try and feed my family doing this thing that no one else has ever done before.’ It’s incredibly admirable. It’s a really terrific story for that reason.” Ironically, it took five years for Superman, arguably the paramount superhero of them all, to finally hit it big for Siegel and Shuster. By all accounts, the only reason the strip made it into publication in June 1938 was because an editor at DC Comics, needing a few pages of filler material, found the work in a desk drawer and inserted it into Action Comics #1. It was then that the floodgates truly opened. RE SS.com

ZAP! POW! BAM!, an exhibit showcasing a compilation of their work — specifically from the Golden Age of comics (the mid 1930s to the late 1940s), debuts this weekend at the Jewish Museum of Maryland., an agency of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. Along with a bevy of original artwork and interactive displays, the exhibit aims to shed more light on an industry that didn’t even exist when Cleveland teenagers Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster teamed up to create Superman in 1933. While Siegel and Shuster never changed their names, they set the stage for comic book writers and artists who followed — artists and writers who, in order to blend in and do what they love, crafted their own alter egos. “That is the neat little hook,” said comic book historian and college professor Arnold T. Blumberg. “You think, oh OK, all the Jewish creators of all the superheroes putting on masks and secret identities are themselves adopting secret identities. They are playing out the same metaphor.” However, just because some creators removed the “Jewishness” from their names doesn’t mean they did the same with their characters and plot lines. Some experts say that there’s no denying the personal experiences and Jewish subtexts present in the comics across the board. Some are more subtle than others, but either way, it’s the kind of discussion that can turn into a heated debate at a comic book convention. “One thing we could say is Jewish creators sat down and, whether knowingly or unknowingly, crafted a whole group of characters who were definitely informed by their sensibilities as Jewish immigrants or the children of immigrants,” Blumberg said. “Therefore, everything about being Jewish at that time in the world and in our history was infused into these characters.”

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Arnold T. Blumberg says many Jewish creators crafted a group of superheroes informed by their sensibilities as Jewish immigrants.

David Stuck

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Our Super Psyche The Jewish subtexts associated with Superman always have been up for debate. However, the Man of Steel is hardly alone when it comes to the presence of the creators’ ideology in comic book characters. Here are a few other characters who exhibit a strong Jewish influence, whether subtly or on the surface. The Thing: Even before it was written into the storyline in 2002 that The Thing (aka Benjamin Jacob Grimm) from “Fantastic Four” was actually Jewish, the large rocky character exhibited what some would call Jewish tendencies. The Thing habitually felt embarrassed by his appearance, often wearing a hat and overcoat to hide who he was. Speculation ended when, in a 2002 edition of “Fantastic Four,” The Thing actually recited the Kaddish for a neighbor. In a later story, he got bar mitzvahed. Magneto: For years, “X-Men” villain Magneto has been painted as a ruthless character with plans for mutants to dominate the human race. However, in exploring his back story, it is learned that Magneto, born Max Eisenhardt, is a Holocaust survivor who saw his parents fall victim to concentration camps. Said Arie Kaplan: “It makes him a more sympathetic character because we understand that he’s been through hell, literally, and there are reasons why he does what he does and feels completely justified lashing out against humanity.” Spiderman: Unlike the above, Peter Parker is certainly not intended to be Jewish. But, as Arnold T. Blumberg explains, Parker, living in New York City, is socially isolated and impeccably nerdy, representative of the stereotypical New York Jewish experience. And that’s not all. “Virtually everything that drives Parker is guilt,” Blumberg said. “It’s one of the absolute perfect stereotypical ideas, and it’s being communicated through a character who’s not even supposed to be Jewish .” — David Snyder 38

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

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name and background story. A refugee from the crumbling planet Krypton, Superman’s Kryptonian name is Kal-El, which loosely translated from Hebrew means: God Is Everything. Sensing impending doom, Superman’s family places him in a rocket and blasts him off to Earth, where he seeks to blend in with society (through the identity of Clark Kent) and start a life for himself. Many historians liken Superman’s back story to the tale of Moses, whose parents, also in an attempt to save their son’s life, place him in a basket and nudge him down the Nile River, where, he too spends the next several years of his life (albeit unaware) hiding who he really is. “Some people make the case that … Siegel and Shuster were writing code for their Jewish audience. I don’t think that’s quite true. I think what it really is, is that they are trying to make this character universally heroic and iconic,” Kaplan said. “We’re talking about the 1930s, and America was a lot less multicultural, and there wasn’t such a thing as Google, so you couldn’t Google the name Kal-El and see what it meant in any language. … If you didn’t know any better, Kal-El just sounds like an alien name.” Pinkert points out that Superman is one of the first situations where “the alien” is actually the good guy. He sees a direct correlation between the comic creators’ status as immigrants and “aliens” in America and the fact that many of their protagonists hailed from distant lands only to become the saviors of the society they joined. “If you think about it, aliens in science fiction had a long history of being the monster, the villain, etc.,” Pinkert said. “It turns around with superheroes — and there are a number of superheroes in this category. The person who is the stranger in the land becomes the savior and the hero, and I ask you to think about whether there isn’t some deep connection between people who often found themselves treated as aliens saying, ‘We not only contribute as all these guys did, but we’re stakeholders in this American society.’” Alien or not, Superman was indeed

a reflection of his time. Introduced during the Great Depression, Superman fought for social justice. His initial adversaries were neighborhood crooks, wife beaters, mob bosses and unscrupulous landlords. In the early 1940s, Superman led the way, as superheroes — perhaps personifying the attitudes of their originators — were sketched in print taking on the Nazis. One iconic cover displays Captain America — a product of Jewish creators Jack Kirby and Joe Simon — socking Adolph Hitler in the jaw nearly a year before the attack on Pearl Harbor and the country’s entry into the war.

In many ways, World War II was a boon for the comic industry in the sense that it cemented these characters in the American public consciousness forever. — Arnold T. Blumberg

“It’s a powerful image to a young Jewish kid reading it back then. Maybe they had family overseas that was being murdered and felt helpless to do anything about it,” Kaplan said. “There’s the idea that creating these characters was sort of therapeutic for some of these cartoonists. It was sort of something where you could exercise your demons a little bit.” Mass Appeal “One of the things that I oen stress in a lot of lectures about comics, and it’s a little perverse to think of it this way,” said Blumberg, “but in many ways, World War II was a boon for the comic industry in the sense that it cemented these characters in the American public consciousness forever, and that’s because they became so entwined with the war effort and with the effort of American superiority and our position as the cause of right.”


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True, not much says “American superiority” quite like Captain America knocking Hitler into oblivion, but that was hardly the only wartime message from comic book creators. During the war, comic book editions included Superman and Batman encouraging readers to buy war bonds and support the American Red Cross. That message was communicated to adults and children alike. The comic books also reached servicemen fighting overseas. An estimated 80 percent of the reading material in Army camps was comic books, and soldiers continued to read once they returned home. While some of the characters may have had Jewish undertones — some more subtle than others — Kaplan emphasized that it’s important to remember that, in the end, the writers and illustrators endeavored to do whatever it took to create a successful product that all readers could relate to. “I think they were simply trying to create entertainment, fun popular entertainment that wasn’t too deep,” Kaplan said, referencing Siegel and Shuster. “Everyone feels kind of like a Clark Kent figure on some level because they feel, ‘Oh, if you could get to know the real me, you’d know I was this Superman underneath, but all the world sees is Clark Kent.’ That’s why Superman resonates with a lot of people.” Blumberg explained that the sentiments of the Jewish creators during that time fell in line with what a lot of people during the 1930s and 1940s were feeling. “There was a desire for protection, a desire for justice, a need to have something to look to for help or support, the belief that you’re not alone and that you can belong, and frankly, no matter how much you can look at aspects of these characters and identify them as Jewish, the fact is that so many of these themes are universal,” Blumberg said. “It didn’t matter if you were a gentile living in stereotypical Middle America or creators on the East Coast making these characters, you’re going to pick up a Superman or Spiderman comic if you feel socially outcasted or alone. Those characters are going to speak to you, and that’s why they stand the test of time and that’s why they have such a lasting emotional impact on individuals and our culture.” JT David Snyder is a JT staff reporter — dsnyder@jewishtimes.com

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Coming to Baltimore Karen Falk, curator at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, grew up in the 1960s and remembers reading superhero comics as a child. She didn’t realize there was such an unmistakable Jewish angle until she learned of The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum’s comic book showcase in 2008. Ever since then, she’s worked to help get the exhibit ZAP! POW! BAM! to the JMM. The Breman Museum teamed with Jerry Robinson, the artist who created Batman’s adversary, The Joker, to compile the majority of what will be on display. The exhibit, which will house around 2,000 square feet of more than 70 pieces of original memorabilia and interactive displays, opens to the public Sunday, Jan. 27 and will remain at the JMM through August. Although many Jews were new to the country, it was their ability as outsiders to observe their surroundings and put pen to paper, said Falk, who jokingly compared it to Irving Berlin composing “White Christmas.” “When you think that a lot of this was written by, drawn by, envisioned by Jews — who really at the time were very much outsiders in American society — that is really what the interesting overall message of this exhibition is,” Falk said. “When you’re outside of something, you observe a lot. [The comic book creators] were able to distill something that was quintessentially American.” Falk said there will be plenty of activities for adults and children at the exhibit. Interactive pieces include a collectors edition Batmobile ride (the kind you used to put a quarter in), a mock Superman phone booth and a drawing studio (similar to the ones the artists of the 1930s used), where visitors can try their hand at sketching superheroes. Embedded in the drawing table are monitors playing video interviews with some of the writers and artists whose work is on display. “We make learning fun. That’s at the top of the agenda,” JMM Executive Director Marvin Pinkert said. “When we think of what the American Jewish experience is, it embraces the cantor at the synagogue, but it also embraces … the way in which the Jewish contributions to American culture are much broader than those things that are exclusive to the Jewish community. I see this as falling into that category.” — David Snyder Photos by David Stuck

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The JMM’s ZAP! POW! BAM! exhibit (center column) has a multitude of rare finds that showcase the Jewish influence on our superheroes. jewishtimes.com

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Arts Life

PUMPKINS AND PJS AND ZIZ BIRDS, OH MY!

Pumpkin Theatre/PJ Library collaboration brings literature to life By Simone Ellin

or the second year in a row, Pumpkin Theatre, PJ Library and the Macks Center for Jewish Education (CJE) have joined forces to present top-notch children’s programming for Baltimore’s young families. On Jan. 26-27 and Feb. 2-3, Pumpkin eatre will present “Quest of the ZIZ Bird,” an adaptation of a PJ Library selected book, “e Hardest Word” by Jacqueline Jules. e story

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was adapted by Pumpkin eatre Artistic Director Jimi Kinstle, with original music by Ryan Michael Haase. Although PJ Library, a free program that brings books and CDs with Jewish content to families with young children across North America, has a great selection of titles, Kinstle was drawn to “The Hardest Word” because of its protagonist, a gigantic mythological bird, as well

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

as by the story’s universal themes, which include forgiveness, bullying and personal responsibility. In Kinstle’s adaptation, the Ziz Bird will be a 7 1/2-foot puppet with wingspans of 3 to 4 feet, played by three actresses at once. Haase’s music, said Kinstle, is “captivating with beautiful harmonies,” and the production itself should appeal to children of all ages. A poet, teacher, librarian and the

author of 24 books — both Jewishthemed and for general audiences — Jules said she always has written about young people. “It took awhile before I realized that all my protagonists were children. en I thought, maybe my audience should be children, too,” she said with a laugh. As a school librarian, Jules found herself immersed in children’s literature, and when she began leading Tot


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Kinstle said he was drawn to “e Hardest Word” because of its protagonist, a gigantic mythological bird, as well as by the story’s universal themes including forgiveness, bullying and personal responsibility.

Shabbat programs at a local synagogue, she was regularly on the hunt for new Jewish folk tales she could read to young congregants. “Sometimes, when I found a folk tale that the kids at my general-interest school loved, I would think, how can I make that story Jewish? I started adapting those stories for Tot Shabbats. When I exhausted that avenue, I started looking into Jewish folklore,” she said. Jules discovered a wealth of material, but much of it was not appropriate for young children. So she adapted the Jewish folk tales for youth, sometimes

borrowing from several different stories to create something new. Jules’ research led her to the Ziz Bird, a mythological Jewish creature that inspired the main character in “e Hardest Word.” e book — and Kinstle’s musical — tells the story of a giant bird that wants to befriend a group of children. e children and their parents tend a garden, where they grow fruits and vegetables for the senior members of their community. Despite his good intentions, the Ziz Bird’s clumsiness leads him to damage the garden. Seeking guidance, the bird flies to Mount Sinai to consult with God. God sends it on a quest for the hardest word. Named a Notable Book for Young Readers from the Association of Jewish Libraries in 2001 and a National Jewish Book Award finalist in 2002,

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“e Hardest Word” teaches children to say they are sorry and highlights the importance of contributing to the community. Lara Nicolson of the CJE believes that the Pumpkin eatre/PJ Library partnership offers a great opportunity to reach out to a wider group in a setting they feel comfortable. “Pumpkin Theatre has many loyal subscribers who may not be aware of PJ Library and the other programs offered by CJE,” she said. As part of its mission to add educational content wherever possible, CJE will complement performances of “Quest of the ZIZ Bird” with a program co-sponsored by the Pearlstone Center, where audience members will take part in a planting activity led by farm staff.

During the activity period, which will take place before and aer the 1 and 3 p.m. shows on Jan. 27 and Feb. 3, parents will have the opportunity to sign up for the PJ Library program. In addition, they will receive an educational brochure created by CJE “so families can extend the Jewish conversations sparked by the play when they return home,” said Amian Kelemer, CJE associate executive vice president. To purchase tickets for “Quest of the ZIZ Bird” visit pumpkintheatre.com. To learn more about PJ Library and the Macks Center for Jewish Education, visit cjebaltimore.org. JT Simone Ellin is JT senior features reporter sellin@jewishtimes.com

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Arts Life

CLASS ACT “IT TOOK ME 10 DAYS to write ‘Avia’s Summer,’ almost without breaks,” actress Gila Almagor told seniors during an interview — in Hebrew — at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School last month. The 73-year-old actress and author, famous in Israel and known around the world, has performed in more than 50 films and countless plays since she began her career at age 15. Almagor appears frequently at the world-famous HaBima Theater in Tel Aviv. Recently, she starred in the Israeli film “HaChov” (“The Debt”) about three secret agents on a failed mission. The movie was adapted to English and starred Helen Mirren in Almagor’s role. Her book, “Avia’s Summer,” is a reflection of her childhood and her life growing up with a mentally ill mother. Her father was murdered 42

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

before she was born. The book has been translated into several languages and has been adapted for both stage and film. She told students that while her childhood was “different,” it was not “difficult,” as far worse things can happen to children. The interview was arranged by BT Hebrew teacher Ella Shaked, a former journalist for the Israeli newspaper Maariv. It took weeks to schedule the interview with Almagor, but the students said it was worth the wait. The first question came from Shira Bor, who asked Almagor about the connection between her life and the life of the book’s troubled character, Avia. Almagor said Avia’s life is almost exactly like her own life was with her mother and that Avia goes through challenges similar to what she encountered. As an up-and-coming performer

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Students take part in a phone interview with acclaimed Israeli actress Gila Almagor. From left: Gil Lehman, Noah Abramowitz, teacher Ella Shaked and Shira Bor.

Beth Tfiloh students interview Israeli film star and author, Gila Almagor By Noah Abramowitz on the BT stage, this reporter asked Almagor for acting tips. She recommended applying to a “serious” acting school, watching great actors in their films — she loves Al Pachino and

“IT’S NOT EVERY DAY THAT YOU MEET A CELEBRITY, ESPECIALLY ONE AS PERSONABLE AND SWEET AS GILA.” — Maia Witow

Meryl Streep — reading famous plays and going to concerts. Other questions included what were Almagor’s favorite roles and a request to hear her impression of an American; she could

not accommodate that final request. Student Gil Lehman described the encounter as “unforgettable” and a real experience with a wonderful actress, who has so much talent and love of her craft.” Maia Witow said, “It’s not every day that you meet a celebrity, especially one as personable and sweet as Gila.” This was an experience BT seniors won’t forget, and the school is working to arrange an in-person meeting with Almagor during its class trip to Israel in the spring. In addition, BT students will hold a fundraiser for the Wish Foundation, Almagor’s nonprofit organization for granting the wishes of Israeli terminally ill children. JT Noah Abramowitz is a senior at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School and a columnist for the school’s newspaper. He will be interning at the Baltimore Jewish Times in the spring.


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| Arts &Life

BRIDGING THE ‘GAP’

Risa Kelemer took a gap year in Israel. Now, she is in the Israeli army.

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RISA KELEMER soon will be helping patrol the Israeli-Egyptian boarder as a member of the IDF. Her assignment with Karkal, a coed combat unit, will come aer months of training — something she felt she was more prepared for aer traveling the world for much of the previous year. e 2011 Yeshivat Rambam of Baltimore graduate learned about the world, its variant cultures and the diversity of Jewish life during a 2011-2012 “gap-year” experience with Kivunim. e program allowed her to earn 30 college credits for spending a year in Israel and visiting countries such as Spain, Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey and India. “Gaining that worldly experience is something I would recommend for any high school graduate,” said Kelemer, 19. “ere’s much more out there than what you can learn in a book or classroom.” Kelemer is not alone. Gap years are becoming more popular among high school graduates. According to the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA, about 1.2 percent of college freshmen are deferring enrollment for a year to participate in a gap-year program. ere are also a growing number of options available to students, including volunteer programs, work-study programs and the more expensive study-abroad options. Laura Rosenberg Hosid, of Vinik Educational Placement Services, said students cite several reasons when searching for gap-year opportunities. For some, she said, it’s a matter of finding a rewarding job to assist with the high cost of a college education, while some are seeking a worldly experience, and others just need a break from the rigid structure of the classroom. Hosid added that some students decide to explore gap-year programs after not getting into the college of

their choice and/or getting waitlisted at their top school. Hosid continued that there are just many more options available to students right after high school today, and many colleges are supporting students who seek to expand their horizons. “We are seeing a lot of students who have just been going non-stop for years and just want to see what is out there beside the classroom,” said Hosid, whose company has an office in Bethesda and has recently branched out to a location in Pikesville. “We also have some people who are just not yet ready for college and want to pursue a valuable experience.” BBYO recently announced plans to offer such an experience. Launched in October, Beyond is BBYO’s foray into a pre-college, gapyear program in Israel. The program, BBYO spokeswoman Carly Lundy Schacknies said, brings together four partners — Authentic Israel, Hillel, Masa Israel Journey and Tel Aviv University — to offer participants an experience that combines academic, service, leadership and travel opportunities. Schacknies said Beyond applicants can choose between a five-month and a nine-month experience, which cost $14,250 and $19,950, respectively. But, she added that applicants are eligible for an automatic Masa scholarship of $1,000, with up to $3,000 more being available based on financial need. Schacknies also said that along with taking classes at Tel Aviv University, participants also will have the opportunity to travel into Europe and/or participate in a community service project in Africa. All of which, she said, helps students better understand the world they are about to enter. “We know that teens who participate in BBYO programs are much

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Students seek unique opportunities between high school and college By Ron Snyder

more likely than their peers to seek out positions of leadership and contribute to the world around them. We are pleased to partner in the program and welcome them to our dynamic campus” said Pnina Gadai Agenyahu, director of Hillel at Tel Aviv University, in a statement. “Being in Israel and Tel Aviv specifically offers the unique learning experiences of an environment that is both ancient and modern, where Biblical archeology and micro-chip development are part of the fabric of daily life.” Programs like Beyond and Kivunum are two of more than 200 Israel programs available for young Jewish adults, according to the Jewish Federations of North America. ose expansive options have led JFNA to transfer ownership of OTZMA, its longtime service and learning experience for young adults, to the Israel Experience Tourism Services Ltd. at the end of this academic year. JFNA plans on refocusing its efforts to support other similar existing programs. “JFNA will continue to work with existing Israel experience programs … to provide the crucial bridge to federations that an Israel experience can and should offer, and to ensure they complement our many young adult programs and services,” said JFNA President and CEO Jerry Silverman in a statement. Hanna Tova Glicksman is hoping to

GAP-YEAR OPTIONS BBYO’s Beyond program: beyondyear.org Kivunim: kivunim.org Spend a year in Israel: masaisrael.org General gap year options: usagapyearfairs.org

be one of the many students to take advantage of those existing programs. e 17-year-old from Baltimore plans on spending a year studying and working in Israel before going to a four-year school in the U.S. “I know a lot of my friends are doing it aer high school, and I thought this would be my best opportunity to spend a year in Israel,” said Glicksman, who will graduate in May from the Melvin J. Berman Hebrew Academy in Rockville. “I’m not sure I’ll get another opportunity like this in a few years. “To get a chance to study Torah and earn college credit while living in Israel just sounds like an amazing experience. is is an opportunity that is just too good to pass up and one I think I will regret if I don’t take advantage of it.” JT Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com

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e Jewish View Rivka Malka Perlman

Share your good news where all your friends will see it. To advertise in the new JT, call 410-902-2326.

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

All The Time T he opening scene is incredible. Like a well-written movie, we enter the story at the height of the action. pharaoh, the great and mighty king, is reduced to crazed madness, as he pursues the israelites. Though they’ve had a head start, the Jews, all 600,000 of them on foot, are no match for the ever-quickening hoof beats of the approaching army. panic ensues! Behind them, the enemy. in front of them, the sea. And, in their hearts, fear that after all they’ve been through, this truly is the end. With a wide sweeping motion, the camera pans across the scene: the angry egyptians, the frightened Jews, their crying children. Moses prays, and god says, “Tell the people to travel!” All at once, the sea splits! cue the orchestra! Waves crash into each other and freeze in midair, creating 12 paths for the people to walk through. The sea of Reeds has become the sea of Redemption. As the lens widens we stare, with choked breath, as thousands of our people walk through the impossible to their freedom. Fade out — another sea of reeds, the nile. in a time when exodus seemed like a distant dream, baby Moses was placed among the reeds: a hiding place, a place of crazy faith. his mother, Yocheved, knew that if she kept him, he surely would be killed by pharaoh’s men so she did the unthinkable, she let her child go. “how do you know there’s a god,” my friend asked. how do i really know? i heard in her question a desire for reassurance. is god really with me or is he “out of office” while i struggle? i thought about it. how do I know there’s a god? Because god is the ultimate scriptwriter. When i press pause and look at my life, where i’ve been and where i’ve

come to, i see deliberate themes and development throughout the story. i see how my chutzpah that landed me in daily detention has allowed me a chutzpah to dare people to find out what it really means to be a Jew. i see how the pain of being different, in a way that left me feeling misunderstood, has been a force in understanding people and their unique beauty. i see how my broken heart at leaving israel and moving to Baltimore

When I press pause and look at my life ... I see deliberate themes and development throughout the story. has been the exact road i needed to travel if i were to find a place for my dreams to blossom. And though i’d rather be comfortable and carefree, it is struggle and conflict that move a story forward giving it depth, character and complexity. in the movie of “life,” there’s nuance and irony. There’s humor and poignancy. There are highs and lows, love and romance. But above all, there’s a purpose. our character is being driven toward its completeness. There’s a rich thread of meaning, and it’s there every time we take the time to look. The reeds in our story let us know he’s been here all the time. JT Rivka Malka Perlman spent four years in Israel before coming to Baltimore to raise her kids, teach and reach out to Jews. She’s the director of WOW!, a program of Etz Chaim. Rivka Malka will be teaching — and learning — at this year’s Limmud Baltimore on April 21 at Johns Hopkins University. Learn more at limmudbaltimore.org.

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FOUND YOUR beshert ?


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| Beshert Linda L. Esterson

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CELEBRATING PLATINUM First Date: Summer 1941, to a movie; Wedding Date: Jan. 20, 1943 Wedding Site: Rabbi Israel Tabak’s living room; Current Residence: Pikesville Favorite Activities: Dining out and reading

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Classified Line Ads LILLIAN ZLOTOWITZ and bernard

strumwater met 72 years ago, and on Jan. 20, they celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary. “i’m proud of that fact; i’m proud of my husband and our lives together,’”says lil, now 89. “it’s been worth every minute. i’m grateful for our time together.” bernie, too, is grateful but admits it���s hard to believe that 70 years have passed. they’ve accomplished so much in that time, and they are proudest of their daughters, iris and maralee, and their four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. ey met in 1941 when bernie was dating one of lil’s friends. aer hanging out together, they started dating that summer. bernie was athletic and handsome with olive skin and dark hair. He was also amusing, lil says. bernie, too, found lil attractive, but at first he was “afraid of her four brothers.’ they recall the “usual teenage” movie dates and dancing at the Club Charles and other area clubs. e war, lil admits, sped up the development

of their relationship. bernie was drafted into the army in september 1942 after they had been dating for about 18 months. when he returned home on his first furlough, in January 1943, they decided to get married. lil, then 19, and bernie, then 20, said their vows before their immediate families, including isaac and sarah Zlotowitz and irving strumwater and Kitty Kaye, on Jan. 20, 1943. rabbi israel tabak performed the ceremony in his living room, and the young couple ventured to new York City for a three-day honeymoon before bernie was sent to Hattiesburg, miss. lil joined her husband two months later. after a transfer to bastrop, texas, bernie was sent to europe in december 1943. lil returned east and lived with bernie’s sister in miami beach, Fla. iris was born in 1944, and her father did not meet her until she was 19 months old. aer the war, bernie joined his family in Florida, but they returned to baltimore a year later and bought a house. bernie worked as an installment

collector and then joined naC Charge Plan (later Citicorp), where he remained for 25 years. lil started as a homemaker — maralee joined the family in 1953 — and when the girls went to school, she worked for stewart’s and other retailers. the family loved vacationing, primarily to Florida to visit bernie’s family. the couple also traveled to spain, england, Portugal and morocco and enjoyed pastimes like mahjong and card games. both have volunteered for different organizations including the red Cross, Covenant Guild, miriam lodge and the big brothers big sisters. today, they enjoy life “in a hotel” at Pomona, where they moved five years ago, and look forward to celebrating with family and friends at the Hilton in march, commemorating their 70th anniversary and lil’s upcoming 90th birthday. “i don’t feel like it’s a long time; i don’t feel like it has been 70 years,” says bernie, 90. “it just went.” JT Linda L. Esterson is an Owings Mills-based freelance writer. For “Beshert,” call 410-9022305 or email Linda.Esterson@verizon.net.

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Community | Milestones Engagements

Krengel — Ruder Linda and Charles Krengel of Owings Mills and Sharon and Jay Ruder of Cherry Hill, N.J. are pleased to announce the engagement of their children, Shelby Lauren and Andrew Frank.

Ziglin — Fairburn Alan and Rochelle Ziglin of Dunwoody, Ga. announce the engagement of their son, Eric, to Jenny Fairburn, daughter of Patricia and Leroy Fairburn of Folsom, La. The future bride is the granddaughter of Bessie Sharp of Abita Springs, La., and the late Lucy and Newton Fairburn of Folsom, La. She is step-granddaughter of the late Myrtle Fairburn of Folsom, La. Jenny graduated from Southeastern Louisiana University with a bachelor’s degree in history. She is employed by the Marriott Courtyard in San Antonio, Texas. The future groom is the grandson of the late Esther and Ernst Huth of Savannah, Ga., and the late Mildred

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Shelby graduated from the University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore with a bachelor’ s degree in dental hygiene. She works in Philadelphia as a dental hygienist. Andrew earned a bachelor’ s degree in mass communication from Towson University and a juris doctorate degree from Rutgers School of Law in Camden, N.J. He is an associate at Pond Lehocky Stern Giordano in Philadelphia. Shelby is the granddaughter of Gerald and Hildegard Hameroff and Sidney and Lois Krengel. Andrew is the grandson of June and the late Marin Ruder and the late Bernard and Frieda Becker. A November 2013 wedding is planned.

and Max Ziglin of Atlanta, formally of Baltimore. Eric is also the greatnephew of Rebecca Ziglin of Baltimore. Eric graduated from Georgia Southern University with a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism. He is employed as a photojournalist at WAOI-TV in San Antonio.

Pearl — Silverman Paula and Michael Pearl of Owings Mills and Sherie and Arthur Silverman of Potomac happily announce the engagement of their children, Jennifer Pearl and David Silverman. Jennifer received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland, Col-

Dobres — Segall Lauren and Larry Dobres happily announce the marriage of their daughter, Melissa Lynn, to Joshua Ian Segall, son of Jeff Segall and Ellen Segall. e wedding took place at the Sheraton Baltimore North on Dec. 1, 2012, and Rabbi Yerachmiel Shapiro of Moses Montefiore Anshe Emunah Greengate Jewish Center officiated. e maid of honor was Erin Davis; bridesmaids included Meghann Russell, Pamela Meister, Allyson Hadel, Amy Segall and Loni Segall. Groomsmen were Andy Black, Brooks Miller, Greg Perl and Ryan Metzger. Witnessing the ketubah signing were Andy Segall, Dori Zvili and Yehudah Seidel. e couple will reside in Mount Washington following their honeymoon in Hawaii.

Community | Notes

ArtPlace Honors City

JLS Offers Owings Mills Clinics

Downtown Baltimore has been selected as one of America’s Top 46 ArtPlaces for 2013, according to the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts. According to ArtPlace, the selected designations have been successful at joining art, artists and venues for creativity and expression with independent businesses, retail shops and restaurants to make vibrant neighborhoods.

Jewish Legal Services, a program of Jewish Community Services, has expanded its monthly clinics to the JCS Owings Mills office (3506 Gwynnbrook Ave.) for this winter. Volunteer community lawyers provide free legal information, advice and referral services for Jewish individuals with limited income. Clinics will be held by appointment only on Feb. 20 and March 20 and will

46

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

offer assistance with consumer/bankruptcy and family/ divorce issues only. Walk-in clinics will continue on the second Monday of each month from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the JCS office at 5750 Park Heights Ave. in Baltimore. Jewish Legal Services is also seeking lawyers to volunteer their expertise at the monthly clinics. For eligibility, appointments and more information, call 410-843-7305 or visit jcsbaltimore.org.

Provided

Provided

Wedding lege Park, and a master’ s degree in health promotion management from American University. She is program manager at Wellness Corporate Solutions. David received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a master’ s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland, College Park. He is communications manager at Tronox and former head speechwriter for U.S. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Jennifer is the granddaughter of the late Brigitte and Curt Pearl and the late Bernice and Mannie Rabovsky. David is the grandson of Esther Lerner and the late Dr. A. Ross Lerner and the late Julia and Max Silverman. A May 2013 wedding is planned.


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Community | Milestones

Perlin

Andrew and Leslie (nee Kornreich) Feldman of Phoenix, Ariz. are thrilled to announce the birth of their daughter, Tyler Elle, on Oct. 10, 2012. Tylerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hebrew name is Tova Eliana. She is named in loving memory of her maternal grandmother, Toby Kornreich, and paternal greatgrandmother, Ernestine Wiesenfeld. Proud grandparents are Karen and Richard Feldman of Pikesville and Michael Kornreich of Paradise Valley, Ariz. Overjoyed great-grandpar-

Ryan and Lauren Perlin (nee Weingrad) are excited to announce the birth of their third daughter, Sadie Paige, on Dec. 10, 2012. Sadie, whose Hebrew name is Sarah Penina, is named in loving memory of her paternal great-great-uncle, Philip Davidoff. Sadieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; s thrilled big sisters are Ava Kiel Perlin, 5, and Millie Woodruff Perlin, 2. Proud grandparents are Ruth Kiel and Walter Frazer of Owings Mills,

Provided

Feldman

ents are Stanley Press of Pikesville and Bunty Kornreich of Boynton Beach, Fla.

Provided

Births

Stephanie and Keith Foster of Annapolis and Marla Bolt and Jeff Weingrad of Clarksville.

Send submissions of births, engagements, weddings and anniversaries via email to sellin@jewishtimes.com or mail to Simone Ellin, BJT, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Please send a stamped, self-addressed envelope for returning photos. Items will be selected and edited at the discretion of the editors.

Justin Tsucalas

Michael G. Stewart

Community | Out & About

In Tune: Award-winning musician Martin Taylor was one of the four innovative acoustic guitarists featured during the 12th North American tour of International Guitar Night (IGN) at the Gordon Center. Other performers included IGN founder Brian Gore, Celso Machado from Brazil and Solorazaf from Madagascar.

Snow Falls In Ashkelon: The children of our sister city, Ashkelon, last Friday enjoyed making snowmen and other icy activities, after truckloads of snow were delivered to the southern city direct from the Hermon Mountains. The project was sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, among other government offices.

jewishtimes.com

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Community | Obituaries AMSTER — On January 20, 2013, LOUIS; beloved husband of the late Shirley Amster (nee Halprin); loving father of Sheryl Amster and Eric (Karen) Amster; devoted brother of the late Samuel Amster, David Amster and Rose Reingold; cherished grandfather of Alexa Paige and Cole Smith Amster. Interment at Columbia Memorial Park, Columbia, Md. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the charity of your choice. BARANOFF — On January 18, 2013, MILDRED A. (nee Suskin); beloved wife of the late Morris Baranoff and David Hawtof; devoted mother of Joyce S. Hawtof and the late Joel Hawtof; loving sister of the late Rose Suskin, Benjamin Suskin, Sylvia Becker and Frieda Suskin Millison; dear grandmother of the late Ari Checkanow. Also survived by other loving friends and family. Interment at Agudas Achim Anshe Sfard Ahavas Shalom Cemetery, Rosedale. Please omit flowers. COHEN — On January 19, 2013, DOROTHY (nee Liller); beloved wife of the late Samuel Cohen and the late Dr. Samuel B. Wolfe; loving mother of Dr. Irving (Marlene) Wolfe, Greta (Dr. Morris) Lasson, Miriam (Charles Rodger) Hazard and Dora Wolfe; devoted stepmother of Dr. Diane Cohen; devoted grandmother of Janet ( Justin Hill) Wolfe, Sharon (Benjamin) Schwartz, Dr. Elliot (Shayndee) Lasson, Daniel (Suzann) Lasson, Deborah (Rabbi Lee Jay) Lowenstein, Dr. Jonathan (Chaya) Lasson, Naomi (Daniel) Miller, Charles Adam ( Jennifer) Hazard, Brenda (Daniel) Corral, Ruth Hazard Goldman, Sarah (Benjamin) Molk and Samuel Machiz; also survived by many loving great-grandchildren. Interment at Beth Isaac Adath Israel Cemetery, North Point and German Hill roads. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to e Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, 101 W. Mount Royal Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 or to the charity of your choice. 48

DESESA — On January 20, 2013, JANE (nee Platt); beloved wife of Steve DeSesa; loving mother of Carly DeSesa; devoted daughter of David and Constance Platt; cherished sister of Jon Platt, Hilary (Ileane) Platt and the late omas Platt. Interment at Beth Tfiloh Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the American Lung Association, 211 E. Lombard St., #260, Baltimore, MD 21202. DOVNER — On January 15, 2013, HAROLD H.; beloved husband of Reita Dovner (nee Friedman); loving father of Bruce Dovner, Robyn Rouelle and the late Michael Dovner; dear brother of Judith Goldman, Robert Dovner and the late Miriam Podolsky, Alvin Dovner, Louis Dovner and Arthur Dovner; adored grandfather of Marcus Shiffman and Sara Shiffman. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Interment at Mikro Kodesh Beth Israel Cemetery, 6700 Bowleys Lane. Please omit flowers. EDLOW — On January 20, 2013, MARION (nee Paul); beloved mother of Judy Sugar-Bloom, Michael Bloom and Mark Sugar; devoted sister of the late Annette Meyers and Florence Howard; cherished grandmother of Ashleigh and Jamie Bloom. Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. GOLDMAN — On January 17, 2013, HERMAN NORMAN; beloved husband of Violet Goldman (nee Francis) and the late Dorothy Rosenblatt Goldman; loving father of Leslye (Gary) Katz and the late Barbara Clagett; dear brother of the late George Goldman, Rose Asrael, elma Caplan, Helen Rabenovets and Lillian Gillis; adored grandfather of Michelle and Daniel Katz and Matthew (Angel) Clagett; cherished great-grandfather of Luke Clagett. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Interment at Tifereth Israel Cemetery, Rosedale. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Beth Am Synagogue, 2501 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, MD 21217.

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

KATZ — On January 21, 2013, CAROLE M. (nee Schaffer); beloved wife of Hal S. Katz; loving daughter of Carolyn and Glen Schaeffer; loving mother of Hal R. Katz; devoted stepmother of Jerry Katz and Geary (Gina) Katz; beloved sister of Glen Schaffer Jr., Wayne Schaffer and Ronald Schaffer; loving grandmother of Daniel and Adam Katz. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Carcinoid Cancer Awareness Network Inc., 2480 Hull Ave., North Bellmore, NY 11710. KOMITZSKY — On January 20, 2013, GERALDINE “JERRY” GOLDSTEIN (nee Silverman); beloved wife of the late Benjamin Komitzsky and Carroll Goldstein; devoted sister of Henry Silverman; loving companion of Bo; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Mid-Atlantic, Inc, 5272 River Road, Suite 700, Bethesda, MD 20816. LANDSMAN — On January 20, 2013, ADELE (nee Axelrod); beloved wife of Irvin Landsman; devoted mother of Jack Landsman and Brenda (Bob) Larson; cherished sister of Joseph Axelrod; adored grandmother of Joseph Landsman and Dennis (Katrina) Carter; dear great-grandmother of Dominic Liepke. Interment at Mikro Kodesh Beth Israel Cemetery, 6700 Bowleys Lane. Please omit flowers. LEVENSON — On January 19, 2013, KAY A. (nee Gerber); beloved wife of the late Lewis Levenson; loving mother of Dorothy (Dr. Andres) Ramos and Janet (Larry) Forsythe; devoted sister of Melvin Gerber and the late Hilda Cogan, Freda Edelson, Henry Gerber, Sylvia Layton, Herman Gerber and Myra Bickman; loving grandmother of Michael, Marcos, Maria and Marisa Ramos, Lauren Montillo and the late Lewis Feldman; adored great-grandmother of Michael, Michael Anthony,

Andres Miguel, Valentina Sofia, Daniel, Jilliana and Luciana. Interment at Hebrew Young Men’s Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058. LEVY — On January 17, 2013, EDWIN; loving husband of the late Lenore Levy (nee Goldman); beloved father of Adele (Howard) Kass and Theodore “Ted” ( Jody) Levy; cherished brother of the late Jerome Levy; devoted grandfather of Adam Kass, Scott (Irina) Kass, Jamie (Marc) Cohen and Melissa ( Jeffrey) Burchman; loving great-grandfather of Jack, Isaac, Ellie and Lexi. Loving companion of Esther Deming. Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation, North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road, Baltimore, MD 21208. MERWITZ — On January 16, 2013, RUTH (nee Ober); beloved wife of Stanley Merwitz; loving mother of Margie (Paul) Block, Rona (Reese) Feuerman and Gary (Debbie) Merwitz; dear grandmother of Lindsay and Rachel Block, Austin, Sammy and Evan Feuerman and Ally, Brooke and Carly Merwitz. Interment at Mikro Kodesh Beth Israel Cemetery, 6700 Bowleys Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Beth Israel Congregation, 3706 Crondall Lane, Owings Mills, MD 21117 or the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 100 Painters Mill Road, Suite 800, Owings Mills, MD 21117. MILLER — On January 17, 2013, HYMAN: beloved husband of the late Betty Miller (nee Sibble); loving father of Ira (Rozlyn) Miller and Janet Miller; devoted brother of Alvin Miller; loving grandfather of Sara Michelle Miller. Interment at Moses Montefiore Woodmoor


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Hebrew Cemetery, Washington Boulevard. Please omit flowers. OSTROFF — On January 16, 2013, MARY D. (nee Distiller); beloved wife of the late Jacob Ostroff; beloved mother of Edward (Frankie) Ostroff and Robert (Eileen) Ostroff; devoted sister of the late Edith Gold and Freda Hall; loving grandmother of David and Ethan Ostroff, Lisa Morse and Samantha Smith; also survived by five loving great-grandchildren. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the charity of your choice. PRAGER — On January 20, 2013, LEONARD; beloved husband of Zelda Prager (nee Waldman); devoted father of David (Lynda) Prager, Jay Prager and Susan (David) Goldner; loving grandfather of Bryan (Shayne) Goldner and Elizabeth (Brett) Endler. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. ROSENTHAL — On January 20, 2013, LEONARD; beloved husband of the late Lorraine Rosenthal (nee Malleck); loving father of Ira (Arlene) Rosenthal and Richard Rosenthal; loving grandfather of Justin, Bryan and Sara Rosenthal. Also survived by loving nieces, nephews, other family members and many dear friends. Interment at Maryland Free State Post 167 Jewish War Veterans Cemetery, Rosedale. Please omit flowers. SAMBOL — On January 20, ROBERT VICTOR, 58; beloved son of Barbara Sambol and the late eodore Sambol. He is also survived by his brother, Paul Sambol. Interment at Shenandoah Memorial Park, Winchester, Va. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Association or the National Humane Society. VIDELGAUZ — On January 16, 2013, MIRA (nee Wolberg); beloved

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wife of the late Iosif Videlgauz; devoted mother of Klara Simanovsky, Berta Kunyavsky and Lenora Pekarsky; also survived by five loving grandchildren. Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation, North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. WEINBERG — On January 19, 2013, BEVERLY (nee Stollof ); beloved wife of Warren Weinberg; loving mother of Aylene (Michael) Salsbury, Steven (Susan) Hackerman and Shawn Hackerman; devoted daughter of the late Sylvia and Sidney Stollof; beloved sister of Rosalie Pilone; loving grandmother of Amanda and Christopher Salsbury and Kevin and Justin Hackerman. Also survived by many loving nieces, nephews and other family members. Interment at Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058, or to the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312 or to the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland, 1107 Kenilworth Drive, Suite 202, Towson, MD 21204. ZILBERSTEIN — On January 15, 2013, Dr. MIKHAEL; beloved husband of Melissa Zilberstein (nee Kearney); cherished son of the late Shlomo Mazel Zilberstein and Elivavietta Yaltishkova; devoted father of Natasha, Boris and Tatiana Zilberstein; dear brother of the late Dr. Boris Zilberstein; dear brother-in-law of Lucy Zilberstein; cherished uncle of Dr. Inga Zilberstein; loving cousin of Emma Zilberstein and Tamara Yaltishkova and family. Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Beth Israel Congregation, 3706 Crondall Lane, Owings Mills, MD 21117. The Baltimore Jewish Times updates obituaries regularly on its website, jewishtimes.com/obituaries. To submit an obituary, contact David Snyder at dsnyder@jewishtimes.com or 410-902-2314.

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LEGAL NOTICES Bruce E. Kauffman, Esq. 406 W. Pennsylvania Ave. Towson, MD 21204

Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Estate of (171410) Richard Grant Shiflet, Jr. Small Estate Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice To Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Notice is given that Dawn M. Shiflet, 1726 Middleborough Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21221, was on January 7, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Richard Notice is given that KAREN GINSBERG, 6533 Grant Shiflet, Jr. who died on November 19, Gardenwick Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21209, 2012 with a will. was on January 18, 2013 appointed Further information can be obtained by rePersonal Representative of the small estate of viewing the estate file in the office of the RegisRose Datnoff who died on December 31, 2012 ter of Wills or by contacting the personal with a will and codicils. representative or the attorney. Further information can be obtained by reviewAll persons having any objection to the aping the estate file in the office of the Register of pointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s Wills or by contacting the personal representative will) shall file their objections with the Register of or the attorney. Wills on or before the 7th day of July 2013 (6 All persons having any objection to the appoint- months from date of appointment.) ment shall file their objections with the Register of Any person having a claim against the deceWills within 30 days after the date of publication of dent must present the claim to the undersigned this Notice. All persons having an objection to the personal representative or file it with the Register probate of the will shall file their objections with of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or bethe Register of Wills within six months after the fore the earlier of the following dates: date of publication of this Notice. (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s All persons having claims against the decedent death, except if the decedent died before Octomust serve their claims on the undersigned perber 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the sonal representative or file them with the Register decedent’s death; or of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or (2) Two months after the personal representabefore the earlier of the following dates: tive mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s copy of this published notice or other written nodeath, except if the decedent died before October tice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decebarred unless the creditor presents the claim dent’s death; or within two months from the mailing or other de(2) Thirty days after the personal representative livery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy on or before that date, or any extension provided of this published notice or other written notice, by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred may be obtained from the Register of Wills. unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the noDAWN M. SHIFLET Personal Representative tice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, Register of Wills for Baltimore County, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable Courts Building thereafter.

WE share WITH FRIENDS.

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YAAKOV'S

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR SERVICES Wallpaper Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Decorative Moldings Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Wallpapering

Clean, neat, guaranteed. 35 years experience. FREE ESTIMATES CA LL YA AK O V T O D AY 4 10 -48 4- 83 50

TRAVEL & LEISURE

SUP

WE h NYC!

time Director of Accounting to handle accounting,

EVERY DAY TO NEW YORK

reporting & related auditing & tax work for over a

Charters Available for All Occasions 410.602.1704 â&#x20AC;˘ www.superiortours.net

accounting; CPA preferred but not required. Salar y

S ub mi t re s um e, c ov e r le tt e r & s al ar y r e q u ir e m e n t s t o : H u m a n R e s o u r c e s , 10 1 W. Mt. Ro ya l Av e ., B al ti mo r e, MD 21 20 1 o r p r ef e rab l y: http s: // hom e .e e as e. co m /r e cr ui t/ ? id = 36 96 11 1 E OE

PART-TIME RABBI: BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE LEXINGTON PARK, MD

EMPLOYMENT

!#  $ %  #  !&# !' %# &(  $&# !% %# #$$&# $ 

MHIC# 16432

experience; demonstrated experience in full cycle

March 7:

FREE ESTIMATES â&#x20AC;˘ 410-356-4722 â&#x20AC;˘ BERT KATZ

'''"#(  #$$&# '$ !

have minimum of 7-10 yrs accounting & super visor y

commensurate w/experience.

PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW!



  

supported by 2 accountants & ideal candidate should

President's Day in Atlantic City

Paper Hanging & Removal Graduate of Maryland Institute of Art

# $%%$

THE ASSOCIATED: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore seeks full

February 18:

Decorator Colors

ROOFING

POWER WASHING

RVIC E

dozen different agencies & programs. Position

FINE INTERIOR PAINTING MHIC 26124

ER

EMPLOYMENT Director of Accounting

ERIOR TO SUP IOR SE URS

TRANSPORTATION

PAINTING

SERVICE DIRECTORY

4 5 member cons er vative congr egation ( u n aff iliated) s eeks r abbi f or 2 w e ekends p er month S ep. 2 013- J un. 2014. C h ap laincy, lead S habbat ser vi ces & assi s t Religious S choo l. A ls o pr ovide o u t r e ach t o S t. M ar yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Hillel C h apter & J ew is h s er vic e member s a t NA S Pax R iver. Cons er vative or dainment pr ef er r ed.

WANTED EXPERIENCED SALESPERSON! Be proud of what you sell. Our media products have the niche demographic that businesses want to target. We get our customers results! Clipper City Media, publisher of Baltimore Jewish Times and Style Magazine has sales opportunities available. Searching for strategic "closers" with proven sales experience only. We're seeking a "superstar" that has a passion for sales and can grow a book of business. Someone that can deliver smart presentations to a sophisticated decision maker.

E - m a il Bethis r aelmd@gmail.com. Top candidates invited fo r w ee kend i n t er view ( r equir ed w ith expens es paid) b etw een F eb. 1- A pr il 30 2013. w w w.b et h is raelm d .org

Competitive compensation with commissions & bonuses. Health options & 401k

JOB REQUIREMENTS NO SUBCONTRACTING 410-876-3602 www.thomasroofing.net

FREE

The position is responsible for generating revenue to meet targeted objectives through new business acquisition and some active business. An awareness and knowledge of the community and the local media landscape. Ability to prospect for new business and make "compelling" media presentations that progress toward a sale-close. Great communication skills; ability to handle deadline pressure and highly-active stress environment. Proficiency in Microsoft Office, internet research tools & customer relations/management software. Email cover letter and resume to Kristen Cooper:

ESTIMATES

â&#x20AC;˘ Shingle Roofing â&#x20AC;˘ Slate Roofing â&#x20AC;˘ Metal Roofing â&#x20AC;˘ Flat Roofing

â&#x20AC;˘ Seamless Gutter â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Gutter â&#x20AC;˘ Historic Restoration â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs

S U B S C R I B E TO T H E 54

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

kcooper@clippercitymedia.com

J EWI S HTI M ES.C O M

J EWISH TI M ES.

CA LL

Full Time Assistant Teaching Position The Meyerhoff ECE Center at Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Jewish Community Center in Park Heights is looking for a responsible, warm, caring professional to care for children in our early childhood program. Experience & ninety hour certification preferred. Please contact Zac Price at 410-500-5936 for more information

APPOINTMENT SETTERS 45 year old Home Improvement company hiring Maryland appointment setters. Call now!

410-252-7732

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MARKETPLACE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES MR. BOB’S ANTIQUES. Buying now. Antique furniture through 1950’s. $Silver-jewelry-lampsclocks-watches-complete estates. 410-371-3675

APPLIANCE REPAIR APPLIANCE DOCTOR -Repairs all major home appliances. Shlomo Roshgadol 410-358-2707.

CHILDCARE EXPERIENCED MATURE BABYSITTER with great local references! 410-702-7149 or 410-718-0550

ELDER CARE

HAULING & MOVING

PRESSURE WASHING

COMPANION SEEKING LIVE-IN WORK. 22 years experience. Local references. 443-956-2125

LIONEL’S HAULING. YARD/ basement/ garage cleaning. Reasonable rates. 410-484-8614/ 443-604-4002

PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPER/ COMPANION CAREGIVER. Mature with references available. 410-701-8487

HAUL AWAY: Prompt professional affordable. Residential/ commercial. Insured/ bonded. Free estimates. SEE OUR AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. 410-526-6000 www.haulawaymd.com

SPARKLY CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING: Fully Insured Hot-Water Pressure Washing. Commercial & Residential. We bring our own water. 410-977-9165 www.SparklyCleanPressurewashing.com

CAREGIVER/COMPANION: Many years experience w/my parents. Pikesville/North Baltimore area. Michael, 410-970-1193 COMPANION SEEKING LIVE-IN WORK. 22 years experience. Local references. 443-956-2125

ELDER CARE NEEDED

CLEANING SERVICES SCRUB-A-DUB CLEANING, Inc. 20yrs of quality service. Bonded/ Insured. 410-667-8714. EXPERIENCED CLEANER: No job too small. 10 yrs local experience. 443-253-5270. MAJESTY CLEANING SERVICE: Residential & Commercial Cleaning. Bonded and Insured. 443-405-4055 SHIMMMER’S CLEANING SERVICE: RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL.LICENSED, BONDED, INSURED. NEW CUSTOMER SPECIALS! 443-912-2775

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUTER SERVICES. Virus-removal, repairing, networking, installing, upgrading. Reasonable rates. Microsoft certified. Quick response. Jeff 410-484-2975 MY PC MEDIC: Mild mannered corporate IT manager by day & Pikesville’s super computer mentsch by night! Why wait in line for a geek? House-calls on evenings or weekends. Our solutions will fit your budget! *See our ad in the Service Directory. 410-929-9985. www.mypcmedicmd.com

ELDER CARE I AM LOOKING FOR WORK AS A PRIVATE DUTY HOME-CARE NURSE OR COMPANION CAREGIVER FOR SICK OR ELDERLY. LIVE IN OR LIVE OUT. DAY OR NIGHT 8 OR 12 HOUR SHIFTS. DRIVES. GREAT LOCAL REFERENCES. PIKESVILLE, SLADE, OWINGS MILLS ETC. OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE! ONLY PHONE CALLS! 410-523-4840.

GOLDEN DAYS HOME CARE LLC. Companion care and errand services. Licensed, bonded & insured. See our ad in the Service Directory! 410-679-0942 COURTNEY CARES NURSING SERVICES: RN CNA & COMPANION CARE Enabling you to stay in your home! Accepting 24/7 patient referrals. 410-366-0797 State of MD, DHMH License # R3039

SEEKING LICENSED CAREGIVER FOR 1-2 MONTHLY DRIVES. OWINGS MILLSROCKVILLE & BACK. (6-8HRS EACH). 301-762-6351

ELECTRICAL SERVICES MARC ELECTRIC MASTER ELECTRICIAN LICENSED in Baltimore City, Baltimore County & Carroll County. Master Electrician in Baltimore City & County. Decorative lighting, house, power and repairs. Marc Balotin. 410-922-7081. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY.

WILLY’S JUNK REMOVAL: SAME-DAY OR NEXT-DAY SERVICE GAURANTEED! REASONABLE RATES! 410-984-7032

PSYCHIC READINGS ASTROLOGY & CHAKRA READINGS: REUNITING LOVED ONES! CALL FOR FREE QUESTION. 443-768-9363

TAX PREPARATION HOME COMPANION CARE NEEDED

EXPERIENCED CPA. REASONABLE rates. House calls. Electronic-filing. Jeff 410-833-5828/ jaw517@verizon.net

LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER/ CAREGIVER for 20 year-old autistic son. Low-functioning, wellbehaved. Doesn’t speak, but types some words. Parents & son live in single-family Pikesville/ Owings Mills home. Au pair suite includes bedroom/full bathroom. Son regularly attends school Monday-Friday. At a minimum, needs care in mornings (5:30 AM-8:15 AM); some evenings, parts of weekends; requires fuller-time care when not in school, parents traveling, or when current after-school caregiver is unavailable. Compensation competitive. Baltimore_Family@yahoo.com

TRANSPORTATION

INSTRUCTION & TUTORING

FRIENDS, FAMILY OR BUSINESS MEETUPS IN/OUT OF TOWN? LET US BRING YOU TOGETHER! ANYWHERE/ANYTIME. CALL DON SHEIN! 410-274-3620

EXPERIENCED MATURE WOMAN seeks position as companion/personal assistant. Excellent References. Has own transportation 443-271-4616. DRIVER-LICENSED TAXI OWNER: 20 yearsexperience. Professional,dependable, courteous. Airports, trains, buses, events, courier service. Credit card accepted. Sam Bach.410-302-0057.

ESTATE SERVICES UNCLUTTER YOUR LIFE & FIND HIDDEN TREASURES! ESTATE CLEAN-OUT/ HAULING, MINOR REPAIRS, APPRAISALS, REAL-ESTATE PURSHASES!!! CHARLIE: 443-928-7073

INDIVIDUALIZED ACADEMIC SUPPORT— Mild/Moderate Disabilities: MD State Certified Generic Special Education, grades 1-8. Ephraim, JHU M.S. 410-746-9396

FURNITURE ARISTA CUSTOM FURNITURE: Make your design a reality! Serving the Baltimore area for over 22 years. Call Gus: 410-371-1589 SEE OUT AD IN SERVICE DIRECTORY

K-12 MATH TUTOR: College graduate math major. Reasonable rates! 410-428-4677

LANDSCAPING

WANTED TO BUY

GROUNDSCAPE INC. For all your lawn and landscaping needs. Winter yard cleanup, snowremoval etc. 410-415-LAWN/ MHIC#126283

1950’S, 60’S, 70’S, Modern. Furniture, art, lighting, etc. Robert 410-960-8622

MOVING

MR. BOB’S ANTIQUES. Buying now. Antique furniture through 1950’s. $Silver-jewelry-lampsclocks-watches-complete estates. 410-371-3675

ABBA MOVING LLC. Full service. Local/Long Distance. Insured. Free estimates. 410-281-6066

WINDOW TREATMENTS

HANDYMAN ARTIST HOME IMPROVEMENT painting interior/exterior, Powerwashing, drywall repair, carpentry work. License#19441. 410-282-1579

IRV’S HANDYMAN SERVICE No job too small. Free estimates, prompt service. MHIC# 77548. 410-486-7454

SIMCHA’S MOVING LLC. Residential and commercial. Please call 410-358-7636, 866-764-MOVE(6683)

PAINTING & WALLCOVERING

HANDYMAN- FOR THOSE little jobs the big guys won’t do! David 410-239-7455.

INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR Painting, Wallpapering, Wall paper removal, decorative moldings. Free estimates. MHIC #44233. Call Yaakov. 410-484-8350. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY.

MR. ODD JOB. No job is too odd. Specializing in nuisance, small jobs around the home. 443-243-4860

THE PAINT MAN INC. Interior/ exterior. Dry wall, power washing, wallpaper removal. Free estimates. 410-710-8245.

PIKESVILLE HANDYMAN & REMODELING: Specializing in small-to-medium projects. Ariel Goodman. 410-350-6564. MHIC# 102281, Licensed & Insured www.PikesvilleHandyman.com

FINE INTERIOR PAINTING Decorator colors, paper hanging and removal. Graduate of Maryland Institute of Art. Free Estimates. MHIC #26124 Bert Katz 410-356-4722

Baltimore Jewish Times on Facebook.

NEED A RIDE? Airports, Doctor’s Appointments & more. I’ll even feed the cat! Call Blumie Blumberg. 410-615-0029

FINKLER’S PAINTING QUALITY WORK since 1988. Call Yury Finkler. 410-653-8676

DISCOUNT DRAPERIES Rods, Verticals, Mini-blinds. Drapery cleaning, restringing, repair, installation. Norman Goldschmitt 410-358-1651 BEST PRICES on custom blinds, upholstery, draperies. Installation, repairs, drapery cleaning.410-526-2744

jewishtimes.com

FELIKS LEYBENGRUB. BEST of Baltimore 2004. 410-916-2083 MHIC # 49059 jewishtimes.com

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REAL ESTATE FOR RENT IVY MOUNT A PA R T M E N T S

R

OVE ISC

RED

Located in Mt. Washington offering yearly lease for large delux 3BR, 2BA apartments. Rental $1650-$1875 includes all gas heat & cooking, water full size washer & gas-dryer in unit.

2009 Award Winning Community Voted by MMHA

PICKWICK EAST A Sixty Acre Rolling Estate

A P A R T M E N T S

Please accept our invitation to view our lovely garden apartments

Experience the feeling of coming home to our luxury garden apartments, nestled between bustling Pikesville and historic Mt. Washington. Enjoy the traditions that have always been a part of Pickwick East living.

All apartments feature generous living areas and spacious closets. 1BR/SOLARIUM STARTING AT

$925

2BR/SOLARIUM STARTING AT

$1125

STARTING AT

$1025

3BR STARTING AT

$1225

• Heat and hot water included • Full eat-in kitchens •Washer and dryer in each unit •Walk-in closets • Cable/FIOS ready •Trash collection at your door • Large patios & balconies • Summer swimming pool membership

410-486-8900

410.363.6216

Monday - Friday 9-5 Closed Saturday & Sunday

www.pomona-apartments.com

unit. All utilities and cable

included. Secure building with

Penthouse. One Bedroom Condo. W/D. Balcony, skylight, indoor parking, pool, tennis, full security. At 695 & 83 $1,600/mo

1•2•3 Bedroom Apartments from $815/mo. plus utilities. 2 BR $980/mo. plus utilities

410.484.2040

elevator features all new

appliances and washer/dryer in

THE RISTEAU

The immediate neighborhood includes houses of worship, schools, recreation, shopping and restaurants.

Rental office open 9-6, Monday-Friday & Saturday by appt.

2br 2ba high rise with Shabbat

Shown by appointment. 410-358-6300 or ivymount@comcast.net

Unparalleled Customer Service • Fully Equipped Kitchen Cost Efficient Washer and Dryer in Every Home • Dishwashers Frost Free Refrigerator with Ice Maker • Gas Cooking • Hot Water Included • Individually Controlled Air Conditioning and Heat • Trash Pick Up at Your Door • Wall to Wall Carpet • Outstanding 24 Hr Maintenance Service • Cable Ready • Olympic & Tot Pools • Tot Lot

2BR/2BA

UPPER PARK HEIGHTS CONDO

24-hr doorman. Available partially furnished or

unfurnished $1,375/month.

Shown by appointment. 443-983-7294

WE’RE A

twitter

ABOUT JEWISH BALTIMORE. Follow us @jewishtimes

Rich in Tradition

SHARE WHERE EVEN Bubbe CAN “LIKE” IT. T

Word travels fast these days – don’t let your unwired loved ones feel left out!

To share your good news in the new JT, call 410-902-2326. 56

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

N 4


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Harriett Wasserman, CRS 410-458-5300

PEN

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PM

30

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2 Y1 DA

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2101 TUFTON AVE| $1,150,000

8411 MEADOWSWEET RD #8411| $377,500

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Renee Reamer 443-744-9610 Ina Leboe 443- 540- 3974

POPLAR HILL | $639,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

NE

W

LIS

TIN

G

CATONSVILLE MANOR | $179,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WORTHINGTON WOODSYDE | $669,900 Diane Baklor 410-303-7700

HARBORVIEW | $639,000 Anne Hoke 410-935-0915

REISTERSTOWN | $649,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

QUARRY LAKE BLUFFS | $352,852 Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

Quarry Lake Bluffs | $325,000 or $2,750/mo Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

GREY ROCK VILLAS | $319,900 Diane Baklor 410-303-7700

UN

DE

R

CO

NT

RA

CT

AVALON EAST | $499,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

CONDOS

RE

DU

CE

D

PAVILION IN THE PARK - $359,000 3BR 2.5BA, NEW LISTI NG Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 GREENE TREE |$298,000 Kathleen House 410-236-5919

DUMBARTON HEIGHTS| $299,000 Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

LYONSWOOD SOUTH | $251,000 Randi Sopher 410-299-7222

STEVENSON VILLAGE - $119,900, 2BR 2BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

STEVENSON VILLAGE - $99,900 1BR 1BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

BEDFORD COMMONS - $96,900, OWINGS CHOICE | $229,900

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

MCDONOGH | $229,900

WYNANS WOODS | $225,000

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

2BR 1BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

THE TOWERS - $89,900 2BR 2BA

RE

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

DU

CE

COURTHAVEN/PIKESVILLE - $85,000

D

2BR 2BA, David Pensak 410-908-2787

SLADE AVENUE - $59,900 3BR 2BA, WALNUT AVE | $199,900, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

THE WOODLANDS| $164,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

VILLAGE OF MILL RUN |$169,000

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

Terry Reamer

Karen Wartzman

Marni Sacks

Randi Sopher

Sharon Mezei

Diane Baklor

MaryZimmerman

Kathleen House

Gerri Miller

443-570-7672

410-456-2477

410-375-9700

410-299-7222

443-226-5007

410-303-7700

443-845-8868

410-236-5919

410-356-3333

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

Renee Reamer 443-744-9610

Ina Leboe 443-540-3974

David Pensak 410-908-2787

Shaun Elhai 443-255-2052

© 2012 BRER Affiliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Prudential the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation with Prudential. PenFed Membership is not required to conduct business with Prudential PenFed Realty. Equal Housing Opportunity.

410-484-7253 • 410-458-5300


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REAL ESTATE Beautifully Appointed Garage Townhome with Gorgeous Private Gated Courtyard. Spacious LR & DR with Atrium. Stunning Remodeled Eat–In Kitchen. Wood Floors. Designer Built–Ins. 2 FPLs. Large MBR Suite.Fully Finished Lower LVL.2Trex Decks.Backs to open space.pool/tennis/playground

New Listing Stevenson

MARGOLIS, SPIGEL & TEAM

Sprawling 4BR 3BA contemporary rancher made for relaxed living & entertaining. Open floor plan bathed in sunlight. LR/DR has wall of glass leading to patio overlooking gorgeous grounds. Beamed ceilings, Lg Kit., MBR Suite w/dressing Rm. Addition possible in-law suite. 2 car garage.

16 VELVET VALLEY CT

BUYERS AND SELLERS CAN CONTACT ME DIRECT FOR CONSULTATION FIRSTTIME BUYERS-LET ME SHOW YOUTHE WAY HOME HAVING A HARDTIME SELLING-LET ME SHOW YOU HOW SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE

NEW

EVA KATZNELSON, GRI Life Member: Real Estate Million Dollar Association, Ltd. 443-386-5384 (CELL) 410-358-7899 (DIRECT LINE) 410-653-1700 (Office) Make Sure You Have Representation!

IN LIST

ER

UND

$585,000

3801 CANTERBURY RD

ING

CT TRA CON

NEW

$319,900 1059 CAMPBELL MEADOW RD

1049 FLAGTREE LN 6711 PARK HEIGHTS CT

TRA

ER UND

2402 SHELLEYDALE DRIVE GREENSPRING / MEADOWOOD

$239,900

THIS TOTALLY UPDATED HOME IS ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS!! EXPANDED 27’X15’ MAGNIFICENT KITCHEN! BEAUTIFUL BATHROOMS! STUNNING FAMILY ROOM AND DEN! CUSTOM WINDOWS, DOORS, FLOORING & DECK! LANDSCAPED GROUNDS TOO!

$199,000

CON

$175,000

$54,900

410-583-5700

ELEGANT ARLINGTON PARK DUPLEX CONDO MAJOR REDUCTIONS - $149,000 THIS BEAUTIFUL DUPLEX CONDOMINIUM BOASTS 2 BEDROOMS, 2 AND ONE HALF BATHROOM PLUS LARGE FAMILY ROOM! HUGE ROOM SIZES! HIGH CEILINGS! CHAIR AND CROWN MOLDINGS! MAGNIFICENT HARD WOOD FLOORS! FULL SIZE WASHER AND DRYER! EAT-IN KITCHEN! NEW WINDOWS! NEW HEATING AND CENTRAL AIR! DRENCHED IN SUNLIGHT TOO!

Call Patti Spigel 410-241-9797

Amy Harlan Cindi Topolski, GRI Diane Stoler Jamie Goldberg 410-440-3479 443-838-2061 410-440-1138 410-458-9580

PARK TOWERS EAST

Completely renovated 3BR, 3BA 3100 sq ft. unit in full service building. Living Room, Dining room, Laundry Room, Kitchen with mirrored marble foyer. Move in condition. Furnished or unfurnished. With additional garage space for sale. Shown by appointment. 410-653-6502

MCDONOUGH Listed For Over 40 Years, -AJust Successful Superb, 2 bedroom Trustedtotally Nameredone in Real Estate midlevel condo. New Kitchen, * Over $250 Million In Sales * Bath, Paint & Carpet. Perfect 1 * Over 2,500 Satisfied Families * bedroom &Real den unit. * Former Radio Estate * Only $122,900. Talk Show Host Office 410-821-1700 • Cell 410-207-2467 • Home 410-484-0829 Search all active listings on my website at cbmove.com/len.bernhardt

No matter who you are,

we can help.

The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives and diminishing suffering from cancer throughresearch, education, advocacy, and service. It is one of the oldest and largest voluntary health agencies in the United States, with over two million Americans united to conquer cancer through balanced programs of research, education,patient service, advocacy, and rehabilitation.

1-800-227-2845

IT’S amazing WHAT PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR. T

Selling? Buyers are flocking to the JT’s Amazing Marketplace. To advertise, call 410-902-2326. Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

LIST

$243,000

$269,900

3 RUDDINGTON CT

MAJOR PRICE REDUCTION, NOW $379,900!!!

LEN BERNHARDT

58

$324,900

923 LINWOOD AVE

8 SUPREME CT

SW

CT TRA

ON ER C UND

$749,000

443-794-5406 Cell • 410-580-0908 Direct

BRAND NEW LISTING STEV ENSON VILLAGE CONDO TOTALLY REMODELED 2 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS PLUS ENCLOSED SOLARIUM TOP FLOOR UNIT! MAGNIFICENT LARGE EAT-IN KITCHEN WITH GRANITE COUNTER, LOVELY WOODEN CABINETS, TOP-OF-THE-LINE APPLIANCES AND CERAMIC FLOOR! NEW BATHROOMS! NEW WINDOWS AND DOORS! FABULOUS BUILT-INS AND SO MUCH MORE!

2510 LIGHTFOOT DR

G

WHEN NOT JUST ANY REAL ESTATE AGENT WILL DO!

SUSAN WEISSFELD

6 CLIFTON CT

042505

Stevenson Crossing GarageTownhouse *** Just Reduced ***


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Harriet Charkatz, NEW LISTING! THE RISTEAU CONDO

Pager (410) 832-6666 Office (410) 653-1700 Direct (410) 580-5999 Home (410) 653-5333

The BEST LOCATION & THE BEST VIEW! 2 BR/ 2BA spacious unit in full service luxury building. Freshly painted and new carpet, sep laundry in unit, garage parking.

NEW LISTING! NEWTOWN

3BR/2.5 BA porch front THS

GREY ROCK FLATS

ANNEN WOODS

LARGEST PENTHOUSE UNIT IN BUILDING! 2 BR / 2 BA + SEPARATE DEN and SOLARIUM! Also includes sep utility room in unit and all appliances. MBR walk-in closet & dressingrm.

3 br /2 ba split level w/ 1st floor den addition

PREVIEW LISTINGS ONLINE AT

SUDBROOK

Brick Cape Cod, fin LL, great fenced lot, priced for quick sale!

Harrietcharkatz.Lnfre.com

1st Floor Master Bedroom suite!3 BR/2 BA contemporary, den w/ f/p, beautiful stone patio, secure gated community.

THE PAVILION

L O N G & F O S T E R R E A L E S TAT E , I N C . REDUCED!

Worthington Greens

Stevenson

Ron Osher

David Desser Associate Broker, MBA, GRI, CRS 410-382-5100

Associate Broker 410-952-8311

Clarksville

UNDER CONTRACT!

SOLD

Beautifully Remodeled 4BR/3BA Rancher. New Kitchen w/Granite Counters, New Baths, Hardwoods. $239,900. Cliff

Reisterstown

Lochern

Renovated & Expanded 4B$/3BA Cape with Large MBR Suite. Everything New-Shows Great! $199,888. Cliff

•‘ ›‘— –Š‹ ›‘—ǯ˜‡ Šƒ† ƒ tough †ƒ›ǫ Providing uplifting programs for critically ill children. Help us help them.

443.568.0064

Brett Miller

$799,975. David

410-299-7653

410-580-5900

NEW LISTING!

6 BR/3.5BA Rancher on 3+ Acre Private Setting. 2 Car Garage, In- Ground Pool. $450,000 Ron

Cliff Rudo 410-294-3497

Custom Built 4BR/4.5BA , 5500SF Contemporary w/1st Floor MBR Suite. Tons of Upgr ades, Private 1 Acre Lot.

DavidDesser.LNF.com

Owings Mills

Large 5BR/3.5BA Colonial with New Windows+Garage Doors. MBR Suite w/Walk-in Closet & Super Bath w/Jacuzzi. $379,900. Cliff

Custom designed 4-5BR/ 3.5 BA , two 1st floor dens! 2 ac., ingrd pool, screened patio.

Luxury full service building w/ garage parking. Large 2BR/2BA corner unit. Fantastic MBR suite w/ 2 walk-in closets & lux BA. Big eat-in kit, sep laundry room, expansive patios, built-ins included.

BEST BUY IN STEVENSON! 4BR/3BA Rancher with Full Basement. New Windows, Updated Kitchen. $379,900 Brett

VALLEY HEIGHTS

REGENCY PARK

3 BR/ 2BR unit / den off kitchen/ private garage with entry into personal foyer.

WILLIAMSBURG

CRS, GRI

Gl e n Ar m

Magnificent 8BR/8.5BA Home ON 2.6 Acres Adjacent To The Loch Raven Watershed! 7,000 SQ.FT. Main Residence PLUS Attached 3BR Guest Home. $989,000. Ron.

Spacious 3BR/3BA Colonial. Huge Kitchen, Huge MBR Suite. Shows Great. $250,000 David

Reisterstown

SOLD

Stevenson Village

RENTAL - NEW LISTING!

Summit Chase

Freshly Painted 1 Bedroom+Den Mid Level Unit Next to the Pool. $94,900 Ron

Freshly Painted 4BR3.5BA Luxury Townhome. New Kitchen w/Granite Counters, Gorgeous Hardwoods, Deck, Back to Trees. $2500/mo. David

WE share WITH FRIENDS. T

Friend us on Facebook for exclusive news, special offers and opportunities to win.

CaseyCaresFoundation.org jewishtimes.com

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OWNED AND OPERATED BY NRT LLC

410-821-1700

WE KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD & REACH THE WORLD. STEVENSON (21153PAR)

ROCKLAND (21208STO)

OWINGS MILLS (21117WOR)

BALTIMORE (21209 YEL)

OWINGS MILLS (21117GAR)

PAVILION IN THE PARK (21208OLD)

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$2,245,000 KEENE BARROLL 443-824-4178

$1,975,000 KAREN HUBBLE BISBEE 443-838-0438

$1,695,000 KAREN HUBBLE BISBEE 443-838-0438

$449,900 RUTH MAIER 410-925-1299

$395,000 JAMES CLAIBORNE 410-852-9660

PARKVILLE/PARKTOWNE (21234PAR)

OWINGS MILLS (21117SHE)

HISTORIC RESEVOIR HILL (21217LIN) D

OWINGS MILLS (21117CED)

SAGAMORE VILLAGE (21136HUN)

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MT. WASHINGTON (21215MER)

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STERLING LEPO - 410-977-5848, JULIE STROHMAN - 443-398-0378

$229,900 ILENE BECKER 410-404-5745

STERLING LEPO - 410-977-5848, JULIE STROHMAN - 443-398-0378

DORCHESTER COUNTY (21672WES)

OWINGS MILLS (21117TOW)

ANNEN WOODS (21208CAN)

THE ELLMONT (21215PAR)

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$159,900 RUTH MAIER 410-925-1299

$149,900 SOFIYA FAYBUSOVICH 410-961-0060

OWINGS MILLS (21117BUX)

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$220,000 AL NOBLIN 410-627-9104

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$159,900 RUTH MAIER 410-925-1299

$229,900

$249,997 NEIL KLOTZMAN 410-591-7653

$249,900

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$259,000 AL NOBLIN 410-627-9104

BALTIMORE (21229WES)

D TE

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$325,000 JEANNE WACHTER 410-978-1183

$139,900 KEN ROCHE 443-310-6729

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$58,900 JEANNE WACHTER 410-978-1183

$1,750/MO KAREN GOLDSCHER 410-979-5775

S

Monday, February 25th to Friday, March 8th – 9am to 4pm Maryland Pre-licensing class at CBRB Greenspring Office – 10751 Falls Rd, Lutherville Presented by the CBRB School of Real Estate – Cost: $190 For more information, or to register, please visit bobkimball@cbmove.com www.cbrbschool.com. Bob Kimball Come see why Coldwell Banker Residential Branch Vice President 443-841-1201 Brokerage is “the place to be” for your 410-821-1700 real estate career! 2010 Coldwell Banker ™ is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An equal opportunity company. Equal housing opportunity owned and operated by NRT LLC.

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Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013


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Rebecca Conway

Dmitry Fayer

Ida Volkomich

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

410-236-1901

410-491-6524

410-978-5544

410-653-SOLD(7653) Marc Goldstein Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI

410-598-9900

Anna Yashnyk

Gennady Fayer

Realtor, ABR, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

Realtor, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

443-983-0426

443-324-3280

Aaron Pearlman

Marina Shwartz

Realtor, ABR, GRI

Realtor

410-961-5773

410-236-1504

GREENSPRING EAST $479,900 (MOO)

STEVENSON $419,900 (WOO)

VLGS OF WINTERSET $357,000 (AVA)

FIELDS OF HARVEST $354,900 (HAR)

BLUE GRASS MANOR $349,900 (BLU)

5BR/3.5BA Colonial w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, MBR w/garden BA. Fin'd bsmt

4BR/2.5BA Contemporary w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, big LR & DR, 2 car garage.

4BR/3.5BA Colonial w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, MBR w/gardenba.Fin'dLLw/jacba.Backstotrees.

4BR/2.5BA Colonial on 1.99 acres! Granite kit, MBR suite w/lux BA, 1st fl FR w/FP, hdwd flrs.

4BR/2.5BA Cape Cod on over 3 acres w/pool! Eat-in kit, 1st fl FR w/FP. MBR suite w/walk-in. 2 car garage.

VELVET VALLEY VILLAGE AT WOODHOLME $299,900 (PAR) Updated 2BR/2BA on 1.48 lush acres! $290,000 (MEA) Granite kit, beaut 6' walk-in

3BR garage Townhouse w/granite eat-in kit, SS appls. 1st fl MBR w/garden bath, hdwds, sunroom & more!

shower, hdwd flrs. Balcony w/stunning view. Agent/ Owner.

ASPEN MILL $254,900 (SIL) 3BR/3.5BA brick EOG w/eat-in kit, sep DR, MBR w/cath ceiling. Fin'd walkout LL.

LYONSWOOD $269,900 (SPI) 4BR/2.5BA Colonial w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, MBR w/FP & garden BA.

ASPEN RUN $260,000 (SHA)

REISTERSTOWN VLG $254,900 (BEN)

3BR/2BA Split Foyer w/eat-in kit, sep DR, 1st fl FR. Custom baths, fin'd LL. Landscaped corner lot.

4BR/3.5BA end Townhouse w/eat-in kit, 2-story foyer, wood floors. MBR suite, fin'd walkout LL. Deck overlooks trees.

BROOKFALLS $239,900 (JON)

SUBURBIA $229,900 (BRA)

SUBURBIA $219,900 (EMP)

OWINGS MILLS $209,900 (BRA)

Renovated 3-4BR Townhouse w/eat-in kit, cathedral ceilings, fin'd walkout LL & more!

3BR/3.5BA Townhouse w/eat-in kit, MBR suite, hdwd flrs, fin'd walkout LL w/FP. Backs to trees.

4BR/3.5BA Townhouse w/eat-in kit, MBR suite, cathedral ceilings, fin'd walkout LL.

4BR/2BASplitFoyerw/eat-inkit,sepDR,fin'dLL w/FP. Deck and corner lot..

GARRISON WOODS $179,900 (HIG)

OWINGS RIDGE $159,000 (JOS)

TIMBERGROVE $149,900 (WIC)

3BR/2/@BA Townhouse w/eat-in kit, hdwd floors, fin'd walkout LL w/FP & half BA.

3BR/2/2BA Townhouse w/eat-int kit, sep DR, sunken LR.MBRsuite,fin'dwalkoutLL.

Stunning 2BR 1st fl Condo w/granite kit, upgraded baths, hdwd flrs, new HVAC. Private setting.

SOLD IN 5 DAYS

FOREST GREEN $199,900 (FOR) 3BR/1.5BA Rancher w/many updates! Custom kit, hdwd flrs, vaulted ceilings, huge FR. Private yard.

OWINGS CHOICE $189,900 (OWI) 3BR garage Townhome w/granite kit, new carpet, fresh paint. Fin'd LL & backs to trees..

410-653-SOLD (7653) Office â&#x20AC;˘ 1-800-770-6404 Toll-Free www.nationalrealtyhome.com jewishtimes.com

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Y RY AR TO OR 2 SEMP NT CO

www.HomeRome.com 12325 FALLS RD UNDER $500,000 Ray Lewis actually lived in this house! TE WA

T

ON

R RF

O TI PA

The Towers #102 C

the right way

Rome

Margaret Rome author of Real Estate

Bright spacious one bedroom and den 8th floor Coop near the elevator. Wide windows bathe the space with light. Tree top views from all rooms. Updated eat kitchen, 3 walk in closets. Move in condition. Full service with doorman and receptionist. Monthly fee includes, heat, air conditioning and taxes. Cash only contracts.

Under $40,000

Eleven Slade

Beautiful bright 5th floor condo close to elevator overlooks the pool. Spacious 2 bed 2 bath Updated custom white eat in kitchen with loads of cabinets, counters and drawers. 4 closets in master bedroom. Bosch washer and dryer. Balcony and pool. 2nd bedroom built in desk/storage is perfect for office or den. Elegant Move In !

Under $75,000

Seven Slade

Master bedroom with His and Hers Bathrooms and THREE walk in closets plus another closet for shoes. Modern decor with mirrors on the walls and ceilings. Lots of custom built -ins. Open plan with marble floors in foyer, dining room, living room and 2nd bedroom(now used as a den) Bright white eat in kitchen with pantry. Convenient laundry inside the unit. Garage parking and full service luxury!

Under $140,000

One Slade

SLADE AVENUE

Custom Built Waterfront Home. Panoramic River Views A home for living, for vacationing and for entertaining. 4-5 bedrooms (2 on main level with full accessible bath) Dock, decks, hot tub, sauna, casita/lanai. Move in ready! www.homerome.com

6831 South River Under $500,000

SELL YOUR HOME WITH MARGARET ROME VELVET HILLS SOUTH R HE OL NC PO RA TH I W

GE

Two bedrooms with full bath plus a powder room is a perfect size. Very bright with oversized windows and double sliding doors to the very private enclosed first–floor patio with gated locked entrance. For photos go to www.homerome.com

HU

Mini horse farm ... Idyllic 7 acres buffered by a forest of trees. Charming home with bright sunroom, central air, gas cooking granite kitchen! A bit of paradise to live and enjoy nature. 3 car garage, workshop. So much charm and so much beauty! Horses, people and pet friendly! When would you like a tour? www.homerome.com

MINI FARM OF THE WEEK 1930 JORDANS RETREAT RD. UNDER $450,000

Large rancher with plenty of parking could be the perfect place. This large one level home with easy access, lots of open space, a huge kitchen and glass doors to the spacious deck, would make an ideal home for someone who needed handicapped accessibility. Main road with lots of parking. In ground pool. Perfect for summer therapy and relaxation.The lower level has a full bath and door to the outside. www.homerome.com

COUNTRY LIVING ONE MILE FROM THE BELTWAY. UNDER $425,000 415 SOUTH RD. 21208

Listen Live or Online 12 noon this Sunday to "All About Real Estate” hosted by Margaret Rome on Talk Radio 680/WCBM-AM

---Unique solid masonry brick custom home on 3 acres buffered by Woodholme County Club. Gated secluded private retreat in Pikesville… convenient to everything. First floor master suite, open floor plan and a guest suite with kitchen. High ceilings and brick fireplace. Drive the golf cart home! www.homerome.com

R OO FL R T TE 1S MAS

17 Oak Hill Court Under $400,000 2 story contemporary on .42 acre. 4 BR 3 1/2 baths. 3 finished levels. gorgeous lot with park like views from the oversized deck. Gourmet granite, stainless, and ceramic kitchen. Stone fireplace in great room. Luxury Master with double vanities, separate jetted tub and stall shower.1st floor laundry. Mancave with wet bar, fridge and full bath. Sliders for easy outside access. This one is special. www.homerome.com

I HAVE QUALIFIED BUYERS FOR THESE HOMES • NEEDED SMALL SINGLE FAMILY OR TOWNHOUSE IN PET FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD. UP TO $125,000 • NEEDED: HOMES ‘ANY CONDITION FOR CASH INVESTORS FAST CLOSINGS. • NEEDED...CHARMING OLDER HOME WITH CHARACTER, ACREAGE, GARAGES AND MULTIPLE FIREPLACES (ONE IN THE MASTER WOULD BE IDEAL) • NEEDED ... GREENE TREE TOWNHOUSE ASCOTT MODEL QUICK SETTLEMENT! • NEEDED...ANNEN WOODS TOWNHOUSE, IMMEDIATE SETTLEMENT. • NEED HOME IN FORT GARRISON SCHOOL SYSTEM • NEEDED...ELDERSBURG OR SYKESVILLE HOME WITH PUBLIC UTILITIES AND GAS HEAT UP TO $500K • NEEDED... SUMMIT PARK RANCHER. NEEDED... LARGE 2 BEDROOM AND DEN CONDO IN FULL SERVICE BUILDING. NEEDED...LUXURY BRICK TOWNHOUSE WITH GARAGE, MEDIA ROOM. MOVE IN CONDITION A MUST. THINKING ABOUT SELLING YOUR HOME PLEASE CALL MARGARET ROME.

www.410-530-2400.com

Search over 50,000 active listings through my website. www.HomeRome.com • mrome@HomeRome.com ABR, ACRE, BROKER, CAP, CRS, e-PRO, GRI, PMN, RECS, SRES, CyberStar™

Baltimore Jewish Times January 25, 2013

62

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Awarded Top 1% of Real Estate Professionals in North America

Glick*Seidel A Higher Standard in Real Estate Services

Carole Glick & Linda Seidel 410.409.8110 • 410.375.6532 G TIN P.M LIS -2:30 W 1 E N UN NS OPE

E OM MH A E DR

N SOO ING M CO

MIDFIELD

$359,900

GREENSPRING VALLEY $849,900

WOODRIDGE

410-583-5700

CE PRI W E N

$759,000

G TIN LIS NEW

ROCKLAND - GATED COMMUNITY $1,180,000 CE PRI NEW

PARKE AT MT.AWASHINGTON $542,459

STEVENSON

G TIN LIS NEW

$339,000

D UCE RED T S JU

VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE WWW.GLICKSEIDELTEAM.COM

NEW TOWN $189,900 ME HO NEW

LOTS FOR SALE

ME HO NEW

ME HO NEW

STEVENSON VILLAGE $119,000

NO BUILDER TIE IN OLD COURT RD & VELVET VALLEY AREAS PALADIA WAY

$1,350,000

VELVET VALLEY

$1,089,900

BARONET WOODS

$929,900

WE ARE SELLING!!

ER UNDRACT C ONT STEVENSON

$469,000

ER UNDRACT C ONT WORTHINGTON OVERLOOK

$464,900

ER UNDRACT C ONT FALLS GABLE

$149,900

ER UNDRACT C ONT COLONIAL VILLAGE

$199,500

carole.glick@longandfoster.com linda.seidel@longandfoster.com Greenspring Valley/Lutherville


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B

di uil

ng a healthi er c om

mu

nit

y, o e ne c hild at a tim

We understand that when one child gets diabetes, helping the whole family is the best treatment.

Introducing the new Samuelson Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital at Sinai. Where family-centered care means that the voices of patients and parents and siblings are every bit as important as those of our renowned pediatric specialists. Within this modern facility, families can be as comfortable with treatment decisions as they are with our spacious private rooms.

Within our Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, we offer comprehensive diagnostic and therapeutic endocrinology services for infants, children and adolescents. The scope of our care includes evaluation and management of diabetes, growth deficit issues and thyroid diseases. A nutritional team is also employed to assist in the effective management of various conditions so both children and their families better understand how to keep not only their disease, but also their lives, under control.

410.601.WELL (9355)

lifebridgehealth.org/children


Baltimore Jewish Times - January 25, 2013